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T H U R S DAY, M AY 9 , 2 0 1 3

VOLUME 130, NUMBER 92

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Former official describes Libya attack BY DONNA CASSATA Associated Press WASHINGTON (AP) A former top diplomat in Libya on Wednesday delivered a riveting minute-by-minute account of the chaotic events during the deadly assault on the U.S. diplomatic mission in Benghazi last September, with a 2 a.m. call from Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton and confusion about the fate of U.S. AmbassaAP PHOTO Gregory Hicks, former deputy chief of mission in Libya, testifies dor Chris Stevens. In a slow, halting and somebefore the House Oversight and Government Reform Committimes emotional voice, Gregory tee's hearing on the deadly assault of the U.S. diplomatic misHicks, the deputy chief of mission in Benghazi in Washington on Wednesday.

sion who was in Tripoli, described for a House committee how a routine day on Sept. 11, 2012, quickly devolved as insurgents launched two nighttime attacks on the facility in eastern Libya, killing Stevens and three other Americans. The hours-long hearing produced no major revelation while reviving disputes over the widely debunked comments made by U.N. Ambassador Susan Rice five days after the attacks and the inability of the U.S. military to respond quickly. “I don’t think there’s a smoking gun today. I don’t think

there’s a lukewarm slingshot,” said Rep. Mark Pocan, D-Wis. The session exposed bitter partisan divisions as Republicans who are pressing ahead with the investigation eight months after the attacks insist the Obama administration is covering up information and Democrats decry politicization of a national security issue. A scathing independent review in December faulted the State Department for inadequate security at the mission, but it has not been the final

C L A S S AC T

Calling all job seekers

Castro charged with rape

Expo to feature more than 20 companies

Cleveland man also faces four counts of kidnapping

BY MELANIE YINGST Staff Writer myingst@civitasmedia.com TROY – Print off a couple copies of your new, updated resume and put on your Sunday best and head to Hobart Arena next Saturday to explore new, exciting and better paying opportunities in the local job market. More than 20 Troy employers have committed to participating in the first Troy Chamber of Commerce Job Expo on Saturday. The event will take place Saturday, May 11 from 10 a.m. through 3 p.m. at Hobart Arena and is open to the public. Troy Development Council president J.C. Wallace said those who are looking for new opportunities with Troy and regional employers should dress in interview attire and bring multiple copies for their resume. “Last year was a big year for our region in terms of job growth,” Wallace said, noting Honda of America restored many of its industrial line and Abbott Industries is building a new manufacturing center in Tipp City. “We need to get people better jobs and tell them what is out there.” Wallace said 20 companies and businesses as

See Libya/Page 2

BY THOMAS J. SHEERAN Associated Press

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MIKE ULLERY/STAFF PHOTO

Brenda Vetter, seated, sits ready at the piano for choir members Antonio Valdez, Devon Parshall, Brady Wise, T.J. Iddings and Noah Magill in the Piqua High School choir room last week.

Vetter strikes a chord with students BY JOHN HAUER For the Daily Call pdceditorial@civitasmedia.com

were nine students who started singing in the seventh grade,” she said. “We practiced a lot and we were good enough to win the top awards in contests and competitions. We also sang at area churches and civic events.” She took her musical talents to Otterbein College and majored in piano, voice and woodwinds. Unfortunately, after two years, she dropped out to work to help put her husband through college. “It was the ‘60’s and that’s what wives had to do,” she said. Vetter worked as a secretary for seven years in the Columbus area. Quickly, she developed the skills to become an office manager and set up file systems and office proce-

dures for important organizations. “This was before the use of computers and electronic files, so everything was on paper,” she said. “I set up systems for the Ohio EPA Ombudsman’s Office, the Ohio State Patrol Crime Lab and Otterbein College Public Relations Office.” She and her husband, Jim, moved back to Piqua and started a family. “Jim worked for Head Start and became the director of Miami County Children’s Services, and I was the stay-at-home mom,” she said. She gave piano lessons in her home during these years. “The late Betty Hemmert was a big influence in my life,” Vetter said. “I took piano

Lehman Catholic 2013 Prom Court

PROVIDED PHOTO

PIQUA — It has been a life filled with music for Piqua High School music aide Brenda Vetter. From piano lessons as a little girl to teaching piano, to working four hours a day helping the high school choirs and bands, to playing in area music groups, Vetter is surrounded by music. And she would not have it any other way. Vetter graduated from Piqua Central High School in 1967. She sang in the chorus and played saxophone, bass clarinet, and baritone sax in the school band. She sang in a group called the Triple Trio. “We

See Vetter/Page 2

“City Nights, Neon Lights” is the theme chosen for Lehman Catholic High School’s 2013 Junior-Senior Prom, set for Saturday at The Oaks Club in Sidney. The Senior Prom Court from left to right includes: Andrew Gilardi, Samantha Neumeier, Tharon Goins, Ellie Waldsmith, Louis Gaier, Lauren Bosway, Michael Jacob, Sloane Glover, Danny Davis, Tori Tullis, Katie Rossman and Mitch Bosse. The After-Prom is scheduled to be held at Jumpy’s in Troy from midnight until 3 a.m.

See Job/Page 2

Index Classified ...............14-16 Opinion ..........................4 Comics ........................17 Entertainment ...............5 Local ..............................3 Obituaries......................2 Sports.....................11-13 Weather .........................3 Religion .........................6 School ........................7-8

CLEVELAND (AP) — A Cleveland man arrested after three women missing for a decade were found alive at his home was charged Wednesday with kidnapping and raping them. Prosecutors no charges brought against his brothers, saying there was no evidence they had any part in the crime. Ariel Castro, 52, was charged with four counts of kidnapping covering all three captives and the daughter born to one of them while she was held and three counts of rape against the three women. The former school bus driver owns the peeling, run-down home where the women were rescued on Monday, after one of them broke through a screen door. At a news conference, authorities gave few details on the women’s ordeal. But police said earlier in the day that they were apparently bound with ropes and chains, and a city councilman briefed on the case, Brian Cummins, said that they were subjected to prolonged sexual and psychological abuse and suffered miscarriages. Cummins also said the women were kept in the basement for some time. “We know that the victims have confirmed miscarriages, but with who, how many and what conditions we don’t know,” he said. He added: “It sounds pretty gruesome.” Deputy Police Chief Ed Tomba said a paternity test on Castro was being done to establish who fathered the now 6-year-old child of captive Amanda See Castro/Page 2

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Obituaries

Job Continued from page 1 well as education centers such as Wright State University, Urbana University, Edison State Community College, Miami-Jacobs Career College and Hobart Welding Institute will be at Hobart Arena to provide continuing education service information. “For those who attend, they should definitely

bring resumes and come prepared to talk to local, Troy companies,” Wallace said. Wallace said he is encouraged about the economic job growth opportunities in the Miami Valley region and hopes the response from the public who may attend the Job Expo may make it an annual event. “We’ll wait and see how

it goes,” Wallace said. Wallace short-term and longterm opportunities will be available at the Job Expo as well as a career board and guide. “Bring your resumes, your friends, your family and get a better job in time for Mother’s Day,” said Wallace with a laugh. “What better gift can you give your mom than a new, better paying job?”

Friday prior to Saturday’s Job Expo, students from local high schools will attend a “Career Day” with the participating companies which include One Call Now, Upper Valley Medical Center Stillwater Technologies and many others. For a list of all participating companies and more information, visit www.troyohiojobfair.com.

“It was a three-year project organizing the sheets of music,” she said. “It fills 19 file cabinets and we are still adding things today.” Her other duties included any office work associated with the keeping department, track of the robes, helping with the music theory class and helping with the senior music plaques. In 2006, a failed levy resulted in budget cuts, and Vetter was riffed (reduction in force), but was almost immediately hired back as a half-time aide to play for the choirs. “I love working with teenagers,” Vetter said. “They can be engaging, funny, intelligent, and sometimes, as dumb as a box of rocks. I can remember how I was

during those years and I can still relate to what they are doing.” Vetter gives credit to high school voice teacher Tom Westfall for maintaining a high-quality program at Piqua. “He is the most organized and best director I have ever worked for,” she said. “He has a special rapport with the students and his choirs have earned many awards.” Away from school, Vetter’s life still revolves around music. She is the accompanist for the First Presbyterian Church in Troy. Along with her husband, she is a member of the New Renaissance Singers, an a cappella group which performs songs written before 1900.

“We sing at different comevents and munity churches,” she said. “We are very busy during the holiday season.” She plays the mountain lap dulcimer and the autoharp and performs and is on the board of directors for the Mountain Dulcimer Society of Dayton. Somehow finding the time, she serves on the Piqua Tree Committee, the Downtown District Design Review Board and is the secretary of the Southview Neighborhood Association. She and Jim have been married 44 years. Their son, Josh, who plays bass in two heavy metal bands, works for the Ohio Historical Society at Johnston Farm.

plaints centered on a report they consider incomplete, with individuals who weren’t interviewed and a focus on the assistant secretary level and lower. Hicks said he was watching television at his villa in Tripoli when he first got word of the initial attack. He listened to two messages on his cell phone and Stevens’ chilling words. “Greg, we’re under attack,” the ambassador said. Hicks described a series of phone calls to the State Department and Libyan officials, frustrating efforts to find out what was happening in Benghazi, and a call from Clinton. “Secretary of State Clinton called me along with her senior staff … and she

asked me what was going on. And, I briefed her on developments,” he said. “Most of the conversation was about the search for Ambassador Stevens. It was also about what we were going to do with our personnel in Benghazi, and I told her that we would need to evacuate, and that was she said that was the right thing to do.” He recalled another phone call from the Libyan prime minister with word that Stevens was dead. “I think it is the saddest phone call I have ever had in my life,” Hicks said. Hicks said that shortly after he was told Stevens was dead, unidentified Libyans called Hicks’ staff from the phone that had been with the ambassador

that night. These Libyans said Stevens was with them, and U.S. officials should come fetch him, Hicks said. Hicks said he believed Stevens’ body was at a hospital at that point, but he could not be certain. “We suspected we were being baited into a trap,” Hicks told the committee, so the U.S. personnel did not follow the callers’ instructions. “We did not want to send our people into an ambush,” he testified. Republicans at the hearing focused on the talking points used by Rice on the Sunday talk shows in which she said the attacks appeared to be associated with demonstrations in Egypt and Libya over an anti-Islam video.

Vetter Continued from page 1 lessons from her for six years when I was growing up. She was a great inspiration and knew how to foster the talent in people.” In 1995, Vetter learned the high choirs needed an accompanist. “I talked to Dick Couchois, the music director, and I started as a volunteer to play piano,” she said. “It was a bit crazy then because I came up to the high school at two different times each day.” After, two years, the schedule was changed, and Vetter was hired fulltime as an aide to accompany the music classes including band. She was also charged with organizing the music and files for the department.

Libya Continued from page 1 word. Nor has congressional testimony from former Obama Cabinet officials and military leaders. In a jam-packed hearing room where Republicans and Democrats furiously traded charges, the softspoken Hicks presented a lengthy recollection of the events and expressed frustration with a military that he argued could have prevented the second attack. Hicks and two other State Department witnesses criticized the review conducted by former top diplomat Thomas Pickering and retired Gen. Mike Mullen, the former chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. Their com-

Berry. Castro was in custody and couldn’t be reached for comment. A brother-inlaw has said the family was “shocked” after hearing about the women at the home. Castro’s brothers, Pedro, 54, and Onil, 50, were also arrested after the women were rescued, but there was no evidence they had any part in the crime, and no charges were brought against them, Cleveland Prosecutor Victor Perez said. Two of the young women, meanwhile, were welcomed home by jubilant crowds of loved ones and neighbors with balloons and banners Wednesday. The families of Berry and Gina DeJesus protectively took them inside, past hundreds of reporters and onlookers. Neither woman spoke, and their families pleaded for patience and time alone. “Give us time and privacy to heal,” said Sandra Ruiz, DeJesus’ aunt. Ruiz thanked police for rescuing the women and urged the public not to retaliate against the suspects or their families. The third captive, Michelle Knight, 32, was reported in good condition at Metro Health Medical Center, which a day earlier had reported that all three victims had been released. There was no immediate explanation from

David C. Cloutier HAMILTON —David C. Cloutier, 48, of Hamilton and formerly of Troy, passed away Saturday, May 4, 2013, at Fort Hamilt o n Hospital in Hamilton. He w a s b o r n M a r c h CLOUTIER 4, 1965, in Attleboro, Mass., to Ronald and Mary Cloutier. He was preceded in death by his father Ronald, and his mother Mary survives and resides in Taunton, Mass. David also is survived by two daughters, Bambi

Cloutier of Piqua and Beth Cloutier of Xenia; one son, Phillip Cloutier of Xenia; two grandchildren, Nathan Fisher and Hayden Cloutier; numerous step-grandchildren; and three sisters, Gabrielle Ey of Germany, Anne Smith of Denver, Colo., and Beth Cloutier of Las Vegas, Nev. A funeral service will be held at 2 p.m. Thursday, at Fisher-Cheney Funeral Home, Troy with Pastor James Oldham officiating. Interment will follow in Casstown Cemetery in Casstown. Visitation will be held from 1-2 p.m. Thursday at the funeral home one hour prior to the service. Condolences may be left for the family at www.fisher-cheneyfuneralhome.com.

Faye E. Seipel PIQUA — Faye E. Seipel, 84, of Piqua, peacefully passed away at 5 a.m. Wednesday, May 8, 2013, surrounded by her family. She was born Jan. 2 1 , 1929, in Elizabeth To w n ship, Miami County to the l a t e Robert G. and SEIPEL Nora B. (Cotrell) Anderson. She married Norman R. Seipel Sr. on Feb. 7, 1948, in Piqua; he preceded her in death Nov. 10, 1988. Survivors include a daughter, Gaye (Michael) Cavender of Piqua; three sons, Norman R. (Judy) Seipel Jr. of Piqua, Brian L. (Laurie) Seipel of Douglas, Wy. and Scott (Beth) Seipel of Urbana; 14 grandchildren; 18 greatgrandchildren; six greatgreat-grandchildren; a sister, Ruth (Joe Cain) Mohr of Piqua; and five brothers, Dave (Pat) Anderson of Eaton, Don (Janet) Anderson of Dublin, Ben (Helen) Anderson and Bill (Teresa) Anderson, all of Piqua, and Larry (Bonnie) Anderson of Elkhart, Ind. She was preceded in death

by a brother, Bob Anderson. Mrs. Seipel was a 1946 graduate of the Brown Township High School, where she earned the honor of Valedictorian, played basketball and was a cheerleader. She retired from the Piqua Paper Box Company following way too many years of employment. She was a member of the Piqua American Legion Post 184, and the Minster Fraternal Order of the Eagles. She was an avid reader, crossword puzzle solver, gardener, and enjoyed garage sales. She loved being with her family, particularly the grandchildren, and her many friends. A service to honor her life will begin at 1 p.m. Monday, at the Jamieson & Yannucci Funeral Home with Chaplain Edward Ellis officiating. Burial will follow at Forest Hill Cemetery. Visitation will be from 1-4 p.m. Sunday at the funeral home. Memorial contributions may be made to Hospice of Miami County Inc., P. O. Box 502, Troy, OH 45373. Guestbook condolences and expressions of sympathy, to be provided to the family, may be expressed through jamiesonandyannucci.com.

Donald Eugene Holtgreven

Castro Continued from page 1

• PIQUA DAILY CALL

the hospital. The Associated Press does not usually identify people who may be victims of sexual assault, but the names of the women were widely circulated by their families, friends and law enforcement authorities for years during their disappearance. In a development that astonished and exhilarated much of Cleveland, the three women were rescued after Berry, 27, broke through a screen door at the Castro house and told a 911 dispatcher: “Help me. I’m Amanda Berry. I’ve been kidnapped, and I’ve been missing for 10 years and I’m, I’m here, I’m free now.” Law enforcement officials left many questions unanswered, including how the women were taken captive and who fathered Berry’s 6-year-old daughter. Neighbors said that Ariel Castro took part in the search for one of the missing women, helped pass out fliers, performed music at a fundraiser for her and attended a candlelight vigil, where he comforted her mother. As recently as 2005, Castro was accused of repeated acts of violence against his children’s mother. On NBC’s “Today” show, Police Chief Michael McGrath said he was “absolutely” sure police did everything they could to find the women over the years. He disputed claims

by neighbors that officers had been called to the house before for suspicious circumstances. “We have no record of those calls coming in over the past 10 years,” McGrath said. On Tuesday, some neighbors said that they had told police years ago about hearing pounding on the doors of the home and seeing a naked woman crawling in the yard. DeJesus, who disappeared in 2004 and is in her early 20s, arrived home in the afternoon Wednesday to chants of “Gina! Gina!” Wearing a bright yellow hooded sweatshirt, she was led through the crowd and into the house by a woman who put her arm around the young woman’s shoulders and held her tight. Her father pumped his fist after arriving home with his daughter, and he urged people across the country to watch over the children in their neighborhoods including other people’s kids. “Too many kids these days come up missing, and we always ask this question: How come I didn’t see what happened to that kid? Why? Because we chose not to,” he said Berry arrived at her sister’s home, which was similarly festooned with dozens of colorful balloons and signs, one reading “We Never Lost Hope Mandy.” Hundreds cheered wildly but weren’t

able to get a glimpse of Berry as she went in through the back. A 2005 domestic-violence filing in Cuyahoga County Domestic Relations Court accused Ariel Castro of twice breaking the nose of his children’s mother, knocking out a tooth, dislocating each shoulder and threatening to kill her and her daughters three or four times in a year. The filing for a protective order by Grimilda Figueroa also said that Castro frequently abducted her daughters and kept them from her. In 1993, Castro was arrested on a domestic-violence charge and spent three days in jail before he was released on bail. A grand jury did not return an indictment against him, according to court documents, which don’t detail the allegations. It was unclear who brought the charge. Meanwhile, the aunt of a 14-year-old girl who disappeared in 2007 near the house where the missing women were found said the girl’s mother has spoken with the FBI. “We’re hoping for our miracle, too,” said Debra Summers, who described her niece, Ashley Summers, as not the type of girl who would leave without coming back. The FBI did not immediately return a call about the case and whether it was connected to that of the three missing women.

PIQUA — Donald Eugene Holtgreven, 74, of Piqua, died at 9 : 0 6 p . m . Mond a y , May 6, 2013, a t Upper Va l l e y M e d - HOLTGREVEN i c a l Center, Troy. He was born in Dayton, on July 24, 1938, to the late Edward and Marianna (Hawker) Holtgreven. Donald is survived by two brothers and sisters-in-law, Charles and Annette Holtgreven of Melbourne, Fla. and Harry and Ginny Holtgreven of Loxahatchee, Fla.; one sister and brother-in-law, Rose and Rondal Puckett of Muncie, Ind.; and many beloved nieces and nephews. Donald graduated from Piqua Catholic High School in 1956. He was a member of St. Boniface Catholic Church, Piqua. Donald also was a member of Knights of Columbus, B.P.O.E. 523, Piqua,

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and Holy Name Society. He worked at Val Decker Packing, Piqua. Donald then worked at Piqua Memorial Hospital, Piqua, and Upper Valley Medical Center before retiring in 2003. Mass of Christian Burial will be held at 10 a.m. Saturday, at St. Boniface Catholic Church, Piqua, with the Rev. Fr. Thomas Bolte as Celebrant. Burial will follow at 12 p.m. at Calvary Cemetery, Dayton. Friends may call from 5–8 p.m. Friday and 99:30 a.m. Saturday at Melcher-Sowers Funeral Home, Piqua. Prayers will be at 5 p.m. Friday with the Rev. Fr. Angelo Caserta as Celebrant at the funeral home. Memorial contributions may be made to St. Boniface Catholic Church, 310 South Downing St., Piqua, OH 45356 or St. Mary Catholic Church, 528 Broadway, Piqua, OH 45356 or Lehman Catholic High School, 2400 St. Marys Avenue, Sidney, OH 45365. Condolences may be expressed to the family at www.melchersowers.com.

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LOCAL

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Thursday, May 9, 2013

Community spotlight

Chance of rain, t-storms We dry out for the first half of today, but rain chances then return late in the day. High: 77 Low: 55.

Elleana Ford Age: 4 Birthdate: May 8, 2009 Parents: Ryan and Missy Ford of Maineville Grandparents: Dave and Connie Hare and Bob and Sharon Ford, all of Piqua

MIKE ULLERY/STAFF PHOTO

Covington Superintendent David Larson hugs CHS principal Ken Miller upon learning of Tuesday’s passage of the district’s 3.89 mill levy and .25 percent income tax, which will be used for an Ohio School Facilities Commission building project for a new K-8th grade building.

ELLEANA FORD

Documentary to play at library

PIQUA — The Piqua Public Library will be showing the award-winning documentary, “The Elephant in the Living Room,” at 2 p.m. Saturday, followed by a presentation by Tim Harrison (one of two people that the film follows) at 3:30 p.m. Harrison will discuss the Outreach for Animals wildlife advocacy program. “The Elephant in the Living Room” takes viewers on a journey deep inside the controversial American subculture of raising the most dangerous animals in the world as common household pets. Set against the backdrop of

a heated national debate, director Michael Webber chronicles the extraordinary story of two men at the heart of the issue – Tim Harrison, an Ohio police officer whose friend was killed by an exotic pet; and Terry Brumfield, a big-hearted man who struggles to raise two African lions that he loves like his own family. In the first of many unexpected twists, the lives of these two men collide when Brumfield’s male lion escapes its pen and is found attacking cars on a nearby highway. Winner of five Best Documentary Awards, the film courageously

Makenna Isabelle Alejandra Santos

ACE AWARD, Humane Society of the United States, Silverdocs Film Festival BEST DOCUMENTARY, Genesis Award BEST DOCUMENTARY, London United Film Festival BEST DOCUMENTARY, Burbank Film Festival BEST DOCUMENTARY, Founders’ Choice Award, Traverse City Film Festival BEST DOCUMENTARY, Sedona Film Festival exposes the shocking reality behind the multibillion dollar exotic pet industry with stunning photography, inspiring storytelling and unprecedented access into a world rarely seen, right in our own backyard. Call 773-6753 or email fplweb@oplin.org for more information.

Age: 10 Birthdate: May 9, 2003 Parents: Pedro and Amanda (Wagoner) Santos of Covington Grandparents: Sammy and Brenda Wagoner of Covington MAKENNA ISABELLE and Francisco and ALEJANDRA SANTOS Rosa Santos of Guatemala City, West Liberity, Ky., Guatemala William Hall of Troy, the G r e a t - g r a n d p a r - late Dessie Hall and the ents: Jannie Wagoner of late Jr Wagoner

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In Brief State rep to speak at OPERS lunch meeting

will benefit the 2013 Fort Rowdy Gathering, to be held Oct. 5 and 6. For more information, PIQUA — The Miami call Larry at 339-0407, or County Chapter of the Anita at 937-676-3381. Ohio Public Employee Retirees will meet Stamp Out Wednesday, June 5, 11:30 Hunger food a.m., St. John’s Lutheran Church, 248 Wood St., drive Saturday COVINGTON — CovPiqua. Lunch is $10, payable at the door. ington Post Office, CovReservations due ington residents and Wednesday, May 29. Call Covington Outreach AsBeth at 335-2771. sociation (COA) will be Speaker will be state rep- participating in the na20th Annual resentative Richard tional Adams. Meeting is open Stamp Out Food for to any current or retired Hunger Food Drive on Saturday. Residents are Ohio public employee. asked to support the Covington Community Food Fort Rowdy to Pantry by setting out a host Mother’s bag of non-perishable Day BBQ food near their mailboxes COVINGTON — The on Saturday. Rural route Fort Rowdy Gathering carriers will pick up dowill host their annual nated food when they Mother’s Day Chicken drop off mail. In town, BBQ from 11 a.m.-5 p.m. food will be picked up by (or until sold out) on Sun- COA volunteers and Covday in the Covington ington students. Park. No need to get out of your car, workers will Community come to your car window. block grant Advance tickets are recommended. The cost is $7 public hearing PIQUA – The City of and includes half a chicken, chips, apple- Piqua’s Development Desauce and a roll. Advance partment will hold a pubtickets may be purchased lic hearing in regard to at Joanie’s Flower Shop the city’s FY 2012 Foror Siegel’s Country Store, mula Allocation Commuboth in Covington, Uni- nity Development Block form’s Plus in Piqua, or Grant Agreement. The from any Fort Rowdy public hearing will be Board member. Proceeds held at 4 p.m. May 22, in

Commission Chambers, 201 West Water St., Piqua. “We are looking to reprogram funds from our 2012 agreement in order to do some road resurfacing on Gordon Street and Wood Street. We are simply adding an activity, the demolition of 650 Wood Street will continue. We encourage all residents to come forward to our hearing or submit their comments via email,” stated William Lutz, development program manager. Individuals with comments or questions are encouraged to contact Lutz at 778-2062 or via email at blutz@piquaoh.org.

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OPINION

4

THURSDAY, MAY 9, 2013

Piqua Daily Call

Contact us For information regarding the Opinion page, contact Editor Susan Hartley at 773-2721, or send an email to sharley@civitasmedia.com www.dailycall.com

Letters

Change be hard

Serving Piqua since 1883

“And I will restore to you the years that the locust has eaten, the cankerworm, and the caterpillar, and the palmerworm, my great army which I sent among you.” (Joel 2:25 AKJV)

Symphony of construction Our lives are at their best when centered not upon ourselves but upon babies!” Cardinal Timothy Dolan made this contention at a gathering hosted by the Chuck Colson Center for ChristianWorldview,which brought together evangelicals and Catholics to celebrate religious liberty. The Colson Center was honoring Dolan for defending religious freedom against the attack posed by the Obama administration’s policy on health coverage for abortion, contraception and sterilization.Though all may agree on the concrete nature of the threat, understanding it is hampered by a dwindling vocabulary with which to discuss it.So Dolan went back to the basics. Dolan declared that the defining event of the past few months for him was not his first papal conclave but the baptism of his most recent grandnephew, Charlie. He said that he was inspired by “the profound change” he saw in this baby’s mother and father. Rather than “diverse and self-referential” interests, Charlie now dominates “their sleep schedule, their plans, their budget, their conversation, their calendar, their future, their dreams.” “The human project,” Dolan proposed, “is all about babies! A man and woman are made for babies!” And culture itself, he said, is “simply humanity’s best effort to protect the baby,the mother, the father.” KATHY LOPEZ He made this contention at Columnist the same time that the horrific murder trial of abortionist Kermit Gosnell was going to the jury in Philadelphia.The gruesome details of this trial -- Gosnell is accused of killing not only one of his patients, but babies born alive, the victims of botched abortions -- have also shed a light on the ugly truths behind late-term abortions. This reflects a different culture than the one the cardinal spoke of, that’s for sure. The abortion debate is never direct: We delude ourselves with euphemisms that keep us complacent and complicit; we pretend that a woman isn’t a mother unless she says she is, even as a life that shares her DNA, and the DNA of another human being, develops within her. We try to pretend that a 23-week-old fetus bears no resemblance to a newborn when science and photos show us the truth. Gosnell has got to mark the end of this. If culture is all about babies, as the cardinal says, many of our most heated political debates may benefit from confronting the “baby in the room.” That baby has a dignity that does not come from his or her mother’s will, or his or her dad stepping up to the plate, or a doctor’s signature. It is inherent. If we’re willing to reconsider the popular understanding of freedom -- which all too often is defined down to license -this is all quite liberating. We’re not made for ourselves. We’re not in this alone. In “How the West Really Lost God,” Mary Eberstadt observes: “(F)amily and faith are the invisible double helix of society, two spirals that when linked to one another can effectively reproduce, but whose strength and momentum depend on one another.” She concludes: “It appears that the natural family as a whole has been the human symphony through which God has historically been heard by many people -- not the prophets, not the philosophers, but a great many of the rest; and the gradual but now recognizable muffling of that symphony is surely an important and overlooked part of the story of how certain men and women came not to hear the sacred music anymore.” We want that music playing. We need to know it’s there. Pope John Paul II said that true faith produces culture. The current pope has said,“A believer is essentially someone who goes into an encounter with other believers, or nonbelievers, to give them a hand.” We need religious liberty because we need people to give us a hand.We need people who see clearly and hear the symphony, who are inspired by the wonder of creation.We need something better for babies and families. We might start with the cardinal’s simple assertion.

Sweet Land of Liberty

Coming: Judgment Day for U.S. torture policies

In the United States, “there s I’ll be turning 88 in have been no professional June, I’d begun to lose sanctions against legal, medhope for at last witical or mental health personnessing in my lifetime some nel who participated in or legal accountability for the authorized cruel treatment George W. Bush-Dick Cheneyand torture.” Barack Obama-CIA-national Nor have there been any security torture policy instisanctions against the execututed after 9/11, which continNAT HENTOFF tive branch. ues today. The report continues: “The That was until I saw this Columnist criminal laws against torture April 16 New York Times front-page headline: “U.S. Practiced Torture have not been enforced against any CIA emAfter 9/11, Nonpartisan Review Concludes.” ployee (including those working in the It was referring to the Washington, D.C.- agency’s secret prisons), even in cases of based Constitution Project, a bipartisan homicide and where the public evidence legal research organization that has long very strongly suggests that interrogators been one of my primary sources for keeping went beyond OLC’s (Office of Legal Counthe Constitution intact. It recently released sel’s) and their headquarters’ authorization.” The Constitution Project goes on to rea deeply researched, footnoted and documented 577-page report entitled “Detainee view both our Republican and Democratic Treatment,” characterized in an April 17 administrations’ licenses to commit torture: “The (U.S.) Uniform Code of Military JusTimes editorial as “Indisputable Torture.” “It is the fullest independent effort so far tice also retains its clear prohibitions on misto assess the treatment of detainees at treating prisoners, but the track record of Guantanamo Bay, in Afghanistan and Iraq prosecutions in the military is mixed at best, and at the CIA’s secret prisons” -- and be- with many serious cases leading to no jail yond (“Indisputable Torture,”The New York time or no convictions at all.” Under the heading “Can it Happen Times, April 17). I have the full report, and in this series I Again?” the Constitution Project makes a will demonstrate why -- as the Times mistake when it says, “The Obama adminphrased it for future historians and We The istration has ended the most inhumane People -- “its authoritative conclusion that treatment of detainees, though some trou‘the United States engaged in the practice of bling questions about current policies retorture’ is impossible to dismiss by a public main unanswered.” These questions are more than troubling, that needs to know what was committed in which a separate section of the report begins the nation’s name.” Showing how forceful this report is, news to make clear. I will focus on that next week. Meanwhile, also judge for yourself analyst Glenn Greenwald, whose commentary I never miss, recently underlined that whether the Constitution Project report ununtil now: “The New York Times ... stead- derestimates how much Obama has sabofastly refused to use the word ‘torture’ to de- taged our future in this passage: “It is scribe what was being done (unless it was unclear whether (his administration) has done by other countries)” (“U.S. torture ‘in- taken sufficient steps to prevent a future addisputable,’ CNN’s humiliation, and Iran ministration from resorting to torture or sanctions,” Greenwald, guardian.co.uk,April cruel treatment, particularly if terrorists succeed again in conducting horrific crimes 18). The most stubborn of those who still re- against Americans as they did on Septemfuse to use the word “torture” to describe our ber 11.” Almost daily, the Obama administration treatment of detainees is President Obama, who has yet to issue any response to the is getting more secretive in its contempt for Constitution Project’s “Detainee Treatment” constitutional restrictions on its power. And report. He remains unyielding in his deter- it isn’t going to prevent future administramination that “nothing will be gained by tions from aping it, even as a few of us keep spending our time and energy laying blame piercing more of its obfuscations. Starkly, what we have learned from the for the past” (my column, “President Reagan’s Torture Advice to President Obama,” Constitution Project is unprecedented in American history. But if the citizenry is not cato.org, May 20, 2009). Ronald Reagan insistently pressed for shaken hard out of its apathy, our present American ratification of the United Nations and future governments will dissolve more Convention Against Torture, which he of our fundamental constitutional precesigned on April 18, 1988. He declared it “will dents and continue to develop more cruel clearly express United States opposition to treatment of detainees. How many 2016 presidential candidates torture, an abhorrent practice unfortunately from either party will likely refer to the Constill prevalent in the world today.” As I have often reported, and as Reagan stitution Project’s report? How many of you emphasized when signing it, the convention will know enough of it to remember it before establishes a “universal jurisdiction” under you cast your vote? More importantly, how many of your which each signer must “prosecute torturers who are found in its territory or ... extradite schoolchildren are aware of it now? Kathryn Lopez is the editor-at-large of National Review them to other countries for prosecution.” Nat Hentoff is a nationally renowned auThis “universal jurisdiction” includes offiOnline www.nationalreview.com. She can be contacted at thority on the First Amendment and the Bill cials from each signing nation -all the way klopez@nationalreview.com. of Rights. He is a member of the Reporters to the top -- “who authorized torture.” Committee for Freedom of the Press, and the It starts here with Bush and Cheney. Yet this is what we find in the Constitu- Cato Institute, where he is a senior fellow. tion Project’s report, as stated on page 335:

A

Moderately Confused

THE FIRST AMENDMENT Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the government for a redress of grievances.

Public officials can be contacted through the following addresses and telephone numbers: ■ Lucy Fess, mayor, 5th Ward Commissioner, ward5comm@piquaoh.org, 773-7929 (home) ■ John Martin, 1st Ward Commissioner, ward1comm@piquaoh.org, 773-2778 (home) ■ William Vogt, 2nd Ward Commissioner, ward2comm@piquaoh.org, 773-8217 ■ Joe Wilson, 3rd Ward Commissioner, ward3comm@piquaoh.org, 778-0390 ■ Judy Terry, 4th Ward Commissioner,

ward4comm@piquaoh.org, 773-3189 ■ City Manager Gary Huff, ghuff@piquaoh.org, 778-2051 ■ Miami County Commissioners: John “‘Bud”‘ O’Brien, Jack Evans and Richard Cultice, 201 W. Main St., Troy, OH 45373 440-5910; commissioners@comiami.oh.us ■ John R. Kasich, Ohio governor, Vern Riffe Center, 77 S. High St., Columbus, OH 43215, (614) 644-0813, Fax: (614) 466-9354 ■ State Sen. Bill Beagle, 5th District, Ohio Senate, First Floor, Columbus, Ohio

To the editor: It’s hard to close a school. Whether we realize it or not, we become accustomed to and maybe even take for granted, familiar surroundings and local landmarks. We find comfort in trusting that they will always endure. A school is more than mere mortar and bricks. It symbolizes for us a more innocent time in life, a time when our biggest worry may have been who to play with at recess, or who to sit with at lunch. A school stands for the time in our formative years spent with peers, teachers, and staff, learning not only the “3 R’s”, but life lessons. Lessons about how to treat others, winning and losing with grace, discovering first crushes and first loves are found in classrooms, hallways, and playgrounds. Time spent at school laughing with friends and shedding tears is woven into our life’s fabric. Change can be hard, but a necessary part of life and growing. From the moment we are born, we are always letting go of something. Change can be uncomfortable, stressful, and uncertain, but eventually change becomes good. The closing, razing, and ultimate rebuilding of Washington School ushers in a new era, not only for the Washington neighborhood, but also for Piqua City Schools and for our town. While the bricks and mortar will be dismantled, the many memories made within its walls can’t be taken away. Current students, teachers, staff and countless future ones will greatly benefit from the “changes” we are experiencing now. — Stacy Patton Washington School

Letters Send your signed letters to the editor, Piqua Daily Call, P.O. Box 921, Piqua, OH 45356. Send letters by e-mail to shartley@civitasmail.com. There is a 400-word limit for letters to the editor. Letters must include an address and telephone number, for verification purposes only.

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PIQUA DAILY CALL • WWW.DAILYCALL.COM REVIEW:

All sparkle, no soul in ‘Great Gatsby’

Thursday, May 9, 2013

5

Suspicious of friend

DEAR ABBY: I have a friend who I believe is having an affair. I have no concrete evidence, only a slew of circumstantial evidence such as odd work hours, blocks of mystery time set aside at night in his cellphone’s day planner, and evading questions about texts from females. I have no idea how to approach him, or if I even should. I wouldn’t know how ABIGAIL VAN BUREN to begin the conversation Advice with him because I have no solid proof. I always consid- wrong with your performered him to be a decent indi- ance. By now, your boss vidual, but in the back of my should have cooled off, and I mind now I’m thinking, “He’s suggest that you have a pricheating on his wife!” What vate chat with him and say makes me uneasy is that it’s that if he has a bone to pick all based on my hunch. I’m with you, you would prefer to usually pretty good with my hear it from his lips rather than have it communicated hunches, though. Any words of wisdom in a text, which was hurtful. would be welcome. DEAR ABBY: After my — NICK IN NEW ENGWARNER BROS. PICTURES/AP PHOTO best friend of more than 20 LAND This film publicity image released by Warner Bros. Pictures shows Isla Fisher as Myrtle Wilson, standing left, years, I’ll call him Tim, told me Joel Edgerton as Tom Buchanan, standing right, Adelaide Clemens as Catherine, seated from left, Tobey DEAR NICK: What are his wife had cheated on him, I Maguire as Nick Carraway and Kate Mulvany as Mrs. McKee in a scene from “The Great Gatsby.” you doing going through your confessed that I am in love BY CHRISTY LEMIRE (We should point out that the lish class: The year is 1922, and friend’s cellphone day plan- with him. His response floored clothes, especially the dresses young Nick Carraway has moved ner and reading his texts? He me. Tim announced that he AP Movie Critic Carey Mulligan wears as the elu- into a cottage on the nouveau riche doesn’t have to account to has been in love with me all you for his time. For all you this time and can imagine If any piece of classic American sive, ethereal golden girl Daisy Long Island enclave of West Egg know the man may be in a growing old with only me. literature should be depicted on Buchanan, are magnificent, though A friend told me I’m comdreams of making it big on the with 12-step program or a therapy film with wildly decadent and — the work of Luhrmann’s wife and boldly inventive style, it’s “The frequent collaborator Catherine New York Stock Exchange. Across group. If he wanted you to mitting adultery with Tim beGreat Gatsby.” After all, who was Martin, who serves as both produc- the bay is the old-moneyed commu- know what he’s doing, he cause he is now in the process the character of Jay Gatsby himself tion and costume designer. Watch- nity of East Egg, where Nick’s would tell you. Right now the of leaving his cheating wife for if not a spinner of grandiose tales ing “The Great Gatsby,” the film, cousin, the dazzling socialite Daisy, “friendliest” thing you can do me. Am I? We haven’t been intimate, nor do we plan to sleep and a peddler of lavish dreams? makes you wonder whether all of lives with her cheating, blue- is mind your own business. with each other until the diAnd Baz Luhrmann would seem this might have functioned more efDEAR ABBY: I have vorce is final. like the ideal director to bring F. fectively as “The Great Gatsby,” the blooded husband, Tom (Joel EdgerI have loved Tim far longer ton). worked at my job almost 10 Scott Fitzgerald’s story to the Vogue magazine spread.) than she has been in the picyears. Most of the owners are But everyone, regardless of screen yet again, to breathe new life Luhrmann’s adaptation, which ture, and I feel this is a nice, and the staff is great. I into these revered words, having he co-wrote with Craig Pearce, lacks where they’re from, gathers each chance for happiness that shaken up cultural institutions pre- the sense of melancholy and longing weekend for wild parties at like my job most days. has offered us and we fate I had a really bad week reviously with films like “William that emanated from the novel’s Gatsby’s palatial abode — which are meant to grow old tocently. I felt like I couldn’t do Shakespeare’s Romeo + Juliet” and pages, even though the script inhappens to be next door to Nick’s anything right. The week gether. Are we wrong to pur“Moulin Rouge!” This is the man vokes Fitzgerald’s prose early and sue a relationship? who dared to stage the iconic bal- often through voiceover from Tobey humble house. The normally myste- ended with a really angry — CONFLICTED IN cony scene in a swimming pool, so Maguire as our narrator, guide and rious Gatsby befriends Nick with text from my boss. He was CALIFORNIA right. I was in the wrong, and mixing in a little Jay-Z amid the Fitzgerald stand-in Nick Carraway. hopes of reconnecting with Daisy, apologized. He sent me anI Jazz Age standards strangely Sometimes, as in the book’s famous, the one who got away five years earDEAR CONFLICTED:If other text, still angry, and my makes sense. final sentence, the words pop right lier. Mulligan’s Daisy is more of an Tim has been in love with you But in Luhrmann’s previous up on screen and linger in the air. idea than a fully fleshed-out person, whole weekend was ruined all these years, he couldn’t by it. I kept thinking how films, there still existed a fundaBut there’s something about but then again, maybe that’s always mad he was, and how in a have had much of a marriage. mental understanding of the point hearing and seeing them in this His wife’s infidelity was his of the stories he was telling; be- fashion that depletes them of the been the point: that she’s alluring few days, I’d start my week in “get out of jail” ticket and he the doghouse. I can’t figure neath their gorgeous trappings, power they provide when we expe- but tantalizingly out of reach. out how not to take work took it. I don’t know what your DiCaprio, meanwhile — despite they still reflected the heart and the rience them on the written page. It’s home with me. Also, I can’t “friend’s” definition of adultery purpose of the works from which a reminder that one of the most cel- the usual depth and edge he can help but think he was wrong is, but according to Webster’s they were drawn. His “Great ebrated novels of our time, at its bring to a role — comes off here as using a text as a means of dictionary, you’re not commitGatsby” is all about the glitter but it core, is a melodramatic tale of love a parody of a Fitzgerald character, discussing the issue. I don’t ting it. has no soul — and the fact that he’s and loss, jealousy and betrayal. tossing around Gatsby’s jovial want to make him angrier. directed it in 3-D only magnifies the Gatsby himself, played with wellDear Abby is written by How do I confront this issue? feeling of artificiality. His camera coifed panache by Leonardo Di- greeting of “old sport” so often in his Van Buren, also Abigail — STILL UPSET IN rushes and swoops and twirls Caprio, too often comes off as a affected accent, it could make for a OREGON known as Jeanne Phillips, through one elaborately staged bac- needy, clingy stalker rather than a dangerous drinking game. Now that and was founded by her chanal after another but instead of tragic figure and a victim of the would truly be intoxicating. DEAR STILL UPSET: mother, Pauline Phillips. creating a feeling of vibrancy, the American dream. But in general, “The Great Gatsby,” a Warner It would have been much Write Dear Abby at result is repetitive and ultimately though, Luhrmann’s “Gatsby” does- Bros. Pictures release, is rated PG- better management if your www.DearAbby.com or P.O. numbing. Rather than creating a n’t get the fact that the book was in- 13 for some violent images, sexual boss had talked with you face Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA sense of immersion and tangibility, tended as a critical look at a to face about what was 90069. the 3-D holds you at arm’s length, crumbling dream. It gets too caught content, smoking, partying and brief language. Running time: 141 rendering the expensive, obsessive up in the buzz of the party. Solve it One and a half stars out of minutes. details as shiny and hollow when The plot, real quickly, in case it’s been a while since 10th-grade Eng- four. they should have been exquisite.

UNIVERSAL

Christie to guest-host ‘Today’ later this month S u d o k u P u z z l e TRENTON, N.J. (AP) — Gov. Chris Christie will guest-host the “Today” show later this month. NBC announced Tuesday that Christie will be a co-host for an hour of the May 24 show, which will broadcast

from the Jersey shore as part of its “Great American Adventure” road trip. A location for the appearance hasn’t been finalized. The road trip segment involves the show’s anchors traveling together to five U.S.

destinations in a single week. Christie has stressed the Jersey shore’s importance as a tourist destination in the wake of Superstorm Sandy. Christie joins Sarah Palin and Laura Bush as other political figures who have co-

hosted an hour of the morning show. The Republican governor is running for a second term. A spokesman confirmed Tuesday Christie had undergone weight loss surgery in February.

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Observe that it would not help East to play the ten on the club lead from dummy. Declarer would win with the queen, cross to dummy with a trump and then lead another club, trapping East’s J-7 with the A-8. East is helpless from the outset as long as South does his homework and forces the defenders to reveal their distribution.

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second spade lead), two hearts and has followed to three rounds of diamonds, he cannot have more than one club. So South leads a club to the king, and when West follows suit, he becomes marked with a 7-2-3-1 distribution. When South then returns a club from dummy and East follows low, South finesses the eight with 100 percent assurance that it will win the trick.

40039566

Declarer cannot see the opponents’ cards when play begins, but he can frequently force them to reveal how their cards are divided, enabling him to achieve the optimum result. Here is a typical example. West leads a diamond

against seven hearts, and South’s only real concern is that one opponent might have four (or five) clubs. All his thoughts are therefore focused on protecting against this possibility. In order to collect all the information he can, South wins the diamond with the ace, ruffs a diamond, cashes the K-Q of hearts and A-K of spades, ruffs a spade and then ruffs a diamond. As a result of these machinations, declarer now knows everything he needs to know to make the contract. Since West started with seven spades (East showed out on the

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6

RELIGION

Thursday, May 9, 2013

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Biden asks clergy to make moral argument on guns Meets regularly with gun violence victims and law enforcement to build support for a second go at legislation to reduce gun violence BY JOSH LEDERMAN Associated Press

EVAN VUCCI /AP PHOTO

Vice President Joe Biden answers questions after a vote on gun legislation on Capitol Hill April 17 in Washington. Senate Republicans backed by a small band of ruralstate Democrats scuttled the most far reaching gun control legislation in two decades, rejecting calls to tighten background checks on firearms buyers. Although momentum on gun control stalled in the Senate last month, Biden has insisted the issue is very much alive, and has been meeting regularly with gun violence victims and law enforcement to build support for a second go at legislation to expand background checks, improve mental health care and take other steps to reduce gun violence. Monday's session reflects an attempt to broaden the coalition calling for new gun laws to include a wide array of religious groups — including evangelicals and conservative faith communities. Without naming names, Biden alluded to senators who opposed background checks — the centerpiece of the Obama administration's push — who have faced a backlash in the weeks since and could possibly be picked off if the issue comes back for a vote. Lingering concerns from some participants illustrated the ongoing challenge the administration faces in winning support for the proposals, even though Biden and Obama regularly tout polls suggesting they enjoy broad support. Some participants raised questions about whether background checks could lead to a national gun

registry or whether mental health provisions would be used to create a list of individuals permanently banned from obtaining guns. “There were some very powerful evangelical leaders in the room who needed to be reassured,” said Pastor Michael McBride of the PICO National Network, a faithbased organizing network. Citing what he described as misinformation from the National Rifle Association and others, Biden said the renewed push for gun control must correct misconceptions about what the proposals do and don't do, participants said. He asked clergy to keep up the pressure and to reframe the debate for their followers in moral terms. A spokeswoman for Biden declined to comment on the meeting. But Rabbi Julie Schonfeld, executive vice president of the Rabbinical Assembly, said a diverse spectrum of denominations and religious orders were represented. She said they included evangelical leaders Richard Cizik and Franklin Graham, the son of evangelist Billy Graham, as well as Sister Marge Clark of Network, a Catholic group.

Volunteers aide family history PIQUA – Sixteen young women and four leaders from the Piqua Ward of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints met at Forest Hill Cemetery in Piqua recently to take photographs of grave markers that people had requested online from a non-profit website called findagrave.com. Findagrave.com is a site where people who are doing their family history can request a photo to be taken of a grave that is not located in their area. Through these photos they are able to get valuable names, dates, and other information about their ancestors to keep in their files. Volunteers around the United States and outside the US participate in this site. Forest Hill Cemetery is a huge cemetery and has nearly 150 photo requests that have not been fulfilled by volunteers. The young women and their leaders started working on some of those requests. The weather was great, and the girls enjoyed walking among the tombstones, searching for names and finding out about some of the people located in the cemetery from reading their stones and seeing their graves (some very elaborate, some very simple). Jim Roth, the director of Forest Hill Union Cemetery, met the group at the cemetery and helped direct them to the areas where the names they were searching were located. One of the young women, Morgan McKinney, 17, said, “This was a great activity and I had an awesome time hanging out with my friends and doing a service at the same time. I did not even know this public service was available and anyone can do it. I highly suggest trying findagrave.com and becoming an active member in the family history process. It’s easy, fun and worthwhile.” 40044564

WASHINGTON (AP) — Vice President Joe Biden wants pastors, rabbis and nuns to tell their flocks that enacting gun control is the moral thing to do. But another vote may have to wait until Congress wraps up work on an immigration overhaul. Biden met for two-and-a-half hours Monday with more than a dozen leaders from various faith communities — Christian, Jewish, Muslim and Sikh, to name a few. Both Biden and the faith leaders encouraged each other not to give up on what has been an arduous and thus far fruitless effort by Biden and President Barack Obama to pass new gun laws in the wake of December's schoolhouse shooting in Connecticut. Around a large, circular table in a conference room on the White House grounds, Biden waxed optimistic about prospects for passing a bill, according to four participants who spoke to The Associated Press after the meeting. Biden's chief of staff, Bruce Reed, joined the group, as did a handful of Obama aides who work on faithbased outreach. The meeting closed with a meditation and a prayer for action. But don't expect a vote any time soon. “The conversation presumed the vote would happen first on immigration,” said Rabbi David Saperstein, who directs the Religious Action Center of Reform Judaism. “That seemed to be the back-andforth on both sides — that immigration was a key priority right now. When that vote took place, it would be an opportunity to refocus on this.” A far-reaching immigration overhaul is in the early stages of advancing through the Senate. Obama said last week he's optimistic it can be completed this year.

• PIQUA DAILY CALL

The workshop is free with materials provided. Call Patti Jenkins at FLC 335-2323 or Deb Sanders at Dorothy Love 4976543 for reservations.

Mark your calendar Recovery meeting slated SIDNEY — The Sidney First Church of the Nazarene will host a Celebrate Recovery (CR) meeting at 6:30 p.m. on Thursdays. CR is a recovery program to help people deal with hurt, habit or hang-up, including from divorce, rejection or betrayal. Habits may include gambling, drugs, pornography or alcohol. Hang-ups may include depression, negativity or anger. The program is open to anyone age 18 and above and is offered free of charge. The CR program focuses on the future, not the past. Participants are encouraged to accept responsibility for their actions. Growth in the context of small groups is emphasized. At CR meetings, music and messages all dealing with the various issues of recovery. The leaders of CR have numerous years experience in song leading and public speaking. Those interested in more information on CR, may go crsidney.com or email questions to crsidney@yahoo.com.

Emeth in Piqua, will be holding a regular Shabbat service on at 7:30 p.m. Friday, May 10. Services will be conducted by rabbinic intern Marc Kasten. The synagogue is located at 320 Caldwell St. in Piqua. For further information, see the website at www.ansheemeth.org or call 937-547-0092.

Senior scams workshop May 14

TROY — First Lutheran Church, 2899 W. Main St., Troy, will host two informational workshops on Senior Scams from 1-2:30 p.m. and from 6-7:30 p.m. Tuesday, May 14. International scam artists use clever schemes to defraud millions of people across the globe each year, threatening financial security and generating substantial profits for criminal organizations and common crooks. They use phone, email, postal mail, and the Internet to cross geographic boundaries and trick victims into sending money or giving out personal information. Deb Sanders, Troy resident and Retirement Counselor from Dorothy Shabbat servLove Retirement Community will address these isices to be consues as they are currently ducted affecting senior citizens PIQUA — The congre- and baby boomers in our gation of Temple Anshe area.

Salvation Army annual dinner PIQUA - The Salvation Army will host this year’s annual dinner/installation of officers for the Piqua Association of Churches at 6:30 p.m. Monday, May 13.. Call in your dinner reservation by Monday, May 6, to 7737563. Cost is $6.

Mercy Street dinner PIQUA — Mercy Street has returned to Upper Valley Community Church in Piqua. Ladies are invited to attend from 6:30-8:30 p.m. Tuesday, May 14. A light dinner will be served and testimonies will be given. Call the church at 773-6877 by May 7 to reserve a spot.

‘Neighbor to neighbor’ community meal FLETCHER — The Fletcher United Methodist Church invites the public to its free “Neighbor to Neighbor” community meal from 5-7 p.m. Tuesday May 21. This month’s menu includes a Taco Bar.

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SCHOOL

PIQUA DAILY CALL • WWW.DAILYCALL.COM

S M O KS IEG N A L S

Thursday, May 9, 2013

The staff for this week: Makylie Killian, Robby Bloom, Eric Craft, and Summer Littlejohn. Adviser: Debbie Allen

PIQUA HIGH SCHOOL

McDonald’s Student of the Week

Piqua students take on pennies BY ERIC CRAFT Staff Writer PIQUA — During the week of May 3, Piqua High School students put on an event known as Penny Wars to help raise money for the Dance Marathon. They plan to put on Dance Marathon next school year in November to raise money for Dayton’s Children Hospital. The Penny Wars helped bring the total of the money raised to $2,000 for students to give to the hospital. This brings them closer to the $50,000 goal they hope to achieve by the end of Dance Marathon. They were also given grants to put on the event (a total of $1,950), so all funds the students raise are

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going strictly to the children’s hospital. The winner of Penny Wars was Mrs. Barr’s sixth period class, bringing in a total of 2040 points per student. Stacy Falcone, who helped the students put on the event, got the idea from the last school where she taught. She said the event “went amazing. It exceeded what I thought we would; props to the students and teachers who got involved.” The points for Penny Wars were as follows: a penny was TAMPLIN worth +1, nickel -1, dime -2, quarter -3, and dollar -15. Con- BY ROBBY BLOOM PROVIDED PHOTO grats to the winners of penny Staff Writer Stacy Falcone’s 8th period class is hard at work rolling pennies wars and great job to the stuPIQUA — The student of the at the end of Penny Wars on Friday, May 3. dents taking up this cause. week for the week of May 6-10 is from the Piqua Fish and Game. senior Austin Tamplin. Tamplin, son of Diana and Fred Tamplin, The bait for the fishing was was nominated by Nick Neary for paid for by the Miami Valley showing respect, responsibility, and Bassmasters. diligence. some of the fun and healthy “Friday went very well as the “Austin always demonstrates a Cara Long, a senior at Piqua things that can be done out- Big Woods was dry with very litrespectful attitude and is diligent doors.” tle mud and it was warm with a High School, and a first year The students went fishing, nice breeze.” He went on to say member to the D.A.R.E commu- and responsible in his pursuit of exand for many it was their first that everyone had a great time, nity, said the day was “very fun cellence in my classroom and beyond. He puts in the extra effort time; they had an event called and he also wanted to give a and I got the opportunity to without being prompted and “Earth Ball” where they roll a special thank you to all of the meet all the fifth-graders.” She makes my job as a teacher easier,” giant exercise ball on the chil- volunteers who helped. dren; then they had a nature “D.A.R.E Day could not be went on to say, “D.A.R.E Day Neary said. Tamplin participates in soccer, walk where the kids had to find possible without the more than was really fun because the NHS, and donates blood at Piqua plaques and then etch the de- 20 volunteers who helped that group I had was from Bennett, High School. After high school, he signs on the papers they re- day, along with The Miami and that is where I was from, so plans on going to The Ohio State ceived. County Park District employees I This year, about 320 Piqua and volunteers,” Fogt said. The liked getting to connect with University to get a bachelor’s in students attended the event at food was provided and paid for the next generation from my old nursing and hopefully become an anesthesiologist. Garbry Big Woods. Fogt said, through generous donations school.”

PHS celebrates D.A.R.E Day BY SUMMER LITTLEJOHN Staff Writer PIQUA — On May 3, the D.A.R.E students had a day to spend with the fifth graders of our community. It is formally known as “D.A.R.E Day” and run by Officer Jerry Fogt, who has been doing it for six years. “The event is a field day for the fifth-grade students of Piqua,” Fogt said. He went on to say it is “both a reward for doing a lot of work in exercises during D.A.R.E and also an example of

PHS holds ‘Hollywood Prom’ BY MAKYLIE KILLIAN Staff Writer PIQUA — On Saturday, May 4, Piqua High School held their annual prom at the Learning Center where they later crowned the junior class king Brian Mayse and queen Maddie Evans. Students danced vivaciously

throughout the night with smiles on their faces and flashing cameras for lasting memories. Prom court members included David Wysong, Bryan Mayse, Xavier Harrison, Dom Stone, Daniel Monnin, Aaron Shroyer, Dustin Ross, Jacob Sowry, Layne Patrizio, Caitlin Cromes, Sarah Grunkemeyer, Heidi Strevell,

Lena Garber, Maddie Evans, Jessica Brown, and Bailey Manning. “I was a little nervous and excited when students voted for prom court because I didn’t want to get my hopes up too high, but then a lot of people said that they voted for me, and then I did get my hopes up,” Evans said. During prom she enjoyed the music al-

though she thought the lengthy version of the “Harlem Shake,” was a little odd. “It was the best moment of my life and I couldn’t make it any better. It was all overwhelming and felt as if it all happened so fast, and it definitely boosted my self-esteem for the night,” said Evans, after discovering that she was voted prom queen. After the crowning the king and queen, they shared an exclu-

sive dance in the middle of the floor for all to view. Students showed respect during the slow dance, to the point an announcement was made to inform the crowd that they were allowed to dance. “The dance was perfect with the song, but it made me laugh when no one started dancing,” Evans said. Overall Saturday was full of humorous moments, laughter, dancing and lasting friendships.

Reporters: Ellie Cain Emilie Cavinder Julia Harrelson John Husa Adviser: Elaine Schweller-Snyder

Issue #31 - May 9, 2013

Field Day wrap-up

The mighty Montgomery brothers

BY: EMILIE CAVINDER Field Day was an all-around success for the Lehman students especially for the senior class who won the spirit sword. The day started off with a corn hole tournament with many students participating. Along with the students, teachers Sister Ginny, Mrs. Wendel, Mr. Schmiesing, and Mr. Albers joined in on the action. The winners of the corn hole tournament were freshman Max Schutt and Ian Smith. The next event in the Field Day madness was a volleyball tournament. Volleyball was very competitive, yet fun. Most teams had matching attire and interesting team names. The obvious winner of the volleyball tournament included three starting varsity volleyball players: Ellie Cain, Andrea Thobe, and Erica Paulus, along with Josh Smith. There was a food eating contest which involved consuming a large piece of cake with no use of your hands. This was by far the messiest event of the day, and the most enjoyable to watch. Quinn Monnin took the lead early, scarfing the cake down as quickly as possible. The award for the messiest competitor, hands down, would have to be Quinton Malone. The class competition started out juniors vs. freshman in the first round of dodge ball. The juniors went on to the second round against the seniors, winner of the seniors vs. sophomores. The seniors made a fantastic entrance just like the movie Dodge Ball. The battle of the upperclassmen began and the seniors took this game, winning their first event. As the tug of war began the freshmen went against the junior class with the junior class defeating them. I have to add that the rope broke and Coach Roll and Mr. Johnson had to tie a knot to make sure it didn’t happen again. The senior class then went against the sophomores, with the seniors taking the win. In the championship, the junior class ended up winning this event. The junior and senior class each had one win as a class, so the tie breaker was the ultimate frisbee game. The senior class had much talent on their team, and won this event as well. This gave their class two wins and the spirit sword and bragging rights. The Lehman student body gives special thanks to the Lehman Cavs 4 a Cure team and Student Council who organized and spent time working all the events.

BY: JOHN HUSA You have more than likely seen their names in the paper lately, or perhaps you have seen them around town. If you have, it is very hard to mistake the two Montgomery brothers. This track season, sophomore Ben and junior Brad are destroying the competition. Both Ben and Brad throw discus and shot for the Lehman track team, and have started the year off hot. The brothers both started doing track in seventh grade, and have a great mentor in their dad, who holds the shot put record at Fairlawn. Brad has been doing particularly well in discus, and is looking to improve his game. His best throw in discus this year is 154’1”, and 47’2” in the shot. Brad has placed first at every meet for discus, except one and he still managed to place second. “My goal is to make it to state in discus this year, and do well,” said Brad. Ben has been making noise in the shot put, and he has already broken his personal record in shot and discus. His best throw in shot put is 47’1”, and 130’0” in the discus. Ben has placed third or higher in shot put at four invitationals, and has won the shot at two tri-meets. “My goal is to make state for shot put this year,” said Ben Montgomery. It is no secret that they are looking to do damage this year, and are doing so already. The hard work the brothers put into the offseason is paying off, as they are continually getting better as the spring goes on. Make your way out to a track meet before the season ends, and support the mighty Montgomery brothers and the talented Cavaliers.

Witnessing through white crosses BY: JULIA HARRELSON Did you know there are 3,600 abortions performed each day in the United States? If you pass by Lehman Catholic High School in the month of May, you would learn this. Each year, the Lehman Pro-Lifeguards set up white crosses in the front lawn to show people a visual reminder of this fact and be witnesses to this terrible tragedy. The Lehman Pro-Lifeguards club was started by the Staudt family in 2004. In 2009, John Staudt, a junior at Lehman, came up with the idea of the white crosses and put the plan into action. Many Lehman students came out to help build the crosses and set them up on the school lawn. Since then, the crosses have become a staple of the organization and their appearance each year serves as a grim reminder than legal abortions continue to happen in our society every day, year after year. Junior club board member Patrick Blenman said, “We do the white crosses to give witness to society about all the unborn children aborted each day. These are children who are being killed before they are given the chance to live.” The crosses were set up last Saturday. They will be displayed throughout the month of May. It is hoped that those from the community who drive by the school will see this display and think twice about the terrible tragedy that is abortion. If those thoughts save even one unborn life, it is worth the effort.

City Nights, Neon Lights BY: ELLIE CAIN On May 11, Lehman will have their junior-senior prom at the Oaks in Sidney. Twelve tudents from each class are in the running for royal titles. In the junior class, the ladies up for Prom Princess are Millie Cartwright, Jordi Emrick, Grace Frantz, Jenna Kronenberger, Olivia Sehlhorst, and Sonja Wolf. The gentlemen running for Prom Prince are Gabe Berning, Patrick Blenman, John Husa, Kevin McElroy, Paxton Spicer, and James Rego. In the senior class, the ladies who could be Prom Queen are Lauren Bosway, Sloane Glover, Samantha Neumeier, Katie Rossman, Tori Tullis, and Ellie Waldsmith. The gentlemen who would become King are Mitchell Bosse, Danny Davis, Andrew Gilardi, Louis Gaier, Tharon Goins, and Michael Jacob. Decorations being planned by the junior class include a cityscape backdrop and many neon features, including neon balloons. Junior Lauren Goettemoeller who is on the decoration committee, said, “The neon decorations are going to be very fun!”


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SCHOOL

Thursday, May 9, 2013

Piqua Catholic Happenings PIQUA — As the school year nears its end, there is a flurry of activity for the students and faculty at Piqua Catholic. • Sunday, April 28, secondgraders gathered at St. Boniface Church to receive their First Communion. Their families joined in the celebration.These students also visited a farm near Versailles to learn about the animals and other aspects of farm life, including milking cows.What fun! On May 16 they will travel to Stillwater Prairie Reserve for the annual Banana Slug Festival, where they will witness many of the treasurers of the outdoors. • The fifth-grade pupils are a chapter away from finishing their math books. In Religion class they have been learning about God’s forgiveness. They have completed the study of Ancient China and are preparing to learn about Ancient Greece. Piqua Police Officer Jerry Fogt has been working with the children in the D.A.R.E. program. Students enjoyed D.A.R.E. Day on May 3 and look forward to the D.A.R.E. graduation celebration May 20. • The sixth-grade class has been busy with geometry studies. In Religion class they have covered the life and times of Solomon’s kingdom while in Social Studies they have concentrated on the Asian continent. The students have been diligently working on the annual country projects and will host a “Taste around the World.”Teachers Mrs. Ritts and Ms. Canady are thankful to the Miami County Foundation for a grant to purchase I-Pads for their classes. • On May 1, band students in grades 5-8 joined Lehman Catholic High School, Troy’s St. Patrick School and Sidney Holy Angels band members for what is affectionately known as “Band Day.” They will all perform the ever popular combined concert at Lehman. • The junior high students traveled to Columbus in April to visit the State House.The trip was made possible by a $300 bus grant.The group was treated to a tour of the inner workings of the Ohio State House. • The annual May Crowning took place on May 1.This was an all school affair with Kate Hemm chosen to crown the statue of Mary, the mother of God. The attendants were Jenna Zimmerman and Megan Neumeier with Eli Baker carrying the banner while Christian Clouse carried the crown. Jake Earhart welcomed everyone with the opening remarks. These students were chosen by a vote of the eighth-grade class. • Today, May 9, the eighth-grade class will each present their wax museum project. Their work is the culmination of their studies of World World II and the Holocaust. • Induction into the National Junior Honor Society takes place May 10.On May 11,Andrew Streng will join more than 600 students from all over Ohio to compete in the State Science Fair. Good luck Andrew. • The eighth-graders and chaperones will board the bus on May 12 for an exciting and educational trip to Gettysburg and Washington, D.C. They will meet with House Speaker John Boehner,see a play at Ford’s Theatre, lay a wreath at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier and visit many other points of interest. • Selected pieces of students’ art will be on display during Mainstreet Piqua’s Taste of the Arts in downtown Piqua on Friday,May 17. The Student Art Exhibit will be located on the 2nd floor of Apple Tree Gallery,405 N.Main Street.Admission is free.The exhibit will be open during regular business hours May 16-20.Also during Taste of the Arts, volunteers of the new Center for Early Learning Preschool will host the event’s photo booth. Stop by on May 17, take home a picture of yourself and learn about what is planned for the new preschool. • Eighth-grade graduation mass and awards takes place at St. Boniface Church at 7 p.m. May 21. All are invited to attend the celebration. • Finally, on May 24, Megan Neumeier and Alanna O’Leary will travel to College of Wooster to compete at the State Power of the Pen competition. Good luck ladies. The faculty, families, friends and the Piqua Catholic Community wish the students a very happy and safe summer vacation.God bless all the students. Be sure to watch for the next Piqua Catholic Happenings. There are exciting changes and additions to the school, classes and educational material. The 2013-2014 year will be better than ever.

WWW.DAILYCALL.COM

• PIQUA DAILY CALL

FFA holds annual parent-member banquet

PROVIDED PHOTO

Pictured above are the Star Award winners from the 2012-13 Miami East FFA Chapter. CASSTOWN — The Miami East FFA Chapter recently held its 54th Annual Parent Member Banquet. More than 275 parents, members, and guests were attendance at Miami East Junior High Auditoria. Highlights of the evening were: • In 2012, the chapter was ranked in the Top 10 out of 315 chapters in the National Chapter Application.Also we placed in the Top 10 Chapter in the areas of Student Development, Chapter Development and Community Development. Our application was then sent on for national judging and we were named a 3Star National Chapter at the National FFA Convention. • For 2013, the Chapter is ranked in the Top 10 in the state. And, we are a Top 10 in all three areas of development. Members will now compete to be No.1 at the State Convention. • In 2012, National FFA Convention graduate Kyle Roeth earned the American FFA Degree. • At the 2012 State FFA Convention we had 25 students compete in the State Agriscience Fair. Rian Kingrey and Olivia Edgell placed first in the state and competed in the National Agriscience Fair. They placed 3rd in the nation. • In 2013, three officers, Lauren Williams, Kendra Beckman, and Rebekah Eidemiller submitted Officer Books for review at the District Evaluations. All three earned a gold rating. They will be further recognized at the 2013 State FFA Convention. • Graduates Meagan McKinney and Amanda Bartel are amongst our record-setting group of State Proficiency Finalists. They will compete and be recognized at the 2013 State FFA Convention. • Chapter FFA Degree Recipients FFA members are given the opportunity to earn four degrees during their membership in the organization. The first is the Greenhand Degree represented by a bronze pin. Students were recognized that reached the second degree presented – the Chapter FFA Degree. 23 candidates met the minimum qualifications for this degree and were in attendance at the banquet to receive recognition. The candidates were Brady Anderson, Mark Beaty, Jennifer Brown, Ashlee Bussen, Casey Copeland, Danielle Danielson, Olivia Edgell, Colin Gump, Amy Hahn, Austin Honeyman, Grant Hodge, Katie Jenkins, Rian Kingrey, Allie Patton, Cody Reid, Emma Rife, Megan Smock, Allyson Supinger, Brittany Taylor, Chris Teaford, Jarrett Willougby, Nick Woolever, and Davey Wright • Honorary Chapter FFA Degree One of the premier goals of the FFA is to promote leadership among its students. The Miami East FFA Chapter would not be able to do special projects without some very special people. There were two individuals recognized with the Honorary Chapter FFA Degree because of their involvement in the Miami East FFA Alumni Chapter – Mr. Mark Bartel and Mrs. Brenda Coverstone. • Proficiency Awards Proficiency awards are designed to recognize the efforts of

PROVIDED PHOTO

PROVIDED PHOTO

The 2013-14 officers for the Miami East FFA Chapter: Historian, Colin Hawes; chaplain, Olivia Edgell; sentinel, Kolin Bendickson; student adviser, Lindsey Roeth; reporter, Rebekah Eidemiller; treasurer, Madeline Davis; secretary, LaurenWilliams; vice president, Kelly Rindler; and president, Kendra Beckman. members who have outstanding Supervised Agricultural Experience programs and have keep accurate records. Winners of the 2012 Chapter Proficiency Awards were: • Agricultural Communications – Lauren Williams Lauren helped promote the weekly event and work with vendors and customers. Lauren donated more than 200 hours to the market. She placed in the Top 3 in the district and Top 4 in the state. • Agricultural Mechanics and Repair – Brady Anderson He is Top 2 in State and first in the district in the area of Agricultural Mechanics Repair and Maintenance – Entrepreneurship. With the help of his grandfather, Brady reconditioned a 1941 John Deere B. • Agricultural Research Animal – Macaleh Thompson Her project consists of research in animal agriculture practices. She surveyed students and staff at Miami East High School on their understanding of animal rights groups. She competed in the National Agriscience Fair. She placed first in the district and Top 4 in the state. • Agricultural Research Integrated – Olivia Edgell Olivia placed first in the district and Top 4 in the state in the area of Agriscience Research-Integrated Systems. She researched the best hand soap and water temperature to remove dirt from hands. She created a hypothesis and conducted her research before competing in the National Agriscience Fair and placing third in the nation. • Agricultural Sales – Lauren Williams Lauren has built a reputation as a Basil Girl amongst her family and friends and the customers at the Troy Farmer’s Market. She raised a garden of basil and tomatoes that she sold throughout the growing season. She placed first in the district and Top 4 in the State. • Beef Production – Entrepreneurship – Lindsey Roeth Lindsey owns and operates Roeth Beef and raises and sells custom beef steers. She has marketed her beef to family and friends. She has learned the value of selecting quality feed and sending her steers to butcher at the ideal time. She earned her State FFA Degree. • Beef Production – Placement – Daniel Bodenmiller Daniel’s SAE is working on his family’s beef farm. Daniel is responsible for feeding, bedding, and managing livestock. Daniel also assisted with planting and harvest. He earned his State FFA Degree. • Forage Production – Kolin Bendickson Kolin owns and operates B&D Hay Distributers. He custom

bales hay and straw for 10 customers. He also raises and sells his own hay. Kolin has purchased the equipment necessary to operate his business and earned the State FFA Degree. • Forestry Products – Andrew Kowalak Andrew placed first in the district in the area of Forest Management and Products for his business Logo Logs. Andrew selects logs from his family’s woods, creates a logo and carves that logo into the log. He sells them at local craft fairs and through social media. • Sheep Production – Emily Johnson Emily has a flock of 21 Dorset ewes which she breeds to a blackfaced ram to sell Brockle lambs to fellow 4-H and FFA members for state and national shows. She placed first in the district and Top 4 in the state. She will have an interview in May. • Specialty Crop – Sarah Pyers placed first in the district and Top 4 in the state in the area of Specialty Crop Production. Sarah raised and sold 400 fall chrysanthemum flowers to family, friends, and at the Troy Farmers Market. She purchased the flowers as small plants, raised them, and helped increase blooms and size through watering and fertilizing. • Swine Production – Kelly Rindler Kelly cared for and exhibited her FFA market hog at the county fair. She used good selection choices to raise a market hog that was both fast growing and efficient. She attended Quality Assurance training to learn how to carefully raise her pigs. • Vegetable Production – Christopher Teaford Christopher placed in the top 2 in the district and Top 4 in the state. Chris raised 72 tomato plants. He sold his crop to family, friends, and at the Troy Farmers Market. Chris created a special caging method to help keep his crop off the ground and to reduce spoilage. • Additional Awards Quality Supervised Agriculture Experience Programs are based on accurate record keeping and perfected record books. Students with outstanding record books in each of the classes were Freshman – Hannah Davis, Sophomore – Casey Copeland, Junior – Lauren Williams, and Senior – Emily Johnson High scholastics are an important part of each high school student’s life. Results of the students with the highest academic records in their entire high school career include Agriculture, Food, & Natural Resources – Stephanie Millhouse, Animal Science – Jarrett Willoughby, Business Management – Junior – Kelly Rindler, and Business Management - Senior – Emily Johnson

Pictured above are Miami East FFA students who have earned chapter degrees.

Emily Johnson, Colin Hawes, Hunter Sharp, Andrew Kowalak, Sarah Pyers, Danielle Danielson, Kelsey Kirchner, Emily Beal, Hannah Davis, Eliza Hershberger, Rebekah Eidemiller, and Lauren Williams were recognized for selling over $1,000.00 worth of fruit during the chapter’s fruit sales. Emily Johnson was the highest selling fruit sales person. • State FFA Degree Recipients The State FFA Degree is the highest degree received in the state.About 2% of the state’s FFA membership earns their State Degree. In May four members of the Miami East FFA Chapter will receive the State FFA Degree. Senior Sarah Pyers, and Juniors Kolin Bendickson, Daniel Bodenimller, and Lindsey Roeth were recognized. • American FFA Degree Recipients The American FFA Degree is the highest degree for a member to receive in the National FFA Organization. This degree will be bestowed upon one member at the upcoming National FFA Convention. Graduates Amanda Bartel, Jacob Eidemiller, and Meagan McKinney will receive their degrees in October in Louisville. • Star Greenhand – Kelsey Kirchner Kelsey has attended the National FFA Convention and competed in the parliamentary procedures contest. She has her Supervised Agricultural Experience off and running. Kelsey has started her own business of making dog treats, which she markets at the Market on the Miami. Congratulations. • Blue and Gold Spirit Award Corrine Melvin Corrine has competed in just about every contest whenever there is a need for help. She has participated in practically every FFA activity. She has shown her true pride in the blue and gold of the FFA. • Star Chapter Leader - Emily Johnson Emily has served as a chapter officer for three years. She has been an example leader for her fellow FFA members to follow. She is dedicated, hard-working, and has great self-motivation – all qualities a leader possess. • Star Chapter in Agribusiness - Sarah Pyers. Sarah has operated her business of selling mums for the past three years. She has marketed her flowers to family, friends, and at the Troy Farmers Market. She has learned the skills necessary to produce a high quality product that her customers adore. Congratulations. • Chapter Officers Installed The 2013-14 Miami East FFA Chapter Officers were installed as follows historian, Colin Hawes; chaplain, Olivia Edgell; sentinel, Kolin Bendickson; student adviser, Lindsey Roeth; reporter, Rebekah Eidemiller; treasurer, Madeline Davis; secretary, Lauren Williams; vice president, Kelly Rindler; and president, Kendra Beckman.

Piqua school news briefs PIQUA — The following activities and programs are taking place in Piqua City Schools: • A reminder to parents of incoming 7th grade students for the 2013-2014 school year: It is required by the state of Ohio, Ohio Revised Code (ORC) 3313.67 and 3313.671, that your son/daughter receive a booster immunization (Tdap) before starting 7th grade. Parents of 6th grade students are required to have their children vaccinated with the Tdap booster before starting in the 7th grade at the junior high. Please schedule an appointment with your family doctor, the Miami County Health Department or the Piqua Health Department Immunization

Clinic, to have your child vaccinated before the start of the 20132014 school year! Clinics will be held in partnership with the Piqua Immunization Clinic in our buildings as follows:Wilder Intermediate on May 9, Bennett Intermediate on May 16 and Washington Intermediate on May 23. If your child has already received this vaccine, please send documentation to the school nurse. • Fifty-two Wilder Intermediate fifth-grade students are at Glen Helen Nature Preserve enjoying four days and three nights of environmental learning and great fun.The students are learning from the naturalists at the

Glen and from their teachers who have teamed up to create an awesome learning experience for all. A huge thank you is extended to French Oil of Piqua who provided scholarships for many of the students. • Favorite Hill Primary School’s first-graders will travel to Brukner Nature Center on May 9 to learn about reptiles and amphibians. Favorite Hill’s third grade students will be spending the afternoon learning about the wetlands at the Willowbrook Educational Center on Thursday, May 9. • Bennett Intermediate students participated in the National Sumdog Contest and finished

86th out of 1,010 schools. Bennett successfully finished as the fourth highest school in the state of Ohio. • Favorite Hill Primary and Kids Read Now are joining forces to hold a Reading Family Night at 6:30 p.m. Thursday, May 16. This program will start at Favorite Hill’s auditorium. Flyers have been sent home about the event. If you need further information, contact the school office. • Favorite Hill Primary School will be holding an open house reception from 4-6 p.m. Thursday, May 23 to honor Rebecca Dickenson and Rebecca Doak. Both teachers will be retiring from Piqua City Schools at the end of the 2012-2013 school year.


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9

Thursday, May 9, 2013

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LOCAL

3

Thursday, May 9, 2013

Community spotlight

Chance of rain, t-storms We dry out for the first half of today, but rain chances then return late in the day. High: 77 Low: 55.

Elleana Ford Age: 4 Birthdate: May 8, 2009 Parents: Ryan and Missy Ford of Maineville Grandparents: Dave and Connie Hare and Bob and Sharon Ford, all of Piqua

MIKE ULLERY/STAFF PHOTO

Covington Superintendent David Larson hugs CHS principal Ken Miller upon learning of Tuesday’s passage of the district’s 3.89 mill levy and .25 percent income tax, which will be used for an Ohio School Facilities Commission building project for a new K-8th grade building.

ELLEANA FORD

Documentary to play at library

PIQUA — The Piqua Public Library will be showing the award-winning documentary, “The Elephant in the Living Room,” at 2 p.m. Saturday, followed by a presentation by Tim Harrison (one of two people that the film follows) at 3:30 p.m. Harrison will discuss the Outreach for Animals wildlife advocacy program. “The Elephant in the Living Room” takes viewers on a journey deep inside the controversial American subculture of raising the most dangerous animals in the world as common household pets. Set against the backdrop of

a heated national debate, director Michael Webber chronicles the extraordinary story of two men at the heart of the issue – Tim Harrison, an Ohio police officer whose friend was killed by an exotic pet; and Terry Brumfield, a big-hearted man who struggles to raise two African lions that he loves like his own family. In the first of many unexpected twists, the lives of these two men collide when Brumfield’s male lion escapes its pen and is found attacking cars on a nearby highway. Winner of five Best Documentary Awards, the film courageously

Makenna Isabelle Alejandra Santos

ACE AWARD, Humane Society of the United States, Silverdocs Film Festival BEST DOCUMENTARY, Genesis Award BEST DOCUMENTARY, London United Film Festival BEST DOCUMENTARY, Burbank Film Festival BEST DOCUMENTARY, Founders’ Choice Award, Traverse City Film Festival BEST DOCUMENTARY, Sedona Film Festival exposes the shocking reality behind the multibillion dollar exotic pet industry with stunning photography, inspiring storytelling and unprecedented access into a world rarely seen, right in our own backyard. Call 773-6753 or email fplweb@oplin.org for more information.

Age: 10 Birthdate: May 9, 2003 Parents: Pedro and Amanda (Wagoner) Santos of Covington Grandparents: Sammy and Brenda Wagoner of Covington MAKENNA ISABELLE and Francisco and ALEJANDRA SANTOS Rosa Santos of Guatemala City, West Liberity, Ky., Guatemala William Hall of Troy, the G r e a t - g r a n d p a r - late Dessie Hall and the ents: Jannie Wagoner of late Jr Wagoner

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In Brief State rep to speak at OPERS lunch meeting

will benefit the 2013 Fort Rowdy Gathering, to be held Oct. 5 and 6. For more information, PIQUA — The Miami call Larry at 339-0407, or County Chapter of the Anita at 937-676-3381. Ohio Public Employee Retirees will meet Stamp Out Wednesday, June 5, 11:30 Hunger food a.m., St. John’s Lutheran Church, 248 Wood St., drive Saturday COVINGTON — CovPiqua. Lunch is $10, payable at the door. ington Post Office, CovReservations due ington residents and Wednesday, May 29. Call Covington Outreach AsBeth at 335-2771. sociation (COA) will be Speaker will be state rep- participating in the na20th Annual resentative Richard tional Adams. Meeting is open Stamp Out Food for to any current or retired Hunger Food Drive on Saturday. Residents are Ohio public employee. asked to support the Covington Community Food Fort Rowdy to Pantry by setting out a host Mother’s bag of non-perishable Day BBQ food near their mailboxes COVINGTON — The on Saturday. Rural route Fort Rowdy Gathering carriers will pick up dowill host their annual nated food when they Mother’s Day Chicken drop off mail. In town, BBQ from 11 a.m.-5 p.m. food will be picked up by (or until sold out) on Sun- COA volunteers and Covday in the Covington ington students. Park. No need to get out of your car, workers will Community come to your car window. block grant Advance tickets are recommended. The cost is $7 public hearing PIQUA – The City of and includes half a chicken, chips, apple- Piqua’s Development Desauce and a roll. Advance partment will hold a pubtickets may be purchased lic hearing in regard to at Joanie’s Flower Shop the city’s FY 2012 Foror Siegel’s Country Store, mula Allocation Commuboth in Covington, Uni- nity Development Block form’s Plus in Piqua, or Grant Agreement. The from any Fort Rowdy public hearing will be Board member. Proceeds held at 4 p.m. May 22, in

Commission Chambers, 201 West Water St., Piqua. “We are looking to reprogram funds from our 2012 agreement in order to do some road resurfacing on Gordon Street and Wood Street. We are simply adding an activity, the demolition of 650 Wood Street will continue. We encourage all residents to come forward to our hearing or submit their comments via email,” stated William Lutz, development program manager. Individuals with comments or questions are encouraged to contact Lutz at 778-2062 or via email at blutz@piquaoh.org.

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INFORMATION Call ROB KISER, sports editor, at 773-2721, ext. 209, from 8 p.m. to midnight weekdays.

SPORTS

Piqua Daily Call • www.dailycall.com

IN BRIEF ■ Golf

Bradley cards hole-in-one Trish Bradley recorded a hole-in-one on the seventh hole at Piqua Country Club. She used a 6-iron on the 134-yard par-3. Witnessing the shot were Gail Reardon and Jackie Rose.

Finkes cards 40 at Echo The Echo Hills Tuesday Ladies League held opening day with regular ninehole play. Sandy Finkes was low gross with 40 and Cindy Pearson was second with 46. Amie Rinaldi was low net with 30 and Linnea Thomas was second with 35. Clara Sowry was low putts with 15 and Jane Rudd and Marty Hemm tied for second with 20.

INSIDE ■ Browns owner excited about season, page 12. ■ Singh decides to sue PGA Tour, page 13.

THURSDAY, MAY 9, 2013

Golf scramble season here Many events will be held WOTVC will hold a golf scramble May 17 at Echo Hills Golf Course. Entry fee is $50 per person or $200 per team. It will be a 1 p.m. shotgun start and the $50 entry fee per person includes hamburgers and hot dogs. Entry forms are due May 10 and can be sent to WOTVC, Piqua TV Channel 5, 1973 Edison Drive, Piqua, OH, 45356. For more information, call (937) 381-1546.

■ Miami Shores will have a two-man best ball event on May 25,beginning at 9 a.m.. It will be a modified format ( front nine alternate shot, back nine scramble). Cost is $50 per team (green fees andcart not included). Cost also includes two drink tickets. There will be Four Flights — Championship(8.0 index and under), First (8.1 index and over, Seniors (50 to 59 yrs.), and Super Seniors (60 and over). There will be gross winners and net winners for those who have an up to

date Ghin Handicap (Gross only for those without a Ghin handicap). Deadline to sign up is May 22. Call Miami Shores Golf Shop for more detail at 335-4457. All cash payout. ■ The George G.H.B Brading seventh annual memorial scramble will be held June 8 at Stillwater Golf course. It is a four-man man best ball scramble, starting at 10 a.m. Check in time at 9:30 a.m. There will be payouts to the top three teams, plus longest drive and closest to the pin payouts.

All proceeds go to the George Brading Scholarsip fund at Piqua High School. Come out have fun and be a part of great cause. Call Dave Brading at 773-1962 to sign up. ■ The Covington Bucc annua golf Boosters scramble will be held urday June 22 at Echo Hill Golf Course, with an 8 a.m. shotgun start. The tournament format provides sponsorship opportunities for local businesses and individuals to help support Covington Athletics. The format is a 4-person best ball scramble for-

Buccs softball rolls to victory

PressPros to air two games PressProsMagazine.com

will air two baseball games this week. They include: Friday: Covington at Fort Loramie, 4:45 p.m. Saturday: Troy at Northmont, 10:45 a.m.

■ Physicals

Lehman to offer physicals

■ Football

Browns sign O-lineman CLEVELAND (AP) — The Cleveland Browns have signed free agent offensive lineman Rashad Butler to a one-year contract.

STUMPER

Reds last Q: The hit two, tworun ninth inning home runs in 1977. Who hit an inside the park homer in that rally?

A:

Dan Driessen

QUOTED “A good win after what happened last night.” —Atlanta manager Fredi Gonzalez on Wednesday’s win over the Reds

mat. There will be lots of prizes, good food, and some specialty holes, incorporating other sports, that you wouldn't normally find. We are looking for anyone interested in entering a team, being a sponsor, or donating a prize for the event. Additional entry and sponsorship information is available at gobuccs.com/golf_scramble.pdf. For additional information please contact Bob or Glen at bobsupinger@gmail.com or glenrh1@yahoo.com

Piqua netters play

■ Website

Lehman High School has announced that sports physicals will be held on May 20 from 5:30-7:30 p.m. at the high school. The sports physicals will be good for the 20132014 school year. It is open to all junior high and high school students athletes for a fee of $15.00. Checks should be made payable to the Lehman HS Athletic Boosters. Physical forms will be at Lehman High School, Piqua Catholic and Holy Angels schools. The forms must be filled out and signed by a parent or guardian.

11

AP PHOTO

Cincinnati batter strikes out against Atlanta Wednesday afternoon at Great American Ball Park.

Francisco ‘slams’ Reds hopes Atlanta bounces back from tough loss to beat Cincinnati CINCINNATI (AP) — Dan Uggla and Juan Francisco helped Atlanta quickly forget a terrible ending. Uggla hit a pair of solo homers and Francisco added his first career grand slam as the Braves recovered from a stunning last-swing loss by beating the Cincinnati Reds 7-2 Wednesday. Atlanta took two of three in the series, the first the Reds lost at home this season. The Reds are 13-6 at Great American Ball Park, the most home wins the majors. Devin Mesoraco and Shin-Soo Choo hit two-out homers in the ninth inning for Cincinnati's 5-4 win on Tuesday night. A day later, one of the NL's top power teams got the better of it. Atlanta came into the game tied with Colorado for the NL lead with 44 homers. "A good win after what happened last night," manager Fredi Gonzalez said. "Good resilience with this club." Uggla had solo shots in the fourth and sixth innings off Mike Leake (2-2), his first multihomer game this season. Leake pitched into the eighth, ending a streak of six straight subpar starts by the Reds rotation. "One of those lessstressful wins, I guess you could say," Uggla said. The Braves took all the stress out of it by sending nine batters to the plate for five runs in the eighth off three Reds pitchers.

Francisco hit the Braves' first grand slam of the season off J.J. Hoover, the player he was traded for last year. His fifth homer landed in the Braves' bullpen down the right field line. "Juan's got some juice," Gonzalez said. "You just get the ball up in the air here." Francisco said he got no extra pleasure from hitting the grand slam against the team that traded him away. "It just felt good that I got first grand slam in major leagues," he said. The top of the lineup had a big day, too. Jordan Schafer had three hits, and Andrelton Simmons had a career-high four hits in the top two spots. Left-hander Mike Minor (4-2) allowed four hits in seven innings, including Zack Cozart's homer in the third. He got Leake to fly out with two out and two aboard in the seventh, throwing 117 pitches overall. Last year, Leake homered off Minor's changeup. This time, he got nothing but fastballs. "Minor looks like he has more confidence than he did last year," Leake said. The Reds stranded a pair of runners in scoring position against Minor and had another thrown out at the plate. The left-hander has gotten a lot better at pitching out of trouble, one reason that Gonzalez left him in

SOFTBALL Lady Buccs roll NEW PARIS — After Tuesday's impressive victory over rival Newton, there was no letdown in focus for the Covington Lady Buccs as they runruled National Trail 16-0 in five innings. "The girls seem to be enjoying the game," said Covington coach Dean Denlinger after his team improved to 23-0 overall and 11-0 in the CCC. "We have a good team atmosphere in the dugout. The See SOFTBALL/Page 12

Nolan run set for July Light camp in Greenville

AP PHOTO

See REDS/Page 14 Zack Cozart circles the bases after a home run.

For Home Delivery, Call: 773-2725

LEBANON — The Piqua boys tennis team was trailing Lebanon 3-1 Wednesday when the match was stopped by lightning. In a match still going on, Tyler Lavey was leading James Hof 3-2 in the second set against Hopf when the match was stopped. In singles matches completed, Andrew Lamphr lost to Matt Odom 6-0, 61; and Joye Hsiang los to Ben Franer 6-4, 6-4. In doubles, Josh and Luke Hanes defeated Billy Nuss and Kyle Kemp 7-6, 4-6, 6-1; and Layne Patrizio and Jarod Haney lost to Jonah Oaks and Kuan Jiang 6-1, 7-5. Piqua plays in the GWOC Silver Flight tournament Saturday at Troy.

BRADFORD — The third annual Chad Nolan Memorial 5K will be held in Bradford July 20. The race will start at 8:30 a.m. and begin an end at the Bradford football field. Registration in advance is $20 and includes tshirt. Race day registration is $25 with no t-shirt. You can register in advance at atomicracetiming.com The 20th annual Matt Light All-Conference Football Camp will be held June 10-11 and ages 8-14 at Harmon Field in Greenville. For more information, call (937) 417-5134 or e m a i l lespmasters@aol.com


12

Thursday, May 9, 2013

SPORTS

WWW.DAILYCALL.COM

• PIQUA DAILY CALL

Love returns at ‘Players’ Coming off back surgery

AP PHOTO

Adam Scott reacts after making a big putt at the Masters earlier this year.

Scott looks to return to earth Masters champion tees it up today at the Players Championship PONTE VEDRA BEACH, Fla. (AP) — Adam Scott never had to take this much time walking from the clubhouse to the practice range at TPC Sawgrass. He couldn't take more than a few steps without a player or a caddie stopping to congratulate him for his feel-good win at Augusta National. There were so many fans pressed against the fence to get his autograph that it nearly collapsed. Finally, he got into a cart to head to the back end of the practice range. It's time for the Masters champion to get back to work, and that might prove tougher than the actual work at The Players Championship. Scott has virtually disappeared since holing that 12-foot birdie putt on the second extra hole to become the first Australian to win the Masters. He was in New York for a couple of days and then headed to The Bahamas where he has a home. He usually takes a few weeks off after a major to decompress. This time, he waited an extra week before picking up a club. It felt that good. "I've had a really nice break since the Masters, which I had planned anyway," Scott said Wednesday. "But it was even better because I was floating around on the clouds the last three weeks. It's been an overwhelming time for me." Once he finally put a club back in his hands, the swing felt as pure as that final round at Augusta. He

that he indeed had won the Masters. The routine he kept each morning golf course," McDowell made that impossible. said. "He likes to penalize the player in his own kind "When I walk in the of unique way, and this closet and I put the green golf course certainly has jacket on every morning ... its dangers. But it's cer- I do," he said as the room tainly scorable at the filled with laughter. "I've same time." missed it the last couple McIlroy was perplexed days. It's the first couple while playing the sixth days I haven't had it with hole Wednesday. He hit me, so that's been a lot of two shots off the tee, one fun just wearing it around in the fairway and one in the house." the rough, about the same That sums up Scott's distance. He hit an iron extraordinary vacation. with the ball in the fairIt was such a big deal in way, pin-high about 15 Australia to finally have a feet left of the flag. He Masters champion that he used the same club from was tempted to go home the rough and watched it and join the celebration. sail over the green. That's But he has bigger plans. the trouble with this The Masters was in April. rough. It's not very high, This is May. The season is and the ball can jump out not even halfway over, and of there. there are still three maAs he played the par-5 jors to be played. Scott cerninth, caddie J.P. Fitzger- tainly never had any ald reminded him that it's intentions of stopping at best to lay up on the hole. one. McIlroy smashed his tee "It was an incredible reshot and his caddie told sponse to winning," Scott him, "You have 266 said. "The prime minister (yards) to the front. Per- of Australia called me. fect 5-iron." McIlroy fol- Like I said, I was overlowed his instructions, hit whelmed. Also, I talked the shot and then threw this one over with the peodown another ball and ple that are around me, asked for the 3-wood. and we're in the middle of He missed to the right the year. of the green, shrugged and “Yes, it's cause for celesaid, "Just wanted to get it bration, but we have a out of my system." plan in place. It's hopeNBC Sports analyst fully not going to stop Johnny Miller said play- with the Masters at the ers have to "tippy-toe" moment. their way around the golf “I want to keep focused course. Scott, meanwhile, while I can and try to is still floating. make this my biggest year There was never a mo- yet. ment where he woke up in "I think we can rustle the Bahamas and realized up some celebration when that the Sunday playoff in I get home at the end of the rain was not a dream, the year."

Singh sues PGA, page 13 was eager to compete again, and The Players Championship is enough to get any pro's attention. It features the strongest and deepest field in golf all year, on a Stadium Course that had can be challenging, frustrating, punishing and rarely dull. Scott won The Players in 2004 after hitting 5-iron into the water on the 18th and making a 10-foot bogey putt to win by a shot. "It's a nice week for me to come back to Sawgrass and The Players, because I've had such a great run here over the years," Scott said. "I'm excited about playing this week. I hopefully can take my head out of the clouds and come back down to earth and play some good golf." That would be the only way to make it around this golf course. Tiger Woods and Phil Mickelson, the best two players of their generation, each have one win at the home of the PGA Tour. The list of winners ranges from power players such as Greg Norman and Davis Love III to pea shooters in the mold of Fred Funk and Tim Clark. Rory McIlroy and Graeme McDowell last won in America on courses designed by Pete Dye: McIlroy at the PGA Championship (Kiawah Island) and BMW Championship (Crooked Stick); McDowell at Hilton Head a couple of weeks ago. "I think Pete Dye designed a certain type of

PONTE VEDRA BEACH, Fla. (AP) — Davis Love III is returning to the PGA Tour just in time to extend his streak at The Players Championship. Love, who turned 49 last month, missed the last three months while recovering from back surgery. He's making his return this week at TPC Sawgress, playing The Players for the 28th consecutive year. His run started in 1986, when he tied for 14th. He has won the tournament twice since, in 1992 and 2003. "It's hard to stay competitive for that long," Love said Wednesday, a day before the opening round. "If I started back over again, I tell you in 2013 there is no way I'd make 28 in a row. It's too competitive now. "One, that means you're old. And two, it means you've stayed pretty competitive. I'm hoping that after this and the hard work I've put in, it's just going to get better for a while." Love had a two-level disk fusion. He started putting and chipping shortly after surgery and was hitting balls eight weeks later. He's been playing full rounds for a month, still trying to regain strength in his left arm. He considered coming back a few weeks ago at the RBC Heritage, but opted to wait for The Players. "I'm excited to be here," he said. "I'm excited to be on the golf course. I'm excited to continue that streak. “Obviously, it was a big point in the schedule that I don't want to miss. I obviously wanted to play before this, but I'm glad to be back on the golf course, and Lord willing, continue this streak of feeling well for the rest of the week." Love said his back has been bothering him for more than a decade, even recalling conversations with his doctor in 2000 about having surgery. The pain reached a new level at Phoenix in early February. "I was at the point in Phoenix where I was very frustrated mentally," Love said. "I knew physically I couldn't do it. ... I was just grinding away, and there was no reason to be doing it. So finally I called my doctor ... and said, 'I'm just beating my head against the wall, aren't I?' And he said, 'Yes, you are. You're going to have that surgery. You can have it now, you can have it in the summer

or you can have it in the fall, but you're going to have it this year. "So I just went ahead and I did it. I literally woke up after surgery and I knew I was fine. I felt so much better. The pain was gone. The tingling was almost gone in my fingers. And since then all it's been is trying to get my arm strength back, and that's been a longer process than I'd like, but my therapists think I'm ahead of schedule, so I'm excited." MJD READY FOR PRO-AM: Jacksonville Jaguars running back Jones-Drew Maurice might not be able to run yet, but his golf game appears to be in perfect shape. Jones-Drew, still recovering from Lisfranc surgery on his left foot, picked up an 8-iron during a practice round at The Players Championship on Wednesday and hit a tee shot to 10 feet at the famed island green. Jones-Drew was hanging around the 17th hole with teammate Sen'Derrick Marks when PGA Tour pros Jonathan Byrd, Stewart Cink and Zach Johnson asked the threetime Pro Bowler to take a swing. Without any warm-up, MJD struck it clean and landed it closer than any of his professional playing partners. "I dabble a little bit in golf here and there," Jones-Drew said afterward. "I was a little nervous. But now I'm ready for a Pro-Am." As for his foot, JonesDrew said it continues to get better. He expects to be running by the end of this month. WAITING LIST: PGA Tour rookie Scott Langley was the last player in the field at The Players when the entry list came out Friday. The only thing that could bump him would be if someone won the Wells Fargo Championship who was not already eligible. Someone like 22-yearold rookie Derek Ernst, who happens to be one of his close friends. Ernst won at Quail Hollow in a playoff, and Langley has been at TPC Sawgrass all week wondering if someone would withdraw. So far, no good. For Ernst, it was a case of mixed feelings. "Like, 'Hey, I just won, this is kind of cool.' And then my buddy falls out, and I didn't want him to fall out," Ernst said. "I hope he gets in this week.”

Softball

Haslam excited about season

Continued from page 11

Browns no longer throwing dinks

girls are focused." Which was needed as the game was delayed nearly 90 minutes due to inclement weather. "We were worried were weren't going to get the game in," Denlinger explained. "We definitely didn't want to have to make anther trip over there. That's a long bus ride." The bus ride was longer than the game as Covington scored in each of the five innings, while pitchers Casey Yingst and freshman Brooke Gostomsky made short work of National Trail batters in combining for a no-hitter. The duo combined to strike out 11 batters and didn't surrender a single walk. Jessie Shilt, Casey Yingtst and Brittanie Flora all had three hits with Shilt, Yingst and

Connor Schaffer recording doubles. Morgan McReynolds and Haley Adams both tripled, while Cassidy Cain has a pair of base hits. Jessica Dammeyer and Arianna Richards each singled. Covington looks to keep the momentum rolling today as it travels to Troy Thursday.

Lady Roaders fall TROY — The Bradford softball team lost to Troy Wednesday 8-5. Haley Patty pitched a nine-hitter, striking out seven and walking three. Kylie Miller was 2-for-3 and hit a grand slam. Patty helped herself with a triple. Bradford is 10-12 overall and will play at Misssinawa Valley today in CCC action.

BY JEFF SCHUDEL Willoughby Herald WESTLAKE — Here is the early scouting report on how the Browns will look under offensive coordinator Norv Turner and defensive coordinator Ray Horton, courtesy of team owner Jimmy Haslam: “I went to practice the other day and we’re not throwing three-yard dinks,” Haslam, guest speaker Tuesday night at the Northeast Ohio Chapter of the National Football Foundation Awards banquet, told a crowd of about 600. “We’re throwing the ball down the field and that’s the way Norv likes to play. And you’re going to really like the way Ray Horton plays defense. He plays defense the way I like to play defense. He gets after them. “I’m watching at prac-

tice and he stands right by the linebackers. He’s right in the middle of everything. He played defensive back for 10 years in the pros. Last year, he coached the Cardinals. I think they blitzed more than any other team but one. I think we’re going to have an exciting team this year.” Haslam addressed the banquet attendees for about six minutes and then met reporters in a separate room for another 10 minutes. He spoke for seven minutes to local media about the FBI investigating his Pilot Flying J truck stop chain for alleged fraud and talked about the Browns for three minutes, repeating some of what he said to customers that paid $50 a plate to attend the awards ceremony at LeCentre Conference and Banquet Facility in Westlake. Pilot allegedly short-

changed an unspecified number of trucking companies of rebates they were due for large purchases of diesel fuel. “Several” members of Pilot Flying J’s sales staff have been suspended, Haslam said. Haslam has held three press conferences in Knoxville, TN., since the FBI raided Pilot Flying J headquarters on April 15. Tuesday was the first time he addressed the Cleveland media, though as in his last two sessions in Knoxville he refused to answer questions – the most pertinent being did he know of the alleged rebate fraud as an FBI informant has said, according to the affidavit used to obtain the search warrants that led to the raid. “I can’t do it; I’m sorry,” he said when a TV reporter asked him about it. “We want to give you the opportunity,” the re-

porter said. “See you guys. Have a great night,” Haslam said, waving, as he left the room. Nine minutes earlier, Haslam began: “I would love to answer all your questions,” Haslam said. “Hopefully you all can understand that this is somewhat of a fluid situation and candidly on a lot of the matters you would like to ask questions about I don’t know any more than you guys do, okay? “Let me start by saying, I apologize to the city of Cleveland, Northeastern Ohio and all Browns fans because the last thing we ever wanted to do as a new owner was detract from football and the Browns and just what a great football area this is and so I apologize for that. We feel badly about it and we’re very comfortable we’ll work through this situation.”


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Singh decides to sue PGA Feels he has been ‘humiliated PONTE VEDRA BEACH, Fla. (AP) — Vijay Singh sued the PGA Tour on Wednesday for exposing him to "public humiliation and ridicule" during a 12-week investigation into his use of deer antler spray that ended last week when the tour dropped its case against him. The lawsuit was a surprise, and so was the timing — the day before The Players Championship, the flagship event on the PGA Tour held on its home course where Singh has honed his game for the last two decades. "I am proud of my achievement, my work ethic and the way I live my life," Singh said in a statement. "The PGA Tour not only treated me unfairly, but displayed a lack of professionalism that should concern every professional golfer and fan of the game." Singh filed the lawsuit in New York, where he has a home and the tour has an office. He is in the field at The Players Championship. The 50-year-old Fijian, inducted into the World Golf Hall of Fame in 2006, said in a Sports Illustrated article in January that he used deer antler spray and he was "looking forward to some change in my body." The spray was said to include an insulinlike growth factor that was on the tour's list of banned substances. The tour sent a sample from Singh to be tested, and it returned small amounts of IGF-1. PGA Tour Commissioner Tim Finchem announced April 30 that the tour was dropping its case because of new information from the World AntiDoping Agency, which said deer antler spray was no longer considered prohibited because it contained just minimal amounts of the growth factor. The lawsuit claims the PGA Tour relied on WADA's list of banned substances and methods without doing any of its own research, including whether such substances even provide any performance-enhancing benefits. Singh's lawyers said the tour "rushed to judgment and accused one of the world's hardest working and most dedicated golfers of violating the rules of the game." "We have not seen the lawsuit, just the statement," PGA Tour spokesman Ty Votaw said. "We have no comment." Some of the details and allegations that emerged from the lawsuit: — Finchem had proposed suspended Singh for 90 days, and his earnings from Pebble Beach and Riviera would have been redistributed. — The tour held Singh's earnings from five tournaments — $99,980 — in escrow without authority during the investigation and appeal. — Singh's current caddie, Tony Shepherd, recommended that he try the deer antler spray to help with his back and knee injuries. — Scientists hired by Singh's attorneys discovered that IGF-1 is found in cow's milk. They also claim that the amount of IGF-1 in deer antler spray is so diluted that it would be comparable to pouring a shot glass of bourbon in an Olympic-size swimming pool, and then drinking a shot from the pool water. "He's looking to reclaim his reputation and hold the tour accountable for acting irresponsible," said Jeffrey Rosenblum, one of Singh's lawyers. "He's concerned about his reputation. There should never be an asterisk next to

Vijay's name." Rosenblum also represented Doug Barron, the only player suspended under the tour's anti-doping policy. Barron sued the tour, and the case was settled. Rosenblum could not comment on the settlement, which was confidential. The development dominated conversations at the TPC Sawgrass during the final day of practice for golf's richest tournament. Some players thought Singh surely would be suspended, and they felt he was let off the hook on a technicality. A week later, they learned he was suing the tour. "Everybody is shaking their heads. It's unbelievable," Bob Estes said. "It seems like the tour did everything it could and everything right as the process unfolded to protect him and his reputation. Everybody is in shock that he would do that. It's not going to help his character. It's only going to hurt it. He got the favorable ruling. It's the week of The Players Championship. He lives here. He's suing his own tour." Estes shook his head and said, "I don't think anyone saw this coming." Masters champion Adam Scott said he could understand Singh filing a lawsuit "if he feels like that." "I would assume Vijay thinks he's doing what's right and the tour thinks it's doing what's right," Scott said. "Overall, these situations should be managed to be avoided. We don't need this in the game of golf. Honestly, I don't believe there's a real issue with performance enhancing drugs in this game. When there's not really an issue, it's a shame that there is." Peter Ginsberg, a sports law specialist and lead attorney in Singh's lawsuit, said the tour never bothered to analyze the trace amounts of IGF-1 in the bottle. "What the PGA Tour accused Vijay of spraying was not a banned substance," Ginsberg said. "It was an inactive substance and could not possibly have any effect, good or bad, on Vijay. And that's something the PGA Tour easily could have determined." Singh's reputation took a beating early in his career when he was accused of changing his scorecard in Indonesia in 1985 and banned by an Asian tour. He did not play any tour until resurfacing on the European Tour in 1989. He came to PGA Tour in 1993, and since has made more than $67 million and reached No. 1 in the world. Singh has won the Masters and the PGA Championship among his 34 tour victories. He holds the PGA Tour record with 22 wins since turning 40. His best year was in 2004, when he won nine times. Singh has not won since the Deutsche Bank Championship in September 2008, two months after the tour's anti-doping program was launched. The lawsuit is geared around allegations that the PGA Tour didn't do basic research the deer antler spray and should not have dragged Singh through the process. Singh appealed the suspension, and it was scheduled for arbitration on Tuesday. Rosenblum said his group submitted its scientific findings on April 24, and that two days later the tour said it received its new information from WADA. The tour announced it was dropping the case on the day it was required to submit its briefs for arbitration.

Thursday, May 9, 2013

13

Record Book Baseball

MLB Standings Major League Baseball At A Glance All Times EDT National League East Division Atlanta Washington Philadelphia New York Miami Central Division St. Louis Pittsburgh Cincinnati Milwaukee Chicago West Division

W 20 17 16 13 10

L 13 15 19 16 25

Pct .606 .531 .457 .448 .286

GB — 2½ 5 5 11

W 21 18 19 15 13

L 12 15 16 16 21

Pct .636 .545 .543 .484 .382

GB — 3 3 5 8½

W L Pct GB Colorado 19 13 .594 — 20 14 .588 — San Francisco Arizona 18 15 .545 1½ San Diego 16 18 .471 4 13 19 .406 6 Los Angeles Tuesday's Games Pittsburgh 4, Seattle 1 Detroit at Washington, ppd., rain Cincinnati 5, Atlanta 4 N.Y. Mets 1, Chicago White Sox 0, 10 innings Chicago Cubs 2, St. Louis 1 Milwaukee 6, Texas 3 Colorado 2, N.Y. Yankees 0 Arizona 5, L.A. Dodgers 3 San Diego 5, Miami 1 Philadelphia 6, San Francisco 2 Wednesday's Games Atlanta 7, Cincinnati 2 Seattle 2, Pittsburgh 1 St. Louis 5, Chicago Cubs 4 San Diego 1, Miami 0 San Francisco 4, Philadelphia 3, 10 innings Detroit at Washington Chicago White Sox at N.Y. Mets Texas at Milwaukee N.Y. Yankees at Colorado Arizona at L.A. Dodgers Thursday's Games N.Y. Yankees (Sabathia 4-3) at Colorado (Francis 1-2), 3:10 p.m. Detroit (Fister 4-0) at Washington (Haren 3-3), 4:05 p.m. Pittsburgh (Locke 3-1) at N.Y. Mets (Gee 2-4), 7:10 p.m. Philadelphia (Hamels 1-4) at Arizona (Corbin 4-0), 9:40 p.m. Atlanta (Teheran 1-0) at San Francisco (Vogelsong 1-2), 10:15 p.m. Friday's Games Chicago Cubs at Washington, 7:05 p.m. Milwaukee at Cincinnati, 7:10 p.m. Pittsburgh at N.Y. Mets, 7:10 p.m. San Diego at Tampa Bay, 7:10 p.m. Colorado at St. Louis, 8:15 p.m. Philadelphia at Arizona, 9:40 p.m. Miami at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10 p.m. Atlanta at San Francisco, 10:15 p.m. American League East Division Boston Baltimore New York Tampa Bay Toronto Central Division Detroit Kansas City Cleveland Minnesota Chicago West Division

W 21 20 18 14 13

L 12 13 13 18 21

Pct .636 .606 .581 .438 .382

GB — 1 2 6½ 8½

W 19 17 16 14 13

L 11 12 14 15 18

Pct .633 .586 .533 .483 .419

GB — 1½ 3 4½ 6½

W L Pct GB Texas 20 13 .606 — 18 16 .529 2½ Oakland Seattle 16 19 .457 5 Los Angeles 11 21 .344 8½ 9 24 .273 11 Houston Tuesday's Games Baltimore 4, Kansas City 3 Cleveland 1, Oakland 0 Pittsburgh 4, Seattle 1 Detroit at Washington, ppd., rain N.Y. Mets 1, Chicago White Sox 0, 10 innings Minnesota 6, Boston 1 Toronto 6, Tampa Bay 4 Houston 7, L.A. Angels 6 Milwaukee 6, Texas 3 Colorado 2, N.Y. Yankees 0 Wednesday's Games Seattle 2, Pittsburgh 1 Detroit at Washington, 7:05 p.m. Kansas City at Baltimore, 7:05 p.m. Oakland at Cleveland, 7:05 p.m. Chicago White Sox at N.Y. Mets, 7:10 p.m. Minnesota at Boston, 7:10 p.m. Toronto at Tampa Bay, 7:10 p.m. L.A. Angels at Houston, 8:10 p.m. Texas at Milwaukee, 8:10 p.m. N.Y. Yankees at Colorado, 8:40 p.m. Thursday's Games Oakland (Colon 3-1) at Cleveland (Kazmir 1-1), 12:05 p.m. N.Y. Yankees (Sabathia 4-3) at Colorado (Francis 1-2), 3:10 p.m. Detroit (Fister 4-0) at Washington (Haren 3-3), 4:05 p.m. Kansas City (Guthrie 4-0) at Baltimore (F.Garcia 0-0), 7:05 p.m. Minnesota (Correia 3-2) at Boston (Lackey 1-2), 7:10 p.m. Toronto (Dickey 2-5) at Tampa Bay (Price 1-3), 7:10 p.m. L.A. Angels (Vargas 1-3) at Houston (Harrell 3-3), 8:10 p.m. Friday's Games Cleveland at Detroit, 7:08 p.m. San Diego at Tampa Bay, 7:10 p.m. Toronto at Boston, 7:10 p.m. Baltimore at Minnesota, 8:10 p.m. L.A. Angels at Chicago White Sox, 8:10 p.m. N.Y. Yankees at Kansas City, 8:10 p.m. Texas at Houston, 8:10 p.m. Oakland at Seattle, 10:10 p.m.

Reds Boxscore BRAVES 7, REDS 2 Cincinnati ab r h bi ab r h bi 4 0 0 0 JSchafr cf 5 1 3 0 Choo cf Smmns ss 5 0 4 0 Cozart ss 4 1 2 1 FFrmn 1b 4 1 1 1 Votto 1b 4 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 Phillips 2b 4 0 1 0 Gattis lf J.Upton lf 1 1 0 0 Bruce rf 3 1 1 1 Uggla 2b 4 3 2 2 Frazier 3b 3 0 1 0 4 0 1 0 JFrncs 3b 4 1 1 4 Lutz lf RJhnsn rf 3 0 0 0 Mesorc c 3 0 0 0 G.Laird c 3 0 0 0 Leake p 3 0 1 0 3 0 0 0 Marshll p 0 0 0 0 Minor p CJhnsn ph 1 0 0 0 Hoover p 0 0 0 0 Varvar p 0 0 0 0 Simon p 0 0 0 0 Hannhn ph 1 0 0 0 Totals 36 7 11 7 Totals 33 2 7 2 Atlanta 000 101 050—7 001 000 001—2 Cincinnati DP—Atlanta 1, Cincinnati 2. LOB—Atlanta 6, Cincinnati 7. 2B—Simmons (6), Phillips (9). 3B—J.Schafer (1). HR—Uggla 2 (7), J.Francisco (5), Cozart (5), Bruce (2). IP H R ER BB SO Atlanta Minor W,4-2 7 4 1 1 3 7 Varvaro 2 3 1 1 0 3 Cincinnati Leake L,2-2 7 8 4 4 1 6 Marshall 0 1 1 1 0 0 Hoover 1 1 2 2 2 1 Simon 1 1 0 0 0 0 Leake pitched to 2 batters in the 8th. Marshall pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. HBP—by Leake (G.Laird). WP—Varvaro. PB—Mesoraco. Umpires—Home, Kerwin Danley; First, Mike Muchlinski; Second, Vic Carapazza; Third, Gary Cederstrom. T—3:04. A—32,640 (42,319).

Atlanta

MLB Leaders TODAY'S MAJOR LEAGUE LEADERS NATIONAL LEAGUE BATTING—CGomez, Milwaukee, .364; Tulowitzki, Colorado, .348; AdGonzalez, Los Angeles, .340; Segura, Milwaukee, .339; YMolina, St. Louis, .339; SMarte, Pittsburgh, .331; Cuddyer, Colorado, .330. RUNS—Choo, Cincinnati, 27; CGonzalez, Colorado, 27; JUpton, Atlanta, 27; MCarpenter, St. Louis, 26; SMarte, Pittsburgh, 26; Holliday, St. Louis, 24; Pagan, San Francisco, 24; Votto, Cincinnati, 24. RBI—Buck, New York, 29; Phillips, Cincinnati, 29; Tulowitzki, Colorado, 28; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 27; Craig, St. Louis, 26; Rizzo, Chicago, 25; 6 tied at 24. HITS—SMarte, Pittsburgh, 43; Choo, Cincinnati, 42; YMolina, St. Louis, 42; Sandoval, San Francisco, 42; Votto, Cincinnati, 41; CGomez, Milwaukee, 40; SCastro, Chicago, 39; GParra, Arizona, 39; Pence, San Francisco, 39; Segura, Milwaukee, 39. DOUBLES—MCarpenter, St. Louis, 12; Schierholtz, Chicago, 12; Desmond, Washington, 11; Pollock, Arizona, 11; Rollins, Philadelphia, 11; Craig, St. Louis, 10; DeJesus, Chicago, 10; GParra, Arizona, 10; Rizzo, Chicago, 10. TRIPLES—ECabrera, San Diego, 3; Hechavarria, Miami, 3; Segura, Milwaukee, 3; DWright, New York, 3; EYoung, Colorado, 3; 9 tied at 2. HOME RUNS—JUpton, Atlanta, 12; Buck, New York, 10; Harper, Washington, 9; Rizzo, Chicago, 9; Beltran, St.

Louis, 8; YBetancourt, Milwaukee, 8; Fowler, Colorado, 8. STOLEN BASES—Pierre, Miami, 12; ECabrera, San Diego, 10; SMarte, Pittsburgh, 10; Segura, Milwaukee, 8; CGomez, Milwaukee, 7; McCutchen, Pittsburgh, 7; CCrawford, Los Angeles, 6; Pence, San Francisco, 6; Revere, Philadelphia, 6; DWright, New York, 6. PITCHING—Lynn, St. Louis, 5-1; Zimmermann, Washington, 5-1; 10 tied at 4. STRIKEOUTS—ABurnett, Pittsburgh, 66; Harvey, New York, 58; Samardzija, Chicago, 52; Kershaw, Los Angeles, 52; Wainwright, St. Louis, 48; Ryu, Los Angeles, 48; Lynn, St. Louis, 47. SAVES—Grilli, Pittsburgh, 13; Romo, San Francisco, 12; Kimbrel, Atlanta, 10; RSoriano, Washington, 10; Mujica, St. Louis, 9; RBetancourt, Colorado, 9; Street, San Diego, 8; League, Los Angeles, 8. AMERICAN LEAGUE BATTING—MiCabrera, Detroit, .385; TorHunter, Detroit, .361; CSantana, Cleveland, .355; Altuve, Houston, .338; LCain, Kansas City, .333; AJones, Baltimore, .331; CDavis, Baltimore, .318. RUNS—AJackson, Detroit, 31; MiCabrera, Detroit, 26; AJones, Baltimore, 26; Jennings, Tampa Bay, 25; McLouth, Baltimore, 25; Crisp, Oakland, 24; Machado, Baltimore, 24. RBI—MiCabrera, Detroit, 36; Fielder, Detroit, 32; Napoli, Boston, 32; CDavis, Baltimore, 30; MarReynolds, Cleveland, 27; NCruz, Texas, 24; Donaldson, Oakland, 23; AJones, Baltimore, 23; Trumbo, Los Angeles, 23. HITS—MiCabrera, Detroit, 47; Altuve, Houston, 45; AJones, Baltimore, 45; Machado, Baltimore, 44; TorHunter, Detroit, 43; Kinsler, Texas, 41; Cano, New York, 40; Ellsbury, Boston, 40; AGordon, Kansas City, 40. DOUBLES—Napoli, Boston, 15; AJones, Baltimore, 13; Machado, Baltimore, 12; Donaldson, Oakland, 11; Lowrie, Oakland, 11; Seager, Seattle, 11; 5 tied at 10. TRIPLES—Ellsbury, Boston, 3; Trout, Los Angeles, 3; 12 tied at 2. HOME RUNS—MarReynolds, Cleveland, 10; Arencibia, Toronto, 9; CDavis, Baltimore, 9; Encarnacion, Toronto, 9; Morse, Seattle, 9; Trumbo, Los Angeles, 9; Cano, New York, 8; Fielder, Detroit, 8. STOLEN BASES—Ellsbury, Boston, 12; McLouth, Baltimore, 10; Crisp, Oakland, 8; AEscobar, Kansas City, 7; Pedroia, Boston, 7; Andrus, Texas, 6; RDavis, Toronto, 6; Kipnis, Cleveland, 6; Rios, Chicago, 6; MSaunders, Seattle, 6. PITCHING—Buchholz, Boston, 6-0; MMoore, Tampa Bay, 5-0; Darvish, Texas, 5-1; Hammel, Baltimore, 5-1; FHernandez, Seattle, 5-2; 9 tied at 4. STRIKEOUTS—Darvish, Texas, 72; FHernandez, Seattle, 56; Buchholz, Boston, 56; Dempster, Boston, 55; Scherzer, Detroit, 54; AniSanchez, Detroit, 50; Verlander, Detroit, 50. SAVES—JiJohnson, Baltimore, 12; Reed, Chicago, 11; Rivera, New York, 11; Wilhelmsen, Seattle, 9; Janssen, Toronto, 9; Nathan, Texas, 8; Perkins, Minnesota, 7; GHolland, Kansas City, 7.

Basketball

NBA Playoffs NBA Daily Playoff Glance All Times EDT (x-if necessary) (Best-of-7) CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS Sunday, May 5 Oklahoma City 93, Memphis 91 Indiana 102, New York 95 Monday, May 6 Chicago 93, Miami 86, Chicago leads series 1-0 San Antonio 129, Golden State 127, 2OT, San Antonio leads series 1-0 Tuesday, May 7 New York 105, Indiana 79, series tied 1-1 Memphis 99, Oklahoma City 93, series tied 1-1 Wednesday, May 8 Chicago at Miami Golden State at San Antonio Friday, May 10 Miami at Chicago, 8 p.m. San Antonio at Golden State, 10:30 p.m. Saturday, May 11 Oklahoma City at Memphis, 5 p.m. New York at Indiana, 8 p.m. Sunday, May 12 San Antonio at Golden State, 3:30 p.m. Monday, May 13 Miami at Chicago, 7 p.m. Oklahoma City at Memphis, 9:30 p.m. Tuesday, May 14 New York at Indiana, 7 or 8 p.m. x-Golden State at San Antonio, 9:30 p.m. Wednesday, May 15 x-Chicago at Miami, 7 p.m. Memphis at Oklahoma City, 8 or 9:30 p.m. Thursday, May 16 Indiana at New York, 8 p.m. x-San Antonio at Golden State, TBA Friday, May 17 x-Miami at Chicago, TBA x-Oklahoma City at Memphis, TBA Saturday, May 18 x-New York at Indiana, TBA Sunday, May 19 x-Chicago at Miami, TBA x-Golden State at San Antonio, TBA x-Memphis at Oklahoma City, TBA Monday, May 20 x-Indiana at New York, 8 p.m.

Hockey

NHL Playoffs NHL Daily Playoff Glance All Times EDT (x-if necessary) FIRST ROUND (Best-of-7) Tuesday, April 30 Chicago 2, Minnesota 1, OT St. Louis 2, Los Angeles 1, OT Anaheim 3, Detroit 1 Wednesday, May 1 Boston 4, Toronto 1 Pittsburgh 5, N.Y. Islanders 0 San Jose 3, Vancouver 1 Thursday, May 2 Ottawa 4, Montreal 2 Washington 3, N.Y. Rangers 1 St. Louis 2, Los Angeles 1 Detroit 5, Anaheim 4, OT Friday, May 3 Montreal 3, Ottawa 1 N.Y. Islanders 4, Pittsburgh 3 Chicago 5, Minnesota 2 San Jose 3, Vancouver 2, OT Saturday, May 4 Washington 1, N.Y. Rangers 0 Toronto 4, Boston 2 Anaheim 4, Detroit 0 Los Angeles 1, St. Louis 0 Sunday, May 5 Pittsburgh 5, N.Y. Islanders 4, OT Ottawa 6, Montreal 1 San Jose 5, Vancouver 2 Minnesota 3, Chicago 2, OT Monday, May 6 Boston 5, Toronto 2, Boston leads series 2-1 N.Y. Rangers 4, Washington 3, Washington leads series 2-1 Detroit 3, Anaheim 2, OT, series tied 2-2 Los Angeles 4, St. Louis 3, series tied 2-2 Tuesday, May 7 Ottawa 3, Montreal 2, OT, Ottawa leads series 3-1 N.Y. Islanders 6, Pittsburgh 4, series tied 2-2 Chicago 3, Minnesota 0, Chicago leads series 3-1 San Jose 4, Vancouver 3, San Jose wins series 4-0 Wednesday, May 8 Boston at Toronto, 7 p.m. Washington at N.Y. Rangers, 7:30 p.m. Los Angeles at St. Louis, 9 p.m. Detroit at Anaheim, 10 p.m. Thursday, May 9 N.Y. Islanders at Pittsburgh, 7 p.m. Ottawa at Montreal, 7 p.m. Minnesota at Chicago, 9:30 p.m. Friday, May 10 Toronto at Boston, 7 p.m. NY Rangers at Washington, 7:30 p.m. Anaheim at Detroit, 8 p.m. St. Louis at Los Angeles, 10 pm. Saturday, May 11 Pittsburgh at N.Y. Islanders, TBA x-Montreal at Ottawa, TBA x-Chicago at Minnesota, TBA Sunday, May 12 x-Detroit at Anaheim, TBA x-Minnesota at Chicago, TBA x-Boston at Toronto, TBA x-Ottawa at Montreal, TBA x-NY Islanders at Pittsburgh, TBA x-Washington at N.Y. Rangers, TBA Monday, May 13 x-NY Rangers at Washington, TBA x-Toronto at Boston, TBA x-Los Angeles at St. Louis, TBA

Golf

Fed-Ex Cup Standings PGA FedExCup Leaders Chart Through May 5 1. Tiger Woods 1,740 2. Brandt Snedeker 1,397 3. Billy Horschel 1,205 4. Matt Kuchar 1,069 5. Kevin Streelman 1,004 6. Phil Mickelson 1,003 7. D.A. Points 906 8. Adam Scott 870 9. Graeme McDowell 838 10. Dustin Johnson 810

11. Charles Howell III 12. Russell Henley 13. Webb Simpson 14. Steve Stricker 15. Jason Day 16. Jimmy Walker 17. Chris Kirk 18. Hunter Mahan 19. Brian Gay 20. Keegan Bradley 21. John Merrick 22. Bill Haas 23. Justin Rose 24. Michael Thompson 25. David Lynn 26. Boo Weekley 27. Martin Laird 28. Nick Watney 29. Tim Clark 30. Josh Teater 31. Rory McIlroy 32. Derek Ernst 33. Scott Brown 34. Brendon de Jonge 35. Rickie Fowler

808 800 796 795 715 712 699 693 684 674 660 633 626 623 610 594 563 542 541 536 533 528 504 501 499

PGA Tour Stats PGA Tour Statistics Through May 5 Scoring Average 1, Tiger Woods, 68.545. 2, Justin Rose, 69.526. 3, Sergio Garcia, 69.532. 4, Charl Schwartzel, 69.560. 5, Graeme McDowell, 69.670. 6, Freddie Jacobson, 69.724. 7, Brandt Snedeker, 69.818. 8, Luke Donald, 69.933. 9, Chris Kirk, 69.963. 10, Kevin Streelman, 69.978. Driving Distance 1, Luke List, 305.2. 2, Nicolas Colsaerts, 304.7. 3, Gary Woodland, 303.4. 4, Dustin Johnson, 302.8. 5, Robert Garrigus, 302.7. 6, Rory McIlroy, 301.1. 7, Jason Kokrak, 300.9. 8, Graham DeLaet, 300.6. 9, Keegan Bradley, 300.4. 10, Bubba Watson, 299.4. Driving Accuracy Percentage 1, Ken Duke, 73.99%. 2, Tim Clark, 72.69%. 3, Henrik Stenson, 72.14%. 4, Jeff Maggert, 71.25%. 5, Jim Furyk, 71.11%. 6, David Toms, 70.78%. 7, Graeme McDowell, 70.36%. 8, Jin Park, 70.19%. 9, Chez Reavie, 69.75%. 10, Brandt Snedeker, 69.59%. Greens in Regulation Percentage 1, Henrik Stenson, 73.89%. 2, Graham DeLaet, 71.96%. 3, Peter Tomasulo, 71.85%. 4, Rory McIlroy, 71.16%. 5, Kevin Stadler, 71.06%. 6, Justin Rose, 70.83%. 7, Bubba Watson, 70.78%. 8, Boo Weekley, 70.29%. 9, Bill Haas, 70.28%. 10, Brandt Snedeker, 70.25%. Total Driving 1, Henrik Stenson, 48. 2, Justin Rose, 72. 3, Graham DeLaet, 82. 4, Matt Jones, 87. 5, Boo Weekley, 88. 6 (tie), Peter Tomasulo and Keegan Bradley, 98. 8, Billy Horschel, 101. 9, Ross Fisher, 106. 10, 3 tied with 109. Strokes Gained - Putting 1, Tiger Woods, 1.476. 2, Bryce Molder, 1.024. 3, Aaron Baddeley, .995. 4, Freddie Jacobson, .977. 5, Greg Chalmers, .923. 6, Graeme McDowell, .911. 7, Kevin Na, .906. 8, Stephen Ames, .902. 9, Chris Kirk, .844. 10, Sergio Garcia, .825. Birdie Average 1, Phil Mickelson, 4.68. 2 (tie), Brandt Snedeker and Billy Horschel, 4.58. 4, Tiger Woods, 4.55. 5, Bubba Watson, 4.37. 6, Kevin Na, 4.32. 7, Jimmy Walker, 4.25. 8, Rory McIlroy, 4.24. 9, Rory Sabbatini, 4.21. 10, Dustin Johnson, 4.17. Eagles (Holes per) 1, Tiger Woods, 60.0. 2, Ernie Els, 72.0. 3, Jordan Spieth, 77.1. 4, Chris Kirk , 77.4. 5, Robert Garrigus, 85.5. 6, Dustin Johnson, 87.0. 7, Freddie Jacobson, 93.6. 8, Rory McIlroy, 94.5. 9, George McNeill, 95.1. 10, Nicolas Colsaerts, 97.2. Sand Save Percentage 1, Justin Rose, 69.23%. 2, Kevin Chappell, 66.00%. 3, K.J. Choi, 65.28%. 4, Jason Day, 64.71%. 5, Bob Estes, 64.29%. 6, Jeff Klauk, 63.41%. 7, Lee Williams , 62.90%. 8 (tie), Lee Westwood and Rickie Fowler, 62.75%. 10, Luke Donald, 62.50%. All-Around Ranking 1, Rory McIlroy, 232. 2, Tiger Woods, 271. 3, Justin Rose, 279. 4, Brandt Snedeker, 280. 5, Billy Horschel, 321. 6, Russell Henley, 332. 7, Kevin Stadler, 356. 8, Charley Hoffman, 362. 9, Jimmy Walker, 390. 10, Jason Day, 412.

Champions Stats Champions Tour Statistics Through May 5 Charles Schwab Cup 1, Bernhard Langer, 928 Points. 2, David Frost, 676. 3, John Cook, 505. 4, Tom Pernice Jr., 488. 5, Rocco Mediate, 461. 6, Esteban Toledo, 444. 7, Gene Sauers, 362. 8, Michael Allen, 341. 9, Jeff Sluman, 326. 10, Fred Couples, 323. Scoring Average (Actual) 1, Fred Couples, 68.11. 2, Bernhard Langer, 68.86. 3, David Frost, 69.48. 4, Tom Lehman, 69.87. 5, Tom Pernice Jr., 69.94. 6, John Cook, 70.05. 7, Tom Watson, 70.22. 8, Rocco Mediate, 70.24. 9, Esteban Toledo, 70.28. 10, Mark O'Meara, 70.38. Driving Distance 1, John Huston, 295.2. 2, Fred Couples, 293.0. 3, ChieHsiang Lin, 286.6. 4, Steve Elkington, 285.7. 5, Kenny Perry, 284.9. 6, Sandy Lyle, 281.5. 7, Bob Tway, 281.4. 8, Tom Lehman, 281.2. 9, Bernhard Langer, 281.0. 10, Steve Lowery, 280.7. Driving Accuracy Percentage 1, Bart Bryant, 82.86%. 2, Fred Funk, 82.65%. 3, Corey Pavin, 79.05%. 4, Hale Irwin, 76.67%. 5, Wayne Levi, 76.47%. 6, Bernhard Langer, 74.83%. 7, Bob Gilder, 73.81%. 8, Jay Haas, 73.47%. 9, Mark McNulty, 73.41%. 10, Peter Senior, 73.02%. Greens in Regulation Percentage 1, Tom Lehman, 76.30%. 2, Bernhard Langer, 74.34%. 3, David Frost, 73.81%. 4, Fred Couples, 72.84%. 5, Gene Sauers, 72.69%. 6 (tie), Bart Bryant and Roger Chapman, 72.22%. 8, Rocco Mediate, 70.26%. 9, Larry Mize, 70.00%. 10, 2 tied with 69.75%. Total Driving 1, Bernhard Langer, 15. 2, Tom Lehman, 28. 3, Kenny Perry, 30. 4, Tom Watson, 38. 5, Gene Sauers, 40. 6 (tie), Russ Cochran and Jay Haas, 44. 8, Mark Calcavecchia, 45. 9, Gil Morgan, 49. 10, Fred Funk, 50. Putting Average 1, Tom Pernice Jr., 1.677. 2, Fred Couples, 1.695. 3, Esteban Toledo, 1.702. 4, David Frost, 1.706. 5, Rocco Mediate, 1.721. 6, Chien Soon Lu, 1.724. 7, Bernhard Langer, 1.726. 8, Olin Browne, 1.727. 9, Mark O'Meara, 1.736. 10, Russ Cochran, 1.750. Birdie Average 1, Fred Couples, 5.33. 2, David Frost, 4.67. 3, Bernhard Langer, 4.62. 4, Gene Sauers, 4.58. 5, Tom Pernice Jr., 4.50. 6, Tom Lehman, 4.20. 7, Rocco Mediate, 4.18. 8, Mark O'Meara, 4.10. 9, Esteban Toledo, 4.06. 10, 3 tied with 4.00. Eagles (Holes per) 1, John Huston, 67.5. 2, Mark O'Meara, 75.6. 3 (tie), Andy Bean, Andrew Magee and Tom Watson, 81.0. 6, Kenny Perry, 90.0. 7 (tie), Bill Glasson and Duffy Waldorf, 108.0. 9, Mark Calcavecchia, 120.0. 10, 4 tied with 126.0. Sand Save Percentage 1, Gene Jones, 73.91%. 2, Corey Pavin, 73.33%. 3, David Frost, 65.38%. 4, Fred Couples, 61.54%. 5, Gary Hallberg, 60.00%. 6, Dana Quigley, 59.09%. 7, Mark Mouland, 58.62%. 8, Steve Jones, 56.52%. 9, Morris Hatalsky, 55.56%. 10, Fred Funk, 55.17%. All-Around Ranking 1, Bernhard Langer, 60. 2, Fred Couples, 102. 3, David Frost, 115. 4, Tom Watson, 124. 5, Mark O'Meara, 127. 6, John Cook, 136. 7, Kenny Perry, 144. 8, Rocco Mediate, 162. 9, Tom Pernice Jr., 165. 10, Gene Sauers, 167.

LPGA Stats LPGA Tour Statistics Through May 5 Scoring 1, Stacy Lewis, 69.42. 2, Inbee Park, 69.44. 3, Suzann Pettersen, 69.83. 4, Na Yeon Choi, 69.84. 5, Lizette Salas, 70.00. 6, Paula Creamer, 70.19. 7, So Yeon Ryu, 70.28. 8, Jiyai Shin, 70.41. 9 (tie), Jessica Korda and I.K. Kim, 70.53. Driving Distance 1, Brittany Lincicome, 273.9. 2, Marina Stuetz, 272.4. 3, Daniela Iacobelli, 270.1. 4, Nicole Smith, 269.9. 5, Gerina Piller, 269.9. 6, Lexi Thompson, 268.7. 7, Yani Tseng, 268.1. 8, Jessica Korda, 267.1. 9, Maude-Aimee Leblanc, 265.2. 10, Alena Sharp, 264.6. Greens in Regulation Pct. 1, Suzann Pettersen, 77.40%. 2, Jodi Ewart Shadoff, 76.70%. 3, Azahara Munoz, 75.50%. 4, Paula Creamer, 75.30%. 5, Stacy Lewis, 75.30%. 6 (tie), So Yeon Ryu and Na Yeon Choi, 74.50%. 8, Caroline Hedwall, 73.90%. 9, Shanshan Feng, 73.80%. 10, Karine Icher, 73.60%. Putting Average 1, Inbee Park, 1.704. 2, Stacy Lewis, 1.727. 3, Hee Kyung Seo, 1.738. 4, Lizette Salas, 1.748. 5, Sandra Gal, 1.749. 6, Jiyai Shin, 1.750. 7, Na Yeon Choi, 1.758. 8, Cristie Kerr, 1.758. 9, Caroline Hedwall, 1.765. 10, Alison Walshe, 1.766. Birdie Average 1, Stacy Lewis, 4.50. 2 (tie), Inbee Park and Na Yeon Choi, 4.22. 4, Jessica Korda, 4.13. 5, Suzann Pettersen, 3.93. 6, Lizette Salas, 3.86. 7, Haeji Kang, 3.83. 8, Jiyai Shin, 3.78. 9, So Yeon Ryu, 3.75. 10, Karrie Webb, 3.72. Eagle Average 1, Brittany Lincicome, .200. 2, Stacy Lewis, .167. 3, Yani Tseng, .156. 4, Carlota Ciganda, .136. 5 (tie), Lexi Thompson, Jessica Korda and Hee Kyung Seo, .125. 8 (tie), Angela Stanford and Vicky Hurst, .118. 10, Beatriz Recari, .114. Sand Save Percentage 1, Jimin Kang, 77.78%. 2, Brooke Pancake, 75.00%. 3, Stacy Prammanasudh, 74.07%. 4, Sandra Changkija, 70.00%. 5, Gerina Piller, 68.18%. 6 (tie), Mika Miyazato, Dori Carter and Tiffany Joh, 66.67%. 9, Mo Martin, 65.38%. 10, Carlota Ciganda, 65.00%. Rounds Under Par 1, Stacy Lewis, .833. 2, Inbee Park, .813. 3, Suzann Pettersen, .767. 4 (tie), Jiyai Shin and Paula Creamer, .750. 6, Lizette Salas, .694. 7, Mo Martin, .692. 8 (tie), Karine Icher and Karrie Webb, .688. 10, 3 tied with .656.


14 XX

XSPORTS XXXXX

Thursday, XXXday, XXX May 9, XX, 2013 2013

Happy Ads / Birthday / Anniversary Memory / Thank You Notices Auctions Auto Auction Yard Sale CONOVER, 7550 N AlconyConover Rd (In Rear), Thursday, Friday 9am-5pm & Saturday 9am-?, Downsizing, Fenton Glass over 100 pieces, porcelain dolls, bicycles, set of old china, small appliances, Christmas items, afghans, Lots of Miscellaneous home items. HARDIN, 6167 Hardin- Wapak Road, Friday & Saturday 9am?, Tools, Lawnmowers, Older kids toys, games, movies, 3/4inch plywood, glass old fashioned lamps, Too Much to list!! Something for everyone, Rain or Shine!! Good, clean sale! PIQUA, 108 Blackwell Drive, Thursday, Friday, Saturday 8am-4pm, Multi Family HUGE sale!, youth golf clubs, decorations, moped helmets, sporting equipment, bike parts, tools, gas fireplace, clotheskids & adult, toys, collectible dolls, paintball items, Miscellaneous

AP PHOTO

Jay Bruce circles the bases after a home run Wednesday.

Reds Continued from page 11 to finish the seventh. "The main change from last year is if things do go bad, I don't dwell on that," Minor said. "I can move on to the next batter." Jay Bruce had a solo shot in the ninth off Anthony Varvaro. The game matched starting pitchers taken back-to-back in the 2009 amateur draft. Minor was taken seventh out of Vanderbilt, with Leake drafted next out of Arizona State. They faced each other in college. There was a replay review in the fourth, when Evan Gattis hit a long foul down the third base line. Gonzalez talked to the umpires, who reviewed the play for 3 minutes, 5

seconds and upheld the call. Gattis struck out on the next pitch. Up came Uggla, who homered on the following pitch to tie it at 1. Uggla is 4 for 10 career off Leake with three homers. Both teams wasted early bases-loaded opportunities. Cincinnati loaded the bases with no outs in the second. Donald Lutz flied out to left field, and Gattis threw out Brandon Phillips at the plate as he tagged on the play. The Braves loaded the bases with one out in the third before Freddie Freeman grounded into a double play. NOTES: The Braves head to San Francisco for

a four-game series. The Reds are off Thursday before hosting Milwaukee. ... Uggla has a six-game hitting streak. ... Simmons has seven multi-hit games in his last 16. ... Braves C Brian McCann, who returned from the DL at the start of the series, got the day off. McCann had surgery on his throwing shoulder last October. ... The Reds' 5-4 win on Tuesday night marked the first time since 1977 that Cincinnati won a game with a pair of two-out homers in the ninth. Dan Driessen and Johnny Bench had homers off Philadelphia's Tug McGraw for a 6-5 win. Driessen's homer was inside the park.

PIQUA, 1303 Forrest Street, Saturday 8am-2pm, Yard tools, kitchen items, Lots of miscellaneous!!

WWW.DAILYCALL.COM • PIQUA DAILY CALL WWW.DAILYCALL.COM • PIQUA DAILY CALL

Classifieds Clerical

TRI-COUNTY BOARD OF RECOVERY & MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES

OFFICE ASSISTANT Part Time Office Assistant, Manufacturing Co. in Piqua looking for a professional, conscientious, detail oriented person capable of working with little supervision. Front desk reception, answer multi-line phone, filing, data entry. Proficient with Microsoft Office. Pay dependent on experience $10-$14/hr. Send resumes to: Attention HR PO Box 617 Piqua, Ohio 45356

• Choose a classification • Write your ad text • Select your markets and upgrades • Have your credit card ready • Place you ad

IT’S THAT EASY!

What are you waiting for? Place your ad online today!

Director of Community Resource Development Will lead the Boardҋs marketing and community outreach programs through a variety of social media platforms. Development of training programs designed to enhance worker retention throughout the tri-county area. Will provide administrative support, communication and leadership to targeted programs such as the Family and Children First and NAMI.

DRIVERS * Semi / Tractor Trailer * Home Daily * All No Touch Loads * Excellent Equipment * Medical Insurance * Eye & Dental Reimbursement * 401K Retirement * Paid HolidaysShutdown Days * Safety Bonus Paid Weekly * Minimum Age 23 * Class A CDL Required

A Bachelors Degree in health education, communications, social work or a closely related field; two to four years of related experience; advanced computer skills and ability to prepare and present reports, outreach and training materials are required for both positions.

Require good MVR and references Call Chambers Leasing (800)526-6435 FLATBED DRIVER CDL required for local runs. Home every night. Need flatbed experience. (937)492-8309 Monday - Friday, 8am-3pm

PIQUA, 314 Glenwood Avenue, May 9, 10, 11, 16, 17 & 18, 9am-5pm. All kinds of goodies! Everything from A to Z!!!

We are looking for 5 classes A CDL drivers for Daily dedicated routes and Dedicated Regional routes.

HOME DAILY DEDICATED ROUTES

Benefits: Paid vacation, Dental, Vision, Major Medical, Aflac, Safety Bonus and more. Also, looking for Teams to run west coast 5000-6000 miles a week. Please apply at: 900 Gressel Dr Delphos, Ohio or call (419)692-1435

The Tri-County Board of Recovery and Mental Health Services offers a competitive salary and benefit package that includes PERS. Resume must be received by 4:30 p.m. on May 17, 2013 to be considered. Resumes should be forwarded by mail or via email to; Mark McDaniel, Executive Director Tri-County Board of Recovery and Mental Health Services 1100 Wayne Street, Suite 4000 Troy, OH 45373 mcdanielm@ mdsadamhs.mh.state.oh.us For detailed position descriptions visit our website at: mdsadamhs.mh.state.oh.us The Tri-County Board is an Equal Opportunity Employer Medical/Health

Help Wanted General JANITORIAL, part time, flexible evening hours. $8.00 to start. Call (937)669-9900 ext 102.

DENTAL ASSISTANT / FRONT DESK Seeking self-starter with organizational, patient communication/ computer skills to handle activities in high quality, restorative dental practice. Prior dental/ medical experience a plus but not required. 30-40 hours. Email resume: bestdentistry@hotmail.com

40041400

SIDNEY, 2841 Wapakoneta Avenue (VFW - located at I-75, 25A exit), Saturday, 10:30-5. Vendor and craft show! Over 20 vendors will be here. Food is available. Bake sale and proceeds benefit Team Nuke Luke for the Leukemia Lymphoma Society Light the Night Walk. Come do your Mother's Day and Graduation shopping! TROY 1304 Keller Drive Thursday, Friday 9am-5pm and Saturday 9am-1pm Estate sale vintage gown, many new appliances, new Christmas items, dishes and lots of miscellaneous TROY 1410 Barberry Court Thursday, Friday, and Saturday 8am-5pm Longaberger pottery, ME items, clothes girls 12 monthe-2T and boys 5-7, household items, scrapbook items, sizzix die cuts, old dolls, toys, CD cabinet TROY 1475 Hunter Court Thursday, Friday, and Saturday 8am-4pm Kids, baby, women's, men's clothes, deep freezer, treadmill, sweeper, DVDs, CDs, miscellaneous furniture, microwave, miscellaneous baby items TROY 650 North County Road 25A (on fairgrounds in the Shop and Crop building) Thursday, Friday 8am-6pm and Saturday 8am-1pm Huge Garage Sale collectible's, crafts, a little bit of everything, proceeds to benefit the fairgrounds

OFFICE STAFF

40041400

IT’S FAST! IT’S EASY! IT’S CONVENIENT!

A multi-county alcohol, drug addiction and mental health services board seeks two fulltime professionals to join its efforts in providing community outreach, training, education and communication within Miami, Darke and Shelby Counties.

Program Coordinator

Drivers & Delivery

PIQUA, 30 E. Loy Road (Corner Troy Sidney Road), Friday 9am-5pm & Saturday 8am-2pm, Microwave, futon, end tables, waterbed, "31" products, kids/ baby items, deep freeze, curtains, jewelry armoire, and much more!!!

SIDNEY, 2190 Miami Conservancy Road, (corner of Fair Road), Lockington UM Church Barn Sale, Thursday and Friday, 9am-5pm, Saturday, 9am12pm. Saturday is bag day! Kitchen & bath cabinets, baby items, laptop, clothes, lots of material, electronics, Precious Moments, exercise equipment, miscellaneous.

Help Wanted General

MECHANIC EXPERIENCED Nationwide Truck Brokers Inc. is a growing, family oriented company with room for advancement. We are now taking applications for an experienced mechanic and wash bay attendants for our tractor trailer repair facility at our Tipp City, Ohio, location. This position is full time with newly enhanced benefit package that includes competitive wages, health, dental, life, card, 401k, paid uniforms, paid vacation and more. If interested apply in person at: 3355 S Co Rd 25A Tipp City, Oh I-75 exit 69

Busy OBGYN office at Upper Valley Medical Center seeking full time positions for Medical Office Staff, Duties include: Checking in & out patients, scheduling appointments, billing, Previous experience preferred. Please fax resume and references to: (937)339-7842 Other WANTED:

CABINET MAKERS Some experience needed. Interested parties apply Monday-Friday between 3pm-5pm Robertson Cabinets Inc 1090 S. Main St. West Milton, OH 45383 Restaurants DISH WASHERS/ PREP COOKS Now taking applications Apply within: Lincoln Square Restaurant 1320 Archer Drive Troy, Ohio 45373 No calls please Commercial COMMERCIAL STORE front office for rent, 1500sf, storage area also available. Call (937)974-6333 For Sale By Owner Apartments /Townhouses 1 BEDROOM 1/2 double, 524 West High, stove/ refrigerator furnished, $300 month + deposit, (937)773-4552.

TROY, 23 Dronfield Road, Thursday, Friday & Saturday, 10-5. Exercise equipment, household goods, lots of miscellaneous. Lawn Service

1-2 bedroom upstairs, W/D hookup. water included $400 a month (937)902-0572

MATT & SHAWN’S

EVERS REALTY

40037539

place your classified ad online at w

1, 2 & 3 Bedroom, Houses & Apts. SEIPEL PROPERTIES Piqua Area Only Metro Approved (937)773-9941 9am-5pm Monday-Friday

LAWN CARE & HOME IMPROVEMENTS Lawn Mowing starting at $15 Landscaping •Trim Shrubs Pavers & Fence Installation Tree Removal • Wood Patios Install & Clean Spoutings • Siding Power Washing N

C

40037539

TROY, 2 Bedroom Townhomes 1.5 bath, 1 car garage, $725 (937)216-5806 EversRealty.net


15

Thursday, May 9, 2013

PIQUA DAILY CALL • PLACE YOUR AD IN THE CLASSIFIEDS THAT WORK 877-844-8385 OR ON THE WEB AT WWW.DAILYCALL.COM

that work .com JobSourceOhio.com

Must be 62 years of age or older All utilities paid Income based Laundry facility onsite Service coordinator onsite

PERSIAN/HIMALAYAN KITTENS, CFA registered brand new litter deposit required. Serious calls only (937)2164515

500 Staunton Commons Dr Troy, OH 45373

Farm Equipment

2008 ACURA TSX 73K Miles, Fully loaded, automatic, with navigation, blue exterior, black leather interior, asking $16800 obo,

Baby Items

2IÀFH (TXLSPHQW

BABY ITEMS & furniture, toddler bed, play yard for kids or puppies, HANDICAP ITEMS, collectible dolls & bears, good condition and more! (937)339 4233

OFFICE SET, 7 piece Ashley Furniture office set, cherry finish, includes built in bookcase and filing cabinet, $400, (937)638-5524

Opportunity Knocks...

CRIB, real wood, good condition, stationary sides, $75 (937)339-4233

40037222

Furniture & Accessories BEDROOM SET, 5 piece Danish Modern, dresser, mirror, chest, brass headboard plus bed frame, excellent condition, $225. (937)498-9822

call (937)473-2596 evenings

Phone: (937)339-2893 Office hours 8:00am-4:30pm Monday - Friday

Auto Classic /Antiques

Miscellaneous

TTY/TTD (800)750-0750

JobSourceOhio.com

STAUNTON COMMONS Accepting Applications for 2, 3 & 4 bedroom townhouses. AC, carpet, laundry facility on premises, rent based on income. Call for appointment, Monday-Friday, 8:00am4:30pm, (937)339-2893. Certain Eligibility Requirements Apply & TTY/TDD 1-800-750-0750

TRENCHER, Case model 360 trencher with backhoe and blade. Only 2900 hours, good original condition. 1994 model, Wisconsin engine. Parts book and owners manual included. (937)489-1725 Garden & Produce HORSE MANURE, free for hauling. Call (937)554-6841

Boats & Marinas Autos Under $5000 1992 CHEVY pickup, 4.3, new tires, new shocks, new battery, good running truck, $1000, (937)570-5239. Autos For Sale

TROY TOWNHOUSE, 2 Bedroom 1.5 bath. Bunkerhill $495 monthly, (937)216-5611 TROY 2 bedroom townhouse for rent. $500/ month. Water/trash included. Metro approved, AC, Carpet,Appliances and laundry facility on premises. Call for appointment, Mon-Fri, 8:00am-4:30pm, (937)339-2893. & tty/tdd 1-800-750-0750

1975 CHEVY CAPRICE CLASSIC Convertible, A1 condition! 350 V8 engine, 125k miles, $12,000 OBO. Call (419)628-4183

1985 LINCOLN Continental, Sea foam green, carriage top, 56k, beautiful car inside and out, 1 owner, $7500, call (937)362-2261 1996 Chevy Blazer, 4WD, V6 vortic, power windows, CD player, looks and runs great, $1500 OBO (937)765-7250

2000 YAMAHA jet boat, (2) 135HP engines, boat & trailer in excellent condition, engines have between 60-80 hours running time, boat cover, life jackets, water skis & tubes, can be seen at 808 North Miami Avenue, Sidney. Around back. Paid $23,000 new. Asking $6500. Will consider any offer, (937)638-2222. 2003 FOUR Winns 180 Freedom, 18' bowrider, 4.3 Volvo Penta (190HP), swim platform with ladder, snap-in carpet, built-in cooler, radio, deluxe interior, no rips or tears, 2 covers, trailer with surge brakes & spare tire, $12,000, (937)6933531

2001 CHRYSLER SEBRING LXi We are relocating out of state and must sell! $2900. Call (937)520-0388

Houses For Rent

Trucks / SUVs / Vans

2007 HONDA CH80 scooter, asking $1500 OBO. Call (937)418-2702

DOLLS, 4 original 1985 Cabbage Patch Dolls, still in box! A box of Story Book dolls and an old fashioned doll carriage. Call for details (937)773-9617. FURNITURE, Moving, nice items for sale, Couch's, beds, matching chair sets, big screen tv, stereo system with surround sound, (937)726-8029 MOREL MUSHROOMS, Pre order, $35 a pound, fresh midwest yellow and grays (937)524-9698 leave message if no answer

2003 DODGE RAM 1500 6Cyl, 2wd, automatic, power steering, air, cruise, 71,600 miles, excellent condition, asking $6500. (937)726-7109 (937)492-5785

TABLE, 4 chairs (2 captain) $30; coffee table, 3 end tables $125; Dixie Chopper RB2700 mower, 47 horse power, 45 hours on motor, $3000 firm (937)335-6064 or (937)5738599

Motorcycles

Air Conditioners

UPRIGHT PIANO, Lester, $500. Frigidaire chest freezer, $100, diverson80@yahoo.com. (937)552-9368.

2007 HONDA Rebel, red in color, 2500 miles, like new, saddle bags and helmet, $2150. Call (937)418-3727.

CENTRAL AIR UNIT, installed but never used, $500. 30lb can of freon, almost full, $100. Call (937)368-2290.

WALKER, adult, folds, adjustable height, good condition, with or without wheels $20. (937)339-4233

40037557

Residential Commercial New Construction Bonded & Insured

Tammy Welty (937)857-4222

Construction & Building

M&S Contracting 40037636 Since 1977 FREE ESTIMATES on Roofing, Siding, Gutters, Windows, Patio Covers, Doors Insured & Bonded

Call 937-236-5392 Gutter Repair & Cleaning

DC SEAMLESS & Service Gutter 40038561 1002 N. Main St. Sidney, Ohio 45365

Call today for FREE estimate Fully Insured Repairs • Cleaning • Gutter Guard

1-937-492-8897 Handyman

Heritage Handyman 40037530 Service •Mowing •Tilling •Landscaping

Call 937-570-7230

We remember those who have passed away and are especially dear to us. On Monday, May 27, 2013, we will publish a special section devoted to those who are gone, but not forgotten.

2003 GMC ENVOY XL Low miles! Call for more info: (937)570-1518

Verse Selections: 1.

2005 FORD 500, good condition, well maintenanced, AM/FM/CD, AC, power everything, newer tires, $6000, (937)710-3907.

2. 3. 4.

Pets KITTENS, 7 black furballs! Free to good homes, 5-6 weeks old. Ready to go! Text or call (937)214-1455

LAB, Chocolate lab, 3 years old, great with kids, Free to good home, (937)778-1095

2005 Cardinal, 5th wheel with 2 slides, excellent condition, well taken care of, asking $14,500 (937)698-6289

COMPUTER DESK, wood tone with file drawer, $30. 14" and 20" TVs. $15 each, (937)492-9863

Cleaning Service

In Loving Memory

PIQUA 2 bedroom, includes utilities but propane $750 a month plus deposit, no pets (937)773-0563

KITTENS, Free to good homes, Multiple colors to choose from, Litter box trained, call (937)418-4703

RVs / Campers

CAMPING MEMBERSHIP, Lakewood Village Resort located in Wapakoneta, Ohio, asking $3500. Call for more details (937)418-2702.

Sparkle Clean

40037684

2 Bedroom Trailer in country, $375, also 6 Bedroom Farmhouse, $750, call, (937)4177111 or (937)448-2974

TRAILER, stove, new refrigerator, new air conditioner, new washer & dryer (optional), $7000 OBO. Call Steve (937)710-3668

(937)448-0714

BOOKS, Boys and Girls books, Dave Dawson, Tom Swift Jr., Dana Girls, Vicki Barr, Connie Blair, Rick Brant, and others, English mystery Series, Blue Mask (AKA the Baron) by Anthony Norton (AKA John Creasy) Hardcovers 1930's1950's, Paper Backs 1960's, (937)492-0606

Cleaning & Maintenance

Memory / Thank You

2 BEDROOM House, new flooring & windows, fresh paint, 612 Robinson, Nicklin Schools, phone (419)394-8509

Sales

250cc, 178 miles, showroom condition, 2 helmets and cover, $1450.

Boat Parts /Supplies BOAT, 17' Bayliner, seats 6, AM/FM radio, 90HP Mercury outboard motor, trailer, $3000 OBO, (937)570-1489 Mopeds

PIQUA AREA, Candlewood, New Haven. 3 bedroom, $750 + deposit. Call (937)778-9303 days, (937)604-5417 evenings.

2008 WILDFIRE SCOOTER MODEL WFH

10'x10' Patio Gazebo has new cover still in box, $100 (937)552-7786

Building & Remodeling

40037636

Accepting applications for our 1 Bedroom Apts.

Staunton Commons II

Motorcycles 2007 HARLEY Davidson Ultra Classic, black pearl, 22,400 miles, CB/CD/MP3, intercom, spoiler with LED lights, heatshield, highway pegs, $14,500, (937)773-8428.

40038561

Autos For Sale

5.

2007 FORD FOCUS SE Sport package, 2 door hatchback, auto, AC, power, silver, excellent condition, 50,000 miles, $8800 (937)286-8893 (937)286-3319

Auctions

9.

40039990

“Ben Cantrill” PUBLIC AUCTION

10.

Sunday May 12th. 10:30 a.m.

11.

909 Nicklin Street Piqua, Ohio Guns: Selling at 11:30 (2) Winchester model 37 12 gauge Red Letters, (2) Winchester model 1200 pump 12 gauge marked Maine State Police, Winchester model 25, Winchester model 74 .22 caliber w/scope, Winchester model 37 .410 w/3” choke, Fox Savage SxS 16 gauge w/duck scroll, Remington Arms SxS 12 gauge, Pride of Spain SxS 10 gauge, E.R. Amantino 12 gauge over and under, Lefever SxS 12 gauge Nitro Special, Marlin 12 gauge single Patent date 1896, German SxS 16 gauge w/crown over U mark, misc. gun cases German bayonets, hunting knives, Red Ryder BB gun w/box. Antiques & Collectibles: Large collection of Marbles, oil lamps, bubble gum machine, large vending machine, chauffer pin, coke buttons, Large amount of Wagner, Favorite and Griswold CI, sad irons, comic book collection, many rock albums from the 60’s-80’s, wooden chicken crates, Quilts, graniteware, modern lighted beer signs, Moose lodge clock, sled, Army jackets, (2) Bundy Clarinets, Decker’s 8lb. lard tin, neon OPEN sign, spots collectibles, bobble heads, scale cars, milk cans, Budweiser holiday beer steins, blue jars, wooden shoe bottle opener, small metal Coke cooler, Favorite Stove pin, camel back trunk, small collectibles, vintage pottery, cookie jars, arrowheads, advertising, slaw cutters, ice tongs, vintage metal toys, Zippo Lighter lighted display cases, box lots. Household Goods & Furniture: Sofa and loveseat, end and coffee tables, recliner, small appliances, flatware, metal utility cabinets, table lamps, (2) iron full size beds, twin bed, (2) maple dinette sets and chairs, straight chairs, M/T East Lake dresser, chest of drawers, plant stands, wardrobe, television and stand, general clean household and kitchen items. Garage & Tools: Craftsman radial arm and table saw, power hand tools, toolboxes, assortment of many hand tools, two wheel cart, Coleman lanterns, fishing items, speaker box, auto repair manuals various years, shelving units, plastic totes, Many more items of interest. Terms: All items to be sold to the highest bidder. Cash or Check. Credit Cards accepted with 3% buyer’s premium. Auctioneers: Justin Vondenhuevel CAI, Tom Roll and David Shields. Apprentice Auctioneers Rick Reichenbacher, DeLynn Cox

VONDENHUEVEL 40039990

AUCTIONEERS 937-538-6231 auctions@woh.rr.com

7. 8.

14 Long Guns-Comic Books-German BayonetsVending Machine-Tools-Furniture-Antiques

VondenhuevelAuctioneers.com

6.

12.

13. 14. 15.

In our hearts your memory lingers, sweetly tender, fond and true. There is not a day, dear Mother/Father, that we do not think of you. Thank you for loving and sharing, for giving and for caring. God bless you and keep you, until we meet again. Your life was a blessing, your memory a treasure. You are loved beyond words and missed beyond measure. Those we love we never lose, for always they will be, loved remembered, treasured, always in our memory. It broke our hearts to lose you, but you did not go alone. For part of us went with you, the day God called you home. My heart still aches in sadness, my silent tears still flow. For what it meant to lose you, no one will ever know. Memory is a lovely lane, where hearts are ever true. A lane I so often travel down, because it leads to you. Oh how we wish he/she was here today, to see all the blessings we have. Yet somehow you know that he/she is guiding us on our paths. Tenderly we treasure the past with memories that will always last. Remembering you on this day, comforted by so many memories. In the hearts of those who loved you, you will always be there. If love could have saved you, you would have lived forever. . Loved always, sadly missed. Forever remembered, forever missed. Suffer little children to come unto me.

Name of Deceased:____________________ Date of Birth:_________________________

Date of Passing:_______________________ Number of verse selected :______________

Or write your own (20 words or less):______

____________________________________ ____________________________________ ____________________________________ Closing Message: (Example: Always in our

hearts, Sue & Family):__________________

____________________________________

Name of person submitting form:__________ ____________________________________

Phone Number:________________________ Address:_____________________________

City, State and Zip Code:________________ ____________________________________

Visa, Mastercard, Discover, Am. Ex. Number: ____________________________________ Expiration Date:_______________________

Signature:____________________________

Only $16.50

To remember your loved one in this special way, submit a photo, this form and payment to:

John Doe

September 19, 1917 thru March 7, 2006 The memory of you will always be in our hearts! Love always, Wife, Children, Family and Friends

Troy Daily News or Piqua Daily Call Attn: In Loving Memory Attn: In Loving Memory 224 S. Market St. 100 Fox Drive, Suite B Troy, OH 45313 Piqua, OH 45356

Publishes in both Troy Daily News and Piqua Daily Call for $16.50. Deadline for this special tribute is May 10,2013. Please call (937) 498-5925 with any questions.

* Limit one individual per 1x3 space

40037684

40037530

Pets LAB PUPS, AKC, declawed, first shots, 1 yellow female, 1 yellow male, 2 black females, parents on site, $250, (937)778-8613

40037557

Apartments /Townhouses


16

Thursday, May 9, 2013

PLACE YOUR AD IN THE CLASSIFIEDS THAT WORK 877-844-8385 OR ON THE WEB AT WWW.DAILYCALL.COM • PIQUA DAILY CALL

Hauling & Trucking

COOPER’S GRAVEL 40037668 Gravel Hauled, Laid & Leveled Driveways & Parking Lots

Auto Auction

Personal • Comfort ~ Flexible Hourly Care ~ ~ Respite Care for Families ~

419.501.2323 or 888.313.9990 www.visitingangels.com/midwestohio 40045876

Land Services

GRAVEL & STONE 40037487 Shredded Topsoil Topsoil Shredded Fill Dirt Dirt Fill

Driveways •• Excavating Excavating Driveways Demolition Demolition

WE DELIVER

40037487

937-606-1122 Paving & Excavating

COOPER’S 40044472 BLACKTOP 40044472

PAVING, REPAIR & SEALCOATING DRIVEWAYS PARKING LOTS

937-875-0153 937-698-6135

SATURDAY, MAY 11, 2013 415 SOUTH STREET, PIQUA, OHIO; UPPER MIAMI VALLEY STORAGE 9:00 A.M. SHARP TERMS OF THE SALE ARE THIS: CASH. NO PERSONAL CHECKS NO CREDIT CARDS. NO CHILDREN. PLEASE CALL WITH QUESTIONS. ALL VEHICLES SOLD 100% AS IS. BANKRUPTCY UNITS HAVE SEPERATE TERMS. AGAIN, PLEASE CALL WITH QUESTIONS BEFORE THE AUCTION. WE ARE ONLY RESPONSIBLE FOR SELLING UNITS, WE CANNOT ANSWER VERIFY OR GUARANTEE ANY CONDITION OF ANY UNIT IN AUCTION. ALL UNITS INCLUDING BOATS, SKIS, TRAILERS, VEHICLES ANYTHING SOLD IS 100% AS IS. PLEASE SEE AUCTIONZIP.COM AUCTION ID CODE 6480 FOR COMPLETE LISTING AND PHOTOS.

BAYMAN AUCTION SERVICE

Remodeling & Repairs

ROBERT BAYMAN 937 773 5702

40037826

937-573-4737 Roofing Windows Kitchens Sunrooms

• • • •

Spouting Metal Roofing Siding Doors

• • • •

Baths Awnings Concrete Additions

CALL TODAY FOR FREE ESTIMATE

40037826

Auctions

2000 Buick LeSabre-Pocket Watch-HouseholdShop Smith-Tools Furniture-Antiques

40037656

Amy E. Walker, D.V.M. 937-418-5992 Mobile Veterinary Service Treating Dogs, Cats & Exotics For Sale By Owner

FOR SALE BY OWNER 40046177

“Paul Wirrig” Moving AUCTION

Sunday May 19th. 10:30 a.m. 715 Manier Street Piqua, Ohio

VONDENHUEVEL

OPEN HOUSE Sun 5/12 1-4 and Sat 5/18 1-4

937-538-6231 auctions@woh.rr.com

Immaculate, ‘big’ ranch: formal LR, DR, eat-in kitchen with new ceramic tile floors, 7.5’ ‘lunch bar’ and a spacious family room with a gas burning fireplace. 3 generously sized bedrooms, newer HVAC system, roof & hot water heater, fresh paint & newer carpet throughout. Finished 2-car garage with attic. This is a special home! Wonderful neighborhood! Must see! $165,000

VondenhuevelAuctioneers.com

40046177

Sealed bids for the purchase of a two dump bodies and snow plows for the City's Public Works Department will be received by the City of Piqua Purchasing Office, 201 West Water Street, Piqua, Ohio, until 2:00 P.M.. on Thursday, May 23, 2013 at which time the bids will be publicly opened and read.

Bids must be signed and submitted on City bid forms included in the bid package. The sealed envelope must be marked "IFB 1319-Dump Bodies." Each Bid must contain the fill name of the party or parties submitting the Bid and all persons interested therein. No Bidder shall withdraw his Bid after the actual opening thereof. The City reserves the right to reject any or all Bids, waive irregularities in any Bid, and to accept any Bid that is deemed by City to be most favorable to the City. Beverly M. Yount, CPPB Purchasing Analyst City of Piqua, Ohio Resolution No.: R-6-13

AUCTIONEERS

1913 Carlyle Dr, Piqua

Advertisement for Bids City of Piqua IFB 1319 FOR DUMP BODIES & SNOW PLOWS FOR PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT

The Bidding Documents, which include Specifications and Bid Form, may be obtained at the City of Piqua, Purchasing Department, 201 W. Water Street, Piqua, Ohio at no cost or download the documents from our web site at www.piquaoh.org.

40040057

Automobile: 2000 Buick LeSabre LTD. Leather and Loaded with 3800 engine. One Owner car with 78,000 miles. Antiques & Collectibles: Hamilton pocket watch, Pressed and loop glass, Depression, oil lamps, Apollo glasses, Ft. Pickawillany nickel 1938, Royal Swirl China, “Let’s Kiss” Bobbleheads, salts, Austria Moose Creamer, marbles, Fire King, Montgomery County History 1882 (rough), Wagner and Griswold CI, Tootsie Toys, J.D. Tractor, J.D. Wagon NIB, J.D. Miniatures, Gilbert mantle clock, Stoneware mixing bowls, Army Compass, Costume Jewelry, Silver Plate, Quilts, treadle sewing machine, Vintage Buttons, Arvin Stereo, many other vintage items. Household Goods & Furniture: Amana Refrigerator, 30” Kenmore electric range, Whirlpool washer and dryer, Oak rocking chairs, Sofa and loveseat, end and coffee tables, 6 leg parlor table, recliners, modern dry sink (Hartzell Hardwood Kit), glass front bookcase, record cabinet, rose back chairs, Stainless cookware, Tupperware, small appliances, several sets of flatware, cookbooks, Kirby model 80, Rainbow chrome top sweeper, mirrors, metal utility cabinets, hall tree, table lamps, (2) full size beds, Large Ash table with several leaves, straight chairs, M/T, wash stand, M/T dresser, Chest of drawers, plant stands, er, vacuum cleaners, set of flatware in box, chest of drawers, general clean household and kitchen items. Garage & Tools: Shop Smith wood working unit complete, Craftsman cordless drill, hand power tools, SK 3/8 drive socket set, Craftsman hand tools, chisels, punches, bar clamps, wooden clamps, coolers, metal spring patio chairs, hand planes, 20’ aluminum extension ladder, step ladders, wheel barrow, garden hose, water cans, vintage fishing poles, yard trailer, battery charger, garden tools, electric edger, misc. garage items Auctioneers Note: Paul is 95 years old and has lived in this home since he was born. Paul retired from Hartzell fan in 1980 and has decided to move to smaller quarters. Please plan to attend this clean auction. Directions: Mainer Street is located behind Hartzell Hardwoods off of Roosevelt. Terms: All items to be sold to the highest bidder. Cash or Check. Credit Cards accepted with 3% buyer’s premium. Car title will be Notarized and possession granted the day of the auction if paid in cash. If paying by check title and possession will be granted upon verification of funds. Auctioneers: Justin Vondenhuevel, Tom Roll and David Shields. Apprentice Auctioneers Rick Reichenbacher DeLynn Cox

Pet Grooming

JOE HARKER 937 606 0536

Notices

www.buckeyehomeservices.com

• • • •

TONY BAYMAN 937 606 0535

05/04, 05/09-2013

Happy Ads / Birthday / Anniversary

Building & Remodeling

Only $21.75

40037695

40037613 #Repairs Large and Small #Room Additions #Basements #Kitchens/Baths #Siding #Windows #Doors #Garages #Barns

2013 Ads

Ask about our Friends & Neighbors discounts 40037613

(937) 339-1902 or (937) 238-HOME Free Estimates • Fully Insured • 17 Years of Home Excellence

Celebrate Your Special Graduate in our newspapers on May 23, 2013

Auctions

ESTATE AUCTIONS 40039828 May 11, 2013, 9:00AM

DEADLINE IS 5:00 P.M., MAY 10, 2013

Antiques-Collectibles-Furniture Household Goods-Tools-Guns 650 N. Co. Rd. 25A Miami County Fair Ground, Troy, OH Furniture: Floral loveseat & sofa bed(2)matching recliners, lift chair, loveseat recliner, wing back chair, china cupboard, buffet, Maple table w/buffet,6 dining chairs, Duncan Fyfe drop leaf table w/hidden compartment & 7 chairs, Butcher block table, Blonde bedroom set, Lg. Oak Bed, Dressers, (6) end tables, Sm. cupboards, Bookshelves, desk & swivel chair, Computer table, glass shelf cabinet,(4) entertainment centers, Ornate room divider. Antiques & Collectibles: Lg. Assort.(300)Comic books, Ertle toys, Marx train set, Dolls, promo cars, Fenton glass rooster, vases/hats, candle holders & more, Rookwood bookends, McCoy, Local Advertisement, Lg. Brass Horses, Horse bookends, Fireking nesting bowls, frosted hanging lamp, Carnival glass, Hummel Spice Rack, Bolivia clock, wood plane, Birdcage ,plate shelf, Walnut bookshelf, oak potty chair, walnut parlor table, sm. walnut table, Oak washstand, 1880's Walnut dresser, Silver items, Doorstops, Christmas bubble lights, cast iron toy stoves, Crystal vases, Walnut/Marble top dresser, Aladdin Lamp, Kellogg Oak wall phone, Lg. Round oak/claw foot table, Walnut bed & dresser, Ornate bed frame, wood school desk, Ladderback chair, walnut side chair, bentwood chair, cane bottom ladies rocker, wood frame mirrors, coat rack, Vin. Trunks, apple crate, wooden boxes, country cupboard, primitive cupboard, chalk board, Ad. Tin, kitchen scales, buttons, metal oil spouts, cast iron kettle, washbasin pitcher/bowl, ruby red, pfalzgraff, walnut drop leaf table, floor lamp, assort. glass paperweight collection, Coke items tins, hanging lamp, cards, ice bucket/glasses, clock, pen holder, radio, lunchbox, cookie jar, serving platters, bottles, table & chairs, Paintings lg. assort.(signed) some local Artist, Lawton Print signed, Horse sculpture (Auston Pro) Dressmaker's Form, Microscope, Vintage Troy Fire Alarm Box. Household Items: Blenders, Crockpot, Breadmaker, Deepfryer, Sets of knives, Flatware, Dishware, canister set, Dishes-syracuse china, homer laughlin, fireking, bavaria, Lg selection of candle holders, Vintage cookie cutters, Granite roasters, Floor lamps, table lamps, Linens, Longaberger baskets & Pottery, Singer portable sewing machine Tools: Battery charger, polisher, table saw, ladders, weed trimmer, workbench, cordless drill, hoes, shovels, rakes, extension cord, Craftsman riding mower, Elec. sanders, hand tools, lots of garden/yard tools. Guns: Ruger No.1 Special Varminter w/scope, Weatherby Vanguard 30-06 w/scope, Cabella's Hawkins flintlock, Austin & Halleck .50 cal, Charles Daly 12-ga, Remington Model 5 .22 w/scope, Weatherby Patrician 12-ga,Ruger 10/22 carbine w/scope, Tula TOZ-122 (Russian).308 w/scope, Weatherby Mod PA-08 Upland 12 ga, Traditions Field 12 ga, Ruger Mod 77RS MKII .300 Win MAG w/scope, Rossi Wizard.22-250 w/scope, CZ 550 SafariMagnum.375 w/scope, Mauser M-98 w/bayonette, Browning A-Bolt Medallion.280 REM w/scope ,RW Arms Markarov 9x18mm, Cabella's 1858 Remington Pietta black powder .44 cal, Mosin-Nagant with holster, Smith & \Wesson Mod 19 .357 Combat Magnum 6" Nickle, rifle scopes. Gun Cabinet& related items. Other Items of Interest: Patio Furniture: Wrought iron, wicker plant stand, (4)chairs, (1)rocker, (3)tables, (2)2x4 cushion chairs, floral ornate cushion sofa, bird bath, live animal trap, fishing poles & tackle, hot shooter basketball game, soft hot tub Auctioneers Comments: This a large (3) Estates Sale, this is only a partial list of items. There will be (2) rings going most of the day. Vehicles: 1990 Geo Tracker (nice), 2003 Chevy Venture - 7 passenger Term of payment are cash or checks with proper ID no out of state checks.

Please submit information along with a payment of $21.75 to: Troy Daily News or Piqua Daily Call Attn: Grad Ads Attn: Grad Ads 224 S. Market St. 110 Fox Dr. Suite B Troy, OH 45373 Piqua, OH 45356 If you would like your photo returned, please include a SASE along with your payment. Please contact us at 877-844-8385 with questions.

Matthew Lyons Piqua High School

2012 We are proud of you! Your Family

Graduate’s Information Graduate’s Name: ______________________________________________ Graduate’s High School: _________________________________________ Greeting: _____________________________________________________ From (to be listed in ad): ________________________________________

Estates of Utrecht/Hedleston/Pfeiffer Check on AuctionZip.Com enter #30691 to see Pictures of items in sale 40039828

40037695

SCHAEFFER AUCTIONS Auctioneers: Bob & Dean Schaeffer 937-335-8352 & 570-7087

40046045

40045876 Senior Homecare

www.dailycall.com

Health Care

40040057

MINIMUM CHARGES APPLY

40037656

BANKRUPTCY AND REPO AUTO AUCTION

40046045

40037668

875-0153 698-6135

Submitted By Name: _______________________________________________________ Address: _____________________________________________________ City, State, Zip: ________________________________________________ Phone Number: ________________________________________________ Visa, MC, Discover, American Express: ______________________________ Expiration Date: ________________________________________________


PIQUA DAILY CALL • WWW.DAILYCALL.COM

COMICS BIG NATE

MUTTS

HAGAR THE HORRIBLE

DILBERT

BLONDIE

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE

HI AND LOIS ZITS

BEETLE BAILEY FAMILY CIRCUS

DENNIS the MENACE

ARLO & JANIS

HOROSCOPE BY FRANCES DRAKE For Friday, May 10, 2013 ARIES (March 21 to April 19) The next three to four weeks are perfect for those of you who write, sell, market, teach or act, because your communication skills will be excellent. Look for ways to make money from your words. TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) In the month ahead, many of you will want to buy beautiful treasures for yourself and loved ones. (You are a sign who loves antiques and collectibles.) GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) With fair Venus moving into your sign now to stay for the next several weeks, you will be extra-charming and diplomatic with everyone you meet. Use this to your advantage. CANCER (June 21 to July 22) Solitude in beautiful surroundings will appeal to you in the next month. Slip away to gentle places where you can ponder your navel. LEO (July 23 to Aug. 22) You’ll find it easy to make friends in the next four weeks, especially in group situations. In fact, a friend might become a lover. (Oh my.) VIRGO (Aug. 23 to Sept. 22) Some of you might become involved with someone older or richer in the next month, or you could develop a crush on your boss. Whatever happens, you look very attractive to others. LIBRA (Sept. 23 to Oct. 22) Travel for pleasure will delight you in the next month. Get away anywhere, if you can. Romance with someone from another culture might blossom. SCORPIO (Oct. 23 to Nov. 21) Gifts, goodies and favors from others will come your way in the next month. Be open to this. Just keep smiling and say, “Thank you!” SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22 to Dec. 21) With fair Venus opposing your sign for the next month, this is an excellent time to mend broken fences. Partnerships and close friendships will be especially warm and friendly. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22 to Jan. 19) Do whatever you can to make your workplace look more attractive, because this will please you. Some of you will get a raise or praise very soon. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20 to Feb. 18) Vacations, love affairs, romance, the arts, sports events and playful activities with children will be tops on your menu for the next month. Enjoy! PISCES (Feb. 19 to March 20) The next month is an excellent time to tackle decorating projects or make improvements where you live. You’ll also enjoy entertaining at home, because you feel warm and friendly with family members. YOU BORN TODAY You have style and charm, and often are physically graceful and active. Because you have a pioneering energy, you’re not afraid to be different or original. You frequently have your finger on the pulse of public trends, which is why you should trust your intuition. People easily like you. In the year ahead, a major decision will arise; choose wisely. Birthdate of: Barbara Taylor Bradford, author; Bono, singer/activist; Fred Astaire, dancer/actor. (c) 2013 King Features Syndicate, Inc.

SNUFFY SMITH

GARFIELD

BABY BLUES

FUNKY WINKERBEAN

CRANKSHAFT

Thursday, May 9, 2013

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HEN THEYâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;REE GONE, THEYâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;RE GONE! RE LIMITED AND W ICTURED. QUANTITIES ARE LY AS PPICTURED. OME ITEMS MA UT SO WHEN OLKS, W FFOLKS, EXACTLY MAYY NOT BBEE EXACTL SOME YOU,, BBUT TRICKK OR FOOL YOU WEE ARE NOT HERE TTOO TRIC


05/09/13