Page 1

COMING

TOMORROW Covington Outreach Commitment To Community

INSIDE: Mumford musician excited about Troy shows. Page 5.

VOLUME 130, NUMBER 27

INSIDE: ‘Nones on the Rise”: Study finds 20 percent have no religious affiliation. Page 6.

INSIDE: Edison women lose to Cincinnati State. Page 12.

T H U R S DAY, F E B R UA RY 7 , 2 0 1 3

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an award-winning Civitas Media newspaper

Briefly Today’s weather High 45 Low 30 Chance of evening rain Complete forecast on Page 3.

USA Weekend coming Saturday This week’s USA Weekend, which will be included in Saturday’s Call.

Cemetery annual financial report available PIQUA — The annual financial report of Forest Hill Cemetery for 2012 is now available for public inspection at the cemetery office, 8660 N. State Route 66.

YMCA hosts spaghetti supper PIQUA — The Miami County YMCA Teen Leaders Club will host a Spaghetti Supper from 5-7 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 10 in the dining room of the Westminster Presbyterian Church at 325 W. Ash St., Piqua. The event is a fundraiser for Leaders Club members to attend statewide leadership rallies. Tickets are available at the door for $6 per adult and $4 for children under the age of 10. Meals include spaghetti with sauce, salad, and bread. Desserts are available for 50 cents. Advance reservations or ticket are not required. For more information call Joe Hinds, Teen Leadership Director at the YMCA at 778-5247. Hinds can also be reached viar email j.hinds@miamicountyymca.net.

Lottery CLEVELAND (AP) — Tuesday’s winning Ohio Lottery numbers: Night Drawings: ■ Rolling Cash 5 1-4-11-27-35 ■ Pick 3 Numbers 9-2-8 ■ Pick 4 Numbers 7-7-9-1 Day Drawings: ■ Pick 3 Midday 5-3-9 ■ Pick 4 Midday 9-1-7-7 For Mega Millions, visit www.ohiolottery.com

Index Classified ...............10-11 Opinion ..........................4 Church ...........................6 Comics ..........................9 Entertainment ...............5 Horoscopes...................9 Local ..............................3 Obituaries......................2 School............................7 Sports.....................12-14 Weather .........................3

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Post office ends Saturday mail WASHINGTON (AP) — The financially struggling U.S. Postal Service said Wednesday it will stop delivering mail on Saturdays but continue to disburse packages six days a week, an apparent end-run around an unaccommodating Congress. The service expects the Saturday mail cutback to begin the week of Aug. 5 and to save about $2 billion annually, said Postmaster General and CEO Patrick R. Donahoe. “Our financial condition is urgent,” Donahoe told a press conference. The move accentuates one of the agency’s strong points — package delivery has increased by 14 percent since 2010, officials say, while the delivery of letters and other mail has declined with the increasing use of email and other Internet services. Under the new plan, mail would be delivered to homes and businesses from Monday only through Friday, but would still be delivered to post office boxes on Saturdays. Post offices now open on Saturdays would remain open on Saturdays. Over the past several years, the Postal Service

has advocated shifting to a five-day delivery schedule for mail and packages — and it repeatedly but unsuccessfully appealed to Congress to approve the move. Though an independent agency, the service gets no tax dollars for its day-to-day operations but is subject to congressional control. Congress has included a ban on five-day delivery in its appropriations bill. But because the federal government is now operating under a temporary spending measure, rather than an appropriations bill, Donahoe says it’s the agency’s interpretation that it can make the change itself. “This is not like a ‘gotcha’ or anything like that,” he said. The agency is essentially asking Congress not to reimpose the ban when the spending measure expires on March 27 and he said he would work with Congress on the issue. The agency clearly thinks it has a majority of the American public on its side regarding the change. Postal Service market research and other research indicated that nearly 7 in 10 Americans

FOR PHOTO REPRINTS, GO TO WWW.DAILYCALL.COM

Postal carrier Sommer Miller attempts to deliver a letter on her route in Piqua on Wednesda. Miller has been employed by the United States Postal Service 12 years. support the switch to fiveday delivery as a way for the Postal Service to reduce costs, the agency said. “The Postal Service is advancing an important new approach to delivery that reflects the strong growth of our package business and responds to the financial realities resulting from America’s changing mailing habits,”

Donahoe said. “We developed this approach by working with our customers to understand their delivery needs and by identifying creative ways to generate significant cost savings.” But the president of the National Association of Letter Carriers, Fredric Rolando, said the end of Saturday mail delivery is “a disastrous idea that

Downtown burglaries increase More break-ins reported at local businesses BY WILL E SANDERS Staff Writer wsanders@civitasmedia.com PIQUA — Three more commercial burglaries were reported last weekend, a continuing trend of such crimes that has been on the rise since December in the downtown district of the city.

In a news story last week, Piqua Chief of Police Bruce Jamison said that since Dec. 1, there has been a total of 11 commercial burglaries in the downtown area — a statistic that grew to 14 after three more were reported on Feb. 2 and 3. On Feb. 2, Piqua Auto Supply, 513

N. Main St., was forcibly entered through a back door and an undisclosed amount of cash was taken. The next day, however, the pattern of the downtown commercial burglaries shifted from the downtown district to elsewhere in the city. The owner of Are U Game, 1410 Edge St., reported that the business was broken into and a safe, two video game consoles and a Blackberry were stolen. Then, at Industrial Spring, 9200 Country Club, a glass door at the business was broken and a computer, a computer monitor and a wrench were stolen. “It certainly appears to be more of the same,” Jamison said. “We need people to remain vigilant.” Businesses in the downtown area that have been struck in the last two months include: Eagle Printing, 318 N. Main St., Dec. 4; Miracle Hair Salon, 322 N. Wayne St., Dec. 21 and again Jan. 15; Tron Insur-

ance, 110 E. Greene St., Jan. 17 and again Jan. 21; Wayne, Wyandt & Assoc., 523 N. Wayne St., Jan. 21 and again Jan. 27; KC Auto Sales & Service, 660 N. Main St., Jan. 25; Masonic Temple, 217 W. High St., Jan. 25; The Barber Shop, 108 E. Greene St., Jan. 27; and Galbreath Realty, 308 W. High St., Jan. 28. Jamison said some of the crimes could be related to one another, but said one predominant similarity to the majority of commercial burglaries was geographic location. All of the crimes remain under investigation, police officials said. “We are really interested in hearing the tips from people who might know the people responsible,” Jamison said. Tips can be submitted anonymously by visiting www.piquaohpd.org or by texting the word “CRIMES” (274637) with the keyword “PiquaPD” or by calling the CrimeStoppers hotline at 615-TIPS.

Construction closes lanes on I-75 STAFF REPORTS MIAMI COUNTY — Lane closures will be in effect on I-75 northbound and southbound between State Route 41 and Northwoods Boulevard today and Friday. These closures will take place daily between the hours of 9 a.m. and 3 p.m. The affected lanes are scheduled to reopen to motorists Friday at 3 p.m. Two lanes of traffic will remain open to motorists in each direction at all times. These lane closures are due to crews removing concrete spalls (pieces of loose concrete) from overhead bridges. Arrow boards and signs will be in place prior to the work zone to alert motorists of the upcoming closure. Law enforcement will be on hand to monitor traffic flow. All work is weather permitting. Safety is a top

MIKE ULLERY/STAFF PHOTO

MIKE ULLERY/STAFF PHOTO

Lanes will be closed on I-75 northbound and southbound between State Route 41 and Northwoods Boulevard today and Friday 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. priority at ODOT. To help ensure the safety of the construction workers as well as the traveling public, motorists

should remain alert, reduce their speed and watch for stopped traffic while passing through the work zone.

For home delivery, call 773-2725

would have a profoundly negative effect on the Postal Service and on millions of customers,” particularly businesses, rural communities, the elderly, the disabled and others who depend on Saturday delivery for commerce and communication. He said the maneuver by Donahoe to make the See Mail/Page 2

Johnston Farms deal in works BY BELINDA M. PASCHAL Staff Writer pdceditorial@civitasmedia.com PIQUA — The Ohio Historical Society’s agreement to turn management of two historical sites over to a local council is “a different way of doing business, and a better way of doing business,” according to OHS Executive Director Burt Logan. The society’s board of trustees and the Johnston Farm Friends Council met Wednesday to seek feedback from the public about a management agreement for Johnston Farm & Indian Agency in Piqua and Lockington Locks in Lockington. Under the arrangement, both sites would still be owned by the OHS, but its daily operations would be managed by the Friends Council. The OHS board of trustees will consider the agreement at its March meeting. Council member Jim Oda called the agreement “the best of both worlds” because it would combine “the expertise and skills of the OHS with the local knowledge we have here in Piqua and wonderful local staff.” Oda noted that though the council would take on increased responsibilities See Johnston /Page 2


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Thursday, February 7, 2013

CITY

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Burglar ‘butt dials’ own arrest BY TOM MILLHOUSE Civitas Media tmillhouse@civitasmedia.com SIDNEY — A Piqua area man may find himself the butt of jokes after he “butt dialed” 9-1-1, leading Shelby County deputies Tuesday evening to the unoccupied home he was in the process of burglarizing in the 500 block of Miami River Road. While breaking a window to gain entry to the home, Douglas J. Wolaver, 40, of 14001 E. Miami

Road, Piqua, accidentally “butt dialed” 9-1-1 on his cell phone. The call was answered by an emergency dispatcher who immediately ascertained the wireless call’s location and alerted deputies of an open call from an cell phone from someone possibly needing emergency help. Sheriffs reports state upon arriving on the scene deputies found a window had been forced open and entry was gained by un-

known subjects. Deputies searching the home they discovered a clue as to where the culprit was hiding. Wolaver’s cell phone was beeping due to a low battery, leading them to the bathroom. He stepped out of a shower and gave himself up. “We would appreciate it if any other criminals call us like that,” said Sheriff John Lenhart. The only other time he could recall deputies having such an

easy time tracking down a burglary suspect was the time when a burglar left behind his wallet. Lenhart said Tuesday was “a great day for technology and a bad day for a burglar. He noted that his department appreciates the technology at the dispatch center that “allows us to not only locate the public when emergenciesarise, but also when burglars call 9-1-1 while the act of committing their crime.”

Locals take bricks in memory of razed high school

• PIQUA DAILY CALL

Obituaries

Thomas R. Evans MESA, Ariz. — Thomas R. Evans, 77, formerly of Piqua and Detroit, Mich., died at 7:03 a.m. Sunday, Feb. 3, 2013, at the Jones Family C a r e Center o f Mesa, Ariz. He was b o r n EVANS Oct. 22, 1935, in Piqua, to the late Lee Andrew and Pearl Hattie (Dowty) Evans. Survivors include a daughter, Tamara “Tami” (Steven) Knapp of Mesa, Ariz.; two sons, Thomas (Kelly) Evans and Terry (Roxa n n e ) Evans, all of Gilbert, Ariz.; eight grandchildren; four great-grandchildren; and a brother, Chris (Arlene) Evans of Piqua. He was preceded in death by a brother and two sisters. Mr. Evans was a 1953

graduate of Piqua Central High School and served as a police officer for South Lyon Police Department of Detroit, Mich. for 22 years. He was a United States Navy veteran having serviced during the Korean War. He enjoyed music from the Big Bands and solving jigsaw puzzles. A service to honor his life will begin at 1:30 p.m. Friday, at the Jamieson & Yannucci Funeral Home with Major Robert Klenk officiating. Burial will follow at Forest Hill Cemetery where full military honors will be provided by the Veterans Elite Tribute Squad. Visitation will be from 12-1:30 p.m. Friday at the funeral home. Memorial contributions may be made to the Alzheimer’s Association, 3797 Summit Glen Dr., Dayton, OH 45449 or Hospice of Miami County Inc., P.O. Box 502, Troy, OH 45373. Guestbook condolences and expressions of sympathy, to be provided to the family, may be expressed through jamiesonandyannucci.com.

Death Notice TIPP CITY — Lyle E. Sandberg, 86, Tipp City, has died. Funeral services will be Monday at Frings and Bayliff Funeral Home, Tipp City. Policy: Please send obituary notices by e-mail to editorial@dailycall.com or by fax to (937) 773-4225. Deadlines: Notices must be received by 6 p.m. Sunday and Tuesday-Friday, and by 4 p.m. on Monday for Tuesday’s online edition. Questions: Please call Editor Susan Hartley at (937) 773-2721, ext. 207 if you have questions about obituaries.

ANTHONY WEBER/STAFF PHOTO

Kim Adams sorts through bricks near the demolition site of the former Milton-Union High School. Adams said she was gathering bricks from the building to give to several nieces and nephews who attended the school as well as friends at McKinley ComBY ANN SANNER mons Apartments. Associated Press

Ohio seeks to overhaul Medicaid eligibility

Johnston including fundraising, switching management would not change visitors’ experiences at Johnston Farm & Indian Agency. “Visitors will see no difference except better programming and better use of our facilities.” In addition to fundraising, the Friends Council would be responsible for overseeing the staff of Johnston Farm. “The Friends Council will operate as a board, with the staff answering to that

board,” Oda said. George Kane, director of historical sites and facilities for the Ohio Historical Society, said the agreement was based on models from the past. In the 30’s, the society partnered with the Department of Highways (now the Ohio Department of Transportation) to maintain its roadside parks. In the early 1980s, the OHS signed similar agreements with 15 groups to manage sites including historic house museums and roadside parks. “We

now have 42 partners managing 49 historic sites and museums,” Kane said. Communities today have become more supportive, involved and invested in the preservation of historical sites, Kane said, and this was reflected in the crowd of about two dozen residents who turned out for the meeting. Most of their questions centered on sites other than Johnston Farm & Indian Agency and Lockington Locks. Larry Hamilton, an author and former history

teacher who lives in Piqua, inquired about the type of fundraising the Friends would be doing for Johnston Farm. “In addition to grant support, keep in mind that every little fourthgrader who comes in, all the people who come in pay an entry fee. That is part of our fundraising,” Oda said. Operations also will be funded by such events as “How the West Was Fun!” which takes place April 18 at the farm.

He said other action will be needed as well, such as shuttering smaller rural post offices and restructuring employee health care and pension costs. “It’s unclear whether the USPS has the legislative authority to take such actions on its own, but the alternative is the status quo until it is completely cash starved,” O’Rourke said in a statement. The Postal Service made the announcement Wednesday, more than six months before the switch, to give residential and business customers time to plan and adjust, officials said. Donahoe said the change would mean a combination of employee reassignment and attrition and is expected to achieve cost savings of approximately $2 billion annually when fully implemented. The agency in November reported an annual loss of a record $15.9 billion for the last budget year and forecast more red ink in 2013, capping a tumultuous year in which it was forced to default on

billions in retiree health benefit prepayments to avert bankruptcy. The financial losses for the fiscal year ending Sept. 30 were more than triple the $5.1 billion loss in the previous year. Having reached its borrowing limit, the mail agency is operating with little cash on hand. The agency’s biggest problem — and the majority of the red ink in 2012 — was not due to reduced mail flow but rather to mounting mandatory costs for future retiree health benefits, which made up $11.1 billion of the losses. Without that and other related labor expenses, the mail agency sustained an operating loss of $2.4 billion, lower than the previous year. The health payments are a requirement imposed by Congress in 2006 that the post office set aside $55 billion in an account to cover future medical costs for retirees. The idea was to put $5.5 billion a year into the account for 10 years. That’s $5.5 billion the post office doesn’t have. No other government

agency is required to make such a payment for future medical benefits. Postal authorities wanted Congress to address the issue last year, but lawmakers finished their session without getting it done. So officials are moving ahead to accelerate their own plan for costcutting. The Postal Service is in the midst of a major restructuring throughout its retail, delivery and mail processing operations. Since 2006, it has cut annual costs by about $15 billion, reduced the size of its career workforce by 193,000 or by 28 percent, and has consolidated more than 200 mail processing locations, officials say.

Mail Continued from page 1 He said the maneuver by Donahoe to make the change “flouts the will of Congress, as expressed annually over the past 30 years in legislation that mandates six-day delivery.” House Oversight and Government Reform Committee Chairman Darrell Issa, R-Calif., and Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Ranking Member Tom Coburn M.D., R-Okla., said in a joint statement that they had sent a letter to leaders of the House and Senate in support of the elimination of Saturday mail. They called it “commonsense reform” Others agreed the Postal Service had little choice. “If the Congress of the United States refuses to take action to save the U.S. Postal Service, then the Postal Service will have to take action on its own,” said corporate communications expert James S. O’Rourke, professor of management at the University of Notre Dame.

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COLUMBUS (AP) — Ohio is closer to replacing an outdated computer system that’s known for rejecting eligible people from the Medicaid program and accepting others who don’t meet the criteria. Officials said Wednesday the state will contract with Accenture LLC for a new system that will help determine who’s eligible for programs across Ohio’s health and human services agencies. The move comes as the governor says he plans to expand the Medicaid program to cover more lowincome people under President Barack Obama’s health care law. Gov. John Kasich unveiled his decision on Medicaid expansion in his two-year state budget proposal on Monday. The Kasich administration anticipates that almost 366,000 Ohioans will be eligible for coverage beginning in 2014 by expanding Medicaid, the health program for the poor that already provides care for one of every five residents in the state. The state also is bracing for 230,000 eligible Ohioans to sign up for Medicaid once the federal law requires most people to have health insurance. Kasich’s proposed budget includes $230 million for the eligibility system upgrade, though the federal government would reimburse the state for most of the cost. The

state’s share of the bill is expected to be $26 million over the two-year budget. The state’s current eligibility system, known as CRIS-E, was launched in 1978. The administration says it’s “so fragile and technically obsolete that it is no longer practical or cost effective to invest in enhancing the system.” The state estimates that 60 percent of CRISE’s eligibility determinations for Medicaid are inaccurate and must be manually overridden to prevent applicants from being denied coverage or remove those who weren’t eligible. Officials say the move will make applicants’ lives easier. “This new system will allow more Ohioans to apply for services online, instead of waiting in line,” said Greg Moody, director of the governor’s Office of Health Transformation. Ohio Medicaid Director John McCarthy said most who fill out the online applications would find out quickly whether they’re eligible for the Medicaid program, without having to leave their home and go to a county office. The state also wants to use the system to determine whether applicants are eligible for food or cash assistance programs. “We’re all working together to make it as seamless for a person as possible,” McCarthy said. The system will begin enrolling people in Medicaid by Jan. 1.

Phone: 937.339.8001 Fax: 855.339.5440 chriswesnerlaw@gmail.com ChrisWesnerLaw.com 22 N. Market Street Suite C, Troy, OH 430 N. Wayne St. - Piqua, OH


COMING

TOMORROW Covington Outreach Commitment To Community

INSIDE: Mumford musician excited about Troy shows. Page 5.

VOLUME 130, NUMBER 27

INSIDE: ‘Nones on the Rise”: Study finds 20 percent have no religious affiliation. Page 6.

INSIDE: Edison women lose to Cincinnati State. Page 12.

T H U R S DAY, F E B R UA RY 7 , 2 0 1 3

w w w. d a i l y c a l l . c o m

$1.00

an award-winning Civitas Media newspaper

Briefly Today’s weather High 45 Low 30 Chance of evening rain Complete forecast on Page 3.

USA Weekend coming Saturday This week’s USA Weekend, which will be included in Saturday’s Call.

Cemetery annual financial report available PIQUA — The annual financial report of Forest Hill Cemetery for 2012 is now available for public inspection at the cemetery office, 8660 N. State Route 66.

YMCA hosts spaghetti supper PIQUA — The Miami County YMCA Teen Leaders Club will host a Spaghetti Supper from 5-7 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 10 in the dining room of the Westminster Presbyterian Church at 325 W. Ash St., Piqua. The event is a fundraiser for Leaders Club members to attend statewide leadership rallies. Tickets are available at the door for $6 per adult and $4 for children under the age of 10. Meals include spaghetti with sauce, salad, and bread. Desserts are available for 50 cents. Advance reservations or ticket are not required. For more information call Joe Hinds, Teen Leadership Director at the YMCA at 778-5247. Hinds can also be reached viar email j.hinds@miamicountyymca.net.

Lottery CLEVELAND (AP) — Tuesday’s winning Ohio Lottery numbers: Night Drawings: ■ Rolling Cash 5 1-4-11-27-35 ■ Pick 3 Numbers 9-2-8 ■ Pick 4 Numbers 7-7-9-1 Day Drawings: ■ Pick 3 Midday 5-3-9 ■ Pick 4 Midday 9-1-7-7 For Mega Millions, visit www.ohiolottery.com

Index Classified ...............10-11 Opinion ..........................4 Church ...........................6 Comics ..........................9 Entertainment ...............5 Horoscopes...................9 Local ..............................3 Obituaries......................2 School............................7 Sports.....................12-14 Weather .........................3

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Post office ends Saturday mail WASHINGTON (AP) — The financially struggling U.S. Postal Service said Wednesday it will stop delivering mail on Saturdays but continue to disburse packages six days a week, an apparent end-run around an unaccommodating Congress. The service expects the Saturday mail cutback to begin the week of Aug. 5 and to save about $2 billion annually, said Postmaster General and CEO Patrick R. Donahoe. “Our financial condition is urgent,” Donahoe told a press conference. The move accentuates one of the agency’s strong points — package delivery has increased by 14 percent since 2010, officials say, while the delivery of letters and other mail has declined with the increasing use of email and other Internet services. Under the new plan, mail would be delivered to homes and businesses from Monday only through Friday, but would still be delivered to post office boxes on Saturdays. Post offices now open on Saturdays would remain open on Saturdays. Over the past several years, the Postal Service

has advocated shifting to a five-day delivery schedule for mail and packages — and it repeatedly but unsuccessfully appealed to Congress to approve the move. Though an independent agency, the service gets no tax dollars for its day-to-day operations but is subject to congressional control. Congress has included a ban on five-day delivery in its appropriations bill. But because the federal government is now operating under a temporary spending measure, rather than an appropriations bill, Donahoe says it’s the agency’s interpretation that it can make the change itself. “This is not like a ‘gotcha’ or anything like that,” he said. The agency is essentially asking Congress not to reimpose the ban when the spending measure expires on March 27 and he said he would work with Congress on the issue. The agency clearly thinks it has a majority of the American public on its side regarding the change. Postal Service market research and other research indicated that nearly 7 in 10 Americans

FOR PHOTO REPRINTS, GO TO WWW.DAILYCALL.COM

Postal carrier Sommer Miller attempts to deliver a letter on her route in Piqua on Wednesda. Miller has been employed by the United States Postal Service 12 years. support the switch to fiveday delivery as a way for the Postal Service to reduce costs, the agency said. “The Postal Service is advancing an important new approach to delivery that reflects the strong growth of our package business and responds to the financial realities resulting from America’s changing mailing habits,”

Donahoe said. “We developed this approach by working with our customers to understand their delivery needs and by identifying creative ways to generate significant cost savings.” But the president of the National Association of Letter Carriers, Fredric Rolando, said the end of Saturday mail delivery is “a disastrous idea that

Downtown burglaries increase More break-ins reported at local businesses BY WILL E SANDERS Staff Writer wsanders@civitasmedia.com PIQUA — Three more commercial burglaries were reported last weekend, a continuing trend of such crimes that has been on the rise since December in the downtown district of the city.

In a news story last week, Piqua Chief of Police Bruce Jamison said that since Dec. 1, there has been a total of 11 commercial burglaries in the downtown area — a statistic that grew to 14 after three more were reported on Feb. 2 and 3. On Feb. 2, Piqua Auto Supply, 513

N. Main St., was forcibly entered through a back door and an undisclosed amount of cash was taken. The next day, however, the pattern of the downtown commercial burglaries shifted from the downtown district to elsewhere in the city. The owner of Are U Game, 1410 Edge St., reported that the business was broken into and a safe, two video game consoles and a Blackberry were stolen. Then, at Industrial Spring, 9200 Country Club, a glass door at the business was broken and a computer, a computer monitor and a wrench were stolen. “It certainly appears to be more of the same,” Jamison said. “We need people to remain vigilant.” Businesses in the downtown area that have been struck in the last two months include: Eagle Printing, 318 N. Main St., Dec. 4; Miracle Hair Salon, 322 N. Wayne St., Dec. 21 and again Jan. 15; Tron Insur-

ance, 110 E. Greene St., Jan. 17 and again Jan. 21; Wayne, Wyandt & Assoc., 523 N. Wayne St., Jan. 21 and again Jan. 27; KC Auto Sales & Service, 660 N. Main St., Jan. 25; Masonic Temple, 217 W. High St., Jan. 25; The Barber Shop, 108 E. Greene St., Jan. 27; and Galbreath Realty, 308 W. High St., Jan. 28. Jamison said some of the crimes could be related to one another, but said one predominant similarity to the majority of commercial burglaries was geographic location. All of the crimes remain under investigation, police officials said. “We are really interested in hearing the tips from people who might know the people responsible,” Jamison said. Tips can be submitted anonymously by visiting www.piquaohpd.org or by texting the word “CRIMES” (274637) with the keyword “PiquaPD” or by calling the CrimeStoppers hotline at 615-TIPS.

Construction closes lanes on I-75 STAFF REPORTS MIAMI COUNTY — Lane closures will be in effect on I-75 northbound and southbound between State Route 41 and Northwoods Boulevard today and Friday. These closures will take place daily between the hours of 9 a.m. and 3 p.m. The affected lanes are scheduled to reopen to motorists Friday at 3 p.m. Two lanes of traffic will remain open to motorists in each direction at all times. These lane closures are due to crews removing concrete spalls (pieces of loose concrete) from overhead bridges. Arrow boards and signs will be in place prior to the work zone to alert motorists of the upcoming closure. Law enforcement will be on hand to monitor traffic flow. All work is weather permitting. Safety is a top

MIKE ULLERY/STAFF PHOTO

MIKE ULLERY/STAFF PHOTO

Lanes will be closed on I-75 northbound and southbound between State Route 41 and Northwoods Boulevard today and Friday 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. priority at ODOT. To help ensure the safety of the construction workers as well as the traveling public, motorists

should remain alert, reduce their speed and watch for stopped traffic while passing through the work zone.

For home delivery, call 773-2725

would have a profoundly negative effect on the Postal Service and on millions of customers,” particularly businesses, rural communities, the elderly, the disabled and others who depend on Saturday delivery for commerce and communication. He said the maneuver by Donahoe to make the See Mail/Page 2

Johnston Farms deal in works BY BELINDA M. PASCHAL Staff Writer pdceditorial@civitasmedia.com PIQUA — The Ohio Historical Society’s agreement to turn management of two historical sites over to a local council is “a different way of doing business, and a better way of doing business,” according to OHS Executive Director Burt Logan. The society’s board of trustees and the Johnston Farm Friends Council met Wednesday to seek feedback from the public about a management agreement for Johnston Farm & Indian Agency in Piqua and Lockington Locks in Lockington. Under the arrangement, both sites would still be owned by the OHS, but its daily operations would be managed by the Friends Council. The OHS board of trustees will consider the agreement at its March meeting. Council member Jim Oda called the agreement “the best of both worlds” because it would combine “the expertise and skills of the OHS with the local knowledge we have here in Piqua and wonderful local staff.” Oda noted that though the council would take on increased responsibilities See Johnston /Page 2


OPINION

4 Piqua Daily Call

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2013

Contact us For information regarding the Opinion page, contact Editor Susan Hartley at 773-2721, or send an email to sharley@dailycall.com www.dailycall.com

Letters

Have hospitals left the calling? Asks reader

Serving Piqua since 1883

“Rejoice in the Lord always: and again I say, Rejoice.” (Philippians 4:4 AKJV) If we get our joy from Jesus, no one will be able to take our joy away. Think it over.

Commentary

GOP ploy to change electoral college bound to backfire BY STEVE AND COKIE ROBERTS We must stop being the stupid party,” Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal warned fellow Republicans recently. “It's time for a new Republican Party that talks like adults.” Many Republicans apparently weren't listening, because they insist on doing stupid things. Exhibit A: lawmakers in a half-dozen states who are trying to alter the Electoral College system to give Republicans more votes. This is a desperate and ultimately self-defeating reaction to the changing demographics of America. The GOP calculus seems to be: We can never appeal to minorities, and we cannot win the presidency without them, so let's rig the system to reduce their influence - and, in the process, really tick them off. The result will be to make minorities feel even more unwelcome in the Republican Party than they already do, and more likely to step up their organizing and voting efforts. In all but two cases, Maine and Nebraska, all of a state's electoral votes go to the winner of the popular vote. Republicans loved this system when they were regularly capturing the White House (five of seven times between 1980 and 2004). But Barack Obama's two victories have scared the heck out of them, and with good reason. In 1980, the electorate was 88 percent white, and Ronald Reagan won 56 percent of that vote in easily defeating Democrat Jimmy Carter. Last year, Mitt Romney actually bested Reagan among whites, winning 59 percent. But whites accounted for only 72 percent of the total vote, and Obama crushed Romney with minorities, taking 93 percent of blacks, 73 percent of Asians and 71 percent of Hispanics. These minority voters, often clustered in urban areas, provided key margins for Obama in swing states such as Ohio, Florida and Virginia. So, figured those brilliant GOP strategists, perhaps the law could be changed to allocate electoral votes by congressional district, thus boosting the leverage of rural areas and undercutting that Democratic advantage. If that alternative system had been in effect last fall in Virginia, for example, Romney would have won nine of 13 electoral votes — even while losing the state by 150,000 popular votes. From a crass political viewpoint, it might be worth enraging minorities if the GOP ploy had any chance of working. But it doesn't. Smart Republicans are appalled. “It's not going to happen in Virginia,” insisted the state's ambitious Republican governor, Bob McDonnell. State Sen. Jill Holtzman Vogel called the scheme “pretty shortsighted.” Then a state Senate committee controlled by Republicans killed the bill. Even if these proposals somehow became law, they would immediately be challenged in court as racially biased. And that's exactly what they are. State Sen. Charles Carrico, the lead sponsor in Virginia, candidly explained his motive in The Washington Post: “The last election, constituents were concerned that it didn't matter what they did, that more densely populated areas were going to outvote them.” Most federal judges will surely understand that “densely populated areas” — along with “urban” and “metro” — are code words for race. And by the way, Sen. Carrico, that's how democracy works. The majority wins. Blacks in Alabama and gays in Idaho also feel outvoted. Just because an idea is stupid doesn't make it surprising. Attempts to rig the Electoral College flow from the same motives that inspired Republican lawmakers to pass laws limiting voter participation in a dozen states last fall. Many of the laws were tossed out on legal grounds, but they gave Democrats in “densely populated areas” a pitchperfect rallying cry. The Nation quoted Matt Barreto, a pollster specializing in the Latino vote: “There were huge organizing efforts in the black, Hispanic and Asian communities, more than there would have been, as a direct result of the voter suppression efforts.” The Rev. Tony Minor, an AfricanAmerican minister in Ohio, added: “When they went after big mama's voting rights, they made all of us mad.” Sanity has not completely deserted Republican ranks. In Florida, state House Speaker Will Weatherford told reporters that Republicans don't need “to change the rules of the game” and offered a different option: “I think we need to get better.” Fellow Floridian Sen. Marco Rubio is doing exactly that, bravely joining a bipartisan group of U.S. senators in proposing a reasonable compromise on immigration reform. Jeb and George Bush have both proved that Republicans can win a decent share of Hispanic support if they respect and understand those voters. Subverting democracy by suffocating minorities is the opposite of respect. It ignores Jindal's advice and damages the Republican brand. Talk about stupid.

Commentary

Choose life, choose family lical understanding, there n the morning of the exists a profound unity be40th anniversary of tween that which is physithe Supreme Court's cal and that which is Roe v. Wade ruling, I felt a spiritual,” he writes. “This chill, and it wasn't the bitter means that our bodies are cold. After Mass at St. not mere shells in which Patrick's Cathedral, some our true 'spiritual selves' 500 or so New Yorkers live. We are a profound walked through the streets of Midtown Manhattan, in KATHRYN LOPEZ unity of body and soul, matter and spirit. In a very real front of God, man and Columnist way, we are our bodies.” Grand Central Station, The general acceptance of praying for life, love and mercy. Our prayers were not in judg- the notion that our bodies are more than ment of others but that humanity may a conglomeration of biological functions do better: that women and men may see is no longer something we can take for better options than abortion and that granted. Not when our federal healthGod may forgive us for letting anyone care policy treats women's fertility as a think that she is alone and has no other disease, as a roadblock to a confused misunderstanding of freedom and equalchoice than the death of her child. The chill was the knowledge that ity. Not when we are sending women some of the people nearby know the pain into combat. The world-famous former mayor of of abortion all too well. It was the certainty that someone, on her morning New York City, Ed Koch, just died. He commute, was thinking that was her was good friends with the late Cardinal only option. It was the sharing in a com- John O'Connor. They collaborated on a book, “His Eminence and Hizzoner,” in munity's pain, guilt and sorrow. We tend to live our lives masked in a 1989 in which Koch wrote: “The future veil of the self, pretending we live alone. of our nation depends on our ability to But as solitary as we might sometimes inculcate a strong sense of morality in our young people. That moral sense feel, our actions affect others. Now is the time to take a few steps should be based on philosophical, ethical back -- not to turn back the clock, but to and religious teachings, which are the underpinnings of conscience. The way to reflect. Our problems won't be solved through oppose abortion is by challenging the legislative actions. And legislative solu- conscience of those who advocate it. If tions, to the extent that they are effec- the battle cannot be won at the level of tive, can't be maximized without a fuller conscience, it cannot be won.” But what is conscience? What consticontext. We can't simply hold a vote to defund Planned Parenthood in order to tutes right or wrong? If we do not agree send a political message and assume there are answers to these questions, that the culture will change, that people we'll never have a constructive policy or will suddenly see the poisonous eugen- cultural debate about abortion. That is ics upon which the organization was the basic work we need to address. No founded and see adoption as the brilliant election is ever going to be better withand generous option that it is. A con- out it. No culture is ever going to be regressional vote is not a magic trick. newed without it. No lives are going to There are so many more steps involved. be truly saved and redeemed without it. In a new book, “Fill These Hearts,” au- We won't start making sense again withthor Christopher West asks us to “Con- out it. The dark bitter cold of winter will sider the idea that our bodies tell a story be warmed by the renewal that comes that reveals, as we learn how to read it, with embracing life, living life lovingly, the very meaning of existence and the supporting life, letting someone know path to the ultimate satisfaction of our they are not alone. deepest desire.” Kathryn Lopez is the editor-at-large of West makes the point that our bodies and souls are not separate things, and National Review Online www.nationalthat our very physical design speaks to review.com. She can be contacted at our creation and destination. “In the bib- klopez@nationalreview.com.

O

Letters

Appreciation expressed to Piqua Manor Nursing Home To the Editor: We would like to take the opportunity to express our sincere appreciation to Piqua Manor Nursing Home for the special care and attention they gave to our mother, Dorothy Cruikshank. The compassion and care that she was given during her stay, we feel the employees go above and beyond their call of duty when it comes to the care of their patients. We would like to extend a special “Thank You” to Dr. Luna, Audrey Alexander, Abbie Hanselman, Vickie Saunders, Susie Davis, Tim Knepp, and Sharon Hicks. Our family

will never be able to thank all of you for the special care and attention that you gave to our Mother.All of you took wonderful care of mom and we know that she appreciated all of your compassion and dedication. It is never easy to place a loved one into a nursing home,however from the moment we stepped through the door at Piqua Manor we knew our Mother was in wonderful hands. Again, a “Big Thank You” and May God Bless each one of you. — Kathie (daughter) and Kirt Huemmer Piqua

Where to Write

THE FIRST AMENDMENT Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the government for a redress of grievances.

Public officials can be contacted through the following addresses and telephone numbers: ■ Lucy Fess, mayor, 5th Ward Commissioner, ward5comm@piquaoh.org, 773-7929 (home) ■ John Martin, 1st Ward Commissioner, ward1comm@piquaoh.org, 773-2778 (home) Steve and Cokie Roberts can be contacted by email at ■ William Vogt, 2nd Ward Commissioner, stevecokie@gmail.com.

ward2comm@piquaoh.org, 773-8217 ■ Joe Wilson, 3rd Ward Commissioner, ward3comm@piquaoh.org, 778-0390 ■ Judy Terry, 4th Ward Commissioner, ward4comm@piquaoh.org, 773-3189 ■ City Manager Gary Huff, ghuff@piquaoh.org, 778-2051 ■ Miami County Commissioners: John “Bud” O’Brien, Jack Evans and Richard Cultice, 201 W. Main St., Troy, OH

To the Editor: Just left the home of someone I love. She had her kidney and a cancerous tumor the size of a grapefruit removed the day before I saw her. The hospital staff treated her “beyond the expectations” but discharged her within 24 hours after she left surgery. Their answer, when she begged not to be sent home – 2 ½ hours away during a snowstorm – until her pain was lessened? “We understand what you’re saying but Medicare will only pay for 24 hours.” Since she had already paid $1,100 as her deductible in order to have the surgery, she had no more money available to pay. I know hospitals used to receive donations from organizations and also bequeaths, which they set aside from which to draw interest for “indigent” patients. What happened to that money? Why have hospitals left the “calling” and become businesses that continually seek to enlarge themselves in competition? Why do they blame their inhumaneness on the government? Why did the government put the money that was set aside for “medical insurance” into the general fund to be used for … research on why turtles, etc. were becoming extinct …grants for more “fashionable” sidewalks … and other priorities. We don’t need the government to take care of us – but to be responsible with the money we have been forced to give them. Why do we just shake our head at the injustice? Why do we accept this? I guess, because we’ve learned that what we feel is right doesn’t matter. — Sandy Knous-Wolf Piqua

Letters Send your signed letters to the editor, Piqua Daily Call, P.O. Box 921, Piqua, OH 45356. Send letters by e-mail to shartley@dailycall.com. Send letters by fax to (937) 7732782.

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ENTERTAINMENT

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TROY — Participants in Mumford & Sons’ Gentlemen of the Road Stopovers tour should expect a high-energy show, according to vocalist and banjo player Winston Marshall. The award-winning English folkrock band’s tour will stop at Troy Memorial Stadium for an end-of-summer concert, Aug. 30-31. Winston Marshall, one of the band’s four members, said Tuesday the band is looking even more forward to the Gentlemen of the Road Stopovers tour than when it began in 2012. He said the unusual two-day touring dates were born from favorite things of the bands from festivals all around the world, tied into one event, such as the Telluride Bluegrass Festival in Colorado. But, he said, at first they thought they might have bitten off more than they could chew. “We were a little bit cocky and wanted to roll all our favorite things about other festivals into one, but we quickly found out it’s a lot of work,” Marshall said. “But, we have found that with collaborating with smaller communities like Troy, Ohio, it works.” Marshall said that Troy was chosen — following an application process — because organizers were willing to put the work in necessary to bring the tour to the town. “Although we have not yet been (to Troy), we’ve been told it’s great,” Marshall said. “A lot of towns are not up for the challenges that bringing something like this means, but Troy was. Our people have had nothing but collaboration

from those in Troy.” The tour also will be making stops in the UK, Canada, Oklahoma and Florida. “These are all the towns that wanted it most. I have had amazing reports about what to expect,” he said. “This tour is amazing; it’s something that we love.” Now that they have a year of the Gentlemen of the Road Stopover tours under their belt, Marshall said this year’s events will be much more enjoyable for the band. “Last year I was nervous. This year I’m very excited,” he said. “It’s going to be amazing.” Looking back, Marshall said he and fellow band mates practically pinch themselves each morning when they get up — in awe of the success they have found. “It’s so bizarre. Whenever we reflect, you are overwhelmed with how mad it is; it’s just not logical,” Marshall said. Their love of being on the road has helped fuel the band to its success by being out their sharing their music in person, he said. “Our common interest, apart from the music, is touring, and going places we haven’t been to before,” Marshall said. “It’s thanks to people who are buying the music and (concert) tickets that we get to continue to do this.” The band will be joined by some of their favorites — an array of bands from Nashville-based to as far away as the UK. Marshall said there wasn’t just one moment for band members when they realized they had “made it,” there have been many.

5

Readers warn teen to avoid becoming a parent too soon

Band member excited to stop in small towns

BY MELODY VALLIEU Civitas Media mvallieu@civitasmedia.com

Thursday, February 7, 2013

“I don’t want to sound spoiled or blase, in one aspect, the journey of the band has been steadily doing bigger, and bigger venues. We have spent the last six years touring and touring. It’s been a slow build,” Marshall said. “There’s been a lot of those moments. “Lots of bands dream about playing on the telly (TV), and we dreamed about going to America to play music. Then, there was playing with Bob Dylan — that was mental.” The band’s sophomore effort, Babel — released in September — shows their musical growth from their first offering, Sigh No More, Marshall said. Babel was the second-biggest selling debut in 2012 in the U.S. and included the No. 1 hit “I Will Wait” — which topped the Billboard rock chart in late 2012 — and the No. 12 single “Lover of the Light.” “We always challenge each other as friends and challenge each other as artists,” he said. Marshall said a lively, exciting performance is on tap for each ticket holder, and they promise not to disappoint. “We were just playing last night and we decided we needed some new songs in the show to keep people on their toes,” he said. “We have lots of songs ready, just getting them ready for the stage is next.” Marshall said he, along with fellow band mates, can’t wait to visit yet another new destination — Troy. “I thank you so much for having us, we’re absolutely thrilled you guys are hosting us,” Marshall said. “It may not be as good as the Strawberry Festival, but we’ll give it our all. It will be the poor man’s Strawberry Festival.”

DEAR ABBY: Thank you for the compassion you showed “Wants to Be a Mom” (Nov. 24), the 15year-old girl considering motherhood with her almost 18-year-old boyfriend. Having lost her dad at an early age and having a mother who prefers drugs over her daughter, must have made this young lady feel very unwanted. I understand why she might think a baby would give her the love she’s missing. I applaud you for not judging her, but instead kindly helping her to understand the consequences of her potential actions. I wish her the best and hope she’ll have the wisdom to realize how important an education will be for her future. With luck, in a few years she’ll be a young adult ready to assume the responsibilities of being a parent. — LINDA IN MICHIGAN DEAR LINDA: “Wants” was smart to write for advice before acting on impulse. She deserved a thoughtful response and not just a reprimand. Readers had much to say about her letter: DEAR ABBY: At 15, I had the first of my five daughters. By the time I was 20 I was raising the babies by myself. Would I do it all over again? Not in this lifetime! “Wants,” your boyfriend is immature. He should finish school and get a job before thinking about children. You are only 15 and have your best years ahead. One thing that never crossed MY mind was how I would be able to support my child without an education. I learned the hard way. If you and your grandma aren’t getting along, it’s up to you to change your attitude. Grandma has more experience than you do in this world. Listening to her will help you avoid many of the pitfalls that I went through, and that you face presently. — WAS THERE ONCE IN WASHINGTON

ABIGAIL VAN BUREN

Advice without having to be responsible for them, the more bragging can go on in the locker room. Every parent needs to know this behavior is going on. Some of these boys have punched holes in condoms and convinced a reticent girl to have sex — then laughed at her and dumped her when she became pregnant. — NURSING SCHOOL STUDENT IN WISCONSIN DEAR ABBY: That 15year-old’s boyfriend’s desire for her to have a baby seems like a control issue to me, and it will set the tone for their relationship. She needs to say no or she will most likely be under his power for the foreseeable future. I have seen this happen too many times with high school girls. — FORMER TEACHER IN THE NORTHWEST DEAR ABBY: Some states will accuse the young man of statutory rape, and he could end up in jail and be branded a sex offender for life. And the girl will wind up with a baby, no education and no husband to help her. Children have no business having children. — FLORIDA READER

DEAR ABBY: Tell that girl and her boyfriend that if they want a baby, they must support that baby on their own. Those of us who are working and raising families are tired of entitlements the young ones count on for support. Life is hard. It’s expensive. And it is about more than what you “want” on a whim. — KATHY IN THE MIDWEST DEAR ABBY: I had my first child at 21, and while I also that playing a fourth were the K-9-x. DEAR ABBY: Please love my son there are times round of spades would be I wish I would have waited tell her to visit Planned equally successful if Tomorrow: Bidding a while. I missed out on col- Parenthood. It promotes reWest's trump holding quiz. lege and figuring out who I sponsible parenting and was and what I wanted to healthy sexuality. I checked do. My son and daughter its website and there’s an Solve it turned out to have special office in Blacksburg, Va., needs, so my life has been not far from where she busy taking care of them. lives. My best to her. — SOMEONE WHO Please tell that teen that CARES IN NEW YORK having a baby is not at all like it is in TV commercials. Dear Abby is written by — MARIA IN ILLINOIS Complete the DEAR ABBY: A mentor Abigail Van Buren, also grid so every row, to teen boys told me that known as Jeanne Phillips, column and 3 x 3 some of them deliberately and was founded by her box contains try to impregnate girls so mother, Pauline Phillips. every digit from Write Dear Abby at 1 to 9 inclusively. they’ll have a “trophy” of www.DearAbby.com or P.O. how manly and virile they Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA WEDNESDAY’S SOLUTION are. The more babies they help conceive, especially 90069.

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Most players are taught early in life that they must never knowingly give declarer a ruffand-discard. But, as with all general rules, there are times when this injunction should be violated. Assume you're East and your partner leads the queen of spades against South's four-heart contract. You overtake the queen with the king — just in case the queen is a singleton — and continue with the A-J. West discards a diamond on the third round of spades, and the question is what to do next. Ordinarily, you'd discontinue the suit, bearing

in mind the ancient ruffand-discard bugaboo. In the present case, however, you should play a fourth round of spades! There are basically two reasons for doing this. The first is that a heart, a diamond and a club return are all give-up plays that can't help your cause at all. The second is that you might manufacture a trump trick for your partner that does not exist naturally, and in that way defeat the contract. In the actual case, once you lead the fourth round of spades, declarer is in a hopeless position. If he discards either a diamond or a club, or ruffs low, your partner ruffs with the nine to promote a trump trick for himself. South is in equally bad shape if he ruffs the fourth spade with the ten or king. In either case, West discards a club to assure a trump trick later on. Note that if you fail to play a spade at trick four, South can bring the contract home by finessing against your partner's queen of trumps. Note

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RELIGION

Thursday, February 7, 2013

Soul’d Out Quartet to perform in Sidney

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• PIQUA DAILY CALL

Commentary

America’s largest religious group ‘I can’t be bothered’ BY PAUL V.M. FLESHER Star Tribune

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Soul’d Out Quartet will be performing at 7 p.m.on Saturday, Feb. 23, New Hope United Methodist Church. SIDNEY — Soul’d Out Quartet will be performing at New Hope United Methodist Church at 7 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 23. Soul’d Out is a full time ministry touring 25 states each year. SOQT performs in churches, theatres, fairs/festivals, Dollywood, Silver Dollar City, as well as the main stage at the National Quartet Convention. Soul’d Out Quartet has been honored to win the Singing News Magazine, Horizon Group of the Year Award, as well as SoGospelnews.com’s Breakthrough Artist Award.

This group is young, energetic, and exciting.They have a good balance of entertainment and ministry. The goal of this group is to encourage their audiences and to set a positive atmosphere for the entire family while presenting a strong gospel message. Soul’d Out Quartet is a great act for ALL ages. The public is welcome. A love offering will benefit Soul’d Out Ministries. New Hope is located at 8985 West Mason Road at the intersection of Mason and PattersonHalpin roads northwest of Sidney.

Life term for Amish leader? TOLEDO (AP) — Federal prosecutors want a life sentence for the leader of an Amish breakaway group convicted in a series of beard- and hair-cutting attacks, saying it's highly unlikely the attacks would have happened without his involvement. Samuel Mullet Sr. not only orchestrated the attacks, but he also held absolute control over the members of his Amish settlement in eastern Ohio near the West Virginia panhandle, prosecutors said in court documents filed Tuesday. Mullet is due to be sentenced Friday in U.S.District Court in Cleveland along with 15 others convicted in the hair-cuttings who live in the settlement.

Cyrene to host Black History Celebration

Since its release last October, the report on religious affiliation by Pew Survey Research has caused quite a stir. Titled “Nones on the Rise,” it revealed that, for the first time in history, as many as 20 percent of Americans identify with no religious organization at all. This information has been widely and wildly misinterpreted, with dire warnings about the dangers of America’s growing atheism at one extreme and reassuring observations that 80 percent of Americans are still religious at the other. For starters, the category “none of the above” refers to the interviewees not identifying with any organized church or religion.It does not mean they do not believe in a god. In fact, 68 percent of the “nones” believe in a divine being, just 3 percentage points less than the national average of 71 percent. Professing atheists make up fewer than 3 percent of the survey’s respondents. More than two-thirds of the people in the “nones” category simply say they follow “nothing in particular” — some 14 percent of the interviewees. What do people mean meal in the dining room. However, freewill offerings will be gratefully accepted. Carry-out meals are available for $5 each. St. John’s Lutheran Church, located at Wall and Bridge streets, is handicapped accessible from the alley.

PIQUA — The Cyrene A.M.E. Church is hosting a Black History Celebration on Feb. 16. The speaker will be the Rev. John Scott of the True Vine Church. Come celebrate The service will be followed by a spaghetti lunchcentennial eon at 1 p.m. Call 773-0852 birthday Soup supper for more information or to tickets, which are $10. PIQUA — The Madison this weekend order The celebration is spon- Ave. First Church of God sored by the church’s Mis- congregation is celebrating POTSDAM — The Pots- sionary Society. it’s centennial birthday all dam Church of the Brethren through the year 2013. The will host a Soup, Supper and church will host special Fast Nacht Auction fundraiser on Saturday at the church, 22 E. dinner planned services during the 10 a.m. worship services on Feb. 10, Cross St., Potsdam. with guest speaker Jan Edat St. John’s The fundraiser is for wards. Bob Edwards, who is Meghan Johnston, who has Lutheran the director of the Church of been selected to participate God Board of Missions, will COVINGTON — As the as a People to PeopleAmbasbe sharing in the 11:00 Lenten season apsador. service. Bob Edward’s faproaches, so does the anSoup will be served from 5-6 p.m., with the auction nual Fast Nacht dinner at ther, the Rev. J.H. Edwards St. John’s Lutheran was Madison Avenue’s passtarting at 6 p.m. tor from 1948 until 1960. For more information, call Church in Covington. Bob Edwards, along with The same menu will be Lillian Moore, 698-3484. offered as was when this his older brothers Jim, who meal was first offered in is the president of Anderson 1913 — chicken, noodles, University, Dave, who is a Cash for gold mashed potatoes, green retired teacher, coach and fundraiser on beans, picked beets, apple- athletic director and older sauce, rolls and, of course, sister Carolyn who is a Saturday their famous crullers teacher and a pastor’s wife, PLEASANT HILL — (German donuts) made grew up in Piqua before moving to Dayton. The Pleasant Hill Church of that very day. Serving will begin at Madison Avenue First God is sponsoring a cash for gold fundraiser from 4:30 p.m. and ends at 7 Church of God would like to 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Feb. 9, at p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 12. invite those who grew-up or the church, 115 N. Main There is no charge for this attended the church to atSt., Pleasant Hill. An independent buyer and owner of gold will offer prices for gold or platinum jewelry, including broken, kinked necklaces, bracelets, earrings, rings, pendants, watches, dental gold. The gold owner will receive cash, with the church receiving 10 percent from the buyer. For more information, contact Kim Moore at 937-417-2424.

Mark your calendar

when they say they belong to “nothing in particular” or, in other words, to no religion or religious organization in particular? Rather than stick to a crisp and careful academic definition, as I usually do, I want to propose a looser understanding. I think it means “I can’t be bothered.” In other words: I can’t be bothered going to church. I can’t be bothered thinking about religion. I don’t spend any time thinking about a god. I’m involved in other things, and I don’t really care about this subject. If atheism is a strongly held feeling, then this is not. Atheists have thought about god or gods,and have made a conscious choice to reject them.The “nothing in particular” bunch simply has not given the idea much thought; they can’t be bothered. This interpretation of the data is supported by an observation made in the Pew report. They say “the increase in the (none of the above category) has taken place almost entirely among the segment of the population that seldom or never attends religious services.” Indeed, there has been an 11 percent increase in the nones, to just fewer than 50 percent, from those who do not attend church more than

once or twice a year. These people have not been attending a church, and so they have largely forgotten about religion. But what about the 50 percent of people who seldom or never attend a church or other religious group,but still identify themselves with a religious organization? They also should be counted in the “I can’t be bothered”category. Think of it this way: There are a number of people whose religious affiliation is rather tenuous. They may have been raised within a religion, but now do not think much about it or do much with it. Do they belong or not? If you ask them,what do they say? Some will have thought about it enough to say, “No, I no longer am affiliated.” By contrast, others will have thought about it even less. So, they may say, for example, “I was raised a Catholic, so I’m still a Catholic even though I have not darkened a church door for 20 years.” By the way, the Catholic Church agrees with this view; you cannot unbaptize yourself. Can we figure out how many people still give a religious affiliation, but can’t be bothered with religion? Let me cautiously hazard a guesstimate. Nationally, 80

At CR meetings, music and messages all dealing with the various issues of recovery. The leaders of CR have numerous years experience in song leading and public speaking. Those inRecovery terested in more informameeting slated tion on CR, may go SIDNEY — The Sidney crsidney.com or email questo First Church of the tions Nazarene will host a Cele- crsidney@yahoo.com. brate Recovery (CR) meetLadies of ing at 6:30 p.m. on Thursdays. CR is a recovery Harmony program to help people deal BRADFORD — The Oakwith hurt, habit or hang-up, including from divorce, re- land Church of the Brethren, jection or betrayal. Habits 8058 Horatio-Harris Creek may include gambling, Road, Bradford, is presentdrugs, pornography or alco- ing The Ladies of Harmony hol. Hang-ups may include as their 2013 Dinner Thedepression, negativity or ater production.This comedy anger. The program is open will bring the audience much to anyone age 18 and above laughter as six church ladies and is offered free of charge. meet to plan a small funeral The CR program focuses dinner for a man they deon the future, not the past. spised. They engage in gosParticipants are encour- sip and during their aged to accept responsibil- conversations reveal several ity for their actions. Growth secrets about themselves. in the context of small The big surprise comes the day of the funeral dinner groups is emphasized. tend for this special time of celebration. There will be a time of fellowship after the services in the fellowship hall for lunch.

Flesher is director of UW’s Religious Studies Program. Past columns and more information about the program can be found on the web at www.uwyo.edu/RelStds. To comment on this column, visit http://religiontoday.blogspot.com. when an unexpectedly large crowd arrives at the dinner and the ladies endure some very embarrassing moments. Those who attend will be greeted with valet parking,a wide variety of freshly prepared salads, entrees and desserts as well as wholesome entertainment that highlights the talents that exist within the congregation. The dates for this comedy are March 1, 2, 8 and 9 at 6 p.m. The cost of the dinner buffet and play is $22. The play only, with dessert to follow, is March 3 at 2 p.m.,cost is $12. Cost for children 10 and under is half price. Reservations may be made by calling Brenda Coblentz at (937) 548-1895 between the hours of 4-8 p.m. Proceeds from the dinner theater production will help support Oakland’s outreach projects. Oakland Church is located 2 and half miles north of Gettysburg.

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PIQUA — Congregation Anshe Emeth, 320 Caldwell St., will be celebrating Purim at a Shabbat service on Friday, Feb. 22. Services will be conducted by rabbinic intern Marc Kasten and will begin at 7:30 p.m. For further information, check the website at www.ansheemeth.org or call 5470092.

percent of Americans are affiliated with a religious organization. Just 58 percent say they pray daily (a figure which includes grace at meals). If the difference between those who belong and those who pray represents the difference between those whose religious beliefs inspire them to do something religious and those who can’t be bothered to do anything religious,we wind up with 22 percent of the population. If we add the 22 percent of the religiously affiliated who can’t be bothered to the 14 percent of the religiously unaffiliated who can’t be bothered, we wind up with 36 percent of the population. This means that “those who can’t be bothered” make up America’s largest religious block, significantly bigger than evangelicals, mainline Protestants, Catholics or Mormons. I would conclude that we should pay more attention to this previously hidden group, but they don’t want to be bothered.

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SCHOOL

S M O KS IEG N A L S

Thursday, February 7, 2013

The staff for this week: Eric Craft, Megan Jones, Robby Bloom, and Mkylie Killian Adviser: Debbie Allen

PIQUA HIGH SCHOOL

FCCLA holds mini Relay for Life BY MEGAN JONES Staff Writer PIQUA — On Jan. 25, some of Piqua High School’s FCCLA members hosted an annual miniature Relay for Life at High Street Elementary with the elementary kids from High Street Elementary and Favorite Hill Elementary. This is the second year that FCCLA has hosted the miniature Relay for Life. This

year, some changes were made to make the event even bigger – Favorite Hill Elementary participated as well. The goal of the second annual event was to raise money to donate to the American Cancer Society. Over 90 students participated, including 15 from the high school. The three high school students in charge of the event were Alle Olds, Jesica Brown, and Cody Congdon. They

were supervised by FCCLA adviser, Rita Potter. Throughout the day, students and their parents had their faces painted, played corn hole, had a cake walk, competed in relay races and also walked for the cure. By the end of the day, almost $3,000 was raised for the American Cancer Society. “I like the fact that even though the kids at Favorite Hill

and High Street are young, they did something bigger than themselves and were able to raise money,” Potter said. “We were able to inspire them to want to help out, and this is by far one of my favorite FCCLA events of the year.” It is safe to say that the Mini FCCLA Relay for Life will return next year and for many years to come.

McDonald’s Student of the Week

Piqua City Schools explain snow day procedures

HOGSTON

BY ERIC CRAFT Staff Writer

BY ROBBY BLOOM Staff Writer

PIQUA — It is winter time in Ohio and with the winter comes snow, frigid temperatures and numerous amounts of hazards on the roads for drivers. Students at Piqua High School always seem to want one thing when the winter season rolls around and that is whether they have a snow day. Students want snow days as they are a great way to relax and get an extra day away from school, and many students don’t understand why they don’t get a snow day when other school

districts do. However, there is a simple procedure that the superintendent and his team use to make sure that the roads are safe for students to venture out to school on a snowy day. The team covers all areas of Piqua, driving the roads and seeing what’s safe, what has been plowed off, and what hasn’t. If the roads are too bad for someone to drive in, then the superintendent makes the call to have a snow day: if they deem them not that bad, then the school day will continue as normal. Perhaps though, the roads just need some time to be

cleared off, so the schools will use the delay system (1-2 hours off the school day) to allow time for the roads to be plowed and the weather to get better. Of course, if the weather has not cleared up or the roads are still bad, a snow day may be called at that point. Along with the one and two hour delays the Piqua City School District also has another resource to utilize in the event of snowy weather and that is a three-hour delay. “The three-hour delay allows more time for the roads to get

clear and snow to be plowed, this way we can get the day of education in,” said Darrell Hite, PHS assistant principal. The catch with three hour delay though is that it extends the school day from 2:28 p.m. to 3:28 p.m. as guidelines say that you can only take two hours off and still have a full day of school. This is then used to give road crews extra time to get the roads clear along with allowing a full day of education to take place. These snow day procedures have been used numerous times through the years and will most likely be used in the future as well.

PHS student heads to national speech finals Ferree to attend National competition on Feb. 28 and March 2 BY MAKYLIE KILLIAN students from PHS pushed through the obstaStaff Writer cles for a chance to place. PIQUA — On Feb. 1 Coming out on top was and 2, the speech and de- Andrea Ferree, who placed bate team traveled to Cen- third for prose and poetry. terville High School to “It made me feel like a compete in categories with champ. With the last three other schools in prepara- years I feel much more tion for national competi- confident in my speaking tion. Even though the abilities.” schedule was blocked due A lot of work had been to a shortage of judges, applied through past prac-

FERREE

tices and had helped students who participated in speech and debate to develop many vocal abilities. These particular vocal abilities got the chance to be stressed throughout particular events. Students were also able to relax in the commons where delicious foods were served while they waited for rotations. Not only

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were appetites sated, but new friends and rivals were made along the journey. Now it’s time for all who are involved in nationals to travel further in their path of excellence while elaborating on content and performance. The national competition dates for the Ferree will be Feb. 28 and March 2.

PIQUA — The student of the week for the week of Feb. 4-8 is Eion Hogston. Hogston, son of Nikki and Dusty Hogston, was nominated by Scott Kaye for showing respect, responsibility, and sportsmanship. “Eion Hogston has been coming in as an aide for my classes. He has done a great job of modeling good participation, sportsmanship, and correct social behavior. He comes in with a great attitude and that affects my students in a positive way, daily,” Kaye said. Hogston participates in soccer and wrestling at PHS, and after high school, he plans to go to a four-year college to get a degree in criminal justice.

More school news, including briefs and honor/merit rolls continue on page 8

Reporters: Julia Harrelson Emily Hoersten John Husa Alyx Meyers Adviser: Elaine Schweller-Snyder

Issue #19 - February 7, 2013

Beyond the beard

The next step

BY ALYX MEYERS

BY JOHN HUSA

Being in education for 15 years, Jake Johnson has seen almost everything. This Mr. No-Nonsense has been helping running things at Lehman as the assistant principal since 2004. Johnson graduated from Xavier University in 1997, and then began teaching social studies in the Cincinnati public schools. After a few years, He moved to Roger Bacon High School, where he continued to teach Social Studies and began to coach football. This is where he met his wife, Andrea. The couple married in 2004 after they moved to Sidney and Johnson got a job at Lehman. The couple are the parents of four children, Will, 6; Leah, 4; Luke, 2; and Daniel, 1. When asked why he chose teaching and administrating in high school Johnson replied: “I love the interaction with the kids. I like teaching the freshmen to help them get acquainted with high school but my favorite class is definitely the seniors — especially this year’s class.” He went on to say that he wanted to be in high school education because he had had great high school teachers and he wanted to give back by being a leader and role model for his students. When Johnson is not busy fixing computers, monitoring study halls, or just filling in where he is needed, he loves spending time with his wife and children as well as just enjoying the little happy blessings of everyday life.

The school year is already past the half way mark, and soon we will be finishing the year off with final exams. Although everybody will be excited and ready for summer, the seniors will have something else on their mind all summer, college. Seniors are now making their final choices on schools that they would like to attend, and are beginning to take the next big step in life. Some may have their decisions made and are ready to go, while others are still undecided and do not have a clue. I was able to ask some of the seniors from Lehman what their plans are. Most students seemed like they knew what they wanted to do, but were waiting to see if they were accepted or not to their first choice of schools. Ryan Edelen plans on attending Miami University if he is accepted, and will major in Biology with future plans of becoming a dentist. Emilie Proffitt has been accepted to Bowling Green University and plans on studying Interior Design. “I am going to go to Ohio University, as I really love the campus and atmosphere,” said Zach Taylor. He plans to major in computer science, a program that gives him the option of studying software engineering in his fourth year. Time may be winding down for the seniors, but it is evident that they are trying to make the best of their busy final semester at Lehman. Some are less stressed as their college selection has been made, while others are a little more frantic, trying to figure things out. We wish the best of luck to all the seniors, and that they make the right decisions and have the best college experience.

Many musical talents

Singing their way to your heart!

BY EMILY HOERSTEN Recently one particular face has been making an appearance in Lehman’s halls more and more often. Jenny Weber spent several weeks in November and December substituting for Jacque Jenkinson when she was on maternity leave. While at Lehman, Weber taught the choir classes and used her piano talent to help her do so. But even now that Jenkinson has returned to school, Weber can still be found helping the Lehman Music Department. After taking last year off to follow her son Ben play in his senior year of Lehman baseball, Weber is back playing piano for the all-school musical. Not only is she playing piano this year, but she is also coaching the singers and choruses. In addition to playing for musical, she is accompanying the show choir and played for a number of soloists at the recent OMEA Solo and Ensemble competition. “How long must someone play piano to have the skills Mrs. Weber possesses?” you might ask. The answer is a very long time. Her piano education began in Manchester, Iowa, about 40 years ago. “My lessons started at 6:30 in the morning,” Weber said. She passed on her piano playing abilities to her daughter, Gretchen, who is a vocal music major at St. Louis University. When she is not playing piano, Weber loves to read. She also enjoys cooking and collecting wine. The Lehman community appreciates all she contributes to the music department. We all hope to see much more of Jenny Weber in the years to come.

BY JULIA HARRELSON It’s that time of year again! Valentine’s Day is around the corner and many couples are planning their special date. Some dates involve a nice dinner and gifts. But what if you are stuck on what to give that special someone? The Lehman Limelighters have a solution for you. For the third year, the Limelighters Show Choir will be selling their Singing Valentines. They are recording excerpts from three songs: “You Are My Sunshine,” “Can’t Take My Eyes Off You,” and “I’m Yours.” The cost is $3 for the first valentine, and $2 for any additional you buy. All you have to do is choose one of the three songs, write the person’s name you want it to and the phone number, plus your name and an optional message. On Feb. 13 and 14, members of the Limelighters will call your special someone, give them your message, and play the pre-recorded song of your choice. Your Valentine will surely be in for a treat. Junior Madilyn Brown always anticipates this time of year, just for the Singing Valentines. “I can’t wait to buy some singing valentines for my friends. And every year I buy one for my mom.” Forms are available in the main office at Lehman. The deadline for turning in your forms is Feb. 11 so be sure to buy them soon. Happy Valentines Day!


8

SCHOOL

Thursday, February 7, 2013

• PIQUA DAILY CALL

Covington Honor Roll

Piqua school briefs PIQUA — The following events and programs are taking place in Piqua City Schools: • Parent/Teacher Conferences will be held at all Piqua City School buildings from 4-7 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 12. Additional conference times are available at the primary and intermediate buildings from 4-7 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 14 and at Piqua High School and Piqua Junior High School from 4-8 p.m.Thursday, Feb. 14. Contact your building office to schedule your conferences. • Piqua City Schools will have a one hour early dismissal on Tuesday, Feb. 12 and no school on Friday, Feb. 15 and Monday, Feb. 18 (President’s Day). • The Piqua High School Speech Team competed at the Greater Miami Valley district speech tournament this past Saturday. Senior Andrea Ferree qualified for the State tournament that will be held in Akron on Feb. 28 and March 1-2. Andrea will be representing Piqua High School in the category of Prose and Poetry. Andrea is the first State qualifier for Piqua High School. In four regions of the state, only 24 students qualified for this tournament. • The Varsity Competition Cheer Squad — Lena Garber, Cecily Stewart, Olivia Barhorst, Kaci Cotrell, Sierra Iddings, Taylor Mayberry, Carrie Latham, Alli Comstock, Katie Stewart and Alli Cole — competed in the OASSA regional competition at Springboro High School on

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Sunday. After competing against several Division 1 schools, the squad was the first in PHS history to qualify for the State Championship competition that will be held on March 3 at St. John Arena at The Ohio State University. • The Piqua High School Show Choir “The Company” competed at Findlay High School this past weekend. The group was awarded Class B Champions and 2nd place overall out of 15 groups. Alex Rohrbaugh was named outstanding performer for Piqua. • Favorite Hill Primary School held its 2nd quarter award assembly on Tuesday, Jan. 29. Students were recognized and presented with certificates for being on the Honor Roll and for having excellent attendance. “On a Roll” certificates were also presented to those students who are making significant improvements in the classroom as well. • Wilder Intermediate School will recognize 143 students for increasing their reading levels by stamping an Indian Head on the cafeteria wall. Students then get to put their name under the stamp. • Favorite Hill Primary School second grade students will be traveling to the J. Scott Garbry Museum at the Willowbrook Environmental Education Center on Feb. 13 where students from the Upper Valley Career Center will be presenting their 32nd annual museum program, “Look at Yesteryear.”

COVINGTON — The following students are on the Principal’s List (all A’s) for the second nine weeks of school at Covington Elementary. • 3rd Grade: Holly Beasley, Claire Fraley, Cameron Kirker, Elizabeth Kuether, Emily Schafer, Jerrick Wolfe • 4th Grade: Jaden Barhorst, Hannah Burns, Robert Burns, Zac Green, Ellie Hedges, Sydney Hogue, Andrew Holley, Grant Humphrey, Madison Jones, Tyler Jones, Alyssa Kimmel, David McCool, Cara Miller, Tyler Owens, Jake Phillis, Ellery Reck, Avery Rench, Donovan Richard, Caleb Roetter-Ditty, Ben Romie, Jeremiah Valentine, Cael Vanderhorst, Ella Warner, Bethany Weldy • 5th Grade: Hailey Baker, Elizabeth Kuntz, Zach Kuntz, Gavin Lutz, Brenna Miller, Josie Schaurer, Bailey

Tipps, Savannah Travers, Joshua Wall, Hailey Weer The following students are on the Honor Roll (all A’s and B’s) for the second nine weeks of school at Covington Elementary. • 3rd Grade: Tyler Alexander, Izeke Benedict, Jarrek Boehringer, Owen Boehringer, Mackinze Brown, Garret Fraley, Gavin Fraley, Amaya Franke, Paige Gillespie, Claudia Harrington, Toby Jones, Ethan Kendig, Daniel Leistner, Keegan Lynott, Kaleigh Maio, Christina Monnin, Megan Naylor, Kody Nelson, Owen Rawson, Ayden Rench, Sarah Slusher, Sandy Turner • 4th Grade: Trentin Alexander, Randy Anthony, Grant Babylon, Tyler Bauer,Morgan Fairchild,Jakob Hamilton, Katie Hembree, Katelyn Homan,

Aimee Kerce, Kyle Meyer, Kayla Mitchell, Nick Rawson, David Robinson, Bryce Smith, Samantha Straw, Gavin Swank, Hailie-Jo Taxis, Carissa VomBaur,Morgan Willoughby, Destina Wills • 5th Grade: Maci Arthur, Marciana Auxier, Kirsti Barnes, Sarah Barnhart, Kara Bowman, Spencer Brumbaugh, Will Clark, Marisa Cota, Josie Crowell, Jesse Fisher, Jospeh Franke, Madison Hite, Sophia Iddings, Gavin Jones, Layklyn Kemp, Morgan Kimmel, Rachel Lauber, Makenzie Long, Morgan Lowe,Parker Lucas,Fletcher Metz, Alexis Meyer, Olivia Mohler, Josiah Nelson,Andrew Parker,Elizabeth Randall, Warrick Reck, Michael Schaffer, Cade Schmelzer, Alex Shaffer, Maci White

Bradford High School/UVCC Honor Roll BRADFORD — The following have been named to the Bradford High School/Upper Valley Career Center honor roll/merit roll for the 2012-13 second quarter: Honor Roll • Juniors Tyler Atchley 4.0, Paul Chapman 4.0, Chip Gade 4.0, Kevin Poole 4.0,

Mikey Barga, Bree Bates, Molly Dunlevy, Molli Lavey, Jayde Mead, Donovan Painter, and Morgan Wintrow • Seniors Addison Bashore 4.0, Megan Hunt 4.0, Billy Deemer, Megan Drieling 4.0, Lindsey Rose 4.0, Jacob Herron, Josh Hoelscher, and Matt

Wolf Merit Roll • Juniors Shonda Elliott, Marah Hedges, TJ Pullins, Sierra Puthoff, Garrett Turner, and Nathan Voisard • Seniors Brett Arnett, Jake Cline and Luke Hafer

Covington Middle School Achievement Roll COVINGTON — The following students have been named to the Covington Middle School’s Achievement Rolls for the 2nd quarter of the 2012/13 school year: • Principal’s List: 6th Grade: Ian Benedict, Emma Hand, Lily Hargrave, Gray Harshbarger, Lauren Hebert, Thomas Kuether, Chad Miller, Samuel Pritchard, Elizabeth Schafer, Anna Winn, Chad Yohey 7th Grade: Deborah Burns, Mason Dilley, Sienna Edwards, Ryan Gengler, Spencer Hogue, Victoria Lyle, Braden Miller, Bryan

Miller, Reuben Miller, Legend Patty, Joseph Schmelzer 8th Grade: Nathan Blei, Kelly Bowman, Emily Cordonnier, Anna Dunn, Adam Lefeld, Trevor Miller, Branden Robinson, Savanna Schaurer, Jesse Wall • Honor Roll 6th Grade: Paige Boehringer, Darlene Burns, Sara Draving, Parker Dysinger, Chelsea Ford, Makenna Gostomsky, Kyle Grieshop, Emily Hedrick, Kyra Hitchcock, Megan McKinley, Clair Minnich, Ashlyn Plessinger, Leah Poling, Caleb Rawson, Ashby Rench, Riley Richards, Kayla

Scott, Jack Shell, Olivia VomBaur, Garrett Warner, Samantha Whiteman, Madison Williams, Natalie Zeitz 7th Grade: Danielle Alexander,Sarabeth Anderson, Mikenna Baker,Bradley Brown, Emily Clark, BritDaniel, Breann tany Dieperink, Tyler Freeman, Cade Harshbarger, Ethan Herron, Sarah Hubbard, Leslie Keith, Dylan Kelly, Breanna Kimmel, Nathan Lyle,Taylor Ray,Shae Robinson, Cameron Schilling, Andrew Slusher, Madison Wise 8th Grade: Allison Angle, Allison Babylon, Zane Barnes, Ross Bowman,

Kayla Gray, Jenna Hagan, Matthew Kuether, Derek McCool, Brooklyn Meyer, Kristen Meyer, Anne Randall, Sarah Retz,Kara Schaffer, Kodie Taylor, Waunetta Thompson, Deron White, Rachel York, Brandi Young • Improvement Award 6th Grade: Kyle Grieshop, Jacob McQuinn 7th Grade: Brenna Hirsch, Bryce Keiser, Lyndsey Kimmel, Elijah McCallum, Shae Robinson 8th Grade: Kayla Gray, Destiny McDavid, Trevor Miller, Joshua Sowers, Waunetta Thompson, Abby Weer.

Covington Middle School Achievement Roll PIQUA — The following students have received all A’s for the 2nd Quarter at Springcreek Primary: Olivia Anthony, Gracee Averesch, Natalie Bair, Keyionna Ball, Anthony Bergman, Karsen Blain, Madison Bolin, Rayshaun

Bolin, Alyssa Brock, Sabastian Broughton, Conner Brown, Garrett Brown, Coltin Byron, Breeze Cary, William Collins, Bryce Davidson, Mason Davis, Summer Doseck, Danaisa Evans, Madison Evans, Torrence

Foster, Gage Gambill, Diana Gertner-Agudelo, Samuel Grabeman. Brooks Grote, Elaini Grove, Lilia Haning, Hemmert, Jackson Zachary Henne, Elizabeth Herndon, Caiden HutsonHuffman, Lotus Isaacs,

Talan Johnson, Lilly Kaye, Maximus Kaye, Brenden Kelly, Alicia Kolker, Gracie Lapointe, Sierra Leonard, Carysn Meckstroth, Alison Miller, Cory Miller, Samantha Nicholes, Zada Ortlieb, Alexis Packard, William

Packard. Brielle Penley, Makayla Roderer, Madison Saunders, Lucas Shaffer, Kirsten Shaneyfelt, Breanna Sheek, Jordan Slife, Reagan Sloan, Seth Staley, Autumn Stump, Austin Sullivan, Gabriel

Swallow, Savannah Swanson, Kiersten Teets, Reagan Toopes, Logan Tucker, Raylynn Ward, Kyen Warner, Reygan Weaver, Rylee Weaver, Kaleb Winks, Nataya Yaqub, and Quintyn Yaqub.

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The toothbrush as a soldier

Keep your children’s smiles healthy by ensuring that they brush, floss, eat healthy foods, and visit the dentist regularly.

February is National Children’s Dental Health Month, sponsored by the American Dental Association. The ADA says that teaching your children how to defend their teeth against acid attacks is the best way to prevent tooth decay. When food particles are allowed to stay in the mouth and under the gums, the sugar in the food attracts bacteria and the mouth becomes acidic. These conditions cause an attack on the teeth that leads to decay. Brushing twice a day is an important defense. After brushing the flat parts of the molars, hold the brush against the gums, massage it in a small circle, then brush downward for upper teeth and upward for lower teeth. Doing this all around the jaw helps get food particles out of the spaces between the teeth and gums. Provide a children’s toothpaste and be sure the child spits and rinses without swallowing any.

Once a day, a child’s teeth need to be flossed. Parents may need to floss younger children’s teeth, but it is a daily habit that, along with brushing, beats the bacteria and sugar attack. It will also help children avoid gum disease when they are older. A healthy diet reduces the chances for sugars and bacteria to cause an acid attack. Eating vegetables, fruit, grains, dairy, and lean meats also helps children develop strong teeth. Choosing snacks carefully is another solid tactic. Many seemingly healthy snacks have a high sugar content, so it is important to read nutrition labels on packaging. Even better, offer snacks such as milk, cheese, nuts, or fruits and vegetables as often as possible. Last but not least, having regular checkups with the dentist is absolutely essential in preventing cavities and treating any problems that may arise.

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DENNIS the MENACE

ARLO & JANIS

HOROSCOPE BY FRANCES DRAKE For Friday, Feb. 8, 2013 ARIES (March 21 to April 19) This is a fantastic day to dig deep for answers. You have the concentration, the energy and the drive to find what you want. TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) If you have to speak to a group today, you will be riveting. However, you might disagree with someone or feel you have to compete. GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) You’re not afraid to voice your ambition when talking to authority figures today. People definitely will sit up and listen to what you have to say. CANCER (June 21 to July 22) You’re highly convincing today. Perhaps this is why you are drawn to discussing profound topics or expanding on religion, philosophy and legal matters. LEO (July 23 to Aug. 22) No doubt you will get the better of disputes regarding shared property, inheritances and anything you share jointly with others. You have drive, focus and tenacious determination. VIRGO (Aug. 23 to Sept. 22) Conversations with partners and close friends might be testy today, because either you are blunt and forward, or you will attract someone who is. This could escalate into an argument. LIBRA (Sept. 23 to Oct. 22) You’re so ambitious to get things done that you are willing to delegate anything to practically anyone. Actually, others will listen to you. SCORPIO (Oct. 23 to Nov. 21) This is a strong day for those involved in sports, whether you are participating or just watching an event. You’re gung-ho with enthusiasm, and you want to win. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22 to Dec. 21) You will get the better of others in family discussions about renovations and changes at home. You will be adamant about what you want, and you’re not going to back down. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22 to Jan. 19) This is a powerful day for those who sell, market, teach, write or drive for a living. You have enormous energy to communicate what you want, and you persuade others to agree with you. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20 to Feb. 18) You’re determined when it comes to earning money today. You know what you want, and you intend to get it. However, you might be equally determined about going after something that you want to buy. PISCES (Feb. 19 to March 20) You are full of intellectual and mental energy today. This is why you will tackle problems and work for a long time on them. You’ll love debating with others, especially if you win. YOU BORN TODAY You have a wonderful imagination and easily can form conceptions of all sorts. Your visualization powers are excellent as well. At times, you can even be prophetic. Your ability to intellectually plan ahead bodes well for writers, architects, musicians, scientists and map readers. You have excellent technical skills. In the year ahead, you have an opportunity to learn something valuable. Grab it. Birthdate of: John Grisham, writer; Jules Verne, novelist; Shiva Rose, actress/blogger. (c) 2013 King Features Syndicate, Inc.

SNUFFY SMITH

GARFIELD

BABY BLUES

FUNKY WINKERBEAN

CRANKSHAFT

Thursday, February 7, 2013

9


10

Thursday, February 7, 2013

PLACE YOUR AD IN THE CLASSIFIEDS THAT WORK 877-844-8385 OR ON THE WEB AT WWW.DAILYCALL.COM • PIQUA DAILY CALL

that work .com JobSourceOhio.com

DEADLINES/CORRECTIONS:

www.dailycall.com MANUFACTURING

ENGINEER

135 School/Instructions AIRLINES ARE HIRINGTrain for hands on Aviation Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified - Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877-676-3836

ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from home. *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice, *Hospitality. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV authorized. Call 877-295-1667 www.CenturaOnline.com

PIANO LESSONS, Register NOW! Professional and private piano lessons for beginners of all ages. 30 years experience. (937)418-8903

200 - Employment

205 Business Opportunities NOW HIRING: Companies desperately need employees to assemble products at home. No selling, any hours. $500 weekly potential. Info: (985)646-1700, Dept. OH-6011.

QUALITY INSPECTOR We are accepting resumes for a highly motivated Quality inspector for our 1st shift. Must have Quality experience in automotive manufacturing. Responsibilities include; The ability to define problems, collect data, establish facts, and draw valid conclusions. Ability to carry out instructions furnished in written, oral or diagram form. Must have computer experience in Word and Excel.

Nitto Denko Automotive PO Box 740 Piqua, Ohio 45356 Attn: HR Manager

SECURITY OFFICERS NEEDED

Automotive Technician Full time position with benefits. Experienced GM candidates need to be thorough, team oriented with a clean driving record. See Charlie Carroll at Dan Hemm Chevy Buick GMC Cadillac 2596 W. Michigan St.

IT'S A GREAT TIME TO JOIN A&B FOUNDRY! A&B Foundry is a producer of aluminum, bronze and brass castings utilizing the Green Sand, Airset and V-Process Sand casting processes. We currently have openings for:

• • • •

Melters Molders Shakeout Cut-Off/ Grinding • X-ray/ LPI at our facility in Franklin, Ohio. We are searching for first, second and third shift roles For employment opportunities and consideration, please email your resume to: HR@ABFoundry.com and/ or you may also fax it to: (937)746-3635

LABORERS CDL TRUCK DRIVERS Industrial contractor hiring for hard hat environment. Training provided. Apply at: 15 Industry Park Court Tipp City

INCREASES

Continental Express Inc., a full service transportation company that specializes in hauling refrigerated food products is currently seeking an experienced Diesel Technician for its Sidney terminal. Will perform maintenance and repairs on semi trailers and refrigeration units. Duties will include preventative maintenance, inspections and repairs, brake and tire repairs, and other duties as assigned Candidates with prior knowledge and experience on refrigeration units helpful but not necessarily required. Must have own tools and be extremely dependable. Competitive salary and benefit package. Apply at: Continental Express Inc. 10450 St Rt 47 Sidney, OH 45365 Or email resume to: mgoubeaux@ceioh.com

• • • • • •

Tipp City Area $10-$12/ hour Basic computer knowledge Able to communicate and work well with others Clean background, pass drug screen Must have reliable transportation

Call (937)454-9035 between 9am-3:30pm, Monday - Friday only All calls outside these hours will not be considered

Small shop needs detail person for small parts. Entry level wage, quick advancement. Own transportation, valid license required. 30 hours + weekdays. For interview appointment call 937-368-2303, MonThurs. 9am-4pm. Fletcher, OH

240 Healthcare

Drivers are paid weekly.

Drivers earn .38cents per mile for empty and loaded miles on dry freight.

575 Live Stock

.40cents per mile for store runs.

.42cents per mile for reefer & curtainside freight.

No Hazmat.

Full Insurance package.

Paid vacation.

401K savings plan.

95% no touch freight.

Compounding Safety Bonus Program.

Drivers are paid bump dock fees for customer live loads and live unloads. For additional info call

300 - Real Estate ★✩★✩★✩★✩★✩★✩★ For Rent

OTR DRIVERS

305 Apartment CDL Grads may qualify Class A CDL required

Call Jon Basye at: Piqua Transfer & Storage Co. (937)778-4535 or (800)278-0619

TROY, 1 & 2 Bedrooms, appliances, CA, water, trash paid, $425 & $525 monthly. $200 Deposit Special! (937)673-1821

Crosby Trucking 866-208-4752

Great Pay & Benefits!

235 General

O/O’s get 80% of the line haul. 100% fuel surcharge. Fuel discount program.

RATE

1, 2 & 3 Bedroom, Houses & Apts. SEIPEL PROPERTIES Piqua Area Only Metro Approved (937)773-9941 9am-5pm Monday-Friday

TROY, 21 N. Oxford, 1 bedroom, down stairs, appliances furnished, $390 monthly, plus deposit. No pets. (937)698-3151 TROY area, 2 bedroom townhouses, 1-1/2 bath, furnished appliances, W/D hookup, A/C, No dogs $475. (937)339-6776. TROY large 2 bedroom downtown $550 plus utilities (937)418-2379 WEST MILTON, 2 bedrooms, appliances, W/D hookup, air. $470/month + $300 deposit. Metro accepted. (937)339-7028. WOODGATE APARTMENTS, 1433 Covington, 1 bedroom, very quiet. $406 monthly, Special $299 deposit if qualified, (937)773-3530, (937)418-9408 Call 9am-5pm

320 Houses for Rent COUNTRY HOME, 3 bedroom, 1.5 bath, Newton Schools, finished basement, large yard, $750+ deposit, (937)638-0943. IN COUNTRY, Near Bradford, 3 bedroom trailer, $400 + deposit. 2 bedroom trailer, $400 + deposit, (937)417-7111, (937)448-2974. PIQUA 1 bedroom house, $325. 1 bedroom apartment, $375. 2 bedroom apartment, $400. (937)773-2829 after 2pm

EVERS REALTY

★✩★✩★✩★✩★✩★✩★ STORAGE TRAILERS FOR RENT (800)278-0617

TROY, 2 Bedroom Townhomes 1.5 bath, 1 car garage, $695 (937)216-5806 EversRealty.net

★✩★✩★✩★✩★✩★✩★ 2 BEDROOM, 1 bath, all appliances included, fenced in back yard and deck, close to railroad, no pets, $425 month (937)658-3824

PART-TIME DRIVER Continental Express has immediate opening for a LOT DRIVER for Saturdays. Will be responsible for parking trucks and dropping trailers on our lot. CDLA not required but must have prior experience operating tractor trailers. Must also pass drug screen.

2 BEDROOM in Troy, Move in special, Stove, refrigerator, W/D, A/C, very clean, no pets. $525. (937)573-7908 3 BEDROOM TOWNHOMES, Piqua, all appliances including washer/ dryer, 2.5 bath with 2 car garage. (937)335-7176 www.firsttroy.com

PIQUA, 910 New Haven. 3 bedroom, 1.5 car, CA, fenced yard. $850, deposit. (937)778-9303, (937)604-5417. TROY, 3 bedroom, 1.5 bath, 1.5 car garage, completely redecorated, $730 month, 1353 Lee Road (937)239-1864

400 - Real Estate For Sale 3 BEDROOM 1 bath brick home. Fenced back yard, front covered porch. Shown by appointment only. Piqua. (937)845-3656

500 - Merchandise

CAUTION FT, PT & PRN STNAs for 2nd & 3rd shifts, PT for Laundry & Housekeeping. Apply in person at: Covington Care Center 75 Mote Dr Covington, OH

250 Office/Clerical OFFICE CLERK, Established tool shop seeking experienced office manager with accounting background. Quickbooks or Peachtree knowledge preferred. Duties include all aspects of small business office. AP, AR, payroll, phones, order processing. Resume to stevelro@yahoo.com or mail to Lostcreek Tool and Machine, 1150 South Main Street, Piqua, OH 45356. (937)773-6022.

If you have questions regarding scams like these or others, please contact the Ohio Attorney General’s office at (800)282-0515.

AMMO, 223, Ar's, Aks, (419)204-4401

7.62y39, Sks's,

CCW CLASS. March 2nd, 8am to 4pm and March 3rd, 8am to noon. Held at Piqua Fish and Game. $60 person. parthelynx@aol.com. (937)760-4210.

577 Miscellaneous CEMETERY PLOTS @ Forest Hill. 6 separate plots in old section, lot 52 front. $400 per plot. rswooj@aol.com. (703)250-5720 CRIB, changing table, pack-n-play, doorway swing, swing, high chair, booster chair, travel bassinet, tub, clothes, blankets, movies, dolls, more (937)339-4233. CRIB, real wood, good condition, stationary sides, $75 (937)339-4233 GUNS & AMMO, Shotgun, 12ga pump, Lightweight, 30 inch barrel, full choke, Marlin nice gun, perfect for home protection or hunting $225, Ammo, .223, 7.62x39, 30-30, 3 0 0 6 , 22LR-22mag-22-250, .308, 7.62x54. PRICES REDUCED!!! Call (937)698-6362 Chuck SNOW BLOWER 2003 5hp, Self propelled, 20" cut. Briggs and Stratton engine. New tires, Runs great. $225 obo. (937)498-9147 WALKER, adult, folds, adjustable height, good condition, with or without wheels $20. (937)339-4233 WALKER, seated walker, tub, shower/ transfer benches, commode chair, toilet riser with or without arms, grab bars, canes, More, (937)339-4233.

583 Pets and Supplies BOXER PUPPIES, 2 males 3 females ready now. Call, text or email for more details, $150, kmiller043@roadrunner.com. (937)621-1172. CATS, Helping Hands Rescue has several special cats in need of homes, (937)570-3518. LAB PUPPIES, black 8 wks, 3 females and 1 male, 1st shots, $75 (937)339-9476 PUPPIES, Yorkie-Poo, Females, $395, also 6 month old CKC male Miniature Poodle, $275, (419)925-4339 WESTIE PUPPIES, 2 males, 16 weeks old, shots and wormed. $175. Call or text (937)658-4267

RIFLE, Bushmaster, AR Carbon-15 5.56, Nato or .223 with red dot, $2500, (937)658-0318

800 - Transportation

805 Auto 1982 CHEVY 1/2 ton truck. 6 cyl. 3 speed. $1000. 1991 CHEVY Silverado, 350 automatic $1200. (937)773-1817 (937)451-1638 2000 JEEP Grand Cherokee, V8, leather, loaded, 1 owner, excellent condition. $2895. ( 9 3 7 ) 4 4 0 - 9 3 2 3 (937)287-4374 2005 CADILLAC CTS, silver, 127,000 miles. FULLY LOADED!! Get a great car at a great price!! $8000. (937)418-4029 2008 FORD Escape XLT, only 27,000 miles, transferable warranty, $14,500 OBO, (937)498-9770. 2009 FORD F150, super cab, long bed, heavy duty, $20,000 (937)698-6051

850 Motorcycles/Mopeds 2001 TOMOS Targa LX moped, black. Two new tires! Good condition. $500. (937)308-6341 kkconley210@gmail.com. MOTORCYCLE SWAP MEET Allen County Fairgrounds Sunday, Feb. 10th 10 a.m.-3:30 p.m. Admission $6.00 Sponsored by J & M Collectibles 419-795-4185

880 SUV’s 1999 FORD Expedition, blue, 119,000 miles. V8, gas, very nice condition. 3rd row seat. Tow package. $3400. (937)778-8760 ccummins@woh.rr.com.

899 Wanted to Buy PAYING CASH for Motorcycles, Jeep Wrangler, and muscle cars (937)681-5266

Ohio’s Site For Jobs Long Term & Full Time Jobs Immediate Openings Darke, Miami, & Shelby Co. Call 937-778-8563 or Apply On-line @ www.hr-ps.com

Find a new wallhanging.

545 Firewood/Fuel

Whether posting or responding to an advertisement, watch out for offers to pay more than the advertised price for the item. Scammers will send a check and ask the seller to wire the excess through Western Union (possibly for courier fees). The scammer's check is fake and eventually bounces and the seller loses the wired amount. While banks and Western Union branches are trained at spotting fake checks, these types of scams are growing increasingly sophisticated and fake checks often aren't caught for weeks. Funds wired through Western Union or MoneyGram are irretrievable and virtually untraceable.

ANGUS BULLS, cows, heifers, (937)209-0911, (937)246-6374.

586 Sports and Recreation

425 Houses for Sale

Apply in person at: Continental Express 10450 St Rt 47 Sidney, OH Or call 800-497-2100 www.ceioh.com.

877-844-8385

R# X``#d

FIREWOOD for sale. All seasoned hardwood, $150 per cord split/ delivered, $120 you pick up. ( 9 3 7 ) 8 4 4 - 3 7 5 6 (937)844-3879

Regional drivers needed in the Sidney, Ohio Terminal. O/O's welcome

DIESEL MECHANIC

lee_fearnley@oh.nitto.com

or fax to: (937)773-2089

Thurs - Weds @ 5pm Sat - Thurs @ 4pm

280 Transportation

We offer excellent working conditions and benefit package. We are a drug free work place. Please send resume with letter of interest with wage requirements to:

POLICY: Please Check Your Ad The 1st Day. It Is The Advertiser’s Responsibility To Report Errors Immediately. Publisher Will Not Be Responsible for More Than One Incorrect Insertion. We Reserve The Right To Correctly Classify, Edit, Cancel Or Decline Any Advertisement Without Notice.

A TAX REFUND FOR YOU NO RENT UNTIL MARCH 1ST 1, 2 & 3 Bedroom apartments with all the amenities 2 BEDROOMS STARTING AT $495 The BEST in apartment living, Call Renee' for details, EHO ARROWHEAD VILLAGE APARTMENTS (937)492-5006 TIPP CITY 3 bedroom, deluxe duplex, 1.5 car garage, CA, gas heat, 2 full baths, all appliances, $820 + deposit. (937)216-0918

FIREWOOD, $125 a cord pick up, $150 a cord delivered, $175 a cord delivered and stacked (937)308-6334 or (937)719-3237

NOTICE Investigate in full before sending money as an advance fee. For further information, call or write:

Better Business Bureau 15 West Fourth St. Suite 300 Dayton, OH 45402 www.dayton.bbb.org 937.222.5825 This notice is provided as a public service by

. Looks D FOR SALE DART BOAR your om. Sharpen ro y an in t grea ’s ove your home skill and impr same time. decor at the

BANKRUPTCY AND REPO AUTO AUCTION SATURDAY FEBRUARY 9, 2013 415 SOUTH STREET, PIQUA, OHIO; UPPER MIAMI VALLEY STORAGE 9:00 A.M. SHARP TERMS OF THE SALE ARE THIS: CASH. NO PERSONAL CHECKS NO CREDIT CARDS. NO CHILDREN. PLEASE CALL WITH QUESTIONS. ALL VEHICLES SOLD 100% AS IS. BANKRUPTCY UNITS HAVE SEPERATE TERMS. AGAIN, PLEASE CALL WITH QUESTIONS BEFORE THE AUCTION. WE ARE ONLY RESPONSIBLE FOR SELLING UNITS, WE CANNOT ANSWER VERIFY OR GUARANTEE ANY CONDITION OF ANY UNIT IN AUCTION. ALL UNITS INCLUDING BOATS, SKIS, TRAILERS, VEHICLES ANYTHING SOLD IS 100% AS IS. PLEASE SEE AUCTIONZIP.COM AUCTION ID CODE 6480 FOR COMPLETE LISTING AND PHOTOS.

BAYMAN AUCTION SERVICE A newspaper group of Ohio Community Media

2363181

LOST: 4 month old black and white Newfoundland from 423 N Main. Answers to Gracie. Timid. 45lbs. REWARD! ( 9 3 7 ) 4 1 8 - 3 4 9 9 ( 9 3 7 ) 4 1 8 - 0 8 1 4 (937)570-5258

TAX PREPARATION $100 flat rate (937)620-6755 taxestogo9@gmail.com

2363178

125 Lost and Found

Develops and implements optimal, cost effective manufacturing processes and methods in accordance with product specification and quality standards. Evaluates and improves manufacturing methods, utilizing knowledge of product design, materials and parts, fabrication processes, tooling and production equipment capabilities, assembly methods and quality control standards. Analyzes and plans work force utilization, space requirements, workflow, and designs layout of equipment and workplace for maximum efficiency.

275 Situation Wanted

Mon - Thurs @ 5pm Weds - Tues @ 5pm Fri - Thurs @ 5pm

Piqua Daily Call

ROBERT BAYMAN 937 773 5702

TONY BAYMAN 937 606 0535

JOE HARKER 937 606 0536

2364687

100 - Announcement

)44g`# pnuBS@ fn]q>Z1NBgq>Z }1J

2363265

PLACE YOUR CLASSIFIED AD ONLINE-24/7

GENERAL INFORMATION

All Display Ads: 2 Days Prior Liners For:


11

Thursday, February 7, 2013

PIQUA DAILY CALL • PLACE YOUR AD IN THE CLASSIFIEDS THAT WORK 877-844-8385 OR ON THE WEB AT WWW.DAILYCALL.COM

Service&Business DIRECTORY

To advertise in the Classifieds That Work Service & Business Directory please call: 877-844-8385 600 - Services

655 Home Repair & Remodel

655 Home Repair & Remodel

660 Home Services

660 Home Services

660 Home Services

675 Pet Care

Sullenberger Pest Control We Eliminate

#Repairs Large and #Room Additions #Kitchens/Baths #Windows #Garages

(937)778-8093

937-335-6080

TERRY’S

•Refrigerators •Stoves •Washers & Dryers •Dishwashers • Repair & Install Air Conditioning

for appointment at

OME IMP ROVEM AL H EN T T TO ALL YOUR NEEDS IN ONE

Free Consultation ~ Affordable Rates

937-620-4579 Call to find out what your options are today! I am a debt relief agency. I help people file for bankruptcy relief under the United States Bankruptcy Code. 2355315

937-489-8558

FREE ESTIMATES

www.thisidney.com • www.facebook.com/thi.sidney NO JOB TOO SMALL, WE DO IT ALL

Eric Jones, Owner

HERITAGE GOODHEW

WINTER SPECIAL

• Metal Roofing • Sales & Service • Standing Seam Snap Lock Panels

aandehomeservicesllc.com Licensed Bonded-Insured

2359221

2358130

“WE REPAIR METAL ROOFS”

937.492.8003 • 937.726.2868

937-606-1122

that work .com

(See Us For Do-It-Yourself Products)

MINIMUM CHARGES APPLY

Voted #1 in Shelby County by Sidney Daily News Readers

937-492-5150

For 75 Years

Since 1936

937-493-9978 Free Inspections

2356762

2357520

Gutters • Doors • Remodel

875-0153 698-6135

00

159 !!

Roofing • Siding • Windows FREE ES AT T ES IM

725 Eldercare

KNOCKDOWN SERVICES

starting at $

2362174

COOPER’S GRAVEL

765-857-2623 765-509-0069

WE KILL BED BUGS!

Continental Contractors

645 Hauling

Gravel Hauled, Laid & Leveled Driveways & Parking Lots

710 Roofing/Gutters/Siding

Roofing • Drywall • Painting Plumbing • Remodels • Flooring Mention this ad and get 10% OFF any remodel of $5000 or more. Expires 2/28/13

WE DELIVER

that work .com

A simple, affordable, solution to all your home needs.

Shredded Topsoil Fill Dirt

DRYWALL ADDITIONS

PORCHES GARAGES

A&E Home Services LLC Insurance jobs welcome • FREE Estimates

Excavating Driveways •• Excavating Driveways Demolition •• Saw Saw Dust Dust Demolition

WINDOWS SIDING

BUY $ELL SEEK

or (937) 238-HOME Free Estimates • Fully Insured • 17 Years of Home Excellence

GRAVEL & STONE

ROOFS • KITCHENS • BATHS • REMODELING PAINTING DECKS

Mobile Veterinary Service Treating Dogs, Cats & Exotics

(937) 339-1902

937-773-4552

INSURED

BONDED

Concentration on Chapter 7 Bankruptcy Law for over 15 years

2362793

Bankruptcy Attorney Emily M. Greer, Esq.

Amy E. Walker, D.V.M. 937-418-5992

Ask about our Friends & Neighbors discounts

APPLIANCE REPAIR

422 Buckeye Ave., Sidney

Small #Basements #Siding #Doors #Barns

“All Our Patients Die”

937-573-4737

Senior Homecare

www.buckeyehomeservices.com

• Roofing • Windows • Kitchens • Sunrooms

• Spouting • Metal Roofing • Siding • Doors

Personal • Comfort

• Baths • Awnings • Concrete • Additions

CALL TODAY FOR FREE ESTIMATE

~ Flexible Hourly Care ~ ~ Respite Care for Families ~

419.501.2323 or 888.313.9990 www.visitingangels.com/midwestohio

2358451

2354666

Call Us To Boost Your Business

1-877-844-8385

PictureitSold

2013 Baby Pages Publication Date:

Thursday, April 18, 2013

To advertise in the Classifieds That Work Picture it Sold please call: 877-844-8385

Deadline for photos is

Wednesday, March 27, 2013 (Babies born January 1, 2012 – December 31, 2012) 2003 CHRYSLER 300 M SPECIAL Pearl black, premium leather black, 3-5 high output V6 24V, 35,000 miles, like new condition, non-smoking, $9600 OBO. (937)489-3426

2003 FORD F150 SUPER CAB V6, 5-speed manual, AM/FM/CD, cruise control, cold AC. $7700. (937)638-1832

The pages will be published in the April 18th edition of the Troy Daily News and Piqua Daily Call

2004 TRITOON PONTOON ODYSSEY 20ft, new stereo, cover, decals, 04 Yamaha 150hp, trailer, runs Great! asking $15,500 email kgeise@electrocontrols.com

ONLY $22.50

Angela Leiss Brown Township Zoning Inspector

2363411

2362846

02/07/2013

June 24, 2011

e

Pa

rents Kelly & Fran k DeBrosse, Piqua Grandparent s Ken & Beck y Smith Don & Sher yl DeBrosse

2013 Baby Pages PLEASE PRINT LEGIBLY- Any names that do not fit in the allowed space will be subject to editing.

TRUCKS FOR SALE

Miami Metropolitan Housing Authority has two (2) 1995 Chevrolet trucks with snow plows, lift gates and toolboxes for sale. Sealed bids will be accepted until and opened at 9:00 a.m. February 15th, 2013. Minimum bid is $3,000 per vehicle. The Authority reserves the right to reject any and all bids and to choose the bid most beneficial to the Authority. Bids may be for either or both vehicles. Vehicles sold “as is”. Authority hours and location: 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday – Friday, 1695 Troy-Sidney Rd., Troy, Ohio 45373.

Olivia DeB ross

• Twins are handled as TWO photos. • Enclose photo, coupon and $22.50

PUBLIC NOTICES The Brown Township Board of Zoning Appeals will meet February 12th, 7 pm at the Township Building in Conover, Ohio. They will discuss and act upon an appeal from Leonard Franke estate.

*Child’s Name: ________________________________________________________ *City: __________________________________ *Birthday: __________________ *Parents’Names: ______________________________________________________ **Grandparents’Names: __________________________________________________ **Grandparents’Names: __________________________________________________ (*Required Information) **Due to space constraints, only parents and grandparents names will be listed.

02/4, 02/06, 02/07, 02/08, 02/09-2013

 Please mail my photo back. SASE enclosed. (Not responsible for photos lost in the mail.)  I will stop by and pick up my photo (we will only hold them for 6 months) Name: ______________________________________________________________ Address: ____________________________________________________________ City: ________________ State: ____ Zip:__________ Phone: ______________ Bill my credit card #: ____________________________ expiration date: __________ Signature:____________________________________________________________  Discover  Visa  Mastercard  Am. Express AMOUNT ENCLOSED: __________

Government officials have to publish their intentions in the newspaper. That includes where they intend to build facilities you don’t want down the block. Ohio newspapers, including the Piqua Daily Call, upload thousands of public notices to a popular website, PublicNoticesOhio.com, at no additional cost. Notices pertaining to local, county and state meetings, organizations and entities are among those included. Log on today to view public notices printed in your local hometown newspaper or visit www.dailycall.com and click on the “Public Notices” link.

Mail or Bring Coupon to:

2359916

2360768

2363335

Call 937-498-5125

Roofing, Windows, Siding, Fire & Water Restoration 2362849

2362836

Electronic Filing 45 Years Experience

Residential/Commercial Licensed & Insured

2357518

937-492-ROOF

2358830

SchulzeTax & Accounting Service

2348994

615 Business Services

2360481

Bed Bugs

ATTN: BABY PAGES 100 Fox Dr. Ste. B, Piqua, OH 45356

ATTN: BABY PAGES 224 S. Market St., Troy, OH 45373


SPORTS

INFORMATION Call ROB KISER, sports editor, at 773-2721, ext. 209, from 8 p.m. to midnight weekdays.

IN BRIEF ■ Basketball

KARN

ZIMPHER

MECKSTROTH

Piqua trio earn district berths CENTERVILLE — Three Piqua divers earned Division I district berths at the Centerville Division I sectional Tuesday night. Ike Karn won the sectional and has the eighth best qualifying score of 333.5. Zach Zimpher finished

second at the sectional and has the 11th best qualifying score of 299.30. Corbin Meckstroth was third at the sectional and has the the 13th best qualifying score of 295.9. They will compete at Miami University next week.

Trotwood visits Friday night Boys Weekend Hoop Schedule FRIDAY Trotwood-Madison at Piqua Anna at Lehman Miami East at Bradford Covington at Fr. Monroe Russia at Houston Newton at Ansonia Versailles at DSJ SATURDAY Piqua at Lebanon Bethel at Lehman Newton at Bradford Covington at Anna Troy at Miami East Houston at Riverside Versailles at Ansonia

Borchers has strong year COLUMBUS — Former Russia state champion Katie Borchers is having an outstanding season for the Ohio State University women’s indoor track BORCHERS team. Borchers has PRs of 2:10.78 in the 800 and 4:55.88 in the mile run. She is also a member of one of the fastest distance medley relay teams in Ohio State history. Borchers runs the first leg (1,200 meters). Their most recent time of 11:33.32 was the fourth fastest time in that event in OSU history.

MIKE ULLERY/CALL PHOTO

Edison Community College’s Eric Beckstedt passes the ball Wednesday.

Baltimore

QUOTED “They didn’t call it, so I guess it wasn’t a foul.” —Aaron Craft on his final shot against Michigan

See PIQUA/Page 14

With the Edison Community College’s all-time winningest coach Larry Leffel in attendance, the Charger men’s basketball team wanted to complete a season sweep of Cincinnati Sate Wednesday in OCCAC action. But, the Surge had other ideas, winning 7957. Edison got in an early 7-0 hole and couldn’t recover. Eric Beckstedt led Edison with 12 points, including four 3-point field goals. Brandon Ervin had another big game inside with 10 points and 12 rebounds. Nick Tingle pulled down 12 rebounds for the Chargers, while Kelly Kirtz had five assists and four steals. Thomas Jackson led the Surge with 22 point and seven rebounds. Winton Grays added 17 points, three assists and four steals; while Devonte Smith was good for 15 points. Jamal Ivery added 12

points and six rebounds off the bench. Edison struggled with its shooting touch all night. The Chargers were 21 of 64 from the floor for 33 percent and nine of 28 from beyond the arc for 32 percent. Edison converted six of 16 free throws for 38 percent. Cincinnati State was 28 of 61 from the floor for 46 percent and 10 of 15 from the line for 67 percent. The Surge made 13 of 22 free throws for 59 percent. The Surge won the battle of the boards 46-36 and had 12 turnovers to the Chargers 19. Edison will host Sinclair Wednesday. BOXSCORE Cincinnati State (79) Devonte Smith 5-5-15, Chrisean Mardsen 4-1-9, Nicholas Robertson 0-0-0, Winston Grays 6-0-17, Thomas Jackson 7-6-22, Jamal Ivery 4-1-12, Lionel Hill 1-02, C.J. Moreland 1-0-2. Totals: 28-13-79. Edison (57) Jacob Benanzer 2-0-6, Nick Tingle 1-35, Brandon Ervin 4-2-10, Kelly Kirtz 3-0-7, Eric Beckstedt 4-0-12, Mike Howard 2-0-5, Jordan Taylor 3-1-8, Jesse Davis 2-0-4, William Plummer 0-0-0. Totals: 21-6-57. 3-point field goals — Cincinnati State: Grays (5), Jackson (2), Ivery (3). Edison: Benanzer (2), Kirtz, Beckstedt (4), Howard, Taylor.

Lady Surge bring physical game Edison women fall in OCCAC BY ROB KISER Sports Editor rkiser@dailycall.com

A:

Q:

Piqua boys basketball coach Heath Butler knows the Indians face a strong challenge Friday night when Trotwood visits. The Rams come in 15-3 overall, 8-0 in the GWOC North and can clinch a share of the GWOC North title with a win. At the same times, Piqua has no intention of waving any white flags. “They are a great team,”

Butler said. “They are leading the GWOC North and one of the best teams in the GWOC.” In the first meeting, at Trotwood-Madison, Piqua lost 81-46. “It is not an insurmountable challenge,” Butler said. “But, we are going to have to play our best basketball. And I think we can do that. The kids have bought into the game plan.” JaMar Hammonds, a 6-

Cincinnati State gets past Edison in OCCAC

Borchers takes fifth place

Who was the first NFL team to lose to an AFL team in the Super Bowl?

BY ROB KISER Sports Editor rkiser@dailycall.com

Charger men drop game

■ Indoor Track

STUMPER

12

Piqua ready for big challenge

Replogle has big game

DAYTON — Former Versailles state champion Christine Borchers is competing on the University of BORCHERS Dayton indoor tack and field team. At the Youngstown State Invitational, Borchers took fifth in the shot put with a distance of 42-feet, 3.5 inches. Dayton is at the Hoosier Hills Invitational this weekend.

■ OSU loses to Michigan in OT, page 13. ■ Meyer lands great recruiting class, page 14.

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2013

Piqua Daily Call • www.dailycall.com

SPRINGFIELD — Kim Replogle had a big game for Wittenberg University recently. Replogle had 14 points REPLOGLE and eight rebounds, leading the team in both categories, against Ohio Wesleyan. The 5-foot-9 senior had seven offensive reobunds and was 7-for-12 from the floor. Replogle is averaging 5.7 rebounds and has the led the team in rebounding in three different games this season.

INSIDE

The Edison Community College women’s basketball team gave Cincinnati State a good battle in a matchup of two of the top teams in the OCCAC Wednesday night at the Convocation and Student Center before losing 67-59. But, Lady Chargers coach Kim Rank felt the difference in the game was noticeably obvious from the start. “I just felt they had the intensity they needed,” Rank said about the Lady Surge. “I just felt like they were more intense and more physical than we were.” And it was never more clear than in the most critical juncture of the game. When Brooke Richards drilled a three with 1:20 remaining, the Lady Chargers trailed just 64-59 — the closest they had been since late in the first half.

And it appeared Edison would get a defensive stop at the other end and have a chance to make it a one possession game — but the Lady Chargers couldn’t secure the rebound, Cincinnati State made one of two free throws and that was as closes as Edison could get. “It was just a lot of little things like that,” Rank said. “Like I said, they were just the more physical team.” After trailing by double figures much of the first half, Edison made a run late in the half. Richards hit two free throws and Morgan Huelskamp scored on a drive to the basket to get the Chargers within 28-24 with 3:15 remaining in the half. After Cincinnati State’s Brandi Henschen hit a three, Emily Mowbray drove the baseline for Edison to get the Chargers within 31-26. But the Surge countered with See CHARGERS/Page 14

MIKE ULLERY/CALL PHOTO

Edison’s Terra Vanover drives to the basket Wednesday.

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Thursday, February 7, 2013

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Piqua bowlers sweep Rams Girls also top WLS DAYTON — The Piqua bowling teams swept a GWOC North match with Trotwood-Madison at Capri Lanes Tuesday. The boys won 2,0971,794. In the first game, Brady Shaw had a 214 game, while Brandon Devaudreuil added a 173. In the second game, Zac Mason had a 191 and Devaudreuil added a 189. Piqua had baker games of 182 and 215. “The boys bowled great and it was good to keep on the winning side,” Piqua coach Eric Wagner said. The Lady Indians won 1,969-1,714. Shae Doll rolled games of 195 and 201 for a 396 series, while Hayley Ryan had games of 175 and 192 fr a 367 sereis.

Alaina Mikolajewski had games of 148 and 178 for a 326 sereis, while Natalie Thobe rolled a 164. Other Piqua scores were Emily Wenrick 148, Kaili Ingle 145, Haley Huebner 113. Piqua had baker games of 153 and 157. The girls were coming off 2,151-1,873 win over West Liberty-Salem on Monday. Ryan led the Indians with duplicate 200s for a 400 sereis. Other scores were Ingle 172, Thobe 170, Wenrick 156, Mikolajewski 143, Doll 143, Huebner 127. Piqua had baker games of 173, 141, 145 and 152. Piqua will bowl West Carrollton and Franklin today at Capril Lanes, before the GWOC Sunday.

Lehman girls fall to D-IV power Russia gives Anna girls battle AP PHOTO

Ohio State’s Aaron Craft has his shot blocked by Tim Hardaway Jr. in the closing seconds of overtime.

Buckeyes can’t hold on Ohio State loses to Michigan in overtime ANN ARBOR, Mich. (AP) — Aaron Craft rushed the ball into the frontcourt, trying to tie the game and force another overtime. Trey Burke defended him almost all the way to the hoop — then Tim Hardaway Jr. smothered Craft's last-ditch attempt at a layup. "There was a bit of contact, but they didn't call it, so I guess it wasn't a foul," Craft said. Ohio State scored at will for most of the second half against No. 3 Michigan on Tuesday night, but in overtime the Buckeyes managed only two points in a 76-74 loss. Craft's final two shots were blocked by Burke and Hardaway. Burke missed a 3pointer at the end of regulation that would have won it for Michigan — the Wolverines' only miss in nine second-half attempts from beyond the arc. Burke's 3 at the start of overtime made it 75-72, and then neither team scored until Craft's driving layup with just under a minute to play.

Craft stole the ball from Burke, but the Michigan point guard hustled back to prevent an easy basket. The ball went out of bounds to Ohio State. With the shot clock off, Craft drove past Burke, but Burke recovered to block Craft's shot from behind at the free throw line. Glenn Robinson III was fouled and made one of two free throws for Michigan (21-2, 8-2 Big Ten) with 7.6 seconds left. Craft had enough time to get all the way to the basket for another shot, but he couldn't convert. Coach Thad Matta reviewed the play but had little to say. "I just watched it, and it is what it is," Matta said. Hardaway's view? "I thought Trey fouled him, and then I thought the whistle was going to blow, and then I just went for the ball," he said. Hardaway brought Michigan back with a relentless streak of 3-point shooting. He finished with 23 points, including five straight 3-pointers in the second half. Deshaun Thomas

scored 17 points for the Buckeyes (17-5, 7-3). Michigan and Ohio State were meeting for the first time with both teams ranked in the top 10. With a sold-out, early arriving crowd cheering them on, the Wolverines went on an early 12-0 run, and they led 18-8 after Burke scored off a nifty hesitation dribble. But the Buckeyes settled in, scoring the game's next seven points and eventually taking a 29-28 lead when Craft drove for a layup. Ohio State was ahead 31-30 at halftime. The Buckeyes led 48-40 after a 3-pointer by Lenzelle Smith Jr., but Hardaway and the Wolverines rallied. Hardaway's fourth 3-pointer of the half put the Wolverines up 55-54. Amid all that, the Buckeyes stayed patient on offense. Smith's three-point play inside put Ohio State back ahead, and a 3pointer by LaQuinton Ross made it 60-55. Ohio State led 62-60 after another 3-pointer by Hardaway, and the

Wolverines were eventually able to stop the Buckeyes for a couple of possessions. Burke's breakaway layup followed by a 3-pointer from Nik Stauskas put Michigan back ahead 65-64. With tension mounting, both teams took advantage of fortunate bounces. After Hardaway's shot was blocked, the Wolverines came up with the loose ball and immediately got it to Burke for a 3 that put them up 68-65. At the other end, Nik Stauskas grabbed a defensive rebound, but his poor pass bounced right to Thomas, who caught it in rhythm in front of the Ohio State bench and sank a 3 to tie it. Smith tied it at 72 with a shot from the left corner in the final minute of regulation — his foot was on the 3-point line — and Ohio State held on to force overtime. "We showed more heart tonight than we have in a long time, and that's big," Thomas said. "I know we didn't get the win, but if we keep playing like this, we will."

SIDNEY — Lehman struggled against a strong Tri-Village girls basketball team Tuesday night, losing 84-39. Allie Hall led Lehman, 5-16, with 11 points. Lehman closes the regular season at Bradford Saturday.

Lady Raiders fall

RUSSIA — The Russia girls basketball team gave Anna a battle before losing 54-49 in SCL action Tuesday. Anna clinched a share of the SCL title with the win. Kylie Wilson led Russia, 13-8, with 14 points. Maggie Kearns and Newton gets win PLEASANT HILL — Claudia Monnin each The Newton girls basket- scored 10. ball team finished the regular season with a 46-33 Lady Cats fall win over Milton-Union HOUSTON — The Tuesday. Houston girls basketball Madison Mollette team lost to a strong New scored 10 points for New- Knoxville team 57-35 ton, 10-12. Tuesday in non-conferMadison Tebics scored ence action. eight and Marissa KleMacey Stang led Housman added seven. ton with 12 points. Newton will play in the Houston will close the Brookville D-IV sectionals regular season tonight at at 2 p.m. Feb. 16 against Botkins in Shelby County Bethel. League action.

East wrestlers sweep tri-match Wrestle at Covington Saturday ARCANUM — The Miami East wrestling team swept a CCC trimatch Tuesday, defeating National Trail 53-15 and Arcanum 44-24. “Overall we wrestled pretty well,” Miami East coach Jason Sroufe said. “We’ve got some guys out right now and we are just trying to healthy before the Covington duals this

weekend and the sectional tournament next week.” Danny O’Malley (160) was the only Viking to go 2-0 on the high, scoring a 17-2 tech. fall and 12-3 major decision. Austin Rush (132), Ben Ferguson (285) and Stephen Morrow (126) all scored pins and Josh Morrow (106) won a 9-0 major decision.

Record Book Basketball

NBA Standings National Basketball Association All Times EST EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division W L Pct GB New York 31 15 .674 — Brooklyn 28 20 .583 4 Boston 24 23 .511 7½ Philadelphia 21 26 .447 10½ Toronto 17 31 .354 15 Southeast Division W L Pct GB Miami 31 14 .689 — Atlanta 26 21 .553 6 Orlando 14 34 .292 18½ Washington 12 35 .255 20 Charlotte 11 36 .234 21 Central Division W L Pct GB Indiana 30 19 .612 — Chicago 29 19 .604 ½ Milwaukee 25 22 .532 4 Detroit 18 31 .367 12 Cleveland 14 34 .292 15½ WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest Division W L Pct GB San Antonio 38 11 .776 — Memphis 30 17 .638 7 Houston 27 23 .540 11½ Dallas 20 28 .417 17½ New Orleans 15 33 .313 22½ Northwest Division W L Pct GB Oklahoma City 36 12 .750 — Denver 31 18 .633 5½ Utah 27 22 .551 9½ Portland 25 23 .521 11 Minnesota 18 27 .400 16½ Pacific Division W L Pct GB L.A. Clippers 34 16 .680 — Golden State 30 18 .625 3 L.A. Lakers 23 26 .469 10½ Phoenix 17 32 .347 16½ Sacramento 17 33 .340 17 Tuesday's Games Indiana 114, Atlanta 103 L.A. Lakers 92, Brooklyn 83 Houston 140, Golden State 109

Phoenix 96, Memphis 90 Denver 112, Milwaukee 104 Wednesday's Games Charlotte at Cleveland Indiana at Philadelphia Boston at Toronto L.A. Clippers at Orlando New York at Washington Memphis at Atlanta Brooklyn at Detroit Houston at Miami Phoenix at New Orleans Golden State at Oklahoma City Portland at Dallas Milwaukee at Utah San Antonio at Minnesota Thursday's Games L.A. Lakers at Boston, 8 p.m. Chicago at Denver, 10:30 p.m. Friday's Games L.A. Lakers at Charlotte, 7 p.m. Toronto at Indiana, 7 p.m. Brooklyn at Washington, 7 p.m. New Orleans at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m. Orlando at Cleveland, 7:30 p.m. San Antonio at Detroit, 7:30 p.m. Portland at Houston, 8 p.m. Golden State at Memphis, 8 p.m. New York at Minnesota, 8 p.m. Phoenix at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m. L.A. Clippers at Miami, 8 p.m. Chicago at Utah, 10:30 p.m.

Men’s Schedule College Basketball Schedule All Times EST Thursday, Feb. 7 EAST St. Francis (NY) at Bryant, 7 p.m. LIU Brooklyn at CCSU, 7 p.m. Old Dominion at Drexel, 7 p.m. St. Peter's at Fairfield, 7 p.m. Marist at Iona, 7 p.m. Canisius at Manhattan, 7 p.m. Monmouth (NJ) at Quinnipiac, 7 p.m. Fairleigh Dickinson at Sacred Heart, 7 p.m. Niagara at Rider, 7:30 p.m. SOUTH The Citadel at Chattanooga, 7 p.m. W. Carolina at Davidson, 7 p.m. FAU at FIU, 7 p.m. UNC Greensboro at Furman, 7 p.m.

Appalachian St. at Georgia Southern, 7 p.m. North Florida at Kennesaw St., 7 p.m. Jacksonville at Mercer, 7 p.m. Hampton at Savannah St., 7 p.m. SC-Upstate at Stetson, 7 p.m. Clemson at Virginia, 7 p.m. Elon at Wofford, 7 p.m. ETSU at Florida Gulf Coast, 7:05 p.m. Tennessee St. at Austin Peay, 8 p.m. UTSA at Louisiana Tech, 8 p.m. Arkansas St. at Middle Tennessee, 8 p.m. Belmont at Murray St., 8 p.m. Coll. of Charleston at Samford, 8 p.m. E. Illinois at UT-Martin, 8 p.m. Troy at South Alabama, 8:05 p.m. UALR at Louisiana-Monroe, 8:30 p.m. Oral Roberts at Northwestern St., 8:30 p.m. NC State at Duke, 9 p.m. Maryland at Virginia Tech, 9 p.m. MIDWEST S. Dakota St. at IPFW, 7 p.m. Indiana at Illinois, 7 p.m. N. Dakota St. at Oakland, 7 p.m. Loyola of Chicago at Youngstown St., 7:45 p.m. Wright St. at Green Bay, 8 p.m. Detroit at Milwaukee, 8 p.m. SIU-Edwardsville at SE Missouri, 8 p.m. Nebraska-Omaha at W. Illinois, 8 p.m. SOUTHWEST W. Kentucky at North Texas, 8 p.m. Texas St. at Texas-Arlington, 8 p.m. Lamar at Texas A&M-CC, 8:30 p.m. McNeese St. at Sam Houston St., 8:45 p.m. Cent. Arkansas at Stephen F. Austin, 9 p.m. Missouri at Texas A&M, 9 p.m. FAR WEST Portland St. at N. Arizona, 8:35 p.m. Seattle at Denver, 9 p.m. N. Colorado at Montana, 9 p.m. Idaho at New Mexico St., 9 p.m. Washington at UCLA, 9 p.m. S. Utah at Idaho St., 9:05 p.m. North Dakota at Montana St., 9:05 p.m. California at Arizona St., 9:30 p.m. UC Irvine at CS Northridge, 10 p.m. Pacific at Cal Poly, 10 p.m. Colorado at Oregon, 10 p.m. Loyola Marymount at Portland, 10 p.m. BYU at San Diego, 10 p.m. UC Davis at UC Santa Barbara, 10 p.m. E. Washington at Sacramento St., 10:05 p.m. Pepperdine at Gonzaga, 11 p.m. Saint Mary's (Cal) at Santa Clara, 11 p.m. Washington St. at Southern Cal, 11:30 p.m. Long Beach St. at Hawaii, Mid

Women’s Schedule Women's College Basketball Schedule All Times EST Thursday, Feb. 7 EAST Loyola (Md.) at Niagara, 11 a.m. Marist at Iona, 4:30 p.m. Fairfield at Rider, 5 p.m. North Carolina at Boston College, 7 p.m. Bowling Green at Buffalo, 7 p.m. Saint Peter's at Canisius, 7 p.m. St. Bonaventure at Duquesne, 7 p.m. Northeastern at Hofstra, 7 p.m. Delaware at Towson, 7 p.m. SOUTH UALR at Louisiana-Monroe, 6:15 p.m. Oral Roberts at Northwestern St., 6:30 p.m. Miami at Clemson, 7 p.m. Presbyterian at Gardner-Webb, 7 p.m. Auburn at Georgia, 7 p.m. William & Mary at Georgia St., 7 p.m. UNC Wilmington at James Madison, 7 p.m. High Point at Longwood, 7 p.m. Campbell at Radford, 7 p.m. Marshall at UCF, 7 p.m. Charleston Southern at UNC Asheville, 7 p.m. South Carolina at Alabama, 7:30 p.m. UTEP at Tulane, 8 p.m. Tennessee at LSU, 9 p.m. MIDWEST Detroit at Youngstown St., 5:15 p.m. Penn St. at Indiana, 6:30 p.m. Cent. Michigan at Ball St., 7 p.m. Rhode Island at Butler, 7 p.m. Wright St. at Cleveland St., 7 p.m. Xavier at Dayton, 7 p.m. W. Michigan at Kent St., 7 p.m. Illinois at Michigan, 7 p.m. Wisconsin at Ohio St., 7 p.m. Milwaukee at Ill.-Chicago, 8 p.m. Green Bay at Loyola of Chicago, 8 p.m. W. Illinois at Nebraska Omaha, 8 p.m. Montana St. at North Dakota, 8 p.m. Oakland at N. Dakota St., 8 p.m. Nebraska at Northwestern, 8 p.m. IPFW at S. Dakota St., 8 p.m. Iowa at Minnesota, 8:30 p.m. UMass at Saint Louis, 9 p.m. SOUTHWEST W. Kentucky at North Texas, 6 p.m. Lamar at Texas A&M-CC, 6 p.m. McNeese St. at Sam Houston St., 6:30 p.m.

Cent. Arkansas at Stephen F. Austin, 7 p.m. Texas-Arlington at Texas St., 7:30 p.m. Kentucky at Arkansas, 8 p.m. East Carolina at Houston, 8 p.m. UAB at SMU, 8 p.m. Louisiana Tech at UTSA, 8 p.m. FAR WEST San Diego at BYU, 8 p.m. New Mexico St. at Idaho, 9 p.m. Portland at Saint Mary's (Cal), 9 p.m. Weber St. at S. Utah, 9 p.m. Sacramento St. at E. Washington, 9:05 p.m. Montana at N. Colorado, 9:05 p.m. Hawaii at Long Beach St., 10 p.m. Santa Clara at Loyola Marymount, 10 p.m. Cal Poly at Pacific, 10 p.m. Gonzaga at San Francisco, 10 p.m. Denver at Seattle, 10 p.m. UC Santa Barbara at UC Davis, 10 p.m. CS Northridge at UC Irvine, 10 p.m. N. Arizona at Portland St., 10:30 p.m.

Transactions Wednesday's Sports Transactions BASEBALL MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL PLAYERS ASSOCIATION — Promoted chief labor counsel Dave Prouty to general counsel. American League LOS ANGELES ANGELS — Agreed to terms with 3B Alberto Callaspo on a two-year contract. National League CINCINNATI REDS — Agreed to terms with RHP Mike Leake on a one-year contract. COLORADO ROCKIES — Agreed to terms with RHP Miguel Batista on a minor league contract. PITTSBURGH PIRATES — Agreed to terms with LHP Jonathan Sanchez on a minor league contract. WASHINGTON NATIONALS — Agreed to terms with 1B Micah Owings on a minor league contract. FOOTBALL National Football League CINCINNATI BENGALS — Named Hue Jackson running backs coach. GREEN BAY PACKERS — Announced the retirement of WR Donald Driver. HOCKEY National Hockey League NHL — Fined Columbus F Brandon Dubinsky $10,000 for boarding L.A. Kings D Rob Scuderi during Tuesday's game. COLUMBUS BLUE JACKETS — Assigned C Ryan Johansen to Springfield (AHL).


14

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Meyer knocks one out of the park OSU football has great signing day BY JIM NAVEAU Lima News

MIKE ULLERY/CALL PHOTO

Morgan Huelskamp drives to the basket against Cincinnati State.

Chargers Continued from page 12 the final five points of the half to make it 36-26 at the break. “That’s what tends to happen when one team is more physical and aggressive than the other one,” Rank said. With Edison down by 13 early in the second half, Terra Vanover came off the bench to give the Chargers some life. She buried consecutive threes to get Edison within 4942. “Terra (Vanover) is a very good shooter,” Rank said. “Sometimes, she is limited by her size. But, she got two open looks and hit them.” But, Cincinnati State would open the lead back up to 16, before one final rally by the Lady Chargers. “I am just disappointed

they were so much more physical than us,” Rank said. “We didn’t shoot the ball well at all. You wouldn’t even think we would be in the game shooting like that, but we were.” Brooke Richards led the Chargers with 20 points, seven rebounds and four steals, going 11-for-11 from the line. Vanover added 10 points. Desiree Ash led Cincinnati State with 26 points, while Cameron Vaughn had a big gam inside with 17 points and 16 rebounds. Edison was 17 of 61 from the floor for 28 percent, including four of 12 from behind the arc for 33 percent. The Chargers were nearly perfect from the line, making 21 of 22 for 96 percent.

Piqua

Cincinnati State was 26 of 67 from the floor for 39 percent, including six of 11 from behind the arc for 55 percent. The Lady Surge made nine of 11 free throws for 82 percent. Cincinnati State won the battle of the boards 44-36, but had 27 turnovers to Edison’s 19. The Chargers will host Sinclair next Wednesday. BOXSCORE Cincinnati State (67) Hannah Stephenson 0-0-0, Cameron Vaughn 7-3-17, Kindsay Brandt 3-0-7, Alexus Chinn 2-0-4, Desiree Ash 9-6-26, Brandi Henschen 2-0-6, Grace McDougel 0-0-0, Hayle Phillips 1-0-3, Samantha Paratore 2-0-4. Totals: 26-9-67. Edison (59) Brooke Richards 4-11-20, Morgan Huelskamp 2-4-8, Kendra Brunswick 2-4-9, Mackenzie May 1-0-2, Tori Purk 2-0-4, Terra Vanover 3-2-10, Kia Perrin 0-0-0, Emily Mowbray 1-0-2, Chris Johnson 0-0-0, Jo Steva 2-0-4. Totals: 17-21-59. 3-point field goals — Cincinnati State: Brandt, Ash (2), Henschen (2), Phillips. Edison: Richards, Brunswick, Vanover (2). Halftime score: Cincinnati State 36, Edison 26. Records: Cincinnati State 21-4 (6-1), Edison 13-5 (4-3).

COLUMBUS – Urban Meyer reached back to his days as a minor league baseball player to describe the football recruiting class Ohio State signed on Wednesday. “Knocking it out of the park,” was the description OSU’s coach attached to the signing of 24 athletes to national letters of intent, including some who kept the Buckeyes in suspense until the final day. “It was a great day. I thought it was going to be a very good day but I would put it in the great category,” Meyer said. And he said that even before running back Ezekiel Elliott reaffirmed his commitment to Ohio State around 5 p.m. “It was a very eventful day. We went to bed last night with three guys we were very on edge about. I thought if we hit one out of three, it would be all right. Two out of three would be a good day and three out of three would be knock it out of the park,” Meyer said. The three late-decision recruits who pushed signing day to great from very good were safety Vonn Bell, wide receiver James Clark and running back/wide receiver Dontre Wilson. Bell, rated one of the top two safety prospects in the country, called Meyer to tell him of his decision just before going on ESPN at 10 a.m. to make his announcement. Clark, who was recruited hard by Florida, revealed his plans at 9 a.m. and Wilson, a former Oregon commitment, said he was coming to OSU on Monday night. Signing Bell gave Ohio State five players rated in rivals.com’s top 50 – linebacker Mike Mitchell (26), Bell (32), athlete Jalin Marshall (35), defensive back Cam Burrows (39) and defensive lineman Joey Bosa (47).

AP PHOTO

Michael Hill was one of OSU’s prized signings. Ohio State’s class was a consensus No. 2 nationally when several of the major recruiting service rankings were averaged. Elliott, who Meyer called “our tailback of the future,” made Ohio State fans nervous by delaying his announcement until late in the day after making a recent visit to Missouri, where both of his parents were former athletes. But Meyer said he was never concerned about getting Elliott’s signature on a letter of intent. “There has never been an issue with Ezekiel,” he said after getting Elliott’s letter of intent. Fifteen of Ohio State’s 24 recruits are defensive players. Thirteen are from out of state and several are from areas where Ohio State made inroads into unfamiliar territory. The only misses for the Buckeyes on signing day came when wide receiver Taivon Jacobs flipped to Maryland and punter Johnny Townsend went back on a verbal commitment to go with Alabama. The Buckeyes’ coaches went head-to-head with the SEC to win several recruiting battles, including getting linebacker Trey Johnson and Bell out of Georgia. They also scored big in Texas, where they

got quarterback J.T. Barrett, Mitchell and Wilson – all rated in the top 20 prospects in that state by Rivals.com. “Now we go from the recruiting phase to the preparation phase to get them ready to play,” Meyer said. “We’re going to recruit guys and get them on the field as soon as we can, as soon as they’re ready.” Co-offensive coordinator Tom Herman, who did much of the recruiting in Texas, cautioned against thinking the new recruits will all get a lot of playing time immediately, though. “We’ll see. To say that we’re going to rely on all these guys, as excited as we are, certainly would be putting our eggs in the wrong basket. First and foremost, I think we have to spend this off-season developing the guys who are here and teaching them how to be better at what we want them to be better at,” he said. Meyer also mixed a little caution with his excitement. “It remains to be determined how this class will be remembered,” he said. How it will be remembered will play out on football fields next year and beyond. But until then Wednesday will be remembered as one of Ohio State’s best signing days.

Chargers Play Surge In OCCAC

Continued from page 12 foot-4 senior guard, leads a balanced Rams attack, averaging 24.1 points, 7.6 rebounds and 3.0 assists; while 6-2 junior guard Dezhonte Bennett averages 22.5 points and 10.6 rebounds. Ravonn Lovette, a 6-3 senior forward, chips in with 11.3 point and 5.2 rebounds per game. “They are a very balanced team,” Butler said. “(JaMar) Hammonds and (Dezhonte) Bennett are two of the top scorers in the conference,” Butler said. And he knows, as always, the Rams will look to push the tempo. “That’s exactly right,” Butler said about Piqua needing to control the tempo.” Trotwood has the ability to score points quickly. We still want to attack on offense, but we need to be patient and work for a good shot.” On Saturday, Piqua will travel to Lebanon for a GWOC crossover game Saturday night. The Warriors are 7-11 overall, but Butler said that record is deceiving. “They have played a strong schedule, like us,” Butler said. “And they have been very competitive.” Lebanon is also pretty balanced. Ben Espitito, a 6-2 sen-

ior, leads the Warriors with 16.2 points and 3.6 rebounds per game. Zach Beckner, a 5-11 senior guard, averages 10.4 points and the other three starters all average at least six. “They key for them has been defense,” Butler said. “They have five guys, all about the same size. If you can get around them, you are in good shape, but that is hard to do. They really do a great job on defense.” And for Piqua, these final three regular season games (they close at Troy) and the tournament may be more important than usual. “Teams that are playing well at the end of the season — that carries over to the next season,” Butler said. “It will be interesting to see how the tournament draw goes.” Piqua is currently starting a a junior, a sophomore and a freshman, with the first three players off the bench being two juniors and a sophomore. “We want to win every game we can,” Butler said. “It has been a long season. We put some new wrinkles in — not just for Trotwood and Lebanon, but Troy and the tournament. It will be interesting to see how it goes.” Just like it has been all season for the Indians.

MIKE ULLERY/CALL PHOTO

Edison’s Kelly Kirtz drives to the basket Wednesday night against Cincinnati State. For more on the game, see page 12.

02/07/13  

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