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Newspapers In Education Visit NIE online at www.sidneydailynews.com, www.troydailynews.com or www.dailycall.com

Word of the Week nectar — the saccharine secretion of a plant, which attracts the insects or birds that pollinate the flower

Newspaper Knowledge The two types of North American Hummingbird Moths are very hard to tell apart. One type is the Hummingbird Clearwing Moth, which (as you can tell by its name) resembles a small hummingbird. The other is the Snowberry Clearwing Moth which actually looks more like a large bumblebee, than a hummingbird. The ranges of both species overlap quite a bit, so you can have both in a given location. Both species have fast moving, scaleless wings and furry bodies with large abdomens with coloration similar to that of a hummingbird. The scales on the wings are rubbed off in flight soon after it emerges from the pupa.

The Bookshelf Butterflies & Moths author: David A. Carter Attracting Birds, Butterflies & Other Winged Wonders to Your Backyard author: Kris Wetherbee 600 Butterflies and Moths in Full Color author: W.F. Kirby

Write On! Adults hover and sip nectar at many different flowers, including honeysuckle, beebalm, phlox, lilac and blueberry and milkweed. One of the sure ways to tell a Hummingbird Moth from a Hummingbird is that the moth will often rest on the flower while it drinks. Have you ever spotted a Hummingbird Moth? If you have write a paragraph about your sighting and send it to the newspaper.

NIE Coordinator: Dana Wolfe / Graphic Designer: Scarlett E. Smith

Hummingbird Moth The Hummingbird Moth, unlike most moths, is seen on clear, sunny days. Many people do confuse it with hummingbirds because of its coloration and how it moves. Hummingbird Moths grow up to two inches long. They have an olive-green body with red bands across their abdomen. Tufts of hairs from the end of the abdomen look a lot like feathers. The wings of this moth are mostly clear, sometimes with some red near the body. Hummingbird Moths live in fields, gardens, and forest edges. After mating, female moths lay eggs on host plants (food for caterpillars), such as honeysuckle, hawthorns, viburnum, and Black Cherry. The caterpillars, which hatch from eggs are yellowishgreen with darker green lines and reddish spots on the sides. They also have a yellow tail horn. When caterpillars are fully grown, they climb down the host plant and into the soil where they make a cocoon and become a pupa (resting stage). If it is early in the season, the adult moths will hatch in a few weeks. If it is in the Fall, the moths won't come out until the following Spring. Adult Hummingbird Moths feed on nectar from many different flowers, just like hummingbirds. Some of their favorites include: Japanese Honeysuckle, Red Clover, Highbush Blueberry, thistles, wild roses, and blackberries. Hummingbird Moths use a long, thin, needle-like mouthpart called a pro-

boscis to eat. The proboscis stays coiled up like a garden hose until it is time to use it. When the moth approaches a flower, it uncoils its proboscis and dips it deep into the flower where the nectar is.

Moths are Insects and belong to the Order Lepidoptera, which includes both moths and butterflies. There are about 100 families of moths with hundreds of genera (plural of genus) and more than 150,000 species. Moths live in all parts of the world, except in the very cold mountaintops and polar regions. Most Moths live in the trop-

ics. Moths and Butterflies are very much alike, but there are several characteristics that moths have that butterflies don't: • Moths usually have less colorful wings. • Moths have furrier bodies. • The antennas of moths are feath-

Predators of Hummingbird Moths include birds, mantids, spiders, bats, and other moth and caterpillar-eaters, although they probably get some protection from looking so much like hummingbirds. ery or threadlike. • Most moths fly at night. One exception to this rule is the Clearwing Hummingbird moth. Like butterflies, moths go through a metamorphosis where the young change completely before becoming adults.

Butterflies and Moths Word Search

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Mrs. Fong’s 5th grade class St Patrick's School Starting their year off recycling in the classroom!

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Tipp City, Troy, Piqua, Sidney, Greenville, Beavercreek and Fairborn. Expires Sept. 30, 2012. Answer – Ronald Wants To Know: fields, gardens, and forest edges

Ronald wants to know... Where do Hummingbird Moths live?


Newspapers In Education Visit NIE online at www.sidneydailynews.com, www.troydailynews.com or www.dailycall.com

Word of the Week composer — a person or thing that composes. A person who writes music.

Newspaper Knowledge Sousa exhibited many talents aside from music. He wrote three novels – The Fifth String, Pipetown Sandy, and The Transit of Venus – as well as a full-length autobiography, Marching Along and a great number of articles and lettersto-the-editor on a variety of subjects. He was also active in the sport of trapshooting, taking an active role on the national stage in competitions.

Marches by Sousa Sousa wrote 136 marches, published by the Sam Fox Publishing Company beginning in 1917 and continuing until his death. Some of his most popular and notable are: • “The Gladiator March” (1886) • “Semper Fidelis” (1888) (Official March of the United States Marine Corps) • “The Washington Post” (1889) • “The Liberty Bell” (1893) (credits theme for Monty Python’s Flying Circus) • “Stars and Stripes Forever” (1896) (National March of the United States) • “El Capitan” (1896) • “Glory of the Yankee Navy” (1909) • “The Black Horse Troop” (1924) (Written in honor of Troop A, 107th Calvary, Ohio National Guard.) • “Salvation Army March” (1930) (dedicated to The Salvation Army’s 50th anniversary in the USA)

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NIE Coordinator: Dana Wolfe / Graphic Designer: Scarlett E. Smith

John Philip Sousa John Philip Sousa (November 6, 1854 – March 6, 1932) was an American composer and conductor of the late Romantic era, known particularly for American military and patriotic marches. Because of his mastery of march composition, he is known as "The March King" or the "American March King" due to his British counterpart Kenneth J. Alford also being known as "The March King." Among his best known marches are "The Washington Post", "Semper Fidelis" (Official March of the United States Marine Corps), and "The Stars and Stripes Forever" (National March of the United States of America). His father was Portuguese, and his mother of Bavarian ancestry. Sousa began his career playing violin and studying music theory and composition under John Esputa and George Felix Benkert. His father eventually enlisted him in the United States Marine Band as an apprentice in 1868. After departing the band in 1875, Sousa eventually learned to conduct. From 1880 until his death, Sousa began focusing exclusively on conducting and wrote marches during this time. He eventually rejoined the Marine Band and served there for 12 years as director. Upon leaving the Marine Band, Sousa organized his own band. He toured Europe and Australia and also developed the sousaphone, a large brass instrument similar to the tuba. On the outbreak of World War I, Sousa was commissioned as a Lieutenant Commander and led the Naval Reserve Band in Illinois. Following his tenure there, Sousa returned to conduct the Sousa Band until his death in 1932. John Philip Sousa was born in Washington, D.C., on November 6, 1854, to John Antonio Sousa and Maria Elisabeth Trinkhaus. Sousa started his music education by playing the violin as a pupil of John Esputa and George Felix Benkert (born 1831) for harmony and musical composition at the age of six. He was found to have absolute pitch. When Sousa reached the age of 13, his father, a trombonist in the Marine Band, enlisted his son in the United States Marine Corps as an apprentice to keep him from joining a circus band. On December 30, 1879, Sousa married Jane van Middlesworth Bellis (1862–1944). They had three children together: John Philip, Jr. (April 1, 1881 – May 18, 1937), Jane Priscilla (August 7, 1882 – October 28, 1958), and Helen (January 21, 1887 – October 14, 1975). All are buried in the John Philip Sousa plot in the Congressional Cemetery. Wife Jane joined the Daughters of the

American Revolution (DAR) in 1907. Daughters Jane Priscilla and Helen Abert also joined DAR in 1907. Their Patriot was Adam Bellis. Several years after serving his apprenticeship, Sousa joined a theatrical (pit) orchestra where he learned to conduct. He returned to the U.S. Marine Band as its head in 1880 and remained as its conductor until 1892. Sousa led "The President's Own" band under five presidents from Rutherford B. Hayes to Benjamin Harrison. Sousa's band played at two Inaugural Balls, those of James A. Garfield in 1881, and Benjamin Harrison in 1889. Sousa organized his own band the year he left the Marine Band. The Sousa Band toured from 1892–1931, performing at 15,623 concerts. In 1900, his band represented the United States at the Paris Exposition before touring Europe. In Paris, the Sousa Band marched through the streets including the Champs-Élysées to the Arc de Triomphe – one of only eight parades the band marched in more than its forty years. In 1911, they went to Australia and performed in Sydney and Melbourne (then the national capital). The marching brass bass, or sousaphone, a modified helicon, was created by J. W. Pepper – a Philadelphia instrument maker who created the instrument in 1893 at Sousa’s request using several of his suggestions in its design. He wanted a tuba that could sound upward and over the band whether its player was seated or marching. The sousaphone was re-created in 1898 by C.G. Conn and this was the model that Sousa preferred to use. Sousa lived in Sands Point, New York. A school (John Philip Sousa Elementary) and a band shell are named after him and there is also a memorial tree planted in nearby Port Washington. Wild Bank, his seaside house on Hicks Lane, has been designated a National Historic Landmark, although it remains a private home and is not open to the public. Sousa died of heart failure at the age of 77 on March 6, 1932, in his room at the Abraham Lincoln Hotel in Reading, Pennsylvania. He had conducted a rehearsal of "The Stars and Stripes Forever" the previous day with the Ringgold Band. He is buried in Washington, D.C.'s Congressional Cemetery. Sousa served in the U.S. Marine Corps, first from 1868 to 1875 as an apprentice musician, and then as the head of the Marine Band from 1880 to 1892; he was a Sergeant Major for most of his second period of Marine service and was a

Warrant Officer at the time he resigned. During World War I, he was commissioned a Lieutenant Commander in the U.S. Naval Reserve and led the Navy Band at the Great Lakes Naval Station near Chicago, Illinois. Being independently wealthy, he donated his entire naval salary minus one dollar a year to the Sailors' and Marines' Relief Fund. After returning to his own band at the end of the war, he continued to wear his naval uniform for most of his concerts and other public appearances.

Facts! • When Sousa was 13, he wanted to join a circus band. To thwart young Sousa's plan, his father enlisted him in the Marines. When World War 1 erupted in 1917, Sousa joined the U.S. Naval Reserve and became a lieutenant. The sousaphone was named after him; it was developed based on his specifications. • He mainly wrote pieces for the marching band. He also wrote concert pieces, instrumental solos, operettas, overtures, suites, songs and pieces for trumpet and drum. • He is popularly called "The March King" because of his many compositions for the marching band and also for pioneering band music. He was an American composer of marches, a conductor, performer and bandleader. He was a music education advocate and a firm supporter for composers' rights.

See if you can find and circle the words listed. They are hidden in the puzzle vertically, horizontally, and diagonally — some are even spelled backwards.

Fall Tab-a-pull-ooza for Miami & Shelby County Schools In observance of America Recycles Day on November 15th, the Green Gals are having a fall Tab-a-pull-ooza Contest. All monies raised will be given to the Dayton Ronald McDonald House. Any school can participate in this contest in either Miami or Shelby County. A drop-off location will be given to the contact person. Tabs will be collected through November 16th. Prizes will be awarded to the school with the most collected tabs by weight. Registration form for Tab-a-pull-ooza Please Print More information/paperwork will be sent to you after registration is received. Contact Name: __________________________________________ School/County: __________________________________________ Phone Number: ________________________________________ Email: ________________________________________________ Please Send Registration by September 30th to: Dana Wolfe Newspapers in Education 224 S. Market St., Troy Fax: 937-440-5211 Phone: 937-440-3552 Email: dwolfe@tdnpublishing.com

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Nourishing Ideas. Nourishing People. Bring in your answer for One form per visit. Not valid with any other offer. No cash value.Valid

You can find the answer on today’s NIE page. Write your answer on the line.

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at all Scott Family McDonald’s®:

Tipp City, Troy, Piqua, Sidney, Greenville, Beavercreek and Fairborn. Expires Sept. 30, 2012. Answer – Ronald Wants To Know: The Sousaphone

Ronald wants to know... What instrument did Sousa develop?


09/10/12