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Commitment To Community INSIDE: Chance showers, T-storm, high 91, low 72. Page 3.

INSIDE: Yes, way! Page 6.

INSIDE: Cespedes wins Home Run Derby. Page 9.

W E D N E S DAY, J U LY 1 7 , 2 0 1 3

VOLUME 130, NUMBER 141

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Union man sentenced to prison Wood enters guilty plea to cultivation of marijuana BY WILL E SANDERS Staff Writer

court Tuesday. Brian E. Wood, 29, entered a guilty plea to cultivation of marijuana, a third-degree felony, and possession of criminal tools, a fifth-degree felony, and was sentenced on the spot for a combined five-year prison sentence. Wood entered the plea in an agreement with prose-

wsanders@civitasmedia.com

TROY — An aerial law enforcement investigation aimed at spotting marijuana plants from the sky resulted in a Union man being sentenced to prison for five years at a court hearing in common pleas

County adopts budget

cutors who dropped other criminal charges, consisting of possession of drugs, trafficking in drugs and child endangering. Authorities with the state drug task force R.A.N.G.E. conducting eradication patrols discovered more than 200 pot plants growing at a residence near Phillipsburg,

9477 N. Montgomery County Line Road, on Aug. 30 and alerted the Miami County Sheriff’s Office. As a part of his sentencing, Woods must forfeit about $1,747 in cash, four silver ounce bars and firearms, all of which were found on the property after deputies executed a search warrant.

According to the sheriff’s office more than 270 pounds of marijuana were found on the property, some growing inside and the rest growing outside, including marijuana that was in the process of being dried out. When authorities arrived at the home Wood was present with his fiancee and a WOOD 5-year-old child.

The best for last

ABOUT TOWN

IS

T H AT L E G A L ?

BY WILL E SANDERS Staff Writer wsanders@civitasmedia.com TROY — Miami County Commission adopted the 2014 tax budget during a special meeting Monday morning that projects revenues at $21.9 million while forecasting expenditures at $27.89 million. Meanwhile, county commissioners approved other fund revenues and appropriations at $69.3 and $68.7, respectively. Commissioners said $4.2 milin lion budget cuts in 2010 are still positively affecting county budgets, including the one passed Monday. “ T h e county has O’BRIEN been diligent in keeping their budget line items tight since the 2010 cuts,” said Commissioner John “Bud” MIKE ULLERY/STAFF PHOTO O’Brien. “It has put us in a Kathy Vukovic of Minster Bank lines up a putt with a bit of an unconventional putter during the strong position to better man- Piqua Area Chamber of Commerce annual golf outing at Piqua Country Club on Monday. age our services and expenses.” Examples O’Brien listed include the combination of four departments into one, forming the department of development, moving all county IT personnel under the county auditor and making them available to all county officers, and launching a new county website. He added that county elected officials and department heads

ALL

GONE

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Index Classified ...............13-14 Opinion ..........................4 Comics ........................12 Entertainment ...............5 Golden Years .................6 Health ............................7 Local ..............................3 Obituaries......................2 Sports.......................9-11 Weather .........................3

ISAAC HALE/STAFF PHOTO

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Gary Landis of Hub Scrap talks to Matt Davis at the demolition site of an industrial building on Weber Street on Tuesday.

SUMMER

SIDEWALK

THIS WEEKEND

SALE July 18, 19, 20

Call for aid and fun-filled weekend top meeting BY BETHANY J. ROYER Staff Writer broyer@civitasmedia.com PIQUA — They saved the best for last at Tuesday’s commission meeting as Ruth Hahn, 88, co-founder of the Hahn-Hufford Center of Hope on Garbry Road took to the podium during public commentary. She wanted to thank staff, volunteers, and those who have donated to the Center over its 41 years within the Piqua community. The Center has assisted those far and wide who may have suffered a brain trauma, neurological disorders, and other related injuries or birth abnormalities. However, Hahn’s main mission that evening was to inform city leaders, commissioners and those in attendance on the publication of her book, Hope Fulfilled: Hands that give hope, as all proceeds will go towards paying off the Center’s mortgage. A dream Hahn has been pursuing for some time now, and one she states would be another hope fulfilled. Hahn will be at the Farmer’s Market from 3-5 p.m. Thursday, July 25, for book signing and sale, the YWCA Sept. 11 and the Public Library Sept. 17. Other news shared that evening came from Commissioner William Vogt who invited everyone to the multiple activities to be had this weekend, from the Park and Recreation’s 7th annual car show starting at 7 p.m. on Saturday at Fountain Park and Hance Pavilion with the Van-Dells making a special concert appearance. To the second annual Activity Day for children preschool to sixth grade from 10 a.m. until 1:30 p.m., at the south end of the park. Another big event for the weekend will be arrival of the Hoverclub of America upon the Great Miami River beginning Friday, July 19. Commission did set to business, of course, as several See Best/Page 2

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Obituaries

Sandra Irene Darr SPLENDORA, Texas — Sandra Irene Darr of Splendora, Texas, formerly o f Piqua, passed away July 2, 2013. S h e w a s b o r n March 2 2 , DARR 1947, to the late Robert Vance and Wilma Irene Beaty. Mrs. Darr is survived by her husband, James “David” Darr; children, Kim and James Sheppard, Jan and Daniel Hiltibrand, Debbie Darr and Ernie Hernandez, Tom Carr, Cindy and Rusty Krueger and Brad Carr, all of Texas; 11

grandchildren, Samantha and Brendan Weeks, Christian, Joey, Jessica Hiltibrand, Justin Courts, Cody and Sean Krueger, Teagan, Tommy and Kendyll Carr; one g r e a t - g r a n d d a u g h t e r, Kaydense Weeks; sister; Connie and husband Nick Brookhart of Tipp City; sister-in-law, Jan Watson; and brother-inlaw, Harry and Ella Gene Darr. She was preceded in death by her parents; and brother, Bobby Beatty. A memorial service was held July 6 at Rosewood Humble Chapel, Rosewood Memorial Park, Conroe, Texas. Memorial contributions may be sent to Lighthouse Hospice, 200 River Point Dr., Suite 300, Conroe, TX 77304

Joan E. Poling PIQUA — Joan E. Poling, 80, of Piqua, died at 1 p.m. Sunday, July 14, 2013, at her residence. She was born May 24, 1933, in Piqua, to the late William W. and Alta (Sharpie) Malone. She m a rr i e d Paul D. Po l i n g o n Ju n e 1 8 , 1954, i n Piqua; he prec e d e d POLING her in death Sept. 13, 2002. Mrs. Poling is survived by a daughter, Lois (Randy) Albright of Piqua; two sons, Steven Poling of Piqua and Randy (Chris) Sherwood; two grandsons; and two great-grandchildren. She was preceded in death by six brothers, Larnell,

Robert, Harold, Francis “Bud,” William Jr., and Richard Malone; a sister, Betty Wagner Schneider; and a son, Jimmy Sherwood. Joan was a homemaker and enjoyed bingo, crocheting, the Cincinnati Reds, and shopping. A funeral service to honor her life will be conducted at 1 p.m. Thursday, at the Jamieson & Yannucci Funeral Home, with the Rev. Gary Wagner officiating. Burial will follow in Forest Hill Cemetery. Visitation will be from 5-7 p.m. Wednesday at the funeral home. Memorial contributions may be made to the charity of the donor’s choice. Guestbook condolences and expressions of sympathy, to be provided to the family, may be expressed through jamiesonandyannucci.com.

Robert ‘Bob’ Counts DAYTON — Robert “Bob” Counts, 84, former resident of Troy, passed away Sunday, July 14, 2013, in Hospice of Dayton. Born on March 31, 1929, in Miami County, Bob was a son of the late Lloyd V. and Dorothy (Clark) Counts. He is survived by a son and daughter-in-law, Mark and Gail Counts of Clayton; three grandchildren, PFC Andrew Counts, U.S. Army, Eglin AFB, Destin, Fla., Tara Counts and Grace Counts, both of Clayton; a sister, Judy Ward of St. Paris; and three nieces and several great-nieces and nephews. He also is survived by his special friend, Dottie Whitten of Tipp City. Robert was a graduate of Lena-Conover High School and received a bachelor’s degree from the University of Cincinnati. He served in the U.S. Air Force during the Korean Conflict. Bob worked for

29 years at Hobart C o r p o r ation, Troy, where he was a director of manufacturing. Later he owned and operated Granger, Counts Associates in Troy. A time of visitation will be held from 2-4 p.m. Friday, in the Suber-Shively Funeral Home, 201 W. Main St., Fletcher. A graveside funeral service will follow immediately in Fletcher Cemetery with the Rev. Rob Fulton, presiding. Veteran’s memorial services will be held by the Veterans Elite Tribute Squad of Piqua. In lieu of flowers, memorial donations may be made to the National Kidney Foundation of OH, 1373 Grandview, Ste. 200, Columbus, OH 432122804. Envelopes will be available in the funeral home. Condolences may be sent to www.shivelyfuneralhomes.com.

John Robert Kiefer TROY — John Robert Kiefer, 66, of Troy, died Monday, July 15, 2013, at home. He was born Dec. 10, 1946, in Piqua, to the late Robert Harry and Janice Marie (Rudy) Kiefer. He was a graduate of Troy High School, Class of 1964, a veteran of the U.S. Marine Corps, where he served during the Vietnam War, retired from BF Goodrich after 28 years of service, was an avid NASCAR fan, and he loved his lake home at Hecht’s Landing at Grand Lake St. Marys. He was preceded in death by his parents; and brother, Richard Kiefer. John is survived by his wife, Kimberly A. Kiefer; one son, Jason Kiefer of Marion; three step-sons, Bryan D. Sturgill Jr. of Centerville, Adam W. and his wife, Laci Sturgill of

Greenville and Brandon L. Sturgill of Troy; step grandson, Cooper Hanlee Sturgill; two nieces; and loyal friends, his dogs, Hunter and Tanner. Funeral services will be held at 10:30 a.m. Friday, at BridgesStocker-Fraley Funeral Home, Covington with Chaplain Ed Ellis officiating. Interment Miami Memorial Park Cemetery with Military Honors provided by the Veteran Elite Tribute Squad. The family will receive friends from 5-8 p.m. Thursday at the funeral home. If desired contributions may be made to Hospice of Miami County. Condolences may be left for the family at www.stockerfraley.com.

Elanor ‘Charline’ Smith Hufford INDIANAPOLIS, Ind. — Elanor “Charline” Smith Hufford, 92, of the St. Augustine Home for the elderly in Indianapolis, Ind., formerly of Troy, passed away Sunday, July 14, 2013. Charline was born Aug. 28, 1920, in Speedway, Ind., to the late Herbert Smith and Nelda (Bennett) Smith. She was married to Robert S. “Duke” Hufford, who preceded her in death in 1967. Charline is survived by her daughter and son-inlaw, Karla and Tim Gonzalez of Carmel, Ind.; granddaughters, Laine and Elizabeth Gonzalez of Carmel, Ind. In addition to her parents and husband, Charline was preceded in death by her son, Bruce Hufford sister, Rosalyn and Strome. Charline grew up in New Carlisle, and was a graduate of Bethel High School. She was formerly employed with Wright Patterson Air Force Base and also served as a private caregiver. For the last nine years, Charline lived at St. Augustine Home for the elderly where she was lovingly cared for by the staff and the Little Sisters

of the Poor. She was a member of First Lutheran the Church in Troy, and formerly active in the Girl’s Civic League, Westbrook Garden Club, Miami County ARC and the Miami County AARP. Services in Indiana will be held 11 a.m. Friday, at the St. Augustine Home, Indianapolis, Ind. The family will receive friends from 10-11 a.m. Friday at St. Augustine’s. Services in Ohio will be held 11 a.m. Saturday, at Baird Funeral the Home, Troy. The family will receive friends from 10-11 a.m. Saturday at Baird Funeral Home. Private interment will follow in New Carlisle Cemetery, New Carlisle. Memorial contributions may be made to Little Sisters of the Poor at St. Augustine Home, 2345 West 86th Street, Indianapolis, IN 46240. Friends may express condolences to the through family www.bairdfuneralhome.co m. Leppert Mortuary, Indianapolis, Indiana and Baird Funeral Home, Troy, are assisting the family.

Death notices SIDNEY — Phyllis J. Iljinsky, 84, of Sidney, passed away at her residence of natural causes Saturday, July 13, 2013. Memorial services will be held Monday, at Salm-McGill and Tangeman Funeral Home, in Sidney. Private burial will be at Forest Hill Cemetery, Piqua. WEST MILTON — Brenda Sue Albaugh Wolf, 65, of West Milton, passed away Sunday, July 14, 2013, at her residence. Graveside services will be held Thursday, at Potsdam Cemetery, Potsdam with Pastor Robert Kurtz officiating. Arrangements are being handled by Hale-Sarver Family Funeral Home, West Milton.

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dorf; sister, B e t t y O’Connor; a n d b r o t h e r, Allen Martin. He was a 1943 graduate of Staunton School, and a U.S. Army Veteran having served during World War II. He attended Stillwater Community Church in Covington. He was a member of The Ohio State Hand Corn Husking Association, Greenville Power of the Past, and the Midwest Draft Horse Association. Mr. Martin was formerly employed with Aeroproducts and later retired from Hobart Manufacturing. He was also a longtime area farmer. Services will be held at 10:30 a.m. Saturday, at the Stillwater Community Church, 7900 West Sugar Grove Road, Covington, with Pastor Ralph Schaafsma officiating. Interment will follow in Riverside Cemetery, Troy, with Veterans Memorial Honor Guard services at the graveside. Friends may call from 4-8 p.m. Friday at the church. Memorial contributions may be to Stillwater Community Church Memorial Fund, 7900 West Sugar Grove Road, Covington, OH 45318. Friends may express condolences to the family through www.bairdfuneralhome.com.

Best Continued from page 1 resolutions and a single ordinance were on the agenda. The final reading updating the Piqua Municipal Code regarding trees was adopted with little commentary save inquires about whether or not Weeping Willows could be banned, with new business seeing to the adoption of annexing property related to the future water treatment plant. Commission also adopted the following: A contract to Walls brothers Asphalt for the resurfacing program and amending an agreement with the Ohio Department of Transportation (ODOT) for the U.S. 36 beautification project. Passage of the project was given on a 4 to 1 vote with Commissioner John Martin voting against the resolution. A resolution for authorizing a purchase order to Valley Ford Truck, Henderson Truck Equipment and

Kalida Truck Equipment for two dump trucks with snow plows for the public works department was adopted, and the donation of an acre plus to the Piqua Improvement Corporation concerning the former power plant property. The latter will eventually see to the acre plus being donated back to the city upon improvements to the area. Want to learn more? Commission meetings are held every first and third Tuesday of the month at 7:30 p.m. at the commission chamber on the second floor of the Government Municipal Complex. For those seeking a more informal opportunity to speak with their city leaders, a commission work session is being offered once a month starting at 7:30 p.m. The public is invited and encouraged to attend with a copy of the meeting agenda available at the city’s website: www.piquaoh.org.

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PLEASANT HILL — Roy Martin, 87, of Pleasant Hill, passed away Tuesday, July 16, 2013, at his residence. He was born Sept. 27, 1925, in Covington, to the late Ferby Cecil Martin a n d Charlotte E l y (Campbell) Martin. H i s wife of 2 6 y e a r s MARTIN of marriage, Ruth E. (Morrett) Martin, survives. He also is survived by his children and their spouses, Becky and Bob Evans of Rosewood, Chuck Martin of Troy, Kathie and Dan Leistner of Covington, and Robin and Steve Epperson of Conover; one sister and brother-in-law, Nancy and Joe Dunn of New Carlisle; seven grandchildren, Chris (Wendy) Batdorf, Jared (Amy) Evans, Mark (Nichole) Leistner, Michelle Leistner (fiancé, Kyle Worley), Martin Leistner, Roy Epperson, and Ted Epperson; and six great-grandchildren, Daniel, Owen and Samuel Leistner, Vella and Vienna Batdorf, and Raegan Evans. In addition to his parents, Mr. Martin was preceded in death by one grandson, Matthew Leistner; son-in-law, Van Bat-

Policy: Please send obituary notices by e-mail to editorial@dailycall.com or by fax to (937) 773-4225. Deadlines: Notices must be received by 6 p.m. Sunday and Tuesday-Friday, and by 4 p.m. on Monday for Tuesday’s online edition. Questions: Please call Editor Susan Hartley at (937) 773-2721, ext. 207 if you have questions about obituaries.

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chaic software that was used” by the Miami County Auditor’s Office. New accounting software will be installed in the county next year to better aid in the annual budgeting process to make it an even smoother process. With Commissioner Richard Cultice absent from the meeting, O’Brien and fellow Commissioner Jack Evans approved the budget, which was based upon projections of estimated carry-over, estimated revenue and anticipated expenditures for the upcoming year. Evans said the cooperation amongst county officials “to hold the line with

major budget cuts” implemented in 2010 is still benefiting county coffers. “If those cuts were not in place we would not be in the position that we are in today,” Evans said. “ Monday’s approval followed a public hearing that was held concerning the tax budget on June 27. Monday’s approval of the tax budget, which included the Troy-Miami County Public Library, was the first step in a two-step budgeting process. At the end of this year commissioners will adopt 2014 appropriations after holding tax hearings in

the fall. O’Brien said the $4.2 million cuts in 2010 has made it possible for the county to have budget surpluses each year since, but noted that this week’s reopening of the Miami County Incarceration Facility will make the budget tighter. “It’s a tough budget item to pay for and it will make the remainder of our budget extremely tight,” the commissioner said. “… We continue to be cautiously optimistic and the general fund will be balanced in 2013 and, with hard work and cooperation, again in 2014.”


PIQUA DAILY CALL • WWW.DAILYCALL.COM

LOCAL

3

Wednesday, July 17, 2013

Community spotlight

Students recognized for academics, dedication

Hot, humid to persist Hot and humid weather will persist through Friday. During the maximum heating of the day, spotty showers or thunderstorms could develop through the end of the work week. Rain chances rise on Saturday as a cold front heads our way. High: 91 Low: 72.

EXTENDED FORECAST FRIDAY

THURSDAY

HIGH: 92

CHANCE

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SHOWER,

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HIGH: 92 LOW: 74

LOW: 72

Judge declines to dismiss charges BURLINGTON, Ky. (AP) — A judge in northern Kentucky has refused to dismiss murder charges against a former Warren County sheriff’s deputy accused of killing his parents four years ago. Boone County Circuit Judge Tony Frohlich concluded that no evidence was withheld from 42-year-old Michael Moore’s attorneys and that lab reports and notes were properly given to the defense. The Kentucky Enquirer reported that Frohlich issued his ruling after a 90-minute hearing on Friday. Moore’s trial, expected to take seven weeks, is set to begin Aug. 12 at the Boone County Justice Center. The trial has been delayed at least three times for various issues, including testing on DNA evidence.

PROVIDED PHOTO

Receiving scholarships at Piqua Catholic High School were, front row, left to right, Kirstyn Lee, Elyse Cox, Kaden Lee, Nick Caldwell, and Emily Bornhorst. Second row, left to right, Kameron Lee, Brendan O’Leary, Marcus Plessinger, Allison Bornhorst and Hope Anthony. Back row, left to right, Principal Joshua Bornhorst and Father Thomas Bolte. PIQUA — Following the end-ofyear Mass, students at Piqua Catholic School were recognized for outstanding achievements in academics and dedication by means of several scholarships. Each scholarship was awarded to students who were outstanding in their studies this past year. In the fourth grade, the Father Thomas Grilliot Grant of $500 each was awarded for the highest overall average in mathematics to Nick Caldwell and Emily Bornhorst. Two fifth-graders were awarded the Larry and Loretta Bolte Grant of $1,000 each for their dedication to serving at Mass, they were Brendan O’Leary and Kirstyn Lee. In the sixth grade, the Kathy

Henne Grant of $500 each was awarded for the highest science scores to Marcus Plessinger and Allison Bornhorst. For the highest overall average in religion in the seventh grade, the Joanne Qualters Grant of $1,000 each was awarded to Kameron Lee and Alanna O’Leary. There were several scholarships awarded to eighth-graders this year continuing on to Lehman Catholic High School. The Father Thomas Bolte Grant of $500 each for server dedication was awarded to Taylor O’Leary and Jenna Zimmerman. O’Leary also was awarded the Lehman Alumni Scholarship of $750. Brandon Simmons received the

Knights of Columbus Scholarship of $920. The Chuck Wagner Scholarship of $200 was awarded to Megan Neumeier. Receiving $500 each from the Lehman Open House were Elizabeth Pax and Jacob Earhart. Three students at Piqua Catholic were recognized for their perfect attendance this year with the Michele Peltier Theado Scholarship of $135, they were Kaden Lee, Kirstyn Lee and Hope Anthony. Elyse Cox was also recognized for her perfect attendance in the fourth quarter. In total, the students of Piqua Catholic earned more $10,000 this year in scholarships. Piqua Catholic School is now registering for this coming school year, if interested, please contact the school office at 773-1564.

INFORMATION Regional Group Publisher - Frank Beeson Executive Editor - Susan Hartley Advertising Manager - Leiann Stewart  History Established in 1883, the Piqua Daily Call is published daily except Tuesdays and Sundays and Dec. 25 at 100 Fox Dr. Suite B, Piqua, Ohio 45356.  Mailing Address: Piqua Daily Call, 100 Fox Dr. Suite B, Piqua, OH 45356. Postmaster should send changes to the Piqua Daily Call, 100 Fox Dr., Suite B, Piqua, OH 45356. Second class postage on the Piqua Daily Call (USPS 433-960) is paid at Piqua, Ohio. E-mail address: pdceditorial@civitasmedia.com.  Subscription Rates: EZ Pay $11.50 per month; $35 for 13 weeks; $66 for 26 weeks; $128 for 52 weeks; $10 for 13 weeks Saturday only; $19 for 26 weeks Saturday only; $35 for 52 weeks Saturday only.  Editorial Department: (937) 773-2721

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will help strengthen the body to prevent falls,” Verceles said. “Balance Movement classes help individuals of all ages reduce their risk of falling through strength, flexibility and balance exercise. This program is especially great for those 60 years and older.”

“The 45-minute classes include exercises in proper walking techniques, balance exercises, weight shifting, core strengthening and stretching. It is a low impact class. Participants are asked to wear comfortable clothes and flat soled shoes. Bring bottled water and a friend,”

Verceles said. For more information on class fees or to register for the class, stop at the YWCA Piqua at 418 N. Wayne St., call 773-6626 or e-mail info@ywcapiqua.com.

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PIQUA — Want to improve your balance, flexibility and reduce your risk of falling? Join in a 4-week class session instructed by Fred Verceles beginning Monday, July 29. Classes will be held from 10-10:45 a.m. at the YWCA Piqua. “These gentle exercises and the hints we provide

FAX: (937) 773-4225 E-mail: pdceditorial@civitasmedia.com  Circulation Department — 773-2721 Circulation Manager — Cheryl Hall 937-440-5237 Assistant Circulation Manager — Jami Young 937-773-2721 ext. 202  Office hours 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays Saturdays and Sundays at 335-5634 (select circulation.)  Advertising Department: Hours: 8 .am. to 5 p.m., Monday - Friday To place a classified ad, call (877) 844-8385. To place a display ad, call (937) 440-5245. FAX: (937) 335-3552.


OPINION

4 Piqua Daily Call

Contact us For information regarding the Opinion page, contact Editor Susan Hartley at 773-2721, or send an email to sharley@civitasmedia.com

WEDNESDAY, JULY 17, 2013

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Letters

Thank you from Gerlach family

Serving Piqua since 1883

“The righteous cry, and the LORD hears, and delivers them out of all their troubles. The LORD is near to them that are of a broken heart; and saves such as be of a contrite spirit.” (Psalms 34:17-18 AKJV)

The Village Idiot

Throwing a fit M

any states have banned, or soon will ban, texting and phoning while you drive because it’s so distracting. However, it’s a well-known fact that eating, fiddling with the radio, singing along with Beyonce, making hand-gestures to other drivers and wiping the ketchup that has dribbled onto your shirt from that burger you just ate while driving are all perfectly safe activities. I think we’ll all feel better if we know that we were killed by a guy eating a cheeseburger and not by a jerk on his cellphone. There’s just something comforting about it. Funny thing though, when drivers finish their phone calls, they usually don’t throw their phones out the window. But when they’ve finished the burger and the soda, they toss the remains out the window, wherever they happen to be — just like we all do. Sure, there are some neat freaks who put all the extra napkins, unopened ketchup packets, burger wrappers and empty french fry boxes all into one bag before they toss it. But most people just toss each item out separately, over hundreds of yards of roadway. Wait, what? You don’t do that? Oh, yeah, I forgot, neither do I. What is the thinking here? That this stuff is far too nasty to keep in the car until you can find a garbage can? What is the big problem with keeping JIM MULLEN your trash in the car until Columnist you can dispose of it? Or is your mother driving behind you just to pick up after you? Let’s see: You have enough money to have a car, you have enough money to buy gas, you have enough money to buy junk food and you’ve got to be over 16 to have a license. So we know that you know better than to throw your garbage out the car window, but you do it anyway. Why? My friends who live in states with bottle deposit laws are amazed at how many people still throw away bottles that can be returned for a nickel or a dime. I can understand getting rid of the empty beer cans. Obviously, when stopped by the police, you don’t want them to find a bunch of empties on the floor of the passenger seat; besides, you’re making plenty of money selling crystal meth, so who needs the nickel back? What floors my bottle-collecting friends is how many empty bottles of water they find on the side of the road. In their mind, people who drink bottled water can do no wrong. After all, they are the parents who don’t let their children drink sugary sodas; the joggers, runners and speed walkers; the back-to-the-earth, organic, grass-fed beef crowd — why on earth would they throw their garbage out of a car window and spoil the natural world they love so much? The answer is not “who is doing this,” but why? What does a small child do when he’s angry or frustrated? He throws things. What does an angry or frustrated adult do? Ever been golfing with a club thrower? The guy may be president of a bank, but he hasn’t a clue how to channel his anger. We’ve all heard of, or worked for, bosses who throw things. People throw drinks on each other, they “throw” a punch, they throw their husbands’ stuff out on the front lawn. Throwing fast-food waste out a car window says you’re mad at the world. But why are you taking out your anger on the rest of us? If you don’t like your parents, go tell them, not me. If you hate your job, get another one; don’t take it out on me. If you married someone you hate, whose fault is that? No one twisted your arm. Besides, if throwing trash out the car window solved problems, trust me, everyone would be doing it. Some days, I think they are. Contact Jim Mullen at JimMullenBooks.com.

Moderately Confused

Commentary

White House determined to start Obamacare money flow manded the administration s a not-so-serious reveal which businesses and part of their ongoing which government officials effort to get rid of were involved in the deciObamacare, House Republision. cans in May started a TwitBut the bigger question ter fight they called for Republicans is how to #ObamacareInThreeWords. handle the administration’s Rep. Darrell Issa got things surprise retreat. Should started with a tweet that BYRON YORK they focus on secrecy, as said simply, “Serious Sticker Columnist Upton & Co. are doing? Shock.” Rep. Michele BachShould they push the White mann added “IRS In House to explain how ObaCharge.” Sen. Richard Burr macare can still work when large emtossed in “Huge Train Wreck.” Democrats hit back, weakly, with Rep. ployers don’t have to pay fines for not Debbie Wasserman Schultz’s “Good for covering workers and, perhaps more imAmerica” and Rep. Gregory Meeks’ portantly, don’t have to report their em“What America Needs.” And then the ployees’ health care information to the White House stepped in with a killer giant new Obamacare bureaucracy, so line: “It’s. The. Law.” The tweet was ac- the bureaucracy can determine whether companied by a photo of the president’s those employees are eligible to buy covsignature on the Affordable Care Act, erage on the exchanges? Or should Republicans just keep pressing for repeal of dated March 23, 2010. Case closed: What part of “It’s. The. the whole thing? “I think we’ll almost certainly be stickLaw.” don’t you understand? Just to add emphasis, in early June President ing to a full repeal message all the way,” Obama dismissed concerns that the na- says one GOP Senate aide. “The question tional health care startup was not going here is for the administration -- not us -well. “This is the way the law was de- and it’s basically this: At what point will signed to work,” he told an audience in they realize that this law is unworkCalifornia. “Since everyone’s saying how able?” Probably never.When key Obama adviser it’s not going to happen, I think it’s important for us to recognize and acknowl- Valerie Jarrett wrote, after the delay anedge that this is working the way it’s nouncement, that, “We are full steam ahead for the marketplaces opening on Oct. 1,” she supposed to.” Now, however, it appears the adminis- was reflecting the administration’s determitration’s bravado was all for show. At the nation to get the health care exchanges up same time Obama was expressing great and running no matter what. Delay the emconfidence, White House officials were ployer mandate? OK.Waive this or that rule? secretly meeting with representatives of Fine. Just make sure the exchanges get big business to discuss ways to postpone going. There’s a reason for that. enforcement of parts of the new law. And Obamacare is designed to increase the on Tuesday the White House announced that the employer mandate – sometimes number of Americans who depend on the described as a “crucial” element of Oba- government to pay for health insurance. macare – will be delayed to 2015 from its It will expand the Medicaid rolls, and it will give subsidies to millions of individscheduled start on Jan. 1, 2014. Treasury Department official Mark uals and families to purchase insurance Mazur called the delay “transition relief.” on the exchanges. In all, the government “We have heard concerns about the com- will be transferring hundreds of billions plexity of the requirements and the need of dollars to Americans for health coverfor more time to implement them effec- age. The White House knows that once tively,” Mazur wrote late Tuesday. “We have listened to your feedback. And we those payments begin, repealing Obamacare will no longer be an abstract are taking action.” The move stunned Republicans in question of removing legislation not yet Congress, who immediately asked: in effect. Instead, it will be a very real Whose feedback? What businesses were matter of taking money away from peomeeting with the White House? What ple. It’s very, very hard to do that. So yes, retreating on the employer deals did they make? “These communications and the deci- mandate was a big deal. But the White sion-making process related to the delay House would rather do that than endan... have not been disclosed publicly,” ger the flow of money that is the heart of wrote House Energy and Commerce Obamacare. The White House will not Committee Chairman Rep. Fred Upton waver on that, no matter what Republiin a letter to the Treasury Department cans say or do. and the Department of Health and Byron York is chief political corresponHuman Services. Along with 13 other Republican committee members, Upton de- dent for The Washington Examiner.

A

To the Editor: The Gerlach Family would like to thank Jamieson & Yannucci Funeral Home and especially Mike for their services in this tragedy. WE want to especially thank UVCC and all their staff, all our friends and Dave’s friends for all we were given and all the flowers and prayers to help us get through these very sad days. Also the Piqua Daily Call for the very respectful article they wrote. — Don and Carol Gerlach and Family Piqua

Politics

Big Lots merchandising chief retires COLUMBUS (AP) — Closeout store operator Big Lots Inc. said Tuesday its chief merchandising officer is retiring. John Martin, 62, will continue in his role, which also includes the executive vice president title, until a successor is named, and will act as adviser after that until May 2014. Executive search firm SpencerStuart will lead a search of external candidates. The move comes less than three months after Big Lots named David Campisi as its new CEO, replacing Steve Fishman. Martin served as executive vice president of merchandising from 2003 to 2011, before serving as executive vice president for administration. He returned to merchandising in 2012. Big Lots’ results have been choppy lately. In its most recent quarter, its net income fell 21 percent, while revenue rose 2 percent to $1.31 billion. But revenue in stores open at least one year, a key retail metric, fell 2.5 percent, and the company lowered its full-year revenue forecast.

Letters Send your signed letters to the editor, Piqua Daily Call, P.O. Box 921, Piqua, OH 45356. Send letters by e-mail to shartley@civitasmedia.com. Send letters by fax to (937) 773-2782. There is a 400-word limit for letters to the editor. Letters must include a telephone number, for verification purposes only.

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Public officials can be contacted through the following addresses and telephone numbers: ■ Lucy Fess, mayor, 5th Ward Commissioner, ward5comm@piquaoh.org, 773-7929 (home) ■ John Martin, 1st Ward Commissioner, ward1comm@piquaoh.org, 773-2778 (home) ■ William Vogt, 2nd Ward Commissioner, ward2comm@piquaoh.org, 773-8217 ■ Joe Wilson, 3rd Ward Commissioner, ward3comm@piquaoh.org, 778-0390 ■ Judy Terry, 4th Ward Commissioner, ward4comm@piquaoh.org, 773-3189 ■ City Manager Gary Huff, ghuff@piquaoh.org, 778-2051 ■ Miami County Commissioners: John “Bud” O’Brien, Jack Evans and Richard Cultice, 201 W. Main St., Troy, OH

45373 440-5910; commissioners@comiami.oh.us ■ John R. Kasich, Ohio governor, Vern Riffe Center, 77 S. High St., Columbus, OH 43215, (614) 644-0813, Fax: (614) 466-9354 ■ State Sen. Bill Beagle, 5th District, Ohio Senate, First Floor, Columbus, Ohio 43215; (614) 466-6247; e-mail: SD05@sen.state.oh.us ■ State Rep. Richard Adams, 79th District, House of Representatives, The Riffe Center, 77 High St. 13th Floor, Columbus, OH 43215, (614) 466-8114, Fax: (614) 719-3979; district79@ohr.state.oh.us ■ Jon Husted, Secretary of State, 180 E. Broad St. 15th floor, Columbus, OH 53266-0418 (877) 767-6446, (614)466-2655;

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Teach children about sex before they become active DEAR ABBY: I became sexually active at an extremely young age. I know my whole life would be different, as well as my children’s lives, had I just known better. I have a 4year-old daughter, a 7year-old son and a 12-year-old stepson. I want desperately to protect them from making the same mistakes I did. I feel like the best way to prevent this is to speak openly about sex. The closest anyone ever came to speaking to me about sex was my grandfather (of all people!), who gave me a Dear Abby booklet that was written to inform kids about sex. Even though I was embarrassed when he gave it to me and I ran back to my room to hide, I still read the whole thing from front to back. It was interesting, but unfortunately, it was too late. I have always wished I would have been given that booklet a couple of years sooner. This was about 15 years ago. Is there any chance

you know the book I’m talking about and where I could find a few to pass on to my children? Obviously, the family around me were not comfortable speaking of sex. Please know how grateful I am even all this time later that you provided my grandfather with a way to reach out to me. — GRATEFUL IN HOUSTON DEAR GRATEFUL: Many parents find the subject of sex a difficult one to raise with their children, so they postpone it. As happened in your case, that discussion often comes after it is too late. Because children are now maturing at earlier ages, these discussions should be part of an ongoing dialogue that begins before puberty. My booklet is written to help “break the ice” and start the discussion more easily. It can be ordered by sending your name and address, plus check or money order for $7 (U.S. funds), to Dear

Abby Teen Booklet, P.O. Box 447, Mount Morris, IL 61054-0447. Shipping and handling are included in the price. It would be helpful for you to review the booklet again so you can prepare beforehand to answer questions or guide the conversation. Among the important topics included in my booklet are: “How old must a girl be before she can get pregnant?” “How old must a boy be before he can father a child?” “What time of the month is a girl 100 percent safe?” and “Can a girl get pregnant the first time she has sex?” Also included is a section on various sexually transmitted diseases and what to do if you think you may have one. This is extremely important because STDs need to be treated right away, and not doing so can have lifelong consequences. Knowledge is power. The more information children receive, the better they will be prepared for making intelligent, in-

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Wednesay, July 17, 2013

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DEAR ABBY: My husband passed away 10 weeks ago. I plan on wearing my wedding ring for the remainder of my life. Your opinion would be appreciated. — GRIEVING WIDOW IN TEXAS 1567 Garbry Rd., Piqua • (937) 778-9385

DEAR GRIEVING WIDOW: Allow me to offer my sympathy for the loss of your husband. Because the ring brings you comfort, you may wear it as long as you wish. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at or www.DearAbby.com P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

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East’s king, whereupon East shifted to the nine of spades, covered by South with the ten. West won the ten with the king and concluded that there was very little chance of defeating the contract unless East had both the eight of spades and ace of hearts. Accordingly, West returned the deuce of spades at trick three. Declarer took East’s eight with the jack and had no alternative but to tackle hearts. East won the first heart with the ace and returned the three of spades, allow-

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Wonder won’t sing in Fla. after Zimmerman verdict NEW YORK (AP) — Stevie Wonder says he won’t perform in Florida and other states with a “stand your ground” law. In a video posted on YouTube, the 63-year-old singer said at a concert in Quebec City, Canada, on Sunday “that until the ‘stand your ground’ law is abolished in Florida, I will never perform there again.” Wonder added: “Wherever I find that law exists, I will not perform in that state or in that part of the world.”

Return beer engagement at county fair LEBANON (AP) — Beer is making a return engagement at a county fair in southwest Ohio. Beer, once banned at the Warren County Fair in Lebanon, will be flowing for a second year in a row when the fair returns this week. Warren County commissioners voted two-toone to allow beer sales at the fair again this year. The fair runs Tuesday through Saturday. Commissioner Dave Young cast the dissenting vote Tuesday. According to the Dayton Daily News Young says his “no” vote wasn’t a moral judgment. Commissioner Pat South says she voted “yes” because the state fair now allows alcohol sales and the beer distributor gave the fair board $10,000 last year.

“stand your The ground” law allows people to use deadly force if they believe their life is in danger. Zimmerman George shot 17-year-old Trayvon Martin during a February 2012 confrontation in Sanford, Fla. Zimmerman

said he fired his gun in self-defense. A six-member jury acquitted Zimmerman of second-degree murder and manslaughter charges on Saturday. Wonder’s representative said the singer had no further comment.

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GOLDEN YEARS

Wednesday, July 17, 2013

I

the house to hide. That’s the only time I recall her using that word. When my older brother and I visited that great-grandma in Circleville, she kept us from exploring her cellar by telling us that Topsy would get us. I didn’t know what a Topsy was or what would happen if I was “got.” It was years before I learned that Topsy was an imaginary little African-American girl. We never went near the cellar door. In Plain City, an girl African-American from two streets away routinely walked past our house on her way to school. Many times I watched for her, hoping to walk with her. She was pretty, two grades older, very aloof, and — I’ll have to call it what it was: prejudiced. She wanted nothing to do with me. I didn’t understand it then and don’t understand it now. I finally left her alone. About the 7th grade, there was a party for our entire class of approximately 25, given by the mother of a classmate. We had one African-American boy in our class, George, who was very reserved, polite and adopted by his grandparents If he ever had anything to say, I never got to hear it. The only objectionable thing about him was the odor of heating oil on his clothing. So George attended the party, as fragile and innocent as a baby rabbit sitting at the edge of a trap. The game we played was Truth or Consequences, it was my turn and I didn’t

know the answer, so I had to deal with the consequence: Kiss George. I felt the searing pain of incredible shame as I witnessed George being used as a penalty, an objectionable something to be avoided. George was embarrassed and terrified. I was so angry, that scene remains frozen in my memory. Without hesitation, I turned to George and kissed him firmly on his cheek. I’m surprised the whole episode didn’t kill him! It was all planned by the mother of the party girl. He never said how he felt about it but he never went to another class party. I wondered if I’d been “set-up” too, but I felt the sting of his humiliation. The bright and shining innocence of childhood was beginning to tarnish. In high school, one of our basketball players was Joe, the only AfricanAmerican guy on the team. Tall and lean, Joe could (did) fall over his own long feet; he was NOT state championship material in sports. Joe was a fantastic artist, producing beautiful sketches. He had a wonderful imagination and used study hall time drawing fashion models in clothing of his own design. Art was a love of mine, the school had no art classes, and it was fun to share ideas and techniques. I didn’t know if Joe was “gay,” as was rumored and actually I didn’t care! To leave my seat in study hall required permission. The disapproval of the study hall monitor

• PIQUA DAILY CALL

Amish Cook favorites

Nahh — no way Yes, way! n sharing stories about RB and me and our families, the subject of racism has recently become a focal point. When we were children, race was seldom (if ever) an issue. I always knew I was “white” but was halfgrown before I learned I’m Caucasian; my generation never heard of it. The “other race” used to be Negro, then colored, then Black, and now AfricanAmerican. Living in central Ohio, skin color was of no interest to youngsters. Plain City, population of about 1,500, had maybe five African-American families, and I knew only the children who went to school with me, and the parents of one boy. Other minorities included Mexican migrants during tomato season, a hardworking German couple with one child, who owned a meat market and were treated without prejudice during World War 11, a respected Syrian grocer and his large family that increased yearly (they filled the small Catholic church every Sunday), and the Amish, who lived outside of town and whose children rarely stayed in school past the 8th grade. The only family conversation involving race was a story my mother told about visits to her grandma’s house as a small child. While there, she occasionally waited for a little African-American girl to walk through the alley and, when she appeared, shouted out a racial slur, and ran into

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CAROLYN STEVENS Columnist was quite clear and I knew the reason involved color. Of course you know I was persistent, mainly to irritate the hall monitor. I didn’t care for her attitude, plus Joe “taught” a subject I liked. Fast forward a few decades. As a member of the Western Ohio Watercolor Society, I received a notice announcing an upcoming meeting at the Springfield Museum of art featuring artist/speaker, a “Mr. Joseph Grey II from Michigan.” From the middle of automobile territory, he was nationally known for his unique style, including pristine paintings of automobiles. I wondered if that could possibly be my old friend, Joe. Nahh — no way. Yes, Way! Before the program began, we actually recognized each other across the room. I got a happy hug and met his lovely wife, who assumed the duties of showing and selling prints of his original works. His depiction of a Native American Indian, “American Spirit,” is framed, hanging, and personally inscribed, “To Carolyn with love, XJoe.” Along with an endless supply of memories, it’s one of my treasures. Contact columnist Carolyn Stevens by emailing candrstevens297@gmail.com

Editor’s Note: Lovina’s column is on summer break this week. I’d like to wish she and her husband Joe a very happy, blessed anniversary this week (July 15). I hope they have many more years of good health and happiness together. Meanwhile, it is the season of peaches and zucchini two summer staples! Here are some favorites from the Amish Cook archives — Kevin Williams, Amish Cook Editor Zucchini Patties 3 cups. peeled and shredded zucchini 3 eggs Salt to taste Just before you’re ready to start frying, mix the above three ingredients. Drop by tablespoon onto preheated buttered frying pan. Mash and shape into patties and fry until golden brown on each side. Top with a slice of cheese and serve. We like to eat these just like this or also on a sandwich with lettuce, tomato and onions. Zucchini Pineapple Bread 4 eggs 2 c. sugar 1 Tab. cinnamon 2 tsp. baking powder 1 tsp. salt 1/4 tsp. baking soda 2 tsp. vanilla 1 1/4 c. oil 3 c. fresh grated zucchini (I peel mine first) 3 c. flour 1 c. chopped nuts (pecans) 1 small can crushed pineapple in its own juice Mix dry ingredients except sugar together and set aside. Beat eggs until

LOVINA EICHER The Amish Cook light, then gradually add sugar. Add oil, vanilla and pineapple, then dry ingredients. Fold in zucchini and nuts. Bake in loaf pans at 350° for one hour depending on loaf pan size. Creamy Peach Pie 1 c. sugar 1/2 c. flour 1/2 tsp. salt 1/2 tsp. cinnamon 2 c. half and half 6-8 c. fresh, sliced peaches or 1 (29-oz. can) sliced peaches, drained 1 9 1/2-inch pie shell Combine sugar, flour, salt and cinnamon. Blend. Add to peaches and toss to coat. Add half and half and mix. Pour into pie shell. Bake at 45 minutes at 350° or until it sets. Cool completely. Apples can also be substituted for peaches. Homemade Peach Cobbler 1/2 c. butter or margarine 2 c. sugar 1 Tab. baking powder 1 /2 c. milk 2 c. flour Melt butter in a 9-by12-inch pan. Mix together sugar, baking powder, milk and flour. Pour mixture into pan and then put on peeled, sliced peaches. Bake at 325° until golden brown. If desired, serve with ice cream or milk.

■ Grandparenting

Lost at sea Dear Grandparenting: I think I have a problem on my hands. Trace is barely seven years old and weighs 55 pounds and acts like he owns the world. Rules are for other people. Don’t try and tell my grandson what to do or how to do it. He already knows. He thinks authority is for suckers and morons. He is especially naughty

with other people around and gets way too big for his britches. Many times Trace makes mountains out of molehills. He is ready to go to war if his milk is too warm at dinner or something minor. It took me a while, but I caught on to how he tries to manipulate me. First he starts something and then he turns it

around and bases his whole case on my reaction to his nonsense. So I stopped over reacting. The worst part about Trace is that he is liable to challenge me on everything and anything, so it’s hard to establish daily routines. You may ask why I spend so much time with my grandson since he tries my patience so much. Let’s just

say everything is not A-OK between his parents and I have extra room. Maybe I doing something am wrong. All my children were girls. I am lost at sea caring for this little boy and sending out an SOS. Can you give me some direction? — Panda, Chicago, Ill.

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Dear Panda: We picked up your distress signal and believe you’re making progress on your way to becoming shipshape with your grandson. Why? Because in this battle of wits, you have already demonstrated you are capable of making the necessary changes to control your grandson. You perceptively sized up the situation and performed a textbook turnaround by not overreacting, which helps extinguish his disobedient behavior. Based on the evidence, Trace may have Oppositional Defiant Disorder, a pattern of stubborn aversion to authority that vexes parents and teachers. ODD is among the most common childhood psychiatric problems; counselors estimate that upwards of 16 percent children and teens are afflicted. ODD is most common in younger males, but girls catch up as they grow older. Although many will outgrow ODD, such habitual defiance is tough to manage. The primary objective is to make the child obey rules, so donÕt bar-

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TOM & DEE HARDIE KEY KIDDER Columnists gain or bend or be sucked into arguments, which plays into the hand of an ODD child. Since ODD children want to be in charge, some advise letting them win on minor issues while adults control major issues. When you must reprimand him, do so privately to avoid confrontations. Let your grandson know you disagree with his behavior but love him regardless. Finally, you should know that ODD is often most effectively dealt with through professional counseling. GRAND REMARK OF THE WEEK Big Bird from Marshall, Mich. likes this quote from A.A. Milne, author of the children’s classic Winnie the Pooh: “Sometimes, the smallest things take up the most room in our hearts.” Dee and Tom, married more than 50 years, have eight grandchildren. Together with Key, they welcome questions, suggestions and Grand Remarks of the Week. Send to P.O. Box 27454, Towson, MD, 21285. Call 410-9634426.

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HEALTH

PIQUA DAILY CALL • WWW.DAILYCALL.COM

Wednesday, July 17, 2013

Focus on women’s health Topics cover reproduction to menopause TROY — The benefits of the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine and continued advocacy for breastfeeding were among topics at the recent UVMC Health Symposium focusing on women’s health. More than 85 people attended the Women’s Health: Important Issues Across the Lifespan forum at the Crystal Room in Troy. Topics ranging from the reproductive years to menopause and other issues were addressed by Dr. Victoria Ocampo of Gyne Associates, Troy, and Dr. Katherine Bachman and Dr. Sergio Vignali of Upper Valley Women’s Center. Although The New York Times recently reported on a Pediatrics journal report that more parents reported in 2010 than in 2008 that they did not intend to vaccinate their daughters for HPV, the local physicians said they have not seen resistance. The same article reported HPV, the most common sexually transmitted infection in the country, had declined by one half in teenage girls in recent

7

UVMC welcomes new office TIPP CITY — Upper Valley Cardiology has opened a new office at UVMC’s Hyatt Center, 450 N. Hyatt St., Suite 206A, Tipp City. Cardiologists Aaron Kaibas, D.O., and KAIBAS Thomas Kupper, M.D., are now seeing patients in the new Tipp City office. They and Cardiologists Cass Cullis, M.D., and William Czajka, M.D., also will continue to see patients at their Troy office at 3006 N. County Road 25-A, just south of the Upper Valley Medical Center. For more information, call (937) 335-3518 Monday through Thursday between 8 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. or Friday between 8 a.m. and 2 p.m.

PROVIDED PHOTO

From left, Dr. Victoria Ocampo, Dr. Katherine Bachman, Dr. Sergio Vignali and Jane Pierce participate in women’s health forum in Troy.

Health law’s rule delay could hamper enforcement

years. Ocampo said that the vaccine is recommended for those ages 9-26. She said she believes parents are educated on the virus and the vaccine’s benefits. “I have not had a lot of concerns,” she said. Bachman agreed, pointing out pediatric offices are getting the word out about the need for the vaccination. “A good variety of them (young patients) coming in have been vaccinated,” she

dressed breastfeeding today. “Breastfeeding is the number one thing that should be done. It is best for the baby and we are pushing for breastfeeding … It is good for the baby, and it is also good for the mom,” Pierce said. “We are working hard, looking at exclusive breastfeeding without bottles/formula.” The forum was provided by Upper Valley Medical Center with support from the UVMC Foundation.

WASHINGTON (AP) — There’s a bit of a domino effect involving President Barack Obama’s health care law. Enforcement of the law’s central requirement — that individual Americans must have coverage — could be weakened by the administration’s recent delay of another mandate that larger employers provide medical insurance. It’s because the delayed rule also required companies to report health insurance details for employees. Without employers validating who’s covered,a scofflaw could lie,and the government would have no easy way to check. The Treasury Department said Tuesday it expects any impact to be minor,since most people will not risk telling the government a lie. Still, it’s another incentive for uninsured people to ignore a costly new government requirement. The Republican-led House will vote Wednesday on delaying both the employer and individual requirements.

said. “It is a preventive measure.” Vignali discussed surgery as part of women’s care, noting that one in three women have a hysterectomy by age 60. While laparoscopic surgery is commonly used today, robotic assisted surgery is the next step beyond that procedure, he said, adding that less invasive surgeries mean faster recovery times. Jane Pierce, Clinical Nurse Specialist, ad-

Study: Later retirement may help prevent dementia BY MARILYNN MARCHIONE AP Chief Medical Writer BOSTON (AP) — New research boosts the “use it or lose it” theory about brainpower and staying mentally sharp. People who delay retirement have less risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease or other types of dementia, a study of nearly half a million people in France found. It’s by far the largest study to look at this, and researchers say the conclusion makes sense. Working tends to keep people physically active, socially connected and mentally challenged — all things known to help prevent mental decline. “For each additional year of work, the risk of getting dementia is reduced by 3.2 percent,” said Carole Dufouil, a scientist at INSERM, the French government’s health research agency. She led the study and gave results Monday at the Alzheimer’s Association International Conference in Boston. About 35 million people worldwide have dementia, and Alzheimer’s is the most common type. In the

ALEX BRANDON/AP PHOTO

In this July 12 photo, June Springer walks between offices where she works at Caffi Contracting Services, in Alexandria, Va. Springer who just turned 90, works as a receptionist. People who delay retirement have less risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease or other types of dementia, a study of half a million people in France found. U.S., about 5 million have Alzheimer’s — 1 in 9 people aged 65 and over. What causes the mindrobbing disease isn’t known and there is no cure or any treatments that slow its progression. France has had some of

the best Alzheimer’s research in the world, partly because its former president, Nicolas Sarkozy, made it a priority. The country also has detailed health records on self-employed people who pay into a Medicare-like

health system. Researchers used these records on more than 429,000 workers, most of whom were shopkeepers or craftsmen such as bakers and woodworkers. They were 74 on average and had been retired for

Doctors: Singer Randy Travis awake after stroke NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Country music star Randy Travis was awake and interacting with his family and friends Monday as he recovers from surgery following a stroke, his doctors said. In a news release and video from the Texas hos-

pital where the 54-year-old singer is recovering, doctors said Travis remains in critical condition and on a ventilator, but is off a heart pump and is breathing spontaneously. His breathing support is gradually being reduced and he has begun the early stages of

physical therapy. Mary Davis, Travis’ fiancee, thanked the singer’s friends and fans for their prayers and support. “I know that Randy feels each and every one of those,” Davis said in the video. “He feels the hands

of the doctors and the care of the nurses and the love of his fans. His friends and family have all been touched by that. He is responding well to voices and he sees and he understands. He’s miles beyond where any of us thought he would be a few days ago.”

an average of 12 years. Nearly 3 percent had developed dementia but the risk of this was lower for each year of age at retirement. Someone who retired at 65 had about a 15 percent lower risk of developing dementia compared to someone retiring at 60, after other factors that affect those odds were taken into account, Dufouil said. To rule out the possibility that mental decline may have led people to retire earlier, researchers did analyses that eliminated people who developed dementia within 5 years of retirement, and

within 10 years of it. “The trend is exactly the same,” suggesting that work was having an effect on cognition, not the other way around, Dufouil said. France mandates retirement in various jobs — civil servants must retire by 65, she said. The new study suggests “people should work as long as they want” because it may have health benefits, she said. June Springer, who just turned 90, thinks it does. She was hired as a fulltime receptionist at Caffi Plumbing & Heating in Alexandria, Va., eight years ago. “I’d like to give credit to the company for hiring me at that age,” she said. “It’s a joy to work, being with people and keeping up with current events. I love doing what I do. As long as God grants me the brain to use I’ll take it every day.” Heather Snyder, director of medical and scientific operations for the Alzheimer’s Association, said the study results don’t mean everyone needs to delay retirement. “It’s more staying cognitively active, staying socially active, continue to be engaged in whatever it is that’s enjoyable to you” that’s important, she said. “My parents are retired but they’re busier than ever. They’re taking classes at their local university, they’re continuing to attend lectures and they’re continuing to stay cognitively engaged and socially engaged in their lives.”

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NATION

Wednesday, July 17, 2013

Senate steps back from brink in nominations fight BY DAVID ESPO AP Special Correspondent WASHINGTON (AP) — The Senate stepped away from the brink of a meltdown on Tuesday, confirming one of President Barack Obama’s long-stalled nominees,agreeing to quick action on others and finessing a Democratic threat to overturn historic rules that protect minorityparty rights. “Nobody wants to come to Armageddon here,” said Sen. Chuck Schumer, the New York Democrat whose talks with Arizona Republican John McCain were critical in avoiding a collision that had threatened to plunge the Senate even deeper into partisan gridlock. McCain, a veteran of uncounted legislative struggles, told reporters that forging the deal was “probably the hardest thing I’ve been involved in.” The White House reaped the first fruits of the deal within hours, when Richard Cordray’s nomination to head the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau was approved 66-34. He was first nominated in July 2011 and has been in office by virtue of a recess appointment that bypassed the Senate. As part of the Tuesday’s agreement, both parties preserved their rights to resume combat over nominations in the future, Republicans by delaying votes and Democrats by threatening once again to change the rules governing such delays. Still, officials in both parties said they hoped the deal would signal a new, less acrimonious time for the Senate, with critical decisions ahead on spending, the government’s borrowing authority, student loan interest rates and more. Under the agreement, several of seven stalled nominees would win confirmation later in the week, including Labor Secretarydesignate Tom Perez; Gina McCarthy,named to lead the Environmental Protection Agency, and Fred Hochberg to head of the Export-Import Bank. Even before the agreement was ratified by the rank and file, Cordray’s longstalled nomination to head the Consumer Finance Protection Bureau advanced toward approval on a test vote of 71-29,far more than the 60 required. Two nominees to the National Labor Relations Board, Richard Griffin and Sharon Clark, are to be replaced by new selections, submitted quickly by Obama and steered toward speedy consideration by Senate Republicans. Obama installed Griffin and Clark in their posts by recess appointments in 2011, bypassing the Senate but triggering a legal challenge. An appeals court recently said the two appointments were invalid,and the Supreme Court has agreed to review the case. In their places, officials said Obama intends to nominate Nancy Schiffer, a former top lawyer for the AFL-CIO, and Kent Hirozawa, counsel to NLRB Chairman Mark Pearce. Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid said their ap-

pointments would be reviewed and voted on in committee on Tuesday and Wednesday of next week, and then come before the Senate for confirmation. Pearce, awaiting confirmation to a new term, is the seventh appointee at issue. His pick is relatively uncontroversial, and he is likely to be approved along with the replacements for Griffin and Clark, if not before. The NLRB appointments, if confirmed as expected, would prevent the virtual shutdown of the agency because of a lack of confirmed board members to rule on collective bargaining disputes between unions and companies. “I think we get what we want, they get what they want. Not a bad deal,” said Reid. “Crisis averted,” said the Republican leader, Sen. Mitch McConnell of Kentucky. There was more to it than that. Scarcely 24 hours earlier, Reid had insisted that if Republicans didn’t stop blocking confirmation of all seven, he would trigger a change in the Senate’s procedures to strip them of their ability to delay. At the core of the dispute is the minority party’s power to stall or block a yesor-no vote on nearly anything, from legislation to judicial appointments to relatively routine nominations for administration positions. While a simple majority vote is required to confirm presidential appointees, it takes 60 votes to end delaying tactics and proceed to a yes-or-no vote. Reid’s threat to remove that right as it applied to nominations to administration positions was invariably described as the “nuclear option” for its likely impact on an institution with minority rights woven into its fabric. The same term was used when Republicans made a similar threat on judicial nominations in 2005 — an earlier showdown that McCain helped defuse when it was his own party threatening to change the rules unilaterally. As part of the deal over Obama’s nominees, Republicans agreed to step aside and permit confirmation of several, some of whom they had long stalled. Cordray was first appointed in July 2011, but a vote was held up by GOP lawmakers who sought to use his confirmation as leverage to make changes in the legislation that created his agency. McCarthy was named to her post in March, and Republicans dragged their feet, demanding she answer hundreds of questions about the EPA. At one point, they boycotted a committee meeting called to approve her appointment. Perez, also nominated in March,is a senior Justice Department official, and was accused by Republicans of making decisions guided by left-wing ideology rather than the pursuit of justice. As described by officials, the deal is strikingly similar to a proposal that McConnell floated in remarks on the Senate floor last week during an unusually personal exchange with Reid.

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Have Aurora, Newtown affected screen violence? BY JOCELYN NOVECK AP National Writer NEW YORK (AP) — It was a year ago this week that the sickening sound of gunfire rang out at a midnight screening of “The Dark Knight Rises” in Aurora, Colo. The mass shooting reverberated painfully in Hollywood, and how could it not? It happened at the movies. Five months later,the horrific massacre of first-graders at the Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Conn.,launched yet more reflection — about gun control, certainly, but also about entertainment content, particularly violent video games said to be favored by the killer. And yet, in the year since Aurora, seemingly little has overtly changed in the area of violence in entertainment, save the notable musings of actor Jim Carrey, who tweeted misgivings about his latest film,“Kick-Ass 2,”after Newtown: “Now in all good conscience I cannot support that level of violence,” he wrote. And some ask: If nothing changes now, will it ever? “My fear is that we have such a short attention span,” says Chuck Williams, a youth violence expert at Drexel University who’s especially troubled by movies that depict “stylized” violence. “And as a society, we don’t like being on a diet. We want to consume what we want, when we want it.” Certainly, screen violence is a complex issue. Studies have not shown clear links with real-world violence; in video games, which have undergone the most scrutiny lately, many researchers say the evidence just isn’t there. There’s also the specter of censorship and infringement on artistic freedom, something that raises hackles instantly in the entertainment industry. And, of course, there’s the issue of gun control. Many in Hollywood say that’s where the focus should be, while the gun lobby has suggested violent images in entertainment and games are more to blame than access to guns. “The issue makes a lot of people uncomfortable in Hollywood — they don’t really want to deal with it,” says Janice Min, editor of The Hollywood Reporter trade publication. She notes that after Aurora, producer Harvey Weinstein called for a summit of filmmakers to discuss screen violence — but it never happened. And one of Weinstein’s favored filmmakers, Quentin Tarantino, director of films like the bloody Western “Django Unchained,” is angered by the mere question of a link between entertainment and violent events.“I’ve been asked this question for 20 years,” he said in a tense exchange on NPR. “Obviously, I don’t think one has to do with the other.” Of Newtown, he said,“Obviously the issue is gun control and mental health.” Others say it’s not so obvious; it’s a whole slew of issues. “We can’t allow this conversation to be ONLY about gun control,” says Williams. “Nothing will happen.” “There are so many com-

AMC, GENE PAGE/AP PHOTO

In this publicity photo released by AMC, Andrew Lincoln as Rick Grimes is shown in a scene from “The Walking Dead.”

peting factors,” says Timothy Gray, a senior VP at the industry trade publication Variety who edited a post-Newtown issue on violence. “The more you pull at the thread, it makes people crazy. People in entertainment say,‘It’s not entirely our fault.’ OK, but there’s a difference between that and saying we’re not going to contribute at all to the discussion.” Gray says he’d like to think the dialogue is changing, but he’s not so sure.And, he adds, “it’s hard, when the public seems to want this stuff.” And yet, tastes may be shifting. An Associated Press-GfK poll in January found that 54 percent of adults would support a policy limiting “the amount and type of gun violence that can be portrayed in video games, in movies or on television.” Other polls at the time found similar misgivings about violent content. And,says Min,while summer offerings are heavy on violent blockbusters, a number have tanked at the box office, perhaps indicating that the public — especially the female segment,she feels — is feeling alienated from the product. (Though four of the five top-grossing films so far this year have PG-13 ratings warning of violence.) “I don’t think there’s any soul-searching about violence on the part of studio executives,” Min says. “But if a different kind of movie does well, you’ll see others coming out like it.” After all:“It’s all driven by economics in Hollywood.” VIDEO GAMES: IS THERE A LINK? Video games got extra scrutiny after Newtown, especially the “first-person shooter” type apparently favored by 20-year-old killer Adam Lanza. Industry executives say the scrutiny is unjustified. “People who play video games have a very firm grasp on the distinction between the fantasy world of play and what happens in the real world,” Andrew House, president of Sony Computer Entertainment, said in a June interview. Researchers tend to support him.“Everybody’s focusing on video games, but empirically, it just hasn’t been proven,” says Patrick

Markey, a psychology professor at Villanova University who’s studied behavioral effects of video games. Besides, he says, “it would have been surprising if Lanza hadn’t played those games, because most male adolescents play them.” He says games may marginally increase aggression — but not to the level of violence. Other research, says psychology professor Sherry Hamby, has suggested possible negative effects of intense consumption of violent content across media platforms. “But just because a kid plays ‘Call of Duty’ doesn’t mean he’s going to become an assailant,” says Hamby, who’s on the American PsychologicalAssociation’s task force on media violence. Industry heads say it’s about parental control. “Games are rated for a reason,” saysVince Zampella,cocreator of “Call of Duty: Modern Warfare.” The appetite for shoot-’emup games doesn’t seem to have waned. Each month since Aurora, mature-rated shooting games have been among the top 10 sold, according to industry tracker NPD Group. TELEVISION: ZOMBIES AND SERIAL KILLERS Shortly after Newtown, the entertainment presidents of both NBC and Fox said they didn’t believe there was any connection between violence their networks depict and real-life tragedies. “Nothing that is on the air is inappropriate,” said Nina Tassler, entertainment chief for CBS. Executives go with what’s buzz-worthy — like AMC’s “The Walking Dead,” a gory zombie drama. Fox’s most successful new show, “The Following,” features Kevin Bacon as an investigator chasing a charismatic killer who gouges out his victims’ eyes. There’s also NBC’s “Hannibal,” about serial killer Hannibal Lecter. And one of the most talked-about TV moments this spring came on HBO’s “Game of Thrones”: a celebration leading to an orgy of stabbings (beginning with a pregnant woman), throat slittings and shootings. Events like Aurora and Newtown have little impact on the thinking of television executives, says Tim Winter

of the Parents Television Council. It’s, “‘We can get back to business as usual as soon as people stop talking of these things,’” he says. For TV executives,“there’s so much money involved that they look the other way, even if they’re socially conscious, intelligent people,” says Dr. Victor Strasburger, pediatrics professor at the University of New Mexico School of Medicine. There’s been at least one pang of hesitation. After Aurora, writer-producer Kurt Sutter,whose bloody“Sons of Anarchy” follows a group of outlaw bikers, said on Twitter that “this kinda thing always make me question my liberal use of violence in storytelling.” MOVIES: A FOCUS ON RATINGS After Aurora, Warner Bros. found itself in the uncomfortable position of having to pull trailers for its “Gangster Squad” due to a scene of gunmen shooting up a movie theater.The film was postponed and reshot. Further scrutiny came with Newtown. In January, former Sen. Chris Dodd, head of the Motion Picture Association of America, met with Vice President Joe Biden, and said the industry was “ready to be part of the conversation” on gun violence — while still vehemently opposing content restrictions. In April, the MPAA and the National Association of Theater Owners announced a new “Check the Box” campaign meant to supplement the ratings system, which has been criticized as soft on violence, by making reasons for a rating slightly more prominent. “Our industry has a long history of voluntary engagement on this issue,” the MPAA said in a statement for this report, declining an interview request. Unveiling the “Check the Box” campaign, John Fithian, president of the theater owners group,suggested studios should make fewer R-rated movies: “It’s cool to be Quentin Tarantino ... But there’s a bit of a disconnect between exhibitors and the studios as to what works.” Just what kind of screen violence is appropriate has been widely debated.

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INFORMATION Call ROB KISER, sports editor, at 773-2721, ext. 209, from 8 p.m. to midnight weekdays.

SPORTS

Piqua Daily Call • www.dailycall.com

9

WEDNESDAY, JULY 17, 2013

IN BRIEF ■ Golf

Paul delivers for Post 184

Wyan records ace at Echo Nikki Wyan made the most of a rare round of golf at Echo Hills Sunday morning. Wyan aced the 109-yard third hole, using a 5-iron for the shot. Witnessing the ace were her husband Kerry Wyan and Matt Thompson.

Three-run double propels Piqua to 8-5 win over Sidney

Robbins cards 71 at Echo

TROY — It may have not been the way Piqua Post 184 coach Jim Roberts had planned it. But, it couldn’t have worked out any better. Jeff Paul’s three-run double in the seventh inning gave Piqua some much needed insurance runs in an 8-5 victory over Sidney Post 217 in the opening round of the American Legion District tournament. Piqua will play Troy, a 12-4 winner over Lima Wednesday, tonight at Duke Park. First pitch is expected to be around 9 p.m. Lima and Sidney will kick things off at 6 p.m. “Jeff (Paul) has swung the bat great for us all summer,” Roberts said. “Originally, we had planned on Jeff (Paul) being the second pitcher tonight, but that didn’t work out.” Robers had inserted

BY ROB KISER Call Sports Editor rkiser@civitasmedia.com

Brian Robbins and Ashley Johnson were the winners of the July 4 Association tournament at Echo Hills. On the men’s side, Robbins was low gross with 71, Marty Jackson was second with 72, Brian Deal and Ben Gover tied for third with 73 and Ryan Pearson was fifth with 74. Joe Hoster was low net with 58, Jerry Cantrill was second with 62, Hal Cain and Mike Butsch tied for third with 65 and Joe Thoma was fifth with 66. Johnson was low gross for the women with 77 and Renie Huffman was low net with 69.

Finkes cards 37 at Echo Sandy Finkes was low gross with 37 in the Tuesday Ladies League last week, while Judy Williams was second with 48. Renie Huffman was low net with 32, while Karen Nickol and Kathy Knoop tied for second with 39. Kay Hardman was low ent with 15, while Clara Sowry was second with 16.

Lavey cards 34 at Echo

MIKE ULLERY/CALL PHOTO

Leftfielder Damien Richard tracks down a fly ball in left field Tuesday.

Hoopin’ in Covington

Paul in the fourth inning in right field. “Jeff and Reece Jones have been close all year,” Roberts said. “We decided to put him out there.” With Piqua clinging to a 5-4 lead, a single by starting pitcher John Edwards, and Zach Blair and a walk to Buddy Nix had loaded the bases. Two outs later, Paul hit a shot into the right-center field gap, clearing the bases. “No question,” Roberts said. “That was a huge at bat for us.” Cam Gordon stranded our runners in the eighth and ninth inning, allowing only a RBI single by Bailey Francis after Dalton Bollinger had doubled to make the final 8-5. “This is a big win,” Roberts said. “You always want to get started with a win.” Post 184 had taken an early 1-0 lead in the second on a two-out single by Brandon Kirk. See POST 184/Page 11

Wiggan Athletic Plays Dutch Lions At Piqua

Casey Lavey was gross in the Wednesday Industrial League at Echo Hills last week with 34. Mike Lavey was second with 37 and Dave Barnhart was third with 39. The Covington Police Department and Tony Cox was low net with Covington Noon Optimist will be hosting a 31, while Andy Hildreth and Jim 3-on-3 basketball tournament. Shaw tied for second with 33.

3-on-3 set for August

STANDINGS Patriot Fence Hollywood Knights Joe Thoma Jewelers Long Shots Palmer Bolt & Supply Co. Hartzell Hardwood Dr. Steve Koon Optometrist Francis Office Supply The 4 Hacks Smitty’s Bike Shop

48.5 47.5 47.5 46 42.5 41.5 35.5 34.5 33.5 23

Two card 36 at Echo Hills

The tournament will be played on Aug. 3, beginning at 9 a.m. Information on the tournament can be found on Facebook at Covington Basketball Tournament. The entry deadline in July 29. For registration information, contact Chris Walters at 473-2102.

Duo shoots 8-under

Mike Lavey and Mike Ford shared low gross honors with 36 in the Thursday Industrial League at Echo Hills last week. Kirt Huemmer was third with 37. Jeff Clark was low net with 28, while Kenneth Nelson Hostetter was second with 31. Tying for third with 32 were Ron Pearson Sr, Travis Karn and Hank Poff. STANDINGS Bing’s 53.5 No Complaints 49.5 47 Browning Plumbing Associates Staffing 45 Craycon Homes 44 42.5 Staley Plumbing Jim Sherry Chrysler 42 MichaelWebSolutions 41.5 39 Hemm’s Glass A.R.M.S. Inc. 36 Four Dudes 31.5 Murray Property Investments 31 Gisco 30.5 Mulligan’s Pub 27

STUMPER

The Tuesday Night Disc Golf Random Doubles League went on last week, despite a thunderstorm. Brent Everman and Nate Metz won with a score of 8-under par. March Hutchin took second with 6-under par, having the joker card to play as a single team. For more on the league, find them on Facebook at The Upper Valley Disc Golf Club or email ndexmusic@gmail.com

Post 43 tryouts The Troy Post 43 American Legion baseball team will be holding tryouts on Aug. 3 and 4 at Duke Park. Players should be 15-19 years old and bring their own equipment. For more information, email ibrown@woh.rr.com or call (937) 339-4383 or (937) 474-7344. Also, registrations are now being accepted for the Frosty Brown Fall Batting Leagues. For more info, go to frostybrownbatting league.com or find it on facebook at frostybrownfallbattingleague.

MIKE ULLERY/CALL PHOTO

The Dayton Dutch Lions Brandon Swartzendruber heads the ball against Wiggan Athletic Tuesday night at Wertz Stadium. Wiggan Athletic won the game 6-1.

Cespedes makes mark in ‘Derby’

player Q: What hit 41 home runs in the Home run Derby at the 2005 Major League Baseball All-Star game?

Non All-Star puts on sizzling power display A:

Bobby Abreu

QUOTED “I felt like I was in a good groove. That was the key." —Yoenis Cespedes AP PHOTO after winning the Home Run Derby Yoenis Cespedes hits a home run Monday night during Home Run Derby. For Home Delivery, Call: 773-2725

NEW YORK (AP) — Yoenis Cespedes certainly made his mark at the AllStar game — and he's not even on the roster. Actually, it was a dent. Oakland's second-year slugger won baseball's Home Run Derby with a dazzling display of power Monday night, becoming the first player left out of the Midsummer Classic to take home the crown. Cespedes beat Bryce

Editor’s Note: At press time, the American League led the National League 2-0 in the eighth inning at press time.

Harper 9-8 in the final round at reconfigured Citi Field, hitting the decisive drive with five swings to spare. The outfielder from Cuba flipped his bat aside and raised his left arm in See ALL-STARS/Page 10


10

SPORTS

Wednesday, July 17, 2013

Following in Phillips path Brown joins Reds infielder iat All-Star game this year NEW YORK (AP) — Domonic Brown's path to the All-Star game went right through Georgia. It wasn't easy. Brandon Phillips helped make it easier. Both players attended Redan High School in suburban Atlanta. Brown had previously lived in Florida before moving to Georgia to be with his father. "I think I needed that father figure back in my life. He left when I was in eighth grade. He was still in my life, but I wasn't seeing him on an everyday basis," the Phillies outfielder said. "There were some tough times, but we finished strong and I ended up getting drafted. Now I'm here." Phillips would come back to visit, providing Brown with a big league role model. They even hit together. Now they're sharing the field at the All-Star game. "That's my little boy," said Phillips, the Reds' second baseman. "He played with my younger brother, so it's going to be nice for me to say that I played with somebody that my brother played with and then he can say that he played with both brothers. That's going to be nice for me and it's also going to be nice for him. "Representing Atlanta,

Georgia, with him. I'm looking forward to it." THE SHOW: Miguel Cabrera has the kind of numbers that draw attention from fans. The Detroit Tigers slugger tends to get the same reaction from his peers, too. "That's just like, video game, and let's just go out and have some fun and smile and laugh when we strike out," Washington slugger Bryce Harper said Monday during All-Star festivities. "It's just, Miggy is going up there and ... going 'Hey, if I don't hit a homer, I shouldn't be playing today.'" Cabrera hit .330 with 44 homers and 139 RBIs last season, winning the AL Triple Crown. The third baseman is hitting .365 with 30 homers and 95 RBIs at the All-Star break this year. That's an impressive full season for almost any player. Let alone a first half. Not that he's all that impressed with any of it. "There isn't a lot of time to see that," he said. "Maybe if I see it in the game, you know how they put it on the scoreboard? So I think that's the only chance we got time to see it. Because you got to worry about other stuff, why are you going to worry about the stats?"

All-Stars triumph when he sent his 32nd homer of the night some 455 feet to center field, where it caromed off the back wall of the black batter's eye. He was swarmed by the American League AllStars near the third base line. "You come for a show in New York. He put on a show," said Detroit Tigers pitcher Max Scherzer, set to start for the AL on Tuesday night. The final addition to the field, Cespedes was the fourth player not selected for the All-Star game to compete in the event. Right off the bat, he proved he belonged. With family in the stands, Cespedes hit a whopping 17 home runs in the first round — more than any other player managed in their first two trips to the plate. "I felt that I was getting into a very good rhythm, and that as long as the ball was right over the plate, I felt like I was in a good groove," he said through a translator. "That was the key." Baseball's big boppers took aim at two trucks parked beside the home run apple behind the center-field fence, a popular staple at Mets games dating to their days in Shea Stadium. With a shiny prize to shoot for, Cespedes dinged the hood on one and elicited a rousing cheer. Cuban reliever Aroldis Chapman of the Cincinnati Reds brought Cespedes water and a towel during the first round, and 2010 champion David Ortiz strolled over to offer encouragement and advice. The Rockettes danced atop the dugouts and did their famous kickline between first-round batters. "It's far different from in Cuba," Cespedes said. "There might be two people at our games. There's only one photographer, and this is completely different and foreign to me. But I'm very happy to be here." His first-round outburst was enough to send him

Auto Racing

Camping World 301 NASCAR Sprint Cup Camping World RV Sales 301 Results Sunday At New Hampshire Motor Speedway Loudon, N.H. Lap length: 1.058 miles (Start position in parentheses) 1. (13) Brian Vickers, Toyota, 302 laps, 103.5 rating, 0 points, $214,075. 2. (4) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 302, 128, 43, $228,043. 3. (9) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 302, 112.4, 41, $141,935. 4. (1) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 302, 119.9, 41, $179,076. 5. (17) Aric Almirola, Ford, 302, 81.7, 39, $152,496. 6. (43) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 302, 93.7, 38, $147,646. 7. (18) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 302, 82.2, 37, $140,221. 8. (6) Carl Edwards, Ford, 302, 92.2, 36, $128,560. 9. (12) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 302, 112, 36, $127,776. 10. (5) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 302, 102.6, 34, $134,871. 11. (8) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 302, 97.3, 33, $105,235. 12. (11) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 302, 83.8, 32, $117,380. 13. (20) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 302, 83.2, 31, $127,518. 14. (3) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 302, 98.1, 30, $108,260. 15. (22) Greg Biffle, Ford, 302, 80.6, 29, $102,410. 16. (19) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 302, 70.9, 28, $118,610. 17. (14) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 302, 73, 27, $116,501. 18. (24) David Gilliland, Ford, 302, 65.1, 26, $103,918. 19. (29) David Ragan, Ford, 302, 59.5, 25, $109,618. 20. (42) David Stremme, Toyota, 302, 53.2, 24, $100,518. 21. (7) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 302, 84.9, 23, $101,110. 22. (26) A J Allmendinger, Chevrolet, 302, 57.4, 22, $104,218. 23. (39) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet, 302, 54.3, 21, $93,782. 24. (10) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet, 302, 82.2, 20, $111,149. 25. (38) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, 302, 44.3, 0, $80,985. 26. (16) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 302, 100.5, 19, $132,560. 27. (33) Bobby Labonte, Toyota, 301, 62.6, 17, $91,210. 28. (27) David Reutimann, Toyota, 299, 46.9, 16, $82,910. 29. (40) J.J. Yeley, Chevrolet, 298, 41.6, 15, $82,535. 30. (37) Ken Schrader, Ford, 298, 36.5, 14, $83,785. 31. (2) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 283, 111.2, 15, $110,430. 32. (36) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, transmission, 281, 37.7, 0, $78,810. 33. (21) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 277, 41.8, 11, $105,799. 34. (23) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 275, 56.9, 10, $128,221. 35. (35) Josh Wise, Ford, 270, 39.9, 0, $78,185. 36. (28) Casey Mears, Ford, 242, 29.4, 8, $85,955. 37. (32) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, accident, 237, 47.7, 7, $77,741. 38. (31) Travis Kvapil, Toyota, accident, 236, 49, 6, $80,675. 39. (15) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, accident, 225, 63.3, 5, $102,833. 40. (25) Joey Logano, Ford, 211, 34.3, 4, $92,583. 41. (41) Morgan Shepherd, Toyota, vibration, 92, 25.3, 0, $60,675. 42. (30) Michael McDowell, Ford, vibration, 89, 34.5, 2, $56,675. 43. (34) Mike Bliss, Toyota, rear gear, 75, 30.6, 0, $53,175. Race Statistics Average Speed of Race Winner: 98.735 mph. Time of Race: 3 hours, 14 minutes, 10 seconds. Margin of Victory: 0.582 seconds. Caution Flags: 12 for 58 laps. Lead Changes: 10 among 6 drivers. Lap Leaders: B.Keselowski 1-9; Ky.Busch 10-62; Ku.Busch 63-74; B.Keselowski 75-77; Ku.Busch 78-123; B.Keselowski 124; M.Kenseth 125-157; B.Keselowski 158; Ku.Busch 159-202; T.Stewart 203-286; B.Vickers 287-302. Leaders Summary (Driver, Times Led, Laps Led): Ku.Busch, 3 times for 102 laps; T.Stewart, 1 time for 84 laps; Ky.Busch, 1 time for 53 laps; M.Kenseth, 1 time for 33 laps; B.Vickers, 1 time for 16 laps; B.Keselowski, 4 times for 14 laps. Top 12 in Points: 1. J.Johnson, 696; 2. C.Bowyer, 640; 3. C.Edwards, 623; 4. K.Harvick, 622; 5. D.Earnhardt Jr., 578; 6. M.Kenseth, 576; 7. Ky.Busch, 576; 8. G.Biffle, 545; 9. Bra.Keselowski, 529; 10. K.Kahne, 523; 11. M.Truex Jr., 521; 12. J.Gordon, 521.

MLB Standings straight into the finals, though he added six long balls in round two for good measure. Some of his drives were especially impressive, too. Cespedes hit about a half-dozen balls into the upper deck in left, never reached by anyone in a game, and banged another couple of shots off the restaurant windows in the corner just below. The 27-year-old Cespedes has struggled as a sophomore, batting .225 with 15 home runs, but hardly anyone in the game doubts his ability. "This trophy will motivate me so that things continue to go well for me, and I just want to thank the people that believed in me, that thought I could play at this level," he said. The 20-year-old Harper, wearing shiny gold spikes as his father pitched to him, hammered eight homers in all three rounds. But the Washington Nationals phenom couldn't keep up with Cespedes. "He's incredible," Harper said. "He's an absolute machine." Colorado outfielder Michael Cuddyer and Baltimore first baseman Chris Davis, who leads the majors with 37 homers, were eliminated in the second round. Davis tied Reggie Jackson (1969) for the AL record before the All-Star break. "I had a little blister come up second round. It's just one of those things," Davis said. "I usually get one once a year and it just happened to be tonight. It actually popped during a swing. My main concern is obviously not to hurt myself and to hang onto the bat. "It's something that I've dealt with in my career since I can remember. You've just got to kind of wear it for a couple of days and then it hardens up and you're good to go." Citi Field opened in 2009 with a cavernous outfield and yielded the fewest home runs in the majors over its first three seasons, according to STATS.

• PIQUA DAILY CALL

Record Book

Baseball

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WWW.DAILYCALL.COM

Major League Baseball At A Glance All Times EDT National League East Division W 54 48 48 41 35

L 41 47 48 50 58

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W 57 56 53 42 38

L 36 37 42 51 56

Pct .613 .602 .558 .452 .404

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W Arizona 50 Los Angeles 47 46 Colorado San Francisco 43 San Diego 42 Monday's Games No games scheduled Tuesday's Game All-Star Game Wednesday's Games No games scheduled Thursday's Games No games scheduled

L 45 47 50 51 54

Pct .526 .500 .479 .457 .438

GB — 2½ 4½ 6½ 8½

Atlanta Washington Philadelphia New York Miami Central Division St. Louis Pittsburgh Cincinnati Chicago Milwaukee West Division

American League East Division Boston Tampa Bay Baltimore New York Toronto Central Division Detroit Cleveland Kansas City Minnesota Chicago West Division

W 58 55 53 51 45

L 39 41 43 44 49

Pct .598 .573 .552 .537 .479

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W 52 51 43 39 37

L 42 44 49 53 55

Pct .553 .537 .467 .424 .402

GB — 1½ 8 12 14

W L Pct GB 56 39 .589 — Oakland Texas 54 41 .568 2 Los Angeles 44 49 .473 11 43 52 .453 13 Seattle Houston 33 61 .351 22½ Monday's Games No games scheduled Tuesday's Games All-Star Game at New York (Mets), 8 p.m. Wednesday's Games No games scheduled Thursday's Games No games scheduled

MLB Leaders TODAY'S MAJOR LEAGUE LEADERS NATIONAL LEAGUE BATTING—YMolina, St. Louis, .341; Craig, St. Louis, .333; Cuddyer, Colorado, .330; Segura, Milwaukee, .325; Posey, San Francisco, .325; MCarpenter, St. Louis, .321; Votto, Cincinnati, .318. RUNS—MCarpenter, St. Louis, 72; CGonzalez, Colorado, 68; Choo, Cincinnati, 66; Votto, Cincinnati, 66; Holliday, St. Louis, 64; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 60; SMarte, Pittsburgh, 59; JUpton, Atlanta, 59. RBI—Goldschmidt, Arizona, 77; Craig, St. Louis, 74; Phillips, Cincinnati, 74; DBrown, Philadelphia, 67; Bruce, Cincinnati, 66; CGonzalez, Colorado, 64; PAlvarez, Pittsburgh, 62. HITS—Segura, Milwaukee, 121; Craig, St. Louis, 116; MCarpenter, St. Louis, 115; Votto, Cincinnati, 112; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 110; YMolina, St. Louis, 110; CGonzalez, Colorado, 107; SMarte, Pittsburgh, 107. DOUBLES—Bruce, Cincinnati, 28; MCarpenter, St. Louis, 28; YMolina, St. Louis, 27; Posey, San Francisco, 27; Rizzo, Chicago, 27; McCutchen, Pittsburgh, 26; GParra, Arizona, 26. TRIPLES—CGomez, Milwaukee, 9; SMarte, Pittsburgh, 8; Segura, Milwaukee, 8; Span, Washington, 7; CGonzalez, Colorado, 6; Hechavarria, Miami, 5; DWright, New York, 5. HOME RUNS—CGonzalez, Colorado, 25; PAlvarez, Pittsburgh, 24; DBrown, Philadelphia, 23; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 21; Beltran, St. Louis, 19; Bruce, Cincinnati, 19; Uggla, Atlanta, 18. STOLEN BASES—ECabrera, San Diego, 34; SMarte, Pittsburgh, 28; Segura, Milwaukee, 27; Revere, Philadelphia, 22; CGomez, Milwaukee, 21; McCutchen, Pittsburgh, 20; Pierre, Miami, 18. PITCHING—Zimmermann, Washington, 12-4; Wainwright, St. Louis, 12-5; Corbin, Arizona, 11-1; Lynn, St. Louis, 11-4; Lee, Philadelphia, 10-3; Bumgarner, San Francisco, 10-5; 7 tied at 9. STRIKEOUTS—Harvey, New York, 147; Kershaw, Los Angeles, 139; Wainwright, St. Louis, 130; Samardzija, Chicago, 128; Latos, Cincinnati, 127; Lincecum, San Francisco, 125; Lee, Philadelphia, 125. SAVES—Grilli, Pittsburgh, 29; Kimbrel, Atlanta, 26; Mujica, St. Louis, 26; RSoriano, Washington, 25; Romo, San Francisco, 21; Chapman, Cincinnati, 21; Papelbon, Philadelphia, 20.

AMERICAN LEAGUE BATTING—MiCabrera, Detroit, .365; Trout, Los Angeles, .322; Mauer, Minnesota, .320; DOrtiz, Boston, .317; Pedroia, Boston, .316; ABeltre, Texas, .316; CDavis, Baltimore, .315; Loney, Tampa Bay, .315; TorHunter, Detroit, .315. RUNS—MiCabrera, Detroit, 73; CDavis, Baltimore, 70; AJones, Baltimore, 67; Trout, Los Angeles, 65; DeJennings, Tampa Bay, 63; Bautista, Toronto, 61; Encarnacion, Toronto, 60. RBI—MiCabrera, Detroit, 95; CDavis, Baltimore, 93; Encarnacion, Toronto, 72; NCruz, Texas, 69; Fielder, Detroit, 69; AJones, Baltimore, 67; Cano, New York, 65; DOrtiz, Boston, 65. HITS—MiCabrera, Detroit, 132; Machado, Baltimore, 128; Pedroia, Boston, 119; Trout, Los Angeles, 119; ABeltre, Texas, 118; AJones, Baltimore, 117; Ellsbury, Boston, 115. DOUBLES—Machado, Baltimore, 39; Mauer, Minnesota, 30; Trout, Los Angeles, 29; CDavis, Baltimore, 27; JCastro, Houston, 25; Pedroia, Boston, 25; JhPeralta, Detroit, 25. TRIPLES—Trout, Los Angeles, 8; Ellsbury, Boston, 7; Drew, Boston, 6; Gardner, New York, 5; DeJennings, Tampa Bay, 5; LMartin, Texas, 5; Kawasaki, Toronto, 4; HKendrick, Los Angeles, 4. HOME RUNS—CDavis, Baltimore, 37; MiCabrera, Detroit, 30; Encarnacion, Toronto, 25; ADunn, Chicago, 24; Ibanez, Seattle, 24; NCruz, Texas, 22; ABeltre, Texas, 21; Cano, New York, 21; Trumbo, Los Angeles, 21. STOLEN BASES—Ellsbury, Boston, 36; RDavis, Toronto, 24; McLouth, Baltimore, 24; Altuve, Houston, 21; Kipnis, Cleveland, 21; Trout, Los Angeles, 21; AlRamirez, Chicago, 20. PITCHING—Scherzer, Detroit, 13-1; MMoore, Tampa Bay, 13-3; Colon, Oakland, 12-3; Tillman, Baltimore, 113; FHernandez, Seattle, 10-4; Verlander, Detroit, 10-6; Masterson, Cleveland, 10-7. STRIKEOUTS—Darvish, Texas, 157; Scherzer, Detroit, 152; FHernandez, Seattle, 140; Masterson, Cleveland, 137; Sale, Chicago, 131; Verlander, Detroit, 125; DHolland, Texas, 121. SAVES—JiJohnson, Baltimore, 33; Nathan, Texas, 30; MRivera, New York, 30; Balfour, Oakland, 25; AReed, Chicago, 24; Frieri, Los Angeles, 22; Rodney, Tampa Bay, 22; GHolland, Kansas City, 22.

Golf

British Open Tee Times British Open Tee Times At Muirfield Gullane, Scotland Purse: $7.8 million Yardage: 7,191 yards; Par: 71 All Times EDT (a-amateur) Thursday-Friday 1:32 a.m.-6:33 a.m. — Peter Senior, Australia; Lloyd Saltman, Scotland; Oliver Fisher, England. 1:43 a.m.-6:44 a.m. — Robert Karlsson, Sweden, Todd Hamilton, United States; a-Ben Stow, England. 1:54 a.m.-6:55 a.m. — Thomas Aiken, South Africa; Kiradech Aphibarnrat, Thailand; Bud Cauley, United States. 2:05 a.m.-7:06 a.m. — Mikko Ilonen, Finland; Brooks Koepka, United States; Ashun Wu, China. 2:16 a.m.-7:17 a.m. — David Duval, United States; Bernd Wiesberger, Austria; Chris Wood, England. 2:27 a.m.-7:28 a.m. — Scott Stallings, United States; Stewart Cink, United States; Richard McEvoy, England. 2:38 a.m.-7:39 a.m. — K.J. Choi, South Korea; Miguel Angel Jimenez, Spain; Jimmy Walker, United States. 2:49 a.m.-7:50 a.m.. — Ben Curtis, United States; Shane Lowry, Northern Ireland; Rafael Cabrera-Bello, Spain. 3 a.m.- 8:01 a.m. — Jonas Blixt, Sweden; Brian Davis, England; Graham DeLaet, Canada. 3:11 a.m.-8:12 a.m. — Robert Garrigus, United States; John Senden, Australia; Marc Warren, Scotland. 3:22 a.m.-8:23 a.m. — Martin Kaymer, Germany; aGarrick Porteous, England; Jason Day, Australia. 3:33 a.m.-8:34 a.m. — Carl Pettersson, Sweden; Jason Dufner, United States; David Lynn, England. 3:44 a.m.-8:45 a.m. — Bubba Watson, United States; Nicolas Colsaerts, Belgium; Dustin Johnson, United States. 4 a.m.-9:01 a.m. — Nick Faldo, England; Tom Watson, United States; Fred Couples, United States. 4:11 a.m.-9:12 a.m. — Justin Rose, England; Ernie Els, South Africa; Brandt Snedeker, United States. 4:22 a.m.-9:23 a.m. — Ian Poulter, England; Keegan Bradley, United States; Billy Horschel, United States. 4:33 a.m.-9:34 a.m. — Gonzalo Fernandez-Castano, Spain; Richard Sterne, South Africa; Nick Watney, United States. 4:44 a.m.-9:45 a.m. — Rory McIlroy, Northern Ireland; Hideki Matsuyama, Japan; Phil Mickelson, United States. 4:55 a.m.-9:56 a.m. — Scott Piercy, United States; Tim Clark, South Africa; Kevin Streelman, United States. 5:06 a.m.-10:07 a.m. — Zach Johnson, United States; Shingo Katayama, Japan; Thomas Bjorn, Denmark. 5:17 a.m.-10:18 a.m. — Angel Cabrera, Argentina; Camilo Villegas, Colombia; Estanislao Goya, Argentina. 5:28 a.m.-10:29 a.m. — George Coetzee, South Africa; Ken Duke, United States; Mark Calcavecchia, United States. 5:39 a.m.-10:40 a.m. — John Huh, United States; Brendan Jones, Australia; Hyung-sun Kim, South Korea. 5:50 a.m.-10:51 a.m. — Josh Teater, United States; Steven Tiley, England; a-Jimmy Mullen, England. 6:01 a.m.-11:02 a.m. — K.T. Kim, South Korea; Steven Jeffress, Australia; Luke Guthrie, United States. 6:12 a.m.-11:13 a.m. — John Wade, Australia; Gareth Wright, Wales; Makoto Inoue, Japan. 6:33 a.m.-1:32 a.m. — Daniel Willett, England; Y.E. Yang, South Korea; Johnson Wagner, United States. 6:44 a.m.-1:43 a.m. — Thaworn Wiratchant, Thailand; Lucas Glover, United States; Oscar Floren, Sweden. 6:55 a.m.-1:54 a.m. — Boo Weekley, United States; Sandy Lyle, Scotland; Niclas Fasth, Sweden. 7:06 a.m.-2:05 a.m. — Marcus Fraser, Australia; aGrant Forrest, Scotland; Mark O'Meara, United States. 7:17 a.m.-2:16 a.m. — Tom Lehman, United States; Thongchai Jaidee, Thailand; Freddie Jacobson, Sweden. 7:28 a.m.-2:27 a.m. — Justin Leonard, United States; aRhys Pugh, Wales; Marc Leishman, Australia. 7:39 a.m.-2:38 a.m. — Alvaro Quiros, Spain; Kyle Stanley, United States; Alexander Noren, Sweden. 7:50 a.m.-2:49 a.m. — Russell Henley, United States; Jordan Spieth, United States; a-Matthew Fitzpatrick, England. 8:01 a.m.-3 a.m. — Padraig Harrington, Ireland; Michael Thompson, United States; Richie Ramsay, Scotland. 8:12 a.m.-3:11 a.m. — Vijay Singh, Fiji; Darren Clarke, Northern Ireland; Martin Laird, Scotland. 8:23 a.m.-3:22 a.m. — Ryan Moore, United States; Henrik Stenson, Sweden; a-Steven Fox, United States. 8:34 a.m.-3:33 a.m. — Thorbjorn Olesen, Denmark, Jim Furyk, United States; Paul Lawrie, Scotland. 8:45 a.m.-3:44 a.m. — Geoff Ogilvy, Australia; Harris English, United States; Stephen Gallacher, Scotland. 9:01 a.m.-4 a.m. — Lee Westwood, England; Charl Schwartzel, South Africa; Sergio Garcia, Spain. 9:12 a.m.-4:11 a.m. — Adam Scott, Australia; Matt Kuchar, United States, Luke Donald, England. 9:23 a.m.-4:22 a.m. — Rickie Fowler, United States; Matteo Manassero, Italy; Hunter Mahan, United States. 9:34 a.m.-4:33 a.m. — Peter Hanson, Sweden; Hiroyuki Fujita, Japan; Bill Haas, United States. 9:45 a.m.-4:44 a.m. — Tiger Woods, United States; Graeme McDowell, Northern Ireland; Louis Oosthuizen, South Africa. 9:56 a.m.-4:55 a.m. — Webb Simpson, United States; Branden Grace, South Africa; Jamie Donaldson, Wales. 10:07 a.m.-5:06 a.m. — Francesco Molinari, Italy; Toru Taniguchi, Japan; Bo Van Pelt, United States. 10:18 a.m.-5:17 a.m. — D.A. Points, United States; Brett Rumford, Australia; Marcel Siem, Germany. 10:29 a.m.-5:28 a.m. — George Murray, Scotland; Mark Brown, New Zealand; Justin Harding, South Africa. 10:40 a.m.-5:39 a.m. — Gregory Bourdy, France; Scott Jamieson, Scotland; Shiv Kapur, India. 10:51 a.m.-5:50 a.m. — Scott Brown, United States; Satoshi Kodaira, Japan; Gareth Maybin, Northern Ireland. 11:02 a.m.-6:01 a.m. — Tyrrell Hatton, England; Eduardo De La Riva, Spain; Kenichi Kuboya, Japan. 11:13 a.m.-6:12 a.m. — Stephen Dartnall, Australia, Darryn Lloyd, South Africa; Daisuke Maruyama, Japan.

Golf

John Deere Classic PGA Tour John Deere Classic Scores Sunday At TPC Deere Run Silvis, Ill. Purse: $4.6 million Yardage: 7,268; Par: 71 Final x-won on fifth playoff hole a-amateur x-Jordan Spieth (500), $828,000 70-65-65-65—265 David Hearn (245), $404,800 66-66-64-69—265 Zach Johnson (245), $404,800 64-66-67-68—265 Martin Flores (115), $190,133 67-67-69-63—266 Jerry Kelly (115), $190,133 68-64-66-68—266 D. Summerhays (115), $190,133 65-67-62-72—266 Matt Jones (85), $143,367 66-65-68-68—267 Patrick Reed (85), $143,367 67-63-70-67—267 J.J. Henry (85), $143,367 68-65-65-69—267 Jim Herman (73), $119,600 66-68-67-67—268 Steve Stricker (73), $119,600 67-66-69-66—268 Steven Bowditch (61), $96,600 69-68-67-65—269 Kevin Sutherland (61), $96,600 70-65-65-69—269 N. Thompson (61), $96,600 69-66-64-70—269 Chad Campbell (53), $71,300 69-67-66-68—270 Harris English (53), $71,300 69-69-65-67—270 Lucas Glover (53), $71,300 68-62-71-69—270 Morgan Hoffmann (53), $71,300 74-64-63-69—270 Steve LeBrun (53), $71,300 67-67-72-64—270 Chez Reavie (53), $71,300 72-61-69-68—270 a-Patrick Rodgers 67-69-65-69—270 Jason Bohn (47), $47,840 69-69-64-69—271 Scott Brown (47), $47,840 71-67-65-68—271 Chris Kirk (47), $47,840 67-66-66-72—271 Ryan Moore (47), $47,840 67-70-65-69—271 Robert Streb (47), $47,840 66-72-65-68—271

Scottish Open Scottish Open Leading Scores Sunday At Castle Stuart Golf Links Inverness, Scotland Purse: $4.48 million Yardage: 7,193; Par: 72 Final Phil Mickelson, United States 66-70-66-69—271 71-65-66-69—271 Branden Grace, South Africa J.B. Hansen, Denmark 68-65-69-71—273 Henrik Stenson, Sweden 70-64-66-71—273 68-69-69-68—274 Martin Laird, Scotland Gareth Maybin, Northern Ireland 69-70-64-71—274 John Parry, England 64-72-66-72—274 70-68-68-69—275 Nicolas Colsaerts, Belgium Raphael Jacquelin, France 68-70-65-72—275 Marcel Siem, Germany 67-69-72-69—277 67-66-70-74—277 Peter Uihlein, United States Simon Dyson, England 70-69-69-70—278 Brooks Koepka, United States 70-68-68-72—278 69-69-68-72—278 Eddie Pepperell, England Hennie Otto, South Africa 70-70-66-72—278 Chris Doak, Scotland 66-66-73-73—278 69-69-71-70—279 Seve Benson, England Victor Dubuisson, France 68-66-74-71—279 David Lynn, England 69-70-68-72—279 70-68-68-73—279 Ricardo Gonzalez, Argentina Tommy Fleetwood, England 70-67-68-74—279 Simon Khan, England 65-69-70-75—279 67-67-70-75—279 Lorenzo Gagli, Italy Also Francesco Molinari, Italy 69-66-72-76—283 69-71-73-71—284 Paul Lawrie, Scotland Matteo Manassero, Italy 69-70-70-76—285 Thorbjorn Olesen, Denmark 67-69-78-73—287

U.S. Senior Open U.S. Senior OpenScores Sunday At Omaha Country Club Omaha Neb. Purse: $2.75 million Yardage: 6,711; Par: 70 Final a-amateur Kenny Perry, $500,000 67-73-64-63—267 67-70-67-68—272 Fred Funk, $295,000 Rocco Mediate, $155,503 68-67-72-66—273 Corey Pavin, $155,503 69-73-64-67—273 Michael Allen, $103,416 67-63-72-72—274 Steve Elkington, $83,461 70-70-71-65—276 Jeff Sluman, $83,461 69-67-72-68—276 Chien Soon Lu, $83,461 68-75-65-68—276 Kirk Triplett, $60,800 70-72-71-65—278 Duffy Waldorf, $60,800 70-69-72-67—278 67-71-70-70—278 Tom Lehman, $60,800 Bart Bryant, $60,800 72-69-67-70—278 Chris Williams, $60,800 70-72-66-70—278 71-74-69-65—279 Jeff Hart, $44,989 Peter Senior, $44,989 68-73-70-68—279 Loren Roberts, $44,989 76-67-68-68—279 71-69-70-69—279 Fred Couples, $44,989 Bernhard Langer, $44,989 68-74-68-69—279 Mark O'Meara, $37,890 67-71-70-72—280 72-70-68-71—281 Joe Daley, $33,779 David Frost, $33,779 72-70-67-72—281 Steve Pate, $33,779 72-69-67-73—281 70-70-73-69—282 Tom Watson, $24,845 Kohki Idoki, $24,845 69-74-70-69—282 Barry Lane, $24,845 73-71-68-70—282 Gary Hallberg, $24,845 67-74-69-72—282 Jeff Brehaut, $24,845 69-68-72-73—282 John Riegger, $24,845 72-69-67-74—282 Tom Pernice Jr., $24,845 74-69-65-74—282

Manulife Classic LPGA Tour Manulife Financial Classic Scores Sunday At Grey Silo Golf Course Waterloo, Ontario Purse:, $1.3 million Yardage: 6,336; Par: 71 Final x-won on third playoff hole a-amateur x-Hee Young Park, $195,000 Angela Stanford, $120,353 Catriona Matthew, $87,308 Meena Lee, $67,539 Karine Icher, $54,362 Na Yeon Choi, $31,158 Haeji Kang, $31,158 Stacy Lewis, $31,158 Suzann Pettersen, $31,158 Austin Ernst, $31,158 Gerina Piller, $31,158 Amy Yang, $31,158 Hanna Kang, $21,612 Jessica Korda, $19,702 Inbee Park, $19,702 Irene Cho, $16,803 Jennifer Johnson, $16,803 Michelle Wie, $16,803 Chella Choi, $16,803 So Yeon Ryu, $13,849 Dewi Claire Schreefel, $13,849 I.K. Kim, $13,849 Sun Young Yoo, $13,849 Christina Kim, $13,849 Ryann O'Toole, $13,849 Morgan Pressel, $11,894 Anna Nordqvist, $11,894 Lisa McCloskey, $10,971 Lizette Salas, $10,971 Alena Sharp, $9,554 Katie M. Burnett, $9,554 Mariajo Uribe, $9,554 Jee Young Lee, $9,554 Belen Mozo, $9,554

65-67-61-65—258 63-67-64-64—258 63-64-68-66—261 65-66-65-68—264 67-66-69-63—265 69-68-67-62—266 70-67-67-62—266 68-67-67-64—266 68-64-68-66—266 68-64-67-67—266 70-67-62-67—266 66-67-66-67—266 69-70-64-64—267 68-66-69-65—268 65-67-68-68—268 65-72-67-65—269 67-68-68-66—269 69-67-67-66—269 66-65-70-68—269 71-67-68-64—270 69-67-69-65—270 68-66-70-66—270 68-67-68-67—270 71-65-66-68—270 66-65-71-68—270 68-70-69-64—271 67-64-67-73—271 68-69-67-68—272 70-67-67-68—272 68-71-69-65—273 72-66-69-66—273 70-68-67-68—273 68-68-68-69—273 65-66-73-69—273

Cycling

Tour de France Results Tour de France Results Tuesday 16th Stage At Gap, France A 104.4-mile, medium-mountain ride to the Alps from Vaison-la-Romaine to Gap, with an early Category-3 climb and a pair of Category-2s, one early, one late 1. Rui Costa, Portugal, Movistar, 3 hours, 52 minutes, 45 seconds. 2. Christophe Riblon, France, AG2R La Mondiale, 42 seconds behind. 3. Arnold Jeannesson, France, Francaise des Jeux, same time. 4. Jerome Coppel, France, Cofidis, same time. 5. Andreas Kloeden, Germany, RadioShack Leopard, same time. 6. Tom Dumoulin, Netherlands, Team Argos-Shimano, 1:00. 7. Mikel Astarloza, Spain, Euskaltel-Euskadi, 1:01. 8. Philippe Gilbert, Belgium, BMC Racing, 1:04. 9. Cameron Meyer, Australia, Orica GreenEdge, same time. 10. Ramunas Navardauskas, Lithuania, Garmin-Sharp, same time. 11. Peter Velits, Slovakia, Omega Pharma-QuickStep, same time. 12. Cyril Gautier, France, Team Europcar, same time. 13. Yury Trofimov, Russia, Katusha, same time. 14. Laurent Didier, Luxembourg, RadioShack Leopard, same time. 15. Thomas De Gendt, Belgium, Vacansoleil-DCM, 1:09. 16. Nicolas Roche, Ireland, Team Saxo-Tinkoff, 1:26. 17. Jean Marc Marino, France, Sojasun, same time. 18. Daniel Navarro, Spain, Cofidis, same time. 19. Thomas Voeckler, France, Team Europcar, same time. 20. Johnny Hoogerland, Netherlands, Vacansoleil-DCM, 2:21. Overall Standings (After 16 stages) 1. Chris Froome, England, Sky Procycling, 65 hours, 15 minutes, 36 seconds. 2. Bauke Mollema, Netherlands, Belkin Pro Cycling, 4:14. 3. Alberto Contador, Spain, Team Saxo-Tinkoff, 4:25. 4. Roman Kreuziger, Czech Republic, Team Saxo-Tinkoff, 4:28. 5. Nairo Quintana, Colombia, Movistar, 5:47. 6. Laurens ten Dam, Netherlands, Belkin Pro Cycling, 5:54. 7. Joaquin Rodriguez, Spain, Katusha, 7:11. 8. Jakob Fuglsang, Denmark, Astana, 7:22. 9. Jean-Christophe Peraud, France, AG2R La Mondiale, 8:47. 10. Daniel Martin, Ireland, Garmin-Sharp, 9:28. 11. Michal Kwiatkowski, Poland, Omega Pharma-QuickStep, 9:37. 12. Michael Rogers, Australia, Team Saxo-Tinkoff, 10:54. 13. Andrew Talansky, United States, Garmin-Sharp, 13:32. 14. Daniel Navarro, Spain, Cofidis, 13:54. 15. Alejandro Valverde, Spain, Movistar, 14:42. 16. Maxime Monfort, Belgium, RadioShack Leopard, 14:47. 17. Cadel Evans, Australia, BMC Racing, 16:40. 18. Mikel Nieve, Spain, Euskaltel-Euskadi, 19:51. 19. Andy Schleck, Luxembourg, RadioShack Leopard, 21:07. 20. Rui Costa, Portugal, Movistar, 22:34. Also 55. Tejay Van Garderen, United States, BMC Racing, 1:08:10. 69. Thomas Danielson, United States, Garmin-Sharp, 1:28:05. 86. Brent Bookwalter, United States, BMC Racing, 1:41:53.


SPORTS

PIQUA DAILY CALL • WWW.DAILYCALL.COM

Wednesday, July 17, 2013

11

Spieth focused on British Open Struggling with cell phone service in Scotland

AP PHOTO

Tiger Woods practices an awkward shot.

Woods seeks for key shot Golfer hopes to return to getting ‘major’ wins GULLANE, Scotland (AP) — British Open champions at Muirfield are more likely to be found on a ballot for the Hall of Fame than the bottom of a betting sheet. It has never been known as a haven for long shots, which would seem to bode well for someone like Tiger Woods. Even so, Woods struggled to find the right definition of an "outsider" when asked Tuesday about the trend of highcaliber winners at Muirfield. Because if an "outsider" is someone who had never won a major, then all bets are off. "You probably can't say that given the fact that over the past, what, five years or so ... that we've had first-time winners at virtually every single major," Woods said. "The fields are so deep now and the margin between the first player and the last player in the field is not that big anymore. It's very small." Eighteen players have won the last 20 majors, the most diverse collection of major champions in some 25 years. Fourteen of them had never won a major. Perhaps it was more than just a coincidence when Woods dated this trend to the last five years. Because that's when he stopped winning them. "There's certainly a connection between so many different winners and

Tiger not winning one," Graeme McDowell said. "Because we all know when he gets in the mood, he likes to win a few. I think in the period when Tiger kind of went missing for a couple of years there, it gave a lot of players a chance to step up to the plate and show how healthy the game of golf is, get their confidence up and win the big ones and really get a bit of belief in themselves. "But I think Tiger has been responsible for raising the bar," he said. "I think he certainly has set the standard for how good guys can be." Times sure have changed since the British Open last came to this links course along the Firth of Forth. In 2002, the question was whether Woods was going to win all four majors in a single year. Eleven years later, not a major goes by without him being asked when he's going to win one — any of them — again. The drought is at 16 majors, stretched over five years, since Woods hobbled and winced his way to a playoff win at Torrey Pines in the 2008 U.S. Open for his 14th career major, leaving him four short of the standard set by Jack Nicklaus. Woods gets defensive when asked about his confidence. Surely it would seem to have been easier when he was winning them with regularity.

GULLANE, Scotland (AP) — Jordan Spieth has a problem that would be a major irritation to most teenagers. His cellphone keeps cutting out since he arrived in Scotland. "Honestly, my service plan is not working too hot over here," Spieth said Tuesday, strolling slowly toward the lunch tent at Muirfield. But Spieth isn't like most teens. This past weekend, the 19-year-old from Texas became the youngest PGA Tour winner in 82 years. Within hours, he was on a charter flight across the Atlantic, where he'll play in his first British Open beginning Thursday. And, thanks to that spotty phone service, he hasn't been able to spend too much time dwelling on his grueling, landmark victory in the John Deere Classic. That's not a bad thing, either. "It's interesting not being able to watch any of it, to not be able to see some of the responses I would normally want to see afterward," Spieth said. "I can refocus, think of it as just another week. I can reflect on (the John Deere win) more after this week. But today, I had to turn my attention here because it's one of the biggest weeks of the year." Seems as though he'll handle the pressure just fine. Spieth turned pro after just one season at the University of Texas, intent on earning his Tour card even though he didn't have status on any circuit. His agent promised to line up at least seven events through exemptions, perhaps enough to earn a few playing chances and give him a realistic shot at earning his card for 2014. Instead, Spieth has already played in 16 tournaments, finishing in the top 10 five times before his breakthrough victory in America's heartland. It didn't come easy. He needed what will surely be remembered as one of the shots of the year — holing out from a greenside bunker on the 72nd hole for a birdie that pushed him into a three-man playoff. Then, on the fifth extra hole, Spieth finally finished off David Heard and

AP PHOTO

Jordan Spieth celebrates after holing a bunker shot last Sunday. Zach Johnson. The most immediate benefit was earning a spot at Muirfield. But there's all sorts of perks that came along with the win, including a two-year exemption on the PGA Tour, a spot in next year's Masters, and a chance to play in the season-ending FedEx Cup playoff after he soared to No. 11 in the standings. "I never would have expected this at the start of the year," Spieth said, still sounding as though it hasn't sunk in just yet. "I just wanted to get my Tour card for next year. To play in the Tour Championship would be unbelievable, to be one of those 30 guys. "There's still a long ways to go." Some of his fellow players realized he had plenty of game even before he began playing regularly on Tour. Phil Mickelson, who started getting noticed while still in college as well, has been watching Spieth's promising play for three years. "But he is more than that," the four-time major champion said. "He's enjoyable to be around. He's got charisma. People are drawn to him. He's going to be a real asset to the Tour." Lefty is already looking forward to the day when Spieth is playing for the U.S. team in events such

as the Ryder Cup. Now, he doesn't have to fret about whether a tournament will invite him to play. He can set his goals much higher. "He's not dependent on sponsor exemptions," Mickelson said. "It allows him to start thriving on the PGA Tour, rather than having to worry about week to week. And I love his game. I love everything about it. It's not about pretty. It's not about making the most perfect swing. It's about hitting shots. And that's what he did under pressure." It might be a bit of a reach to expect Spieth to contend this week at Muirfield, which he played for the first time Tuesday, facing a tight schedule that will allow him to get in only one full round of practice on the tricky links course before the tournament begins. But he's got plenty of experience with this style of golf, representing the U.S. in the 2011 Walker Cup at another storied Scottish course, Royal Aberdeen. Even though the Americans fell to a combined British-Irish squad, Spieth did his part by winning both singles matches and halving his team event. He also got a chance to practice extensively on a layout that looks nothing like the ones back in the States.

He quickly took to the creative shots required in the bumpy, windy conditions. He looks forward to breaking out a few of them again this week. "This is my favorite type of golf," Spieth said. "It's fun. You get to use your imagination. You can use all types of clubs around the greens. You can play off ridges. I can pretty much play with (caddie Michael Greller's) head. There's nothing basic. I'm sure he'll be saying, 'What the heck are you trying to do?' a couple of times out there." He's still trying to adjust to the six-hour time difference and the long flight across the Atlantic, struggling to get more than a few hours of sleep. But he did manage to take in some of the sights in nearby Edinburgh before turning his attention solely to golf. "The towns around here are just awesome, with the stone walls lining just about every road you go on," Spieth said. "It's different than back home." On the way to lunch, his agent, Jay Danzi, suggested that Spieth take a seat while talking to a small group of reporters. "Ahh, that feels so good," the youngster said, his time-lagged legs still a bit woozy. At least he doesn't have to worry about looking at his phone all the time.

Post 184 Continued from page 9 Sidney took the lead in the fourth, scoring two runs on just one hit. Piqua had one error in the inning and Edwards walked two batters. Bollinger had a RBI single to tie it and Treg Francis’ squeeze bunt with the bases-loaded scored Bollinger to make it 2-1. Piqua got out of the jam with a couple web gems by Damien Richard in leftfield and Ethan Bruns at third on a shot down the line. Treg Francis kept Piqua off the board until the sixth, when Post 184 scored four runs to take a 5-2 lead. Edwards started things with a triple. Blair singled him in to tie it and William Borchers and Isaiah Counts relieved Francis, but couldn’t stop the rally until Piqua scored three more times. Jay Eilerman had a RIB single, while Piqua took advantage of two errors and a walk. Sidney got within 5-4 in the seventh, despite still only having one hit in the game. A hit batter and walk ended Edwards night on the mound. Michael Anderson got a sacrfice, before Gordon came in with one out and the bases loaded. He got what should have been an innning-ending double play ball hit by Bollinger. But, Piqua couldn’t get the out at first and two runs scored on the play to make it 5-4. “Michael came in and set things up for Cam,” Roberts said. “We used one more pitcher than we wanted to tonight, but that is OK.” That set up Paul’s big blast in home seventh to set up a matchup with Troy tonight. “Obviously, that was a big hit by Jeff Paul,” Roberts said. “John (Edwards) gave us more than we expected. We were only expecting five innings out of him. “He was up around 102 pitches when we took him out.” Just like with Paul, things worked out better than Piqua Post 184 pitcher John Edwards fields the ball on a squeeze bunt Wednesday night. planned.

MIKE ULLERY/CALL PHOTO


12

Wednesday, July 17, 2013

COMICS

MUTTS

BIG NATE

HAGAR THE HORRIBLE

DILBERT

BLONDIE

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE

HI AND LOIS ZITS

BEETLE BAILEY FAMILY CIRCUS

DENNIS the MENACE

ARLO & JANIS

HOROSCOPE

SNUFFY SMITH

BY FRANCES DRAKE For Thursday, July 18, 2013 ARIES (March 21 to April 19) Satisfy your urge for a change of scenery by doing something different. Go someplace you've never been before. Take a different route to or from work. Visit ethnic restaurants and talk to people from different backgrounds. TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) Be careful with red-tape details regarding inheritances, shared property, taxes and debt. You will be focused on this today; however, wait until the afternoon to make important decisions. GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) Because the Moon is opposite your sign today, you will have to accommodate others. Be prepared to compromise and go more than halfway. (It's not a big deal.) CANCER (June 21 to July 22) Focus on getting better organized today. Make a to-do list, and start crossing things off. Get as much done as you can. You also might think of ways to improve your health. LEO (July 23 to Aug. 22) This is a playful day for you, so get out and enjoy yourself. Sports events, the arts, social occasions plus playful times with children will delight you. (Romance can flourish.) VIRGO (Aug. 23 to Sept. 22) Home, family and your domestic world will be your primary focus today. Perhaps a discussion with a parent will be significant. Cocoon at home if you can. LIBRA (Sept. 23 to Oct. 22) Today is busy with short trips, errands, conversations with siblings and many distractions. Fasten your seatbelt, and go with the flow. SCORPIO (Oct. 23 to Nov. 21) Cash flow, money issues and shopping have your attention today. Postpone important financial matters (including purchases) until the afternoon. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22 to Dec. 21) You're a little bit luckier today because the Moon is in your sign. Why not ask universe for a favor? (You just might get it.) CAPRICORN (Dec. 22 to Jan. 19) Work alone or behind the scenes today, because you need privacy to be productive. You also might need privacy just to feel relaxed and on top of your scene. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20 to Feb. 18) Conversations with a female acquaintance could be significant today. Share your hopes and dreams for the future with others to see with their feedback is. PISCES (Feb. 19 to March 20) Private details about your personal life might be public today, especially in the eyes of bosses, parents and VIPs. (Incidentally, this also includes the police.) Be aware. YOU BORN TODAY You are intelligent, committed and serious about pursuing your goals. You're also idealistic and courageous. You are often a spokesperson for a group because you eloquently present their views. Freedom of expression is a strong value, and you will fight for this freedom for yourself and others. Work hard to build or construct something this year, because your rewards soon will follow. Birthdate of: Margaret Laurence, author; Kristen Bell, actress; Nelson Mandela, South African president/anti-apartheid leader. (c) 2013 King Features Syndicate, Inc.

Monday’s Answer

GARFIELD

BABY BLUES

FUNKY WINKERBEAN

CRANKSHAFT

Monday’s Cryptoquip: AWFUL MONSTER VARIETY THAT TYPICALLY MAKES MEALS OUT OF AMUSEMENT SHOW WORKERS: A CARNIEVORE

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Miscellaneous

Yard Sale Yard

y used, KINDLE FIRE, slightly 37)492with case $150. Call (937)4923927

venue, PIQUA, 1616 Nicklin Avenue, m, fair Thursday & Friday 9-2pm, collection, curio cabinets,, baby ty set, clothes, bathroom vanity es, too some tools, adult clothes, much to list!

Yard Sale Yard er-BuxHOUSTON, 5650 Fessler-Buxt o n Road, R o a d , Thursday T h u r s d a y 9-4pm, 9 - 4 pm , ton 4 T H O F J U L Y EWAY MULTIFAMILY/DRIVEWAY ve and SALE, lots of primitive household decor items,, set of w Atari tires, snow plow, 2 new systems, stereo stereo cabinet, cabinet, young young systems, men, plus size women clothes, miscellaneous. Rain or Shine. PIQUA 1513 Amherst Street m-4pm Friday and Saturday 8am-4pm Fur nit ure, salon sa lon equipment, e quip p ment, Furniture, s, kids TVs, wrestling DVDs, us size clothing and toys, plus clothing, and lots of miscellaneous

gbrook PIQUA, 1215 Springbrook La ne, (off (of f of o f Looney Loo ne y Road) Ro ad) Lane, TIFAMSaturday 9-2pm, MULTIFAMus size ILY SALE, women plus clothing, household decor, 6 John pampered chef, 2006 old for Deere X520 being sold parts. ton AvPIQUA, 1320 Washington ountain enue, (1/2 block from Fountain Park) Thursday, Friday & Saturday 8-2pm, 8-2pm, MOVING MOVING SALE, urday furniture, appliances, tons of ng, chilhousehold items, clothing, dren games, lawn and garden q p equipment. Lots of miscely g must ust go!! g laneous. Everything

Special Notices

h of July 2013 4th sified Deadlines Classified S Sidney Daily News Troy Daily News Piqua Daily Call y, July y4 Thursday, eadline: Monday, July 1, 5pm Display Deadline: line: Wednesday, July 3, 5pm Liner Deadline: y, July y5 Friday, eadline: Tuesday, July 2, 5pm Display Deadline: line: Wednesday, July 3, 5pm Liner Deadline: y, July y6 Saturday, adline: Wednesday, July 3, 5pm Display Deadline: dline: Wednesday, July 3, 5pm Liner Deadline: ill be closed Thursday, July 4. Our office will -open Friday, July 5 at 8am. We will re-open cemails for cancellations Any voicemails e. will be effective with the earliest deadline possible.

PI QUA , 308 30 8 Gordon Gor do n Street, S ree t, St PIQUA, Friday, 9-5, Saturday,, 9-6, thing, Sunday, Noon-4. Clothing, essorgame systems and accessoreather ies, Plug N' Plays, leather bags, cassettes, records,, tools, books, kitchen items, lawn mowers and other! PIQUA, 600 Lambert Drive, Friday & Saturday, 9-3. Piano, hs, die OSU & sports autographs, c a st , Hot Ho t Wheels, W h e e ls , Boyd's B o y d 's cast, Bears, fishing, lots of miscellaneous.

ne, JuPIQUA, 640 South Wayne, E! Aply 4, 8-2. MOVING SALE! p li a nc e s, furniture, f ur n it u re , garage g a ra age & pliances, g, colyard items, men's clothing, l tibles, much h more!! lectibles,

e, SatSIDNEY, 848 Merri Lane, c h ai rss , car u rd ay , 8-5. 8- 5. High H ig h chairs, ca r urday, ersauseats, baby swing, exersaucers, changing tables, craft neous. items, clothes, miscellaneous. Rain or shine! TROY 1008 Pembury Place -3pm, Thursday, Friday 8am-3pm, and Saturday 8am-2pm 3 family sale, lots of wedding decor, ee tatruck bed tool box, coffee ble, prom dresses, junior clotho mising, grill, toys, and lots of llaneous cellaneous

Drivers & Delivery

ocal Continental Express, a local trucking company, has a full time opportunity for a dependable person in our onsWash Bay. Primary responshing, ibilities will include washing, s fueling and parking semi k at the h terminal. i l PerP trucks person will occasionally operate company wrecker to tow inal. tractors to/ from terminal. ss A Must possess a Class CDL. Will be Thursdayy to Sunday work schedule.. No felonies and must pass drug test and physical. Hourly pay ding with full benefits, including uniforms. n Apply Mon-Fri between 8am-5pm at Continental Express 10450 St Rt 47 Sidney, OH or call Mark at (800)497-2100

Education

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Fr e sh wa y Foods F oo d s of Sidney, S i dn n e y, Freshway penOhio has immediate openings within our Shipping Dends. partment working weekends. Previous experience required.

y com tarnold@freshwayfoods.com

Russia 7-12 y Life Science / Biology Teacher

Wanted General al Help Wanted

AN AUTO BODY TECHNICIAN rthBusy facility servicing northw ern Dayton seeking tech with 10 years in both heavy and petlight collision work. Competeriitive pay based on experience. Fax resume to (937)890-1327 om or email to ndbs1@aol.com

RS FORKLIFT DRIVERS

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R/ OFFICE MANAGER/ SECRETARIAL ickMust be proficient at Quickuld Books, Proficiency would xcel, also help in Word and Excel, kills Strong Communication Skills ility â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Written and Verbal, Ability to work independently, Minimum tax tax background background would wou ould imum ude, be nice. Positive attitude, Se l f Motivator, Mo ti v at or , Start St a rt d at e date Self Mi d July Mid Dept: 113 Sidney Daily News 1451 North Vandemark Rd Sidney, Ohio 45365

Wanted General al Help Wanted

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Please visit: www.norcold.com to learn more. EOE Training Job Placement Older and unemployed with limited income, we have training opportunities that may lead to employment. Earn while you learn! Call Experience Works TODAY! 1-877-496-6439 Or 1 866-976-5939 1-866-976-5939 EEO/AA

TRUCK DRIVER ng Pratt Industries is seeking ver an experienced truck driver enfor its new warehouse opening in Sidney. HS degree or nd GED required. CDL-A and at least 5 years recent exailperience driving tractor trailer required. Send resume with pay requirements to email:

y p om scurry@prattindustries.com or fax to (734)853-3031

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This position is involved in ce all aspects of maintenance erand facilities with preference toward proven skills in mechanical, fabrication, hydraulic, c and and pneumatic. pneumatic. The he draulic, ideal candidate will have experience with with electrical, electrical, mamaperience ng chine repair and rebuilding manufactur ing equipeq ui pof manufacturing st ment, Candidates must ory have a solid work history mand be willing to work 2amer 10am, overtime and other shifts when required.

Or fill out an application at your local job center.

MAFOR FURTHER INFORMAY TION OR TO APPLY g www.tmccentral.org

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TODDLER TEACHINFANT/ TODDLER TEA ACHINFANT/ ER: CDA, AA, or BA in Early Childhood Education, Child Development, or related field redit with a minimum of 18 credit al in hours in ECE. Bilingual rred. English/ Spanish preferred. ODIBUS DRIVER / CUSTODIAN: HS Diploma or GED, s be 21 years or older. lder. must CDL with School Bus & Passenger Endorsementss red.. O h i o P a s s e n g ge er quired vice School Bus Pre Service rred. Training Certificate preferred. BUS AIDE (Piqua only):: HS e 18 Diploma or GED, must be le to years or older, and able panread/ write English & Spanish.

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PART-TIME WEEKEND SHIPPING

Norcold, Inc., recognized as or the leader in refrigerator manufacturing for the RV, ts, Marine, and Truck markets, icis currently accepting applicinations for a 3rd shift Mainten ance Technician Tech nici an at our o r ou tenance G et t y sb u rg , Ohio O h i o facility. f ac i li t y . Gettysburg,

recruiter@norcold.com

gs Seasonal Job Openings Piqua, Ohio

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n Or complete an application at: Freshway Foods 601 North Stolle Sidney, Ohio 45365

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LEGALS

MAINTENANCE TECHNICIAN

tion For immediate consideration wii tth e m a il yyou ou r r e ssu ume w h "Weekend" in the subject line to:

Apply to Steve Rose rg g srose@russiaschool.org

View each garage sale on listing and location on our Map p. Garage Sale Map. Available online at y dailycall.com

Wanted General Help Wanted

UTILITY DRIVER

TROY 18 North North Market Market Street Street TROY Wednesday, Thursday, Thursday, Friday, Friday, Wednesday, and Saturday 10am-5pm e comNight Sky rummage sale nt, furmercial kitchen equipment, holiday niture, Christmas and holiday o madecorations, Espresso chine, coffee equipment,, cake tower, display cases, everything must go! gtown TROY, 4710 North Stringtown y, 9-4. Road, Friday & Saturday, niture, Multi Family! Lots of furniture, r kid's r, tools, riding lawn mower, clothes.

Wanted Generall Help Wanted

Crown Equipment Corporation, a leading manufacturer of material

handling equipment, is currently seeking qualified candidates for g positions p the following at our New Bremen and Celina Locations. CNC Machinistt

(Ref #JA004356 New N Bremen) (Ref Bremen) adjus st, and operate automatic CNC C Lathes, CNC Mills and Set up, adjust, Grinders Grinders.

Alcohol and Drug Counselor ullImmediate opening for a fullcotime clinician to provide alcoselhol & drug recovery counseli n g as a s well we l l as a s individual, i nd i v i du a l , ing nd group, marital/ couples and tal family counseling in mental health and alcohol & drug rec o v e r y arenas. a r e n a s . LSW, L S W , LPC, L PC P , covery LISW, LPCC with scope of practice and/ or licensure in Chemical Dependency. Some evening hours reust quired. Candidates must hio have a valid State of Ohio ble Drivers License, reliable nce transportation and evidence of appropriate appropriate automobile automobile liliof insurance. CompetitCompetit t ability insurance. enive wages based upon licenerisure and years of experiailence. Agency benefits availtal able include Health, Dental K, and Life Insurance, 401K, a nd paid vacation, holiday and s sick days. Respond to: Consolidated Care Inc. Box 817 West Liberty, Oh 43357 or fax: (937)465-0442

Welder

(Ref # LJB002121 LJB002121 Celina) Celina) (Ref w electric arc welding process proces ss to weld parts to print Use a dual wire specifications. specifications. opporttunities, including entry level Please visit crown.jobs for other job opportunities, positions.

Crown offers offers an n excellent compensation and benefits package Crown Health/Dental/Pr th/Dental/Prescription Drug Drug Plan and Vision, Flexible e including Health/Dental/Prescription 401K Retirement Retirement Savings Plan, Life and Disability Benefits Plan, 401K Vacation, Tuition Tuition u Benefits, Paid Holidays, Paid Vacation, Reimbursement and more! much more! information regarding regarding these openings and to apply, apply, For detailed information crown.jobs. o â&#x20AC;&#x153;Current Openingsâ&#x20AC;? and search search by y please visit crown.jobs. Select â&#x20AC;&#x153;Current reference number ber above. reference Opportun nity Employer - M/F/D/V Equal Opportunity 93649 40293649

d Resumes will be accepted until position is filled. 13 Please refer to ad #AOD6.13 when responding. yer/ Equal Opportunity Employer/ Provider


that work .com JobSourceOhio.com

Apartments /Townhouses

Autos For Sale

Trucks / SUVs / Vans

Cleaning & Maintenance

Land Care

40318117

INERRANT CONTRACTORS

Air Conditioners

       

:,1'2: 81,7  %78 used 2 months, will trade for a 10 inch IPad (937)778-2131

Houses For Rent

1999 CHEVY CORVETTE

IN BRADFORD, In country, 3 bedroom trailer, $400, (937)417-7111

automatic convertible with approximately 67,000 miles. This car is in great condition. $20,500 or best offer. Call Craig at (937)776-0922

AUSTRALIAN SHEPARD PUPPIES, red merles and red tri's, 6 females, 3 males, asking $200, taking deposits (937)214-0464

2002 GMC SIERRA 1500 Regular cab, fiberglass high top camper, aluminum running boards, 2 wheel drive, 5300 Vortec engine, excellent condition, $8150 Call (937)538-1294

Farm Equipment

RVs / Campers

Autos For Sale

2005 CHRYSLER LIMITED CONVERTIBLE, 31,500 miles, excellent condition, $8500, Call (937)570-2248 or (937)7731831

Pet Grooming

Miscellaneous LONAGERBERGER BASKETS (11) and Boyd Bears, Call Pam (937)773-9025 or (937)570-9945. Before 6pm.

24 FOOT TRAVEL TRAILER, 2 axle, awning, a/c unit, refrigerator, stove, Lot 14 at Piqua Fishing Game Campground (Spiker Road), Lot rent paid until March 2014. Can leave there or tow away. Asking $1,900 OBO (419)778-7178 '89 GULF STREAM MOTOR HOME, 28 foot Chevy 454 automatic, AC-cruise, 16K miles, news tires, stove, refrigerator, roof air-conditioner, 3500 Owen Generator, 19 foot awning all new roof vents, roof coated/resealed last Fall, sleeps 6, lots of inside & outside storage. Good condition. $6700. (937)493-0449

BIKE, 3 wheel, red, good condition, 24" wheel, large basket, cup holder and horn. Asking $250. (937)239-7720, (937)239-0065

5,',1* /$:1 75$&725 John Deere, like new, in Troy (937)308-5545 Sporting Goods

Send resume and cover letter to: Todd C. Russell Ohio Group Circulation Director Civitas Media, LLC 4500 Lyons Road Miamisburg, Ohio 45342-6447

Tree Service

PAVING, REPAIR & SEALCOATING DRIVEWAYS PARKING LOTS

WISE Tree & Shrub Service

937-875-0153 937-698-6135

RACE TICKETS, (5) Brickyard 400, 7/28 NASCAR race in Indianapolis, Paddock Box in shade near start/finish line, $90 each face value. (937)5966257.

COOPERâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S GRAVEL Gravel Hauled, Laid & Leveled Driveways & Parking Lots

875-0153 698-6135 MINIMUM CHARGES APPLY

â&#x20AC;˘ Tree Trimming & Removal â&#x20AC;˘ Shrub Trimming & Removal â&#x20AC;˘ Stump Removal

937-947-4409 937-371-0454

Landscaping

All signs lead to you finding or selling what you want...

â&#x20AC;˘Standing Seam Metal Roofing â&#x20AC;˘New Installation â&#x20AC;˘Metal Roof Repairs â&#x20AC;˘Pole Barn Metal $2.06 LF. â&#x20AC;˘Standing Seam Snap Lock Panels

765-857-2623 Appliances

Land Care

TERRYâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S

APPLIANCE REPAIR â&#x20AC;˘Refrigerators â&#x20AC;˘Stoves â&#x20AC;˘Washers & Dryers â&#x20AC;˘Dishwashers â&#x20AC;˘ Repair & Install Air Conditioning

937-773-4552

2385753

Qualified applicants will have previous home delivery and single copy experience. Requires reliable transportation, valid 2KLR GULYHUŇ&#x2039;V OLFHQVH DQG SURRI RI LQVXUDQFH DW WLPH RI KLUH :H offer a competitive salary, excellent benefits package and an exceptional work environment.

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Tickets

40297018

The Troy Daily News, Troy, Ohio, seeks to fill an immediate opening for a Route Manager in our Circulation Department. As an employee, this individual will be responsible for maintaining an effective independent contractor delivery workforce required to distribute all products either produced or distributed by The Troy Daily News. The candidate must be able to work a 4:00 am to 1:00 pm daily schedule.

Remodeling & Repairs

&&: &/$66  $XJXVW 17th and 18th, Piqua Fish & Game, (937)760-4210, parthelynx@aol.com

HERITAGE GOODHEW

CIRCULATION ROUTE MANAGER

40277397

Hauling & Trucking

Occupational Therapist

Help Wanted General

Pools / Spas

Gutter Repair & Cleaning

JOHN DEERE, 265 riding lawn mower, 17hp, 48" deck, hydrostatic drive, heavy duty, very reliable, excellent condition, Call (419)628-2101

SERVICE / BUSINESS DIRECTORY

Call Kim at Western Ohio Therapy Associates Greenville, OH 937-548-9495 Or send resume to: kimberly.rammel@physiocorp.com

Mobile Veterinary Service Treating Dogs, Cats & Exotics

(937) 473-2847 (937) 216-9361

40296891

ELECTRIC SCOOTER, Guardian Trek-3, A1 condition, $400, call (937)778-8692 or (937)214-1825

Help Wanted General

Part-time School Based

Amy E. Walker, D.V.M. 937-418-5992

40277555

KITTENS, 7 Black & Tiger furballs! Free to good homes, 5-6 weeks old. Ready to go! call (937)773-5245 after 5pm

2000 HONDA CRV LX, black, with cloth interior, 169k miles, great condition, well maintained. $4000 OBO Call (937)658-3324

(937)573-7357 InerrantContractors@gmail.com

Basketball hoop/balls $30, Toy chest $20, 2 metal stars, 15 beer steins $35, lots of Home Interior (937)335-6064

BOXER PUPPIES shots, wormed, tails docked, great with kids, born 5/27, ready now (937)418-7686

TRACTOR, FORD 1300 4x4 diesel compact Tractor, Low hours, 3 point, pto. (937)4891725

Furniture & Accessories =$==< 32:(5 &+$,5 QHZ never used, cost $6300, sacrifice $1750 or OBO (937)7730865

40317833

Pets

Self performing our own work allows for the best prices on skilled labor.                            25 years combined experience FREE estimates

40277626

(937)673-1821

40260164

$200 Deposit Special!

Paving & Excavating

Construction & Building

40297046 40045880

TROY, 1 & 2 Bedrooms, DSSOLDQFHV &$ :DWHU Trash Paid, $425 & $525 Monthly.

1500 Z71, 4x4, 3 door extended cab. black exterior, Tonneau cover, 5.7 liter, tow package, 154000 miles, $5200. (937)726-0273

40296906

1996 FORD MUSTANG Convertible, red, 6 cylinder, many updates! Good condition, 154k miles, asking $4200. Call (937)773-4587

40293349

1997 CHEVY SILVERADO

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25 Year Experience - Licensed & Bonded Wind & Hail Damage -Insurance Approved 15 Year Workmanship Warranty

937-573-4737

40296626

Help Wanted General

www.buckeyehomeservices.com

â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘

Roofing Windows Kitchens Sunrooms

â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘

Spouting Metal Roofing Siding Doors

â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘

Baths Awnings Concrete Additions

CALL TODAY FOR FREE ESTIMATE

40296716 40058902

Help Wanted General

PARAMEDICS/EMTs AMBULETTE DRIVERS Looking for professional, caring individuals to join our growing team in all areas. New Hourly Pay Rates! FT & PT positions available. EMTs: $11 AEMTs: $13 Paramedics: $15 Night shift premiums! Run Bonuses! __________________________________________________ Ambulette Drivers - transporting patients to/from medical appointments by wheelchair van. Full-time $9/hr. Apply online: www.integrity-ambulance.com


PIQUA DAILY CALL • WWW.DAILYCALL.COM

15

Wednesday, July 17, 2013

Newspapers In Education Visit NIE online at www.sidneydailynews.com, www.troydailynews.com or www.dailycall.com

NIE Coordinator: Dana Wolfe Smith

40299247

The Inside Story

15% OFF Any One Item Sandra Armbruster, Unit Leader 937.339.5966 • searmbruster@msn.com www.mycmsite.com/sarmbruster

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After the War of 1812, many settlers moved to Ohio. Some came by boat, while others came by wagon. By 1820, the new state of Ohio had grown to a population of 5,000. There was not much reliable transportation at that time. There was a network of unpaved roads that crossed the state, but travel by land was slow and expensive. In 1825, the state legislature decided to build canals to improve transportation. Between 1825 and 1847, 1,000-mile of canals were built in Ohio. Canals were large, man-made ditches, filled with water that carried boats over hilly, uneven areas. Canals in Ohio were built Canal Boat by hand – dug with picks and Courtesy of the Mount Vernon News shovels. They were built mainly by Irish, German and French immigrants who worked for 31 cents a day, plus food and shelter. The canals were 40-feet-wide and four-feet-deep. Two major canals were built in Ohio. The Ohio and Erie Canal crossed the eastern part of Ohio, while the Miami and Erie Canal crossed western Ohio. The first section of the Ohio and Erie Canal, connecting Cleveland to Akron, opened in 1827. The final section of this project opened in 1832, connecting Cleveland to Portsmouth. Before this canal was built, it took 30 days to travel by land from Akron to New York City. After its construction, the same trip took just 10 Toledo • days by canal boat. • Cleveland • The Miami and Erie Canal was also built in sec• • tions. The construction of the first section of this • • canal, connecting Middletown to Cincinnati, began on Columbus July 25, 1825. The final section opened in 1845, con• Dayton • necting Toledo to Cincinnati. • Cincinnati Canals were successful until 1855. After that time, • railroads began to become a more important means of transportation. The last sections of canals used for transportation were abandoned in 1913. Akron

Youngstown Canton

Lima

Steubenville

Marietta

Portsmouth

Brought to you by The Ohio Newspapers Foundation and the Ohio Newspaper In Education Committee. This is one of a series of Ohio profiles. Copyright 2006.

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The Newspapers In Education Mission – Our mission is to provide Miami, Shelby and neighboring county school districts with a weekly newspaper learning project that promotes reading and community journalism as a foundation for communication skills, utilizing the Piqua Daily Call, the Sidney Daily News, the Record Herald and the Troy Daily News as quality educational resource tools.

Thank you to our sponsors! The generous contributions of our sponsors and I-75 Group Newspapers vacation donors help us provide free newspapers to community classrooms as well as support NIE activities. To sponsor NIE or donate your newspaper while on vacation, contact NIE Coordinator Dana Wolfe at dwolfe@tdnpublishing.com or (937) 440-5211


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WWW.DAILYCALL.COM

Wednesday, July 17, 2013

• PIQUA DAILY CALL

Newspapers In Education

Word of the Week Dump — To throw away or discard garbage, refuse, etc.

Newspaper Knowledge Have a race through the newspaper to find as many geographical words as you can, like “hill”, “river”, “lake”, “plateau”. Find examples of as many of them as you can on a map of the state.

Much of our tap water comes from rivers. And we all do things around the house every day that can affect our rivers and streams. Remember, your rivers are closer than you think. Be RiverSmart about the things you do by following these easy tips:

Words To Know Effect Purpose Draining Rain Clean

Dumping Waste Polluted Safe

Summer Time Tips Stormwater management information for Miami Valley residents

Did you know? Soapy runoff from vehicle washing in your driveway enters the storm drains and flows untreated into our streams. Detergent levels as low as 0.1 ppm can harm wildlife. Detergents are a source of excessive nutrients which also degrade the creeks and streams in the Miami Valley Here are some tips on how to care for your car to minimize your car to minimize your impact on the environment:

1. Repair leaky faucets and toilets right away. Leaky sinks and toilets can waste 50 gallons of water in one day, depleting our rivers. For a leaky faucet, look for a faulty o-ring or valve seat. Toilet leaks aren’t always so obvious. Try pouring colored liquid into the tank. If after 15 minutes you see dye in the bowl, you may need to replace the flapper. 2. Turn off the tap while brushing your teeth and washing the dishes. You can save 3-5 gallons a day. Try using a cup when brushing and shaving. And fill up the sink first when washing vegetables or doing a load of dishes. It’s a small change that will make a big difference.

Used motor oil can be reprocessed for reuse. Put used oil in clean container with a tight lid and contact and contact your local recycling center for where to take it. Park and wash your cars in the grass keeping the dirty and soapy water from running from your driveway directly into the storm drains. Even better, take your car to a commercial car wash where the water is typically filtered for reuse and ultimately treated at a wastewater treatment plant. Keep your car serviced. Regular tune-ups reduce the amount of hydrocarbons, nitrous oxide, and other pollutants which impact our water as well as our air. Repair leaks. Spots on your driveway or garage floor indicate the engine, transmission or radiator is leaking. Clean up spots and spills with cat litter or other absorbent materials and place into the trash. Do not dump or hose these pollutant into streets or storm drains.

3. Run the washing machine and dishwasher only when they are fully loaded. You can save between 300-800 gallons of water each month. 4. Dispose of household cleaners, paint and other chemicals safely. Many cleaning products found in our homes and garages are too dangerous to be disposed of in the trash or down the drain. Read the label: anything marked “Poison” or “Danger” should be taken to your local hazardous waste center. Use water-based paints and dry off excess paint with a paper towel before rinsing your paintbrush. 5. Sweep off-instead of hosing-the driveway, patio or sidewalk. Hosing for 15 minutes wastes 150 gallons of water. Water run-off from our driveways or sidewalks carries contaminants, such as dirt, motor oil, fertilizers and animal waste, into our rivers. 6. Pick up after your pet. When it rains, bacteria from pet waste left in the yard can run into our streets and storm drains, polluting our rivers and streams. This can be harmful to humans and to wildlife using the river. Be a good neighbor by picking up after your pet at home and on walks. 7. Fix car leaks promptly. Leaky cars leave drips or puddles of motor oil and other fluids on our streets and driveways. When it rains, these contaminants run down our streets, through the storm drains, and into our rivers. So clean stains on your driveway or street and fix car leaks right away. Preventing polluted run-off will help keep our rivers and drinking water safe. 8. Take care when changing your car’s motor oil and dispose of the oil safely. One quart of motor oil can pollute 250,000 gallons of river water, so use a large pan if you are changing motor oil yourself. Never pour leftover oil down a storm drain or into the trash - instead, drop it off at your local hazardous waste center. 9. Water your lawn and garden only in the morning or evening. Water evaporates quickly during the middle of the day. Remember, a lawn only needs 1 to 1.5 inches of water per week, and you can set our a can to measure for you. Watering less creates deeper, stronger roots and a healthier lawn. Or you could try letting the lawn go brown, as nature intended during summer months. Another option is to plant native plants or xeriscaping that require less water altogether. 10. Buy and use environmentally friendly products. Choose safer, multi-purpose cleaners marked with only a “Caution” warning, rather than products with “Poison” and “Danger” on the label. Avoid chlorine, phosphate products and solvents like paint thinner. Visit www.riversmart.org to find recipes for inexpensive, safe alternatives. To find out more, go to www.riversmart.org

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