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July 8, 2013 It’s Where You Live! Volume 105, No. 161

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Officials probe airliner crash SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Pilots of Asiana Flight 214 were flying too slowly as they approached San Francisco airport, triggering a control board warning that the jetliner could stall, and then tried to abort the landing seconds before crashing, according to federal safety officials. Investigators also said they were looking into the possibility that rescue crews ran over one of the two teenagers killed in the crash on Saturday. Officials released the details without explaining why the pilots were flying so slow or why rescue officials didn’t see the girl. The Boeing (NYSE:BA) 777 was traveling at speeds well below the target landing speed of 137

Fracking foes keep fighting VESTAL, N.Y. (AP) — Big energy companies have been trying for five years to tap the riches of the Marcellus Shale in southern New York, promising thousands of new jobs, economic salvation for a depressed region, and a cheap, abundant, clean-burning source of fuel close to power-hungry cities. But for all its political clout and financial prowess, the industry hasn’t been able to get its foot in the door. One reason: Folks like Sue Rapp and Vera Scroggins are standing in the way. See Page

knots per hour, or 157 mph, said National Transportation Safety Board chief Deborah Hersman at a briefing Sunday on the crash. “We’re not talking about a few knots,” she said. Hersman said the aircraft’s stick shaker a piece of safety equipment that warns pilots of an impending stall went off moments before the crash. The normal response to a stall warning is to increase speed to recover control. There was an increase several seconds before the crash, she said, basing her comments on an evaluation of the cockpit voice and flight data recorders that contain hundreds of different types of information on what happened to the plane. And at 1.5 seconds before

impact, there was a call for an aborted landing, she said. The new details helped shed light on the final moments of the airliner as the crew tried desperately to climb back into the sky, and confirmed what survivors and other witnesses said they saw: a slow-moving airliner. Pilots normally try to land at the target speed, in this case 137 knots, plus an additional five more knots, said Bob Coffman, an American Airlines captain who has flown 777s. He said the briefing raises an important question: “Why was the plane going so slow?” The plane’s Pratt & Whitney engines were on idle, Hersman said. The normal procedure in the Boeing 777, a wide-body jet, would

CIVITAS MEDIA PHOTO/ISAAC HALE

Murray wins at Wimbledon

Tim Starcher, an artist from Troy, sits with two pieces of his artwork Friday. Starcher not only uses different types of paints, but also uses other mediums such as pencil and ink.

Making an impression

LONDON (AP) — Andy Murray needed one more point, one solitary point, to win Wimbledon a title he yearned to earn for himself, of course, and also for his country. Britain had endured 77 years since one of its own claimed the men’s trophy at the revered tournament referred to simply as The Championships, and now here was Murray, on the brink of triumph after 3 hours of grueling tennis against top-seeded Novak Djokovic under a vibrant sun at Centre Court. See Page 12.

Artist finds his niche at Edison

TROY

made after taking some drawing classes. Early on, Starcher was drawn to the modern impressionist artist Leonid Afremov, who uses palette knifes and oils. “I love the use of color in his BY ALYSSA RECK pieces,” said Starcher. “It inspires Civitas Media pdceditorial@civitasmedia.com me.” For most of Starcher’s pieces, A local artist, Tim Starcher, he uses acrylic paint or water Troy High School 2010 graduate mixable paint rather than oils, and Troy resident, creates colorbut still gets a similar stroke ful paintings at his home during effect as Afremov’s. his free time. Some of Starcher’s other In his senior year of high favorite artists include Monet, school, Starcher began drawing to Michelangelo and Leonardo da pass free time but hadn’t consid- Vinci. ered art as a full major. “My mom and teachers have He started at Edison been my greatest supporters,” Community College as a music Starcher said. “Though my motheducation major before deciding er doesn’t like having oil paint in that he would rather pursue a the house, because it is so messy.” degree in art. This decision was Though Starcher’s paintings

INSIDE TODAY Advice ..........................7 Calendar ......................3 Classified ...................10 Comics.........................8 Deaths .........................6 Gerald Hausfeld Steven Robbins James Rinehart Joan Seay Horoscopes .................7 Opinion ........................5 Sports ........................12 TV ................................7

Next Door If you know someone who should be profiled in our Next Door feature, contact City Editor Melody Vallieu at 4406265, or send her an email at mvallieu@civitasmedia.com

are mostly landscapes or portraits, he also enjoys drawing characters from favorite shows and animes, as well as celebrities. “It would be great to do a live portrait of Johnny Depp,” Starcher said. Over the past couple years, Starcher has completed 25-30 pieces and continues to work towards submitting his work to a gallery. Starcher accepts commission pieces at his Facebook page, Art by Tj. Star.

Talks on Egypt leaders hit Islamist block

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be to use the autopilot and the throttle to provide power to the engine all the way through to landing, Coffman said. There was no indication in the discussions between the pilots and the air traffic controllers that there were problems with the aircraft. Among the questions investigators are trying to answer was what, if any, role the deactivation of a ground-based landing guidance system played in the crash. Such systems help pilots land, especially at airports like San Francisco where fog can make landing challenging. Altogether, 305 of the 307 people aboard made it out alive in

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CAIRO (AP) — Secular and liberal factions trying to install one of their own as Egypt’s new prime minister collided into strong resistance Sunday from the sole Islamist faction that backed the military’s ouster of President Mohammed Morsi, reflecting the difficulties in building a broad coalition behind a new leadership. As wrangling continued over the prime minister spot, giant rallies by the movements that pushed out Morsi took on a sharply nationalist tone, pervaded with posters of the military’s chief and denunciations of the United States and President Barack Obama for they see as their backing of the Islamist leader. The show of strength in the streets was aimed at fending off a determined campaign by Morsi’s

Muslim Brotherhood, which brought out its own supporters Sunday in large protests. Warning that the military is turning Egypt into a “totalitarian state,” Brotherhood officials vowed to stay on the streets to reverse what they call a coup against democracy and restore Egypt’s first freely elected president to office. Military warplanes swooped over the anti-Morsi crowd filling Cairo’s Tahrir Square, drawing a heart shape and an Egyptian flag in the sky with colored smoke. Large banners read “Obama, hands off, a message to the USA. Obama supports the terrorists of 911” with a picture of Obama with an Islamists’ beard. Throughout Morsi’s year in office, many of his opponents

accused the United States of backing his administration. Washington often underlined that it was dealing with Morsi as the country’s elected leader. Before the wave of anti-Morsi protests began on June 30, U.S. Ambassador to Egypt Anne Patterson said in a speech that she was “deeply skeptical” protests would be fruitful. She defended U.S. relations with Morsi’s Muslim Brotherhood as necessary because the group is part of the democratically elected government. Since Morsi’s removal Wednesday, Washington has tread carefully, expressing concern without outright calling the army’s move a coup or denouncing Morsi’s ouster. On Saturday, the

• See EGYPT on Page 2

WASHINGTON (AP) Hiring is exploding in the one corner of the U.S. economy where few want to be hired: Temporary work. From Wal-Mart to General Motors to PepsiCo, companies are increasingly turning to temps and to a much larger universe of freelancers, contract workers and consultants. Combined, these workers number nearly 17 million people who have only tenuous ties to the companies that pay them about 12 percent of everyone with a job. Hiring is always healthy for an economy. Yet the rise in temp and contract work shows that many employers aren’t willing to hire for the long run. The number of temps has jumped more than 50 percent since the recession ended four years ago to nearly 2.7 million the most on government records dating to 1990. In no other sector has hiring come close. Driving the trend are lingering uncertainty about the economy and employers’ desire for more flexibility in matching their payrolls to their revenue. Some employers have also sought to sidestep the new health care law’s rule that they provide medical coverage for permanent workers. Last week, though, the Obama administration delayed that provision of the law for a year. The use of temps has extended into sectors that seldom used them in the past professional services, for example, which include lawyers, doctors and information technology specialists. Temps typically receive low pay, few benefits and scant job security. That makes them less likely to spend freely, so temp jobs don’t tend to boost the economy the way permanent jobs do. More temps and contract workers also help explain why pay has barely outpaced inflation since the recession ended. Beyond economic uncertainty, Ethan Harris, global economist at Bank of America, thinks more lasting changes are taking root. “There’s been a generational shift toward a less committed relationship between the firm and the worker,” Harris says. An Associated Press survey of 37 economists in May found that three-quarters thought the increased use of temps and contract workers represented a longstanding trend. Typical of that trend is Latrese Carr, who was hired by a WalMart in Glenwood, Ill., two months ago on a 90-day contract. She works 10 p.m. to 7 a.m., helping unload trucks and restocking shelves. Her pay is $9.45 an hour. There’s no health insurance or other benefits. Carr, 20, didn’t particularly want the overnight shift.

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what survivors and rescuers described as nothing less than astonishing after a frightful scene of fire burning inside the fuselage, pieces of the aircraft scattered across the runway and people fleeing for their lives. The flight originated in Shanghai, China, stopped over in Seoul, South Korea, before making the nearly 11-hour trip to San Francisco. The South Korea-based airline said four South Korean pilots were on board, three of whom were described as “skilled.” Among the travelers were citizens of China, South Korean, the United States, Canada, India, Japan, Vietnam and France. There were at least 70 Chinese students and teachers heading to summer camps, according to Chinese authorities. the plane As approached the runway under clear skies a luxury at an airport and city known for intense fog people in nearby communities could see the aircraft was flying low and swaying erratically from side to side. On board, Fei Xiong, from China, was traveling to California so she could take her 8-year-old son to Disneyland. The pair was sitting in the back half of the plane. Xiong said her son sensed something was wrong. “My son told me: ‘The plane will fall down, it’s too close to the sea,’” she said. “I told him: ‘Baby, it’s OK, we’ll be fine.’” On audio recordings from the air traffic tower, controllers told all pilots in other planes to stay put after the crash. “All runways are closed. Airport is closed. San Francisco tower,” said one controller. At one point, the pilot of a United Airlines plane radioed. “We see people … that need immediate attention,” the pilot said. “They are alive and walking around.” “Think you said people are just walking outside the airplane right now?”

“I needed a job,” she says. The store managers have said some temps will be kept on permanently, Carr says, depending on their performance. Carr isn’t counting on it. The trend toward contract workers was intensified by the depth of the recession and the tepid pace of the recovery. A heavy investment in long-term employment isn’t a cost all companies want to bear anymore. “There’s much more appreciation of the importance of having flexibility in the workforce,” says Barry Asin of Staffing Industry Analysts, a consulting firm. Susan Houseman, an economist at the Upjohn Institute of Employment Research, says companies want to avoid having too many employees during a downturn, just as manufacturers want to avoid having too much inventory if demand slows. “You have your just-intime workforce,” Houseman says. “You only pay them when you need them.” This marks a shift from what economists used to call “labor hoarding”: Companies typically retained most of their staff throughout recessions, hoping to ride out the downturn. “We clearly don’t have that anymore,” says Sylvia Allegretto, an at the economist University of California, Berkeley. The result is that temps and contract workers have become fixtures at large companies. Business executives say they help their companies stay competitive. They also argue that temp work can provide valuable experience. “It opens more doors for people to enter the labor market,” says Jeff Joerres, CEO of ManpowerGroup, a workplace staffing firm. But Houseman’s

AP

People gather at a lookout point to get a view of the wreckage of Asiana Flight 214 at the San Francisco International Airport in San Francisco Sunday. the controller replied. “Yes,” answered the pilot of United Flight 885. “Some people, it looks like, are struggling.” When the plane hit the ground, oxygen masks dropped down, said Xu Da, a product manager at an Internet company in Hangzhou, China, who was sitting with his wife and teenage son near the back of the plane. When he stood up, he said he could see sparking perhaps from exposed electrical wires. He turned and could see the tail where the galley was torn away, leaving a gaping hole through which they could see the runway. Once on the tarmac, they watched the plane catch fire, and firefighters hose it down. “I just feel lucky,” said Xu, whose family suffered some cuts and have neck and back pain. In the chaotic moments after the landing, when baggage was tumbling from the overhead bins onto passengers and people all around her were screaming, Wen Zhang grabbed her 4-year-old son, who hit the seat in front of him and broke his leg. Spotting a hole at the back of the jumbo jet where the bathroom had been, she carried her boy to safety. “I had no time to be scared,” she said. At the wreckage, police officers were throwing utility knives up to crew members inside the burning wreckage so they could cut away passengers’ seat belts. Passengers jumped

down emergency slides, escaping from billowing smoke that rose high above the bay. Nearby, people who escaped were dousing themselves with water from the bay, possibly to cool burn injuries, authorities said. By the time the flames were out, much of the top of the fuselage had burned away. Inside The tail section was gone, with pieces of it scattered across the beginning of the runway. One engine was gone, and the other was no longer on the wing. San Mateo County Coroner Robert Foucrault said senior San Francisco Fire Department officials notified him and his staff at the crash site on Saturday that one of the 16-year-olds may have been struck on the runaway. Foucrault said an autopsy he expects to be completed by Monday will involve determining whether the girl’s death was caused by injuries suffered in the crash or “a secondary incident.” He said he did not get a close enough look at the victims on Saturday to know whether they had external injuries. Foucrault said one of the bodies was found on the tarmac near where the plane’s tail broke off when it slammed into the runway. The other was found on the left side of the plane about 30 feet away from where the jetliner came to rest after it skidded down the runway.

Fattah el-Sissi dangling from his neck. “The United States should support the people’s will and not the interest of a person or a group seeking only their own interest,” he said. The appointment of a prime minister is the key next step in building a post-Morsi leadership. The prime minister is to hold far greater powers in running the country than the interim president Adly Mansour, a senior judge who was sworn into the post earlier. The bloc of secular, leftist and liberal factions that led the giant wave of protests against Morsi last week are now the main grouping in a loose collection of movements trying to fill out leadership posts. They are pushing for one of

their own as prime minister to have a strong voice in shaping the country. But also among them is a main party of the ultraconservative Islamist movement known as Salafis al-Nour which turned against Morsi months ago and backed the military’s ouster of him. On Saturday, al-Nour blocked the appointment of the most prominent liberal figure, Mohamed ElBaradei, as prime minister, who is deeply distrusted by the Islamist movement as too secular. On Sunday, the secularliberal bloc offered a compromise candidate Ziad Bahaa-Eldin, a prominent financial expert and an ally of ElBaradei. The interim president’s spokesman Ahmed alMusalamani, told Egypt’s ONTV that Bahaa-Eldin was the leading candidate, with ElBaradei positioned

research has found that even when jobs are classified as “temp to permanent,” only 27 percent of such assignments lead to permanent positions. About one-third of temporary workers work in manufacturing. Temps can be found on production lines, repairing machinery and stocking goods in warehouses. About a fifth are administrative. Shortages of doctors and nurses have led some hospitals to turn to temp agencies. Staffing Industry Analysts forecasts that spending on temporary doctors will grow 10 percent this year and next. Some school districts now turn to temp firms for substitute teachers. This lets them avoid providing retirement benefits, which union contracts might otherwise require. Manufacturing unions have pushed back against the trend, with limited success. “We run into this across all the various industries where we represent people,” says Tony Montana, a spokesman for the USW, which represents workers in the steel, paper, and energy industries. Todd Miller, CEO of company software Gwabbit in Carmel Valley, Calif., says about a third of his 20 employees are temporary. An additional one-third are contractors. He says he’s had no trouble filling such positions. People are “willing to entertain employment possibilities that they would not have six or seven years ago,” Miller says. If the economy were to accelerate, Miller says he might hire more permanent staff. But “I don’t have tremendous confidence in this economy.” Only the health care and leisure and hospitality sectors have added more jobs during the recovery. But each is roughly five times as large as the temp indus-

try. The proportion of all jobs in the temp industry is about 2 percent, just below a record set in 2000. Temp hiring has accelerated even though the economy has 2.4 million fewer jobs than it did five years ago. Temp jobs made up about 10 percent of jobs lost to the recession. Yet they’ve made up nearly 20 percent of the jobs gained since the recession ended. A survey of companies with more than 1,000 employees by Staffing Industry Analysts found they expect 18 percent of their workforces to be made up of temps, freelancers or contract workers this year, up from 16 percent in 2012. Shane Watson, who in November lost a job providing tech support for Blackberry maker Research In Motion, says contract work has helped him recover. He’s on his third such position. Still, Watson, 36, misses the security of a permanent job. Wal-Mart says it’s been hiring disproportionately more temporary workers. “Flexible associates,” it calls them. Spokesman Dave Tovar says temps allow store managers to provide permanent workers with more reliable schedules. Online competitors are seeking to upend the temp industry just as Amazon and eBay disrupted retail. Employers spent $1 billion last year hiring workers for shortterm projects through online labor exchanges, such as oDesk and Elance, according to Staffing Industry Analysts. That’s 67 percent more than in the previous year. Freelancers in the online exchanges can be evaluated by employers, post portfolios and take online tests to demonstrate their abilities. Gary Swart, CEO of oDesk, says his clients are mainly small or startup companies. But giants like AOL and Unilever are using the service, too.

the interim president throws out the Islamistdrafted constitution and appoints a panel to write a new one, the party will break with the militarybacked “road map” for a transition. So far, the constitution has only been suspended and the talk has been of just amending disputed articles. On Sunday, the Dawaa Salafia, a body of clerics allied to al-Nour, said the new leadership must be inclusive of Islamists, and it criticized the heavy hand against the Brotherhood. “No one should rejoice for undermining the freedom of others even if they are political rivals because repression is harmful for all,” it said in a statement on its website. “The police and the army should not discriminate between citizens based on their political color. Worse than this is to discriminate against anyone because of their Islamic disposition,” it said. The liberal and secular factions want to maintain al-Nour support to show they have a powerful Islamist voice on their side. Al-Nour won a quarter of the seats in parliament in 2011-2012 elections. But they were infuriated by its blocking of ElBaradei, with some insisting it should not have veto power over the

post. The youth activist group Tamarod accused alNour of “blackmail” and arm-twisting.” That raises the possibility they could eventually ignore al-Nour’s demands and force through a candidate of their own. That would risk al-Nour breaking away, further solidifying Egypt’s divide into Islamist and non-Islamist camps. The prime minister will also likely have strong influence on the process of writing a new constitution. That’s a major concern of al-Nour, which pushed hard for the Islamic character of the charter pushed through under Morsi’s administration, which was suspended after his ouster. Walid el-Masry, of Tamarod, said al-Nour is using the ElBaradei issue to press liberals on the constitution, worried about changes to the Islamistdrafted charter. “They are afraid about the articles that concern the state’s Islamic identity,” he said, adding that the liberals assured Salafis that they won’t touch these articles. The Islamists have denounced the removal of Morsi as an army coup against democracy. Their opponents have argued the president had squandered his electoral mandate and that the Brotherhood was putting Egypt on an undemocratic path.

Egypt

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White House said in a statement that it rejects “false claims propagated by some in Egypt that we are working with specific political parties or movements to dictate how Egypt’s transition should proceed,” saying it is committed to Egyptians’ aspirations for democracy. The widespread appearance of anti-American slogans in Tahrir had a double-edged message: painting the Brotherhood as a tool of Washington and pushing back against U.S. concerns over the military’s moves. Obama “must know that this is a popular revolution,” said Shawki Ibrahim, a 37-year-old in Tahrir with a portrait of army chief Gen. Abdel-

to be named vice president. But al-Nour again appeared prepared to block it. “Our position is that the prime minister should not belong to a specific faction … We want a technocrat,” al-Nour Party chief Younes Makhyoun told The Associated Press. He pointed to Bahaa-Eldin’s membership in the National Salvation Front, the main umbrella group of liberal parties that was Morsi’s main opposition. Al-Nour faces considerable pressure from its followers not to be seen as backing down to secular movements. Brotherhood officials claim some alNour members have already joined its proMorsi protests. When alNour broke with Morsi months ago, it caused a split among its ranks, with some members forming a new party that remained with the president. Al-Nour was clearly concerned about appearing to side with the military against fellow Islamists at a time when Morsi and five other prominent Brotherhood figures have been put in detention and Islamist television stations have been put off the air. Speaking on Al-Jazeera Mubasher Misr TV, Makhyoun warned that if

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children third through sixth grade. Programs include puppet shows, stories and • BOOK GROUP: The crafts. Contact the library at Mystery Lovers Book Club (937) 698-5515 for weekly will meet at the Tipp City C o m m u n i t y themes. Public Library, 11 E. Main • KIWANIS MEETING: St., for friendly and fun disCalendar The Kiwanis Club of Troy will cussion of the monthly meet from noon to 1 p.m. at selection. July’s book is CONTACT US the Troy Country Club. “Dragonwell Dead” by William K. Weisenberg, Laura Childs. Books are assistant general counsel of available behind the desk the Ohio State Bar at the library (in large print, Call Melody Association, will speak on regular print and book on reforming the selection of Vallieu at CD), or you may bring your judges, including the 440-5265 to own copy. Snacks and bevSupreme Court. For more erages are provided. list your free information, contact Donn • STORY CORNER: Craig, vice president, at calendar Stories will be read to chil(937) 418-1888. items.You dren from 6:30-7 p.m. in • BOOKMOBILE PROthe children’s area of the can send GRAM: The Miami County Milton-Union Public Library. your news by e-mail to Park District will have the • CRAFTY LISTENmvallieu@civitasmedia.com. “Diggin’ the Bugs” naturalist ERS: The Crafty Listeners program with special guest will meet from 1-2:30 p.m. the Troy-Miami County at the Milton-Union Public Library Bookmobile at 2 p.m. Library. Participants listen The program will be at Lost to an audio book and work on various craft Creek Reserve, 2385 E. State Route 41, projects. east of Troy. Join a park district naturalist on • SALAD BAR: The American Legion a discovery hike and then visit the Post No. 586, Tipp City, will offer a salad Bookmobile for a story about insects. bar for $3.50 or a baked potato bar for Register for the program online at $3.50 or both for $6 from 6-7:30 p.m. www.miamicountyparks, email to regis• WILD JOURNEYS: Join Steve and ter@miamicountyparks.com or call (937) Marian Moeckel to explore Ohio’s Edge of 335-6273, Ext. 104. Appalachia, one of the most biologically • STAUNTON LUNCHEON: The diverse areas in the Midwestern U.S. at 7 Staunton alumni will meet at 11:30 a.m. at p.m. at Brukner Nature Center. A relatively Friendly’s in Troy. All graduates and friends short drive to Adams and Scioto counties are invited to attend. will take participants to a part of Ohio, not • BOE MEETING: The Newton Local flattened by the glaciers, where participants Board of Education will hold its regular can find rolling hills, remnant prairies, clear meeting at 7 p.m. in the Newton School streams and mature forests occupied by Board of Education Room. wonderful wildflowers and beautiful birds.

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While traveling, the presentation also takes a quick look at the culture and history of the area, as well as dining and shopping opportunities. This program is free for BNC members. Non-member admission is $2 per person. • BLOOD DRIVE: The Covington Eagles will partner with the Community Blood Center to host a blood drive from 3-7 p.m. in the lodge multi-purpose room, 715 E. Broadway, Covington. Everyone who registers to donate will be automatically be entered into a drawing to win a Harley Davidson Road King Classic motorcycle, and will receive a free “King of the Road Summer Blood Drive” T-shirt. Donors are encouraged to schedule an appointment to donate online at www.DonorTime.com. • MONTHLY MEETING: The CovingtonNewberry Historical Society will be holding its monthly meeting at 7 p.m. at Village Hall Community Center. The keynote speaker every month will talk about various topics as they pertain to Covington’s history. • POET’S CORNER: Do you write poetry? Bring any poems you have written to share and discuss with others during Poet’s Corner at 6:30 p.m. at the Troy-Miami County Public Library. If you don’t have any poems, bring a poem by your favorite poet to share. This workshop is for anyone who loves to read or poetry. Civic agendas • The Tipp City Parks Advisory Committee will meet at 7 p.m. at the Tipp City Government Center. • Covington Village Council will meet at 7 p.m. at Town Hall. • The Police and Fire Committee of Village Council will meet at 6 p.m. prior to the council meeting. • Laura Village Council will meet at 7 p.m. in the Municipal building. • Brown Township Board of Trustees will meet at 8 p.m. in the Township Building in Conover. • The Union Township Trustees will meet at 1:30 p.m. in the Township Building, 9497 Markley Road, P.O. Box E, Laura. Call 6984480 for more information.

TUESDAY • LUNCH & LEARN: The Tipp City Public Library, 11 E. Main St., hosts biweekly Lunch and Learn sessions. This week, bring your brown bag lunch and listen to guest speaker, Tara Dixon-Engle, speak about the Tippecanoe Farmers Market. The program runs from noon to 1 p.m., and the library will provide drinks. For more details, call (937) 667-3826, Ext. 216. • BIRTHDAY PARTY: The American Legion Post No. 586, Tipp City, will host its quarterly birthday party beginning at 6 p.m. Participants will be singing happy birthday to those with birthdays in July, August and September. Bring your favorite covered dish to share. Table service and a birthday cake will be provided. Civic agendas • The Lostcreek Township Board of Trustees meet at 7 p.m. at Lostcreek Township Building, Casstown. • The village of West Milton Council will meet at 7:30 p.m. in council chambers.

WEDNESDAY • CLASS LUNCH: The Troy High School class of 1962 will meet for an informal lunch gathering at 1 p.m. at Marion’s Piazza, 1270 Experiment Farm Road, Troy. All classmates and their spouses are invited to attend. For more information, call Sharon Mathes at 339-1696 or Esther Jackson at 339-1526. • TINY TOTS: The Tiny Tots program will be from 1-1:30 p.m. at the Milton-Union Public Library. The interactive program is for children birth to 3 years old and their parents and caregvivers. • STORY HOUR: The Milton-Union Public Library will have a summer story hour at 10:30 a.m. for children kindergarten through second grade and 1:30 p.m. for

THURSDAY • WILDLIFE VISIT: Brukner Nature Center will visit from 1:30-2:15 p.m. at the Milton-Union Public Library and bring along their “wildlife ambassadors.” The program is for children and their caregivers. Join the Brukner Nature Center staff as they show and talk about many burrowing animals. • SLOPPY JOES: The American Legion Auxiliary Unit No. 586, Tipp City, will offer sloppy joe sandwiches with chips for $3 from 6-7:30 p.m. Euchre will start at 7 p.m. for $5. • DISCOVERY WALK: A morning discovery walk for adults will be from 8-9:30 a.m. at Aullwood Audubon Center, 1000 Aullwood Road, Dayton. Tom Hissong, education coordinator, will lead walkers as they experience the wonderful seasonal changes taking place. Bring binoculars.

PROVIDED PHOTO

Members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, including Megan Reed, Emily Shurtz and Amanda Griffith, gathered June 11 to clean the statues.

Church members help with statues TROY — About 20 young men and women ages 12-18 from The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints gathered June 11 to clean the bronze statues on display in downtown Troy. Carrying buckets of water and soapy rags, they split into four groups and hit the streets finding and washing down the 20 statues, which need to be

cleaned every other week. The statues by Seward Johnson, an American artist widely recognized for his life-size statues, are castings of living people of all ages depicting them engaged in day-to-day activities. Andi Trzeciak, events coordinator for Troy Main Street, Inc. said, “We are so grateful to all of the youth groups who have volun-

teered their time to clean and inspect the statues. As you can imagine, it is a large undertaking for a small non-profit operation such as ours, and it is an extremely busy summer for our staff. We could not have done it alone and we are so thankful that these three local groups of kind youth stepped up to help us.” The statues will be on display until Sept. 2.

For more information, contact Cheryl Chaney at kidstri2010@aol.com or (937) 216-3078.

Michelle Jordan and Dan Synan.

AREA BRIEFS

Troy Kids Triathlon upcoming

TROY — The Troy Kids Triathlon, to benefit CASA/GAL of Miami County, will be July 21. The course will include swimming at the Troy Aquatic Park, biking in the Hobart Arena parking FRIDAY-SUNDAY lot, Troy Community Park and on the bike path and • ART SHOW: The sixth annual art show running on the track in will take place at Hoffman United Methodist Troy Memorial Stadium. Church in the activity center, 201 S. Main The registration fee is St. It is a non-juried show. There is no $20 and an additional sibadmittance charge and it is open to the ling in the same family is public. The purpose of the show is to provide a showcase for area talent of all ages. $15. The entry fee includes There will be more than twenty participants a T-shirt, finisher’s medal from around the area. For more information, for all participants and awards for the top three in visit HoffmanUMC.org. each age group. A goodie bag and post race refreshJULY 12 ments also will be available. Checks may be made • MUSIC SERIES: The Troy Summer payable to the Troy KIDS Music Series continues with the eclectic Triathlon, Attn: Cheryl sounds of This Side Up on Friday at 7:30 p.m. on Prouty Plaza in downtown Troy. Get Chaney, 263 Swailes Road, Troy, OH 45373. ready to sing and dance the night away as Registration will begin the band performs fan favorite hits that span several decades. This Side Up is pre- at 6:30 a.m. for ages 4-6 and the first race will be sented by Troy Main Street and is free to at 7:30 a.m., beginning at the public. For more information visit www.troymainstreet.org or by calling (937) the pool, 460 W. Staunton 339-5455. Drive, Troy. • OPEN HOUSE: The reopening of the Participants age 7-8 Miami County Incarceration Facility will be will begin at approximatecelebrated with an open house from 1-5 ly 8:15 a.m., ages 9-10 at p.m. at the facility. Staff will be on hand to around 9:15 a.m., ages 11offer the tours and answer any questions 12 at 10:15 a.m. and ages the public may have about either jail. 13-14 at 11:15 a.m. • HAM DINNER: The Sons of the For more information, American Legion, Post No. 586, Tipp City, visit speedy-feet.com, and will offer ham, scalloped potatoes, green results will be posted folbeans, salad bar and rolls for $7 from 6 lowing the race. 7:30 p.m.

Concert venue, date set TROY — The 21st Annual Troy Mayors’ Concert, featuring the Dayton Philharmonic Concert Band and Chorus, will return to Prouty Plaza on Troy’s historic public square this summer, after being held last year at Hobart Arena due to the Adams Street Bridge construction. The concert will take place at 7 p.m. Aug. 18. Contributions are being accepted and may be mailed to Troy Mayors’ Concerts Inc., 2315 McKaig Avenue, Troy, OH 45373. “We look forward to being back on Prouty Plaza in the heart of Troy’s downtown this year,” said David Pinkerton, president of the board of directors. “We hope you will join us.” Troy Mayors’ Concerts Inc. is a 501 (c) 3 nonprofit organization, founded in 1992 by the late W. Bruce George. Board members include David Pinkerton, president; Rachael Boezi, vice president; Dean Matthews, treasurer; Marty Baker, secretary; Frank Bazler; Shane Carter, Richard Jordan,

Camp offered for young children PIQUA — The Miami County Park District will hold its Eco-Splorers Summer Camp “Arts Week: Nature, Art & Music” program July 8-12 from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at Garbry Big Woods Reserve, 6660 Casstown Sidney Rd. east of Piqua. Children ages 4 and 5 years old are invited each morning to come out and discover the connection between art and nature. They will create beautiful artwork, make musical instruments and more. On Friday, families are invited to attend the art and music show and to hike the trails. Dress for the weather and bring a snack and water bottle to camp each day. All camps have a non-refundable $20 fee per camper ($20 for Miami County Residents and $40 for non-Miami County residents) due at the time of registration. Planned activities are subject to change. Registration forms can be found on the Miami County Park District website www.miamicountyparks.com and mailed or dropped off to the Park District Central Office, 2645 E. State Route 41, Troy, OH 45373.

JULY 13 • CANOE FLOAT: The Miami County Park District will hold a canoe float at 9 a.m. The float departs from Treasure Island in Troy. Registration is required. A nonrefundable $5 per paddler fee is due at time of registration. Registration forms can be accessed at www.miamicountyparks.com. • FARMERS MARKET: The Downtown Troy Farmers Market will be offered from 9 a.m. to noon on South Cherry Street, just off West Main Street. The market will include fresh produce, artisan cheeses, baked goods, eggs, organic milk, maple syrup, flowers, crafts, prepared food and entertainment. Plenty of free parking. Contact Troy Main Street at 339-5455 for information or visit www.troymainstreet.org. • FARMERS MARKET: The Miami County Farmers Market will be offered from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. behind Friendly’s, Troy. • DISCOVER DAYS: Family fun begins with BNC’s Family Discovery Days from 2-4 p.m. for hands-on fun for all ages, including adults. Staff will be bringing nets out to catch dragonflies, going to the creek and searching for crayfish and learning to use binoculars as participants search for backyard birds, all with the help of a BNC naturalist. Each program will include something cool you can take home to remember all you’ve learned. Visit www.bruknernaturecenter.com for more information. Registration preferred, but not required.

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NIE

Monday, July 8, 2013

TROY DAILY NEWS • WWW.TDN-NET.COM 402959

4

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OPINION

Contact us David Fong is the executive editor of the Troy Daily News. You can reach him at 440-5228 or send him e-mail at dfong@civitasmedia.com.

XXXday, 2010 Monday, July 8,XX, 2013 •5

TROY DAILY NEWS • WWW.TROYDAILYNEWS.COM

In Our View Troy Daily News Editorial Board FRANK BEESON / Group Publisher DAVID FONG / Executive Editor

ONLINE POLL

(WWW.TROYDAILYNEWS.COM)

Question: Do you think Edward Snowden is a patriot or traitor?

Watch for final poll results in Sunday’s Miami Valley Sunday News.

Watch for a new poll question in Sunday’s Miami Valley Sunday News.

PERSPECTIVE

“Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.” — First Amendment, U.S. Constitution

EDITORIAL ROUNDUP Seattle Times on Congress and the issue of student-loan interest rates: Congress squandered a year of potential progress on student-loan interest rates. The result of its inaction was a sharp rise in rates on Monday. Rates on federally subsidized Stafford loans jumped from 3.4 percent to 6.8 percent, essentially slapping a $1,000 tax hike on students, according to U.S. Sen. Patty Murray, D-Wash. The average student-loan debt is around $25,000, which can include other types of loans. A financial hit to 7 million undergraduates, including more than 100,000 in Washington state, can be reversed. If Congress passes a temporary extension to the lower rate by the end of July, the rate hike would be reversed. Just do it, Congress. Strong options include a proposal by Murray to freeze rates for one year and a bill by Democratic U.S. Rep. Suzan DelBene, D-Medina, to hold it at 3.4 percent for two years. DelBene deserves support from her colleagues as she tries to get 218 members to sign a discharge petition, allowing an immediate up-or-down vote on her bill, which has been blocked by House Republicans. Credit the state Legislature for trying to address the problem of rising tuition. The 2013-15 budget freezes tuition for at least one year. An important precedent by state lawmakers should not be erased by political intransigence at the federal level. Families do not need interest rates that rise and fall from year to year. They need affordability and consistency. President Obama proposed annually setting rates to the Treasury’s cost of borrowing and fixing rates for the life of the loan. Obama’s proposal would also expand the “Pay as You Earn” repayment option so no borrower ends up paying more than 10 percent of his or her discretionary income for student loans. Congress needs to fix this. The Oklahoman on Hobby Lobby’s battle against Obamacare mandate: Score one — a big one — for Hobby Lobby, and for all those offended by the Obama administration’s assault on religious liberties in this country. Last week the 10th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Denver said Hobby Lobby had the right to sue over a Health and Human Services mandate included as part of Obamacare that requires companies to provide insurance covering birth control. The administration had argued that for-profit companies couldn’t claim that the mandate violates their constitutionally protected religious freedoms. The Denver court called the argument bogus. … Like many Christians, the family was floored by the original mandate announced in January 2012. It required faith-affiliated institutions such as hospitals and charities to offer free contraception and abortifacients as part of their health insurance coverage. One month later the administration “improved” the rule by making insurance companies, not the religious employer, offer contraception free of charge. This was of no help to self-insured companies such as Hobby Lobby. Of course, organizations that didn’t get on board would be fined — Obamacare is loaded with potential fines and penalties. In the case of Hobby Lobby, these fines would have been about $1.3 million per day. The struggle is sure to continue, too, because Barack Obama is a true believer in the cause of abortion-rights advocates. As a state senator, he opposed a bill designed to prevent partial-birth abortions. The National Abortion Rights Action League gave then-U.S. Sen. Obama a 100 percent score on his abortion-rights voting record. In April, he gave a speech to Planned Parenthood — becoming the first sitting U.S. president to do so in the nearly 100 years Planned Parenthood has been in business. In his remarks there, Obama said that as long as there’s a fight to defend women’s reproductive rights, “you’ve also got a president who will be right there with you, fighting every step of the way.” Part of that battle plan includes forcing employers’ insurance companies to pay for drugs that can stop a pregnancy.

LETTERS

Thank you for your support

ets courtesy of club member and Troy Main Street president Patty Rose. Our local McDonalds restaurant, Allstate To the Editor: Insurance office and Kiwanis Our caring and involved Club members sold chances, to community helped make our the public, for an opportunity Mumford & Sons Fundraiser a to win the Mumford & Sons success. concert tickets. The Kiwanis Club of Troy On June 26 at our regular was the lucky recipient of two meeting the winner was drawn Mumford & Sons Passport tick- by the Kiwanis guest speaker.

The winner is Heather Geissler of Troy. The Kiwanis Club raised $660 with this fundraiser. I want to thank all of the community members who came up with the idea, marketed and donated to our Club.

WRITETO US: The Troy Daily News welcomes signed letters to the editor. Letters must contain your home address and a telephone number where you can be reached during the day. Letters must be shorter than 500 words as a courtesy to other writers. We reserve the right to edit for length and clarity. MAIL: 224 S. Market, Troy, Ohio, 45373; E-MAIL: editorial@tdnpublishing.com; FAX (937) 440-5286; ONLINE: www.troydailynews.com (“Letters To The Editor” link on left side).

DOONESBURY

The last tango is really apple mango A relentless sun is roasting the life out of everything all around us. Leaves are limp and the lawn is limper. Your thirst has reached a Sahara-worthy level. Gasping, you recall an ad for a product that sounds satisfyingly refreshing. Let’s see ... the name was apple something. Apple mango, maybe? Yes, yes, that’s it … apple mango tango. If anything is going to quench one’s thirst on a scorcher like today, it’s a nice icy apple mango tango. Here’s a tip; don’t imbibe anything until you very carefully scan the drink label to make sure it’s actually, you know, a drink. “Apple mango tango” is currently the descriptor of a detergent. Wouldn’t want to drink that unless you’ve been swearing a lot and need your mouth washed out with soap. (Do parents still do that?) I have some lotion, one ingredient of which is oatmeal. Another is apparently just rife with cocoa butter. One shampoo has clover in it, one has strawberries. Voila! A fruit salad with garnish, right there in the toiletries. While the floor cleaner is not yet redolent of peanut butter, I look forward to the day it is. Right now the stuff that cleans the kitchen floor is touted as having a pine fresh aroma. This is true only if the pine trees are in real trouble,

Marla Boone Troy Daily News Columnist scent-wise. Frankly, I think the manufacturers are missing the boat on the peanut butter-scented floor cleaner. A lot of the peanut butter in our house ends up on the floor anyway (some sort of cosmic law that dictates the bread must always fall peanut butter side down). A person would still have to clean the floors, not the most pleasant task, but at least that delicious aroma would take your mind off that dried up pea under the stove you can’t quite get the broom on. Obviously no one is going to have shampoo as a salad course. And no one (except possibly the man who promised to love, honor, and bring home the Jif) is going to smear peanut butter around on the floor and pretend it’s clean. It’s okay if our hair smells like strawberries or vanilla and our dishes give off a subtle tropical

— Bobby Phillips President, Kiwanis Club of Troy

bouquet. What’s really disturbing are developments in the world of ice cream. Ice cream, of course, is the world’s perfect food. Fat, sugar, dairy, and, if one opts for the mocha, caffeine right there on a waffle cone. My sister has always maintained Irish coffee is the definition of perfection. It contains all the above requirements for decadence plus a belt of whiskey. You have to admit this makes for a fairly convincing argument. Before I became an ice cream aficionado, I thought corn dogs were the best. You have meat wrapped in breading deep fried and served on a wooden skewer. Nothing says country hick like a meal on a stick. But you just can’t beat ice cream. My personal favorite is the chocolate ice cream with chocolate covered peanuts in it with swirls of chocolate fudge throughout. Are you sensing a trend here? Ice cream is supposed to be sweet and creamy and full of chocolate, not stupid stuff like corn. That’s right … corn. Some people who seem unable to recognize perfection when they see it are seriously messing with ice cream. There is a store in Delaware that is offering tomato ice cream. One in Oregon is selling and I swear I am not making

this up ice cream labeled “bacon pear with blue cheese.” The ad showed no comma between the “bacon” and the “pear.” Heaven help us if some mad scientist has hybridized a bacon-flavored piece of fruit. Other offenders include salt and pepper (San Francisco), brown bread (LA), feta cheese and basil (Atlanta) and lobster (Maine, of course). Corn ice cream, which one would assume arises from a cornintense place like Iowa, comes to us from New York City. This is upsetting on several levels. I once met a person from New York City who was unaware corn grew up out of the ground on stalks. Now these same people want to preempt corn for their ice cream? Wrong. Just wrong. All this begs the question: if you are craving something that tastes like bacon, (? on the comma) pears, and blue cheese, why not eat bacon and pears and blue cheese? All this talk of food is driving me to search my pantry for something tasty to snack on. I think I’ll have that good old American stand-by: a Dorito-and-hot-dog apple. Marla Boone appears every other Monday in the Troy Daily News

Troy Daily News

FRANK BEESON Group Publisher

DAVID FONG Executive Editor

LEIANN STEWART Retail Advertising Manager

CHERYL HALL Circulation Manager

BETTY BROWNLEE Business Manager

SCARLETT SMITH Graphics Manager

A CIVITAS MEDIA NEWSPAPER 224 S. Market St. Troy, Ohio 45373 www.TDN-NET.com 335-5634


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LOCAL & NATION

Monday, July 8, 2013

BIRTH

OBITUARIES

Son welcomed

Cincinnati. He was 21 1/2 inches Hogan Matthew long and weighed in at 8 Jackson was born at 11:27 pounds and 3 ounces. p.m. May 8, 2013, at He was welcomed home Christ Hospital, by a brother, Carter; sisCincinnati, to Chris and ter, Victoria; maternal Tracy Jackson of grandparents, Dave and

Jeanne Benedict of Sandusky; and paternal grandparents, Rick and Susan Jackson of Troy. Hogan also is the baby’s paternal greatgrandmother’s maiden name.

RESTAURANT INSPECTIONS Restaurant inspections are performed in the county by Miami County Public Health, except in Piqua, which has its own health department. Miami County Public Health can be reached at (937) 573-3500, by email at info@miamicountyhealth.net or on the website at www.miamicountyhealth.net. These violation reports were provided by Miami County Public Health. June 24 Al’s BP Oil Service, 6 E. Broadway, Covington — Unable to locate test strips. Provde chlorine test strips and use 50-100 ppm solution. The Cakery, 1875 W. Main St., Troy — Restroom door open. Keep door closed at all times. Facility very clean and organized. Village Pizza & Drive Thru, 302 S. Miami Ave., Bradford — Handles to equipment unclean; clean handles. Observed flies in food service. Properly control for flies to eliminate problem. No date marking on prepared tcs foods. Date foods with a consume-by date not to exceed seven days to reduce harmful bacteria growth. Required immediate correction. Missing floor tiles in back room. Provide tiles on floors. Observed meat thawing in sink with no water running. Use an approved method of thawing to reduce harmful bacteria growth. Observed outdated wing sauce. Properly discard such food within seven days of preparation to reduce harmful bacteria growth. Required immediate correction and voluntarily discarded. Observed light through rear exit door when closed; provide tight seal on door. Observed first aid supplies stored on shelving with food service equipment and supplies. Store first aid supplies separate to reduce cross-contamination. Taco Bell No. 4528, 985 Main St., Troy — Management reports she has contacted repair company several times, but they have not yet showed up. Company contacted again during inspection and repair tech is to call to schedule time. Management has ordered spacers for top of cooler, but reports they are on back order. Facility will be grant-

ed one additional week to correct issue. If temperatures are not mechanically able to be maintained at 41 degrees F or below, facility will be ordered in for hearing at health district. June 26 Asian Cottage, 761 W. Market St., Troy — Observed open drinks on prep counters between uses. Contain all drinks and store seperate from food areas to prevent crosscontamination. Required immediate correction. Observed cooling foods sitting out of temperature control. Properly cool foods by dividing portions into smaller quantities and placing in cold holding equipment immediately. Cool from 135 degrees F to 70 degrees F within two hours and from 135 degrees F to 41 degrees F within a total of six hours. Required immediate correction. Build up of ice debris in freezer. Defrost to remove ice. Wiping cloths on counters between uses. Store in sanitizer water. Corrected. Bag of onions on floor. Keep up off floor. Corrected. Uncovered foods in walk-in cooler. Cover all foods except when cooling. Numerous foods recently prepared in containers with old date stickers during washing, rinsing and sanitizing process and place new date labels on foods as they are made. Torn screen on door. Replac or repair screen. Top portion of prep cooler holding foods 41-44 degrees F and undercounter refrigerator holding foods 50-52 degrees F. Ensure all cold units hold food at 41 degrees F or below to reduce harmful bacteria growth. Units turned down at time of inspection. Owner reports foods were placed in both units recently and were just prepared. Thin-tip thermometer not working properly. Provide working thermometer. Equipment fronts unclean; clean refrigerator and freezers. Observed numerous personal items in food service, such as shampoo, coats, boots, etc. Personal items such as these should not be in food service. Only essential items that are needed to operate business are permitted to be on premises. Personal food containers mixed with restaurant foods. Provide clear separation. Person in charge unable to answer or demon-

strate how to properly cool foods. PIC must have a general understanding of food safety, such as cooling temperatures and times and what approved methods must be used. Recommend owner taking Level 1 course to help with understanding general food safety practices. A follow-up will be done in two days to verify violations have been corrected. Sam & Ethels, 120 E. Main St., Tipp City — Loose and damaged FRP in walk-in cooler. Repair areas. Owners in process of cleaning oven. All other violations from 6/19/203 have been corrected. June 28 Asian Cottage, 761 W. Market St., Troy — Several improvements have been made. Correct the following violations that remain from 6/26/2013: Build of of ice debris in freezer. Defrost to remove ice. Torn screen on door. Replace door or repair screen. Reach-in cooler holding foods at 46 degrees F. Adjust unit so all cold foods are maintained at 41 degrees F or below to reduce harmful bacteria growth. Correcting. Will follow up on 7/1/2013. Thintip thermometer not working. Provide working thermometer. Still observed personal items in restroom, such as toothbrush, washcloths, make-up supply, shoes, slippers, etc. Continue to remove personal items from food service. Only items needed to operate food service are permitted in facility. Owner reports she is in process of taking Level 1 course. Her son will call the get information and where to take course next week. Speedway 9366, 4 Weller Drive, Tipp City — Spray bottles of cleaner hanging above and rear food prep areas. Store chemicals separate from these areas to prevent cross-contamination. Required immediate correction. Floors in food service unclean in hard-to-reach areas. Clean floors. Parmesan cheese container states “Refrigerate after opening.” Product found sitting out of temperature control. Keep product 41 degrees F or below to reduce harmful bacteria growth. Recommend providing documentation from manufacturer that product can set out.

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David F. Cargo, a maverick Republican who became the youngest governor of New Mexico and served two terms in the turbulent 1960s, died Friday at the age of 84. Cargo had been in an Albuquerque nursing home for about two years following a stroke, but he had remained active. He suddenly fell ill following a day of Fourth of July activities and died after being taken to an Albuquerque hospital, his son Patrick Cargo of Dallas told The Associated Press. Cargo’s son remembered his father’s bigger-than-life personality, his humor and love for helping people. “He was really one of a kind,” the younger Cargo said. “We actually saw him last week. He was doing great, he had good energy and he looked really good.

We were very thankful that we got to spend time with him.” Known as “Lonesome Dave,” Cargo championed the film industry as economic development and established the first state film commission. He also was an early advocate of a policy for apportioning legislative seats that has altered the political landscape in New Mexico over several decades. Cargo earned his nickname during his first bid for governor in 1966 when he had little support from the GOP and traveled the state alone in a 1959 Chevrolet to campaign in rural areas and small towns typically bypassed by his better-funded Democratic opponent, a longtime state Senate leader. A sheepherder on horseback, according to Cargo,

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STEVEN LEE ROBBINS Steven Lee Robbins, 45, of County Rd. 5, West Liberty, Ohio, passed away of natural causes at his residence, Friday morning, July 5, 2013. He was born November 20, 1967, in Troy, Ohio, to the late Kenneth "Jack" Earl Robbins and Carol Jean “Jeanie” Yates (Robbins) Blair who survives at West Liberty. Also surviving are one son, Colton K. Robbins and Colton's mother, Jenny Simmons of Minster; three siblings: Thomas Robbins of West Palm Beach, FL, Kenneth & Jeannie Robbins of Wellington, FL, Jacqueline & Duane Smith of West Liberty; five ROBBINS nieces & nephews: Trace, Leah and Gavin Robbins, Tyler and Austin Smith; uncles & aunts: Jerry Robbins of Minster, Jack Brock of Troy, Audrey Myers of Troy, Steve & Karen Yates of Sidney, Edgar &

Barbara Yates of West Palm Beach, FL, and Linda & Ralph Boardwine of Wythville, VA. Mr. Robbins had been employed at C.A.P.T. in Celina and was also a skilled brick mason. While living in Florida, Steven attended Grace Gospel Church in West Palm Beach. A memorial service will be held 2:00 PM, Wednesday, July 10, 2013, at Gehret Funeral Home, 64 Elm St. in Fort Loramie, with Pastor James Manuel presiding. Interment will follow at the Pioneer Cemetery in Fort Loramie. Friends may call from noon until the hour of services at Gehret Funeral Home. Memorials may be made to the Colton K. Robbins Memorial Fund. Condolences may be expressed at www.gehretfuneralhome.com

JAMES V. RINEHART James V. Rinehart, 57, of 4245 Frazier- awards. James was an avid outdoorsman who Guy Rd. Sidney, passed away Friday, July loved to fish, he enjoyed watching 5, 2013 at 6 p.m.. at the OSU Hospital in NASCAR, and truly enjoyed Columbus following a brief illgoing to his grandchildren's ness. sporting events and watching He was born on March 4, them. He will be dearly missed 1956 in Sidney, Ohio, the son of by all of his family. William and Joan (Westerbeck) A celebration of Mr. Rinehart who reside in Sidney. Rinehart's Life will be held Also surviving are two daughFriday, July 12, 2013 at 7 P.M. ters, Colette Vestal and Christina from the Cromes Funeral Home Meyers both of Sidney, five & Crematory, 302 S. Main Ave. grandchildren, Courtney, Troy, with Rev. Dave Moran officiatAlivia, Alaina and C.J. Five ing. The family will receive friends brothers, Mark Rinehart, Scott RINEHART from 5 p.m. until the hour of servRinehart both of Sidney, Tom ice. A private family burial will take Rinehart of Columbus, OH, Phil place at a later date. Rinehart of Sidney, Richard The family suggest that memoRinehart and his wife Barb of rials may be made to Dayton Sidney and one sister, Terri Children's Hospital , 436 Valley St. Rinehart of Sidney. Dayton, OH 45404 in memory of Mr.Rinehart was employed by James V. Rinehart. Envelopes will Ferguson Construction Co. where be provided at the funeral home. he had worked for the past 18 years. Guestbook condolences and expresJames was a U.S. marine veteran with sions of sympathy may be made to the commendation medals awarded for the Rinehart family at Cromes Funeral Home's National Defense Service, Rifle-Expert, Good Conduct Medal among several other website, www.cromesfh.com

GERALD E. ‘JERRY’ HAUSFELD PIQUA — Gerald E. “Jerry” Hausfeld, Catholic Church and the Piqua Eagles, Moose, a life member of the AMVETS 73, of Piqua, died at 8:32 a.m. Friday, July 5, 2013, at the Upper Valley Medical and the Miami County Board of Realtors. He worked as a barber and real Center. estate broker, and owned Hausfeld He was born March 14, 1940, in Barber Shop and Jerry Maria Stein, to the late Albert Hausfeld Realty of Piqua. and Bernadine (Wendeln) A Mass of Christian Burial Hausfeld. will be celebrated at 10 a.m. He married Mary Ann Tuesday, July 9, at St. Bohman on Nov. 23, 1964 in Boniface Catholic Church, Osgood; she survives. with the Rev. Fr. Angelo C. Mr. Hausfeld also is surCaserta and the Rev. Fr. vived by three children, Jeffery Thomas Bolte concelebrating. Hausfeld of Chillicothe, Ann Burial will follow in Forest Hill (George) Curtis of Piqua, and Cemetery, where full military Mark (Amy) Hausfeld of honors will be conducted by the Cincinnati; five grandchildren, HAUSFELD Veterans Elite Tribute Squad. Michael (Jessica) Hausfeld, Visitation will be from 4-8 p.m. Jerry Curtis, Abigail Hausfeld, Monday at the Jamieson & Elle Hausfeld, Peter Hausfeld; Yannucci Funeral Home. two brothers, Walter Hausfeld of Memorial contributions may Celina, Anthony (Cathy) be made to St. Boniface Catholic Hausfeld of Fort Wayne, Ind.; Church, 310 S. Downing St., and a sister, Alfreda “Fritz” Piqua, OH 45356; Piqua Catholic Albers of Maria Stein. He was Schools, 503 W. North St., Piqua, OH preceded in death by a brother, Cyril 45356; or Lehman Catholic High School, Hausfeld; and two sisters, Mary Ann 2400 St. Marys Ave., Sidney, OH 45365. Depweg and infant Rose Hausfeld. Guestbook condolences and expresJerry was a 1958 graduate of St. sions of sympathy, to be provided to the John’s High School in Maria Stein and family, may be expressed through served in the U.S. Army. jamiesonandyannucci.com. He was a member of St. Boniface

FUNERAL DIRECTORY

A graveside service will be conducted • Joan Seay Thursday, July 11, 2013, at Riverside GLENDALE, Ariz. — Joan Seay, 83, Cemetery, Troy. of Glendale, Ariz. and formerly of Troy, called him “Lonesome Fisher-Cheney Funeral Home in Troy Ohio, passed away Saturday, June 22, Dave” during a chance is handling arrangements. 2013. encounter when the candidate got out of his car on a DEATHS OF NATIONAL INTEREST muddy road to greet the man. A newspaperman heart of Target Corporation today,” with Cargo used the • Douglast Dayton Steinhafel said. MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — Douglas exchange in a story and the • Oliver Red Cloud Dayton, who led the transformation of a nickname stuck. PINE RIDGE, S.D. — Oliver Red Cloud, family department store into retailing giant “People started seeing who died Thursday, was a champion of me as a guy who was bat- Target Corp. has died at the age of 88. Lakota culture, a defender of American Dayton’s wife, Wendy Dayton, confirmed tling business-as-usual and Indian treaty rights and a descendent of his death Sunday. She said the resident of the special interests all by one of the most important leaders in Native Wayzata, west of Minneapolis, died Friday himself. Although I had American history, friends and family memafter a long battle with cancer. always been the underdog, bers said. Douglas James Dayton was the the name Lonesome Dave Oliver Red Cloud died in a Denver hoscrystallized that in peoples’ youngest of George Nelson Dayton’s five pital after a long-running illness, the Oglala sons who took over the family’s downtown minds,” Cargo wrote in an Sioux Tribe announced. He was 93. Minneapolis department store from their autobiography in 2010. A former foreman for the Bureau of He exhibited a liberal father in 1948. Douglas Dayton started Indian Affairs, he had served as chief of working in the family business after serving streak in his political phithe Sioux Nation since 1979, the Rapid in an Army infantry division in Europe durlosophy. He opposed anti-union, ing World War II, where he was injured and City Journal reported. He was a fourthgeneration descendent of Chief Red Cloud, right-to-work measures received a Purple Heart. who led several battles against the U.S. Having worked as a store manager, and proposed abolishing Army and also signed the 1868 Fort the death penalty when he Dayton sensed the threat posed by disLaramie peace agreement with the United was in the Legislature. In count retailers such as Kmart. In 1960, he States. his first year as governor, became the first president of Target, and Vanessa Red Cloud, one of Oliver Red Cargo urged the within two years, the company had opened Cloud’s 36 grandchildren, said her grandfafour Target stores in the Twin Cities subLegislature to increase the ther was an important part of his family, minimum wage, raise urbs. community and the Pine Ridge Indian “Target was the best job I had,” he unemployment compensaReservation. recalled in a May interview with the tion benefits and start “Words cannot describe how this man offering state financing for (Minneapolis) Star Tribune. has become a part of everyone’s life as a His nephew, Minnesota Gov. Mark kindergarten programs. “As the years passed, Dayton, issued a statement calling Douglas whole,” she said. Steve Emery, Oliver Red Cloud’s you realize he really was Dayton “an extraordinary businessman, nephew and a lawyer in Rapid City, said ahead of his time with a lot philanthropist, and leader of our family.” his uncle was a lifelong advocate for the Target released a statement Sunday of the stuff he was doing,” Lakota culture. Patrick Cargo said. “He from current President and CEO Gregg “He was passionate about making sure cared so much about the Steinhafel praising integral Dayton’s role in the kids knew the Lakota ways and that state that he didn’t mind the company’s origins. they knew about the treaty the 1868 treaty, “Doug was instrumental in helping to taking on a lot of those the 1851 treaty and the special relationship tasks and partnering and guide the strategic direction of Dayton that exists between the United States and really reaching across the Hudson Corporation for many years and aisle.” institutionalize the values that are at the the Great Sioux Nation,” Emery said.

Former N.M. governor dies at 84 By the Associated Press

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ANNIE’S MAILBOX

Shame on grandparents for making you a target Dear Annie: I am 15 and the oldest of four boys. During one of many fights between my parents, my mom left the house with my brothers and me, and we spent the night at a shelter. Our grandparents told our father that we have no values because we went with our mom. They say we are old enough to know better. This makes us feel guilty about the fights. Now my grandparents refuse to see us even for our birthdays, because they say we are not loyal to the family and don't deserve them. Annie, we are losing our family and our grandparents all at once. Our school guidance counselor tells us it's not our fault, but we feel like outcasts. We are no longer invited to any family events with our cousins. We feel abandoned. — Scared in Massachusetts Dear Scared: Your grandparents don't know how to fix the situation with your parents, so they take their frustrations out on you. You are an easy target and can't fight back. Shame on them. If you have other family members who are not part of this manipulative blackmail, please get closer to them. Otherwise, "family" can mean many things -- including good friends, teachers, neighbors and others who take an interest in your life and are good influences. Lean on them. And continue to talk to your guidance counselor, who obviously understands the problem and can help. Dear Annie: I am a working professional woman in my 50s. For some reason, my dentist, a man in his 30s, calls me "dear." The first time he did this, I was mortified and didn't know how to respond to such a condescending remark. I like my dentist. He's otherwise a competent professional. How do I respond in an appropriate way to this inappropriate manner of addressing me? — Need To Know in Saskatoon Dear Saskatoon: Let's give him the benefit of the doubt and assume he addresses all of his patients as "dear," regardless of age or gender. He probably has no idea that anyone finds it offensive. You need to speak up. The next time he does this, simply say, "I'd prefer that you call me 'Miss Smith,'" or however you want him to address you. You may need to do this more than once, but we assure you, he'll eventually get the message. Dear Annie: The letter from "New Yorker" really touched a nerve. When he was 11 years old, he made an insulting comment to his sister's friend, and his mother keeps bringing it up year after year. He's now 35. When I was 10, my 5-year-old neighbor stole some silver coins and blamed me. Everyone believed him, including my family. The police were called, and my family had to replace the coins. In the 33 years since, the boy admitted to the theft, and both he and his brother apologized to me. It doesn't seem to matter to my family, though. I became a New York state trooper, serving honorably and earning many commendations, awards and community accolades. But many family members still bring up this theft and act like I did it. My grandmother is in a nursing home. My brother gave her his old TV, but she didn't want it, so he took it back. My aunt saw it was missing and said, "Jane probably took it. She likes to steal." This type of thing bothers me to no end, but I realize I will never be able to change these attitudes. My response varies upon my mood, but my favorite was my reply to my aunt about the stolen TV: "I thought you knew I had to steal to support my drug habit." Her shocked expression was priceless. — Not-Guilty Jane Annie's Mailbox is written by Kathy Mitchell and Marcy Sugar, longtime editors of the Ann Landers column. Please email your questions to anniesmailbox@comcast.net, or write to: Annie's Mailbox, c/o Creators Syndicate, 737 3rd Street, Hermosa Beach, CA 90254.

TV

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BRIDGE

SUDOKU PUZZLE

HOW TO PLAY: Complete the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively. Find answers to today’s puzzle in tomorrow’s Troy Daily News. SATURDAY’S SOLUTION:

HINTS FROM HELOISE

Sound off: Wipe the seat, then where I eat? Dear Readers: Here is this week’s Sound Off, about table bussers: “Why is it that table bussers in some restaurants wipe the seat and the table with the same damp cloth? There’s nothing more unappetizing than seeing them wipe the seat at a table, then wipe the tabletop. “I have brought this to the attention of restaurant managers on numerous occasions. They all thank me, but I’m willing to bet that it still goes on. We always make sure our silverware is not placed directly on the tabletop. Talk about unsanitary! I enjoy reading your

Hints from Heloise Columnist

columns in our paper and Good Housekeeping.” — Barb in Athens, Ala. Yuck! And double yuck! Maybe they have NOT been trained in the correct procedure! However, I usually see it in reverse — they wipe the table crumbs off to the seat, then wipe

it off the chairs. But still! I’d love to hear from restaurant owners and managers. — Heloise FAST FACTS Dear Readers: Other uses for clean, plastic ketchup bottles: • Keep homemade salad dressing in one. • Buy bulk shampoo and then keep a small amount in one for the shower. • Make and store your own horseradish sauce in one. • Place water in one and let kids water plants with it. • Put pancake batter in one for easy pouring. — Heloise IRONING-BOARD USES Dear Readers: Here are just a

few of the responses about other uses for an ironing board: Kathryn in Lubbock, Texas, said: “I use mine when I’m going to work on sewing, like hemming slacks, dresses, etc.Ironing boards are great because they can be adjusted for the right height one needs. Also, pins can be stuck into them if necessary.” Jeanette in Westlake Village, Calif., said, “Use for folding and hanging clothes before putting them away.” Sally in Fort Wayne, Ind., said, “I place my suitcase on the ironing board in a hotel room to keep it counter height. No more stooping.”


8

COMICS

Monday, July 8, 2013

MUTTS

BIG NATE

HAGAR THE HORRIBLE

DILBERT

BLONDIE

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE

HI AND LOIS ZITS

BEETLE BAILEY FAMILY CIRCUS

DENNIS the MENACE

ARLO & JANIS

HOROSCOPE BY FRANCES DRAKE For Tuesday, July 9, 2013 ARIES (March 21 to April 19) Discussions with family authority figures will be interesting today. You or someone else will clearly speak their mind, which, in turn, could trigger opposition from someone holding the purse strings. Easy does it. TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) Because you are enthusiastic about something today, be careful not to push the limits of someone's boundaries. A partner or someone older might disagree with you. GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) You might be excited about moneymaking ideas today. Unfortunately, someone at work might rain on your parade. Not to worry -- keep your ideas for future consideration. CANCER (June 21 to July 22) It's easy to put a lot of yourself into what you have to say today, which is why others are ready to jump on your bandwagon. However, responsibilities with children cannot be ignored. LEO (July 23 to Aug. 22) Your ability to research data is excellent today because you have wonderful powers of concentration. However, don't let someone older or more experienced discourage you. VIRGO (Aug. 23 to Sept. 22) You will be successful dealing with groups today because you can inspire others to do what needs to be done. Don't worry about second-guessing yourself; just go forward with enthusiasm! LIBRA (Sept. to Oct. 22) In discussions with authority figures today, you'll be convincing because you believe what you're saying. Some naysayer might have criticisms that are financially related. (You can deal with this.) SCORPIO (Oct. 23 to Nov. 21) Do talk to others about travel plans or anything with publishing, the media, medicine and the law today, because you have great ideas. (Even if a female authority opposes you.) SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22 to Dec. 21) You might see a way to cut through red-tape details regarding shared property, insurance matters, inheritances, taxes and debt. Believe in your ideas. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22 to Jan. 19) Discussions with partners are enthusiastic. It looks like things are all systems go! Don't worry about someone (likely a female) who is skeptical. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20 to Feb. 18) You're effective at work today, especially wrapping up old business. Move forward with your ideas even if you have to politely listen to objections from someone. PISCES (Feb. 19 to March 20) This is a playful, fun-loving day. Enjoy yourself and accept invitations to reunions or things from the past. Workrelated responsibilities can be dealt with swiftly. (Ignore criticisms.) YOU BORN TODAY You like to make sense of things. You take things apart to see how they work. You love serendipity and the intriguing way cycles are related. You study the past to investigate and learn so you can share your findings with others, because you are forever curious. Work hard to build or construct something this year, because your rewards will soon follow. Birthdate of: Tom Hanks, actor; Kelly McGillis, actress; Courtney Love, singer/songwriter. (c) 2013 King Features Syndicate, Inc.

SNUFFY SMITH

GARFIELD

BABY BLUES

FUNKY WINKERBEAN

CRANKSHAFT

TROY DAILY NEWS • WWW.TDN-NET.COM


WEATHER

TROY DAILY NEWS • WWW.TROYDAILYNEWS.COM

Today

Tonight

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

9

Monday, July 8, 2013

Friday

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Chance of showers/ T-storms High: 83°

Scattered showers/ T-storms Low: 65°

SUN AND MOON

Chance of showers/ T-storms High: 86° Low: 65°

Chance of showers/ T-storms High: 88° Low: 70°

Chance of showers/ T-storms High: 87° Low: 70°

Chance of showers/ T-storms High: 84° Low: 67°

TODAY’S STATEWIDE FORECAST Monday, July 7, 2013 AccuWeather.com forecast for daytime conditions, low/high temperatures

MICH.

NATIONAL FORECAST

Sunrise Monday 6:16 a.m. ........................... Sunset tonight 9:06 p.m. ........................... Moonrise today 5:50 a.m. ........................... Moonset today 8:31 p.m. ........................... New

July 8

First

Full

Last

July 15

July 22

July 29

Cleveland 79° | 72°

Toledo 81° | 68°

Youngstown 84° | 68°

PA

Mansfield 75° | 68°

TROY • 83° 65°

ENVIRONMENT

Columbus 77° | 68°

Dayton 81° | 66°

Today’s UV factor. 8

Fronts Cold

Warm Stationary

Pressure Low

High

0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10+ Low

Minimal

Moderate

Very High

High

Air Quality Index Moderate

Harmful

Main Pollutant: Particulate

2

250

500

Peak group: Trees

Mold Summary 6,482

0

12,500

25,000

Top Mold: Cladosporium Source: Regional Air Pollution Control Agency

GLOBAL City Athens Bangkok Calgary Jerusalem Kabul Kuwait City Mexico City Montreal Moscow Sydney Tokyo

Hi 86 90 67 89 95 113 68 86 86 68 80

10s

20s 30s 40s

50s 60s

Lo Otlk 68 clr 80 rn 51 rn 74 clr 64 clr 82 clr 57 rn 70 rn 64 pc 51 clr 75 rn

70s 80s 90s 100s 110s

Cincinnati 88° | 70°

Calif. Low: 35 at Stanley, Idaho

Portsmouth 82° | 66°

NATIONAL CITIES Temperatures indicate Saturday’s high and overnight low to 8 a.m.

Pollen Summary 0

0s

Yesterday’s Extremes: High: 125 at Death Valley,

42

Good

-10s -0s

Hi Lo PrcOtlk 83 70 .31 Rain Atlanta Atlantic City 90 74 Clr Austin 98 67 PCldy Baltimore 89 74 PCldy Boston 95 79 PCldy Buffalo 83 68 Cldy Charleston,S.C. 90 74 .13 PCldy Charleston,W.Va.86 69 .03 Cldy Charlotte,N.C. 86 71 .16 Rain Chicago 86 65 PCldy Cincinnati 78 69 .39 Rain Cleveland 80 70 .01 Cldy Columbus 79 71 .16 Rain Clr Dallas-Ft Worth 97 73 Denver 92 63 Cldy Des Moines 90 69 PCldy Detroit 83 70 Rain Greensboro,N.C. 86 701.18 Cldy Honolulu 86 73 Clr Houston 97 75 PCldy Indianapolis 80 70 .02 Rain Jacksonville 90 74 Cldy Kansas City 88 69 PCldy Key West 87 78 .66 Cldy Las Vegas 111 90 PCldy Little Rock 93 68 PCldy

Hi Los Angeles 80 Louisville 80 88 Memphis Miami Beach 88 Milwaukee 84 Mpls-St Paul 89 Nashville 77 New Orleans 81 New York City 90 Oklahoma City 93 Omaha 88 Orlando 90 Philadelphia 91 Phoenix 106 Pittsburgh 83 Sacramento 83 St Louis 84 St Petersburg 89 Salt Lake City 93 San Antonio 96 73 San Diego San Francisco 65 Seattle 74 Spokane 80 Syracuse 90 Tampa 91 Tucson 100 Washington,D.C. 90

Lo Prc Otlk 66 Cldy 68 .94 Rain 70 .01 Cldy 80 .12 PCldy 66 PCldy 76 Cldy 681.43 Rain 74 .17 Rain 78 PCldy 72 PCldy 69 Cldy 74 .03 Cldy 77 PCldy 89 Clr 70 Cldy 57 Clr 71 PCldy 76 .54 PCldy 70 Cldy 74 PCldy 67 Cldy 55 PCldy 56 PCldy 55 Clr 72 .21 Cldy 76 .10 PCldy 75 PCldy 77 PCldy

W.VA.

KY

SOURCE: ASSOCIATED PRESS

REGIONAL ALMANAC Temperature High Yesterday .............................79 at 3:17 p.m. Low Yesterday............................70 at 11:32 a.m. Normal High .....................................................84 Normal Low ......................................................65 Record High ......................................102 in 2012 Record Low.........................................44 in 1972

Precipitation 24 hours ending at 5 p.m..............................0.66 Month to date ................................................1.37 Normal month to date ...................................0.83 Year to date .................................................18.79 Normal year to date ....................................22.04 Snowfall yesterday ........................................0.00

Ohio flood warning stretch to new areas COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — There appears to be no end in sight for a soaked state. Flood warnings are in effect in several Ohio counties as rain continues to soak the state. The National Weather Service has issued flash flood warnings from Sunday morning until late Sunday night for east central Ohio, Belmont,

Monroe and Noble counties. Meteorologists say heavier showers and thunderstorms moved southwest to northeast into Sunday, with the heaviest rains in newly affected Ohio areas expected late Sunday morning. A flood warning in southeast Warren County and flash flood watches in Ross,

Hocking, Pike and Scioto counties remained in effect until 11 p.m. Saturday. High waters Saturday caused numerous road closings in the Cincinnati area and re-routing of two city bus routes. A marine unit rescued two employees trapped in high water inside a storage unit in Monroe.

Fervent foes devote their lives to fracking fight VESTAL, N.Y. (AP) — Big energy companies have been trying for five years to tap the riches of the Marcellus Shale in southern New York, promising thousands of new jobs, economic salvation for a depressed region, and a cheap, abundant, cleanburning source of fuel close to power-hungry cities. But for all its political clout and financial prowess, the industry hasn’t been able to get its foot in the door. One reason: Folks like Sue Rapp and Vera Scroggins are standing in the way. Rapp, a family counselor in the Broome County town of Vestal, in the prime shale gas region near the Pennsylvania border, is intense and unrelenting in pressing her petitions. Scroggins a retiree and grandmother who lives across the border in hilly northeastern Pennsylvania, where intensive gas development has been going on for five years is gleefully confrontational. She happily posts videos of her skirmishes. The anti-fracking movement has inspired a legion of people like Rapp and Scroggins idiosyncratic true believers, many of them middle-aged women, who have made it the central mission of their lives to stop gas drilling using high-volume hydraulic fracturing in the Marcellus region that underlies southern New York, Pennsylvania, Ohio and West Virginia. They are not necessarily popular; they have been shunned by former friends who support drilling and the economic benefits it brings. Their opponents accuse them of distorting the truth about fracking’s impacts by insisting that their communities and surrounding countryside will be transformed into a polluted industrial wasteland if natural gas interests have their way. But many of those same opponents acknowledge that Rapp, Scroggins and others like them have been effective. “There’s no denying that their actions have had an impact,” said Jim Smith, spokesman for the Independent Oil and Gas Association of New York. “If they weren’t doing what they’re doing, we would have been through with this a long time ago. They’re wrong on the facts but they’re very loud and very vocal, and that gets noticed for political rea-

AP

In this Jan. 17 photo, anti-fracking activist Vera Scroggins, left, talks with Yoko Ono, center, and Sean Lennon at a fracking site in Franklin Forks, Pa., during a bus tour organized by Scroggins. Scroggins, a scrappy, in-your-face videographer, is a self-appointed guide to the gas patch of northeastern Pennsylvania, where she lives in a single-wide trailer near a lake. sons.” Their cause is amplified by an extensive coalition including deep-pocketed environmental groups, New York City lawyers, organic farmers, doctors, paid professional activists and celebrities that has waged a relentless campaign urging Gov. Andrew Cuomo to ban fracking. The Democratic governor continues to delay his decision, leaving drillers and landowners with leases in limbo since 2008. That’s when the state launched a study of the environmental impact of fracking, which frees gas from shale a mile or so underground by injecting chemically treated water and sand into a horizontal well bore. While Rapp and Scroggins are among the more visible of the grassroots fracking foes, their motivations and personal styles are different. “I don’t have a political agenda. I just want to preserve the quality of life for myself and my neighbors,” Rapp said as she had lunch with Scroggins at the Vestal Diner. Thin and birdlike with curly red hair, Rapp is a leader in the so-called “home rule” movement, which has led more than 100 communities to enact bans or moratoriums against fracking. The gas industry has challenged the legality of such bans but has

lost two cases which it plans to appeal to the state’s highest court. Rapp devotes her free time to organizing letter-writing campaigns to the governor, gathering signatures on petitions, and trying unsuccessfully to get her town board to enact a fracking ban or pass road-use laws aimed at the convoys of water and gravel trucks heading for Pennsylvania’s drilling sites. She campaigned last fall for anti-fracking candidates. But in her county and others in the border region where drilling is most likely to start if Cuomo gives it the green light, all were defeated. “I have two petitions, the road petition and the ban petition,” Rapp said. “I knock on doors, I go to farmers markets and the rail trails. I don’t think of myself as an activist or an environmentalist; this is just something I have an enormous commitment to.” In contrast, Scroggins relishes the label of activist. A short, stocky woman with long silver hair and loose T-shirt, Scroggins is a scrappy, in-your-face videographer and self-appointed guide to the gas patch of northeastern Pennsylvania, where she lives in a single-wide trailer near a lake. She has given tours to state and local politicians, community groups, and anti-fracking celebrities such as Yoko Ono, Sean

Lennon and Susan Sarandon. Several days a week, she drives people around to show them drilling sites, pipelines, compressor stations, and truck-worn roads. She introduces them to residents of Dimock and Franklin Forks who believe their well water was ruined by drilling operations even though state and federal investigators couldn’t confirm all the complaints. She records the tours on video. She also records town board meetings, often raising the ire of people who’d rather not be in the videos she posts online by the hundreds. “Basically what I show is, ‘Do you want this near your home?’” Scroggins said, standing on a road beside a well site with a rumbling compressor station, tanks, pipes, and other equipment. There are 700 gas wells in Susquehanna County; 38 percent of the county is under lease, and gas companies indicate a potential of 3,000 drilling locations. Gas industry bloggers have mocked Scroggins, but she clearly relishes her notoriety. On a recent tour, she flagged down the SUV of a gas company’s new security guards and introduced herself. “I’m the tour guide. I’m sure you’ve heard about me,” Scroggins said. When the guards

said they hadn’t, Scroggins told them about her frequent tour groups and said she’s often tailed by security details and shooed away from drilling sites. Many of the farmers and other landowners who are getting royalty checks from the gas wells on their land don’t welcome the self-appointed guide to the gas patch. Some have signs in their yards saying “Our water’s fine” and “My gas well pays my mortgage.” Scroggins takes it in stride. Rolling slowly down the road, she waved and smiled at a woman glowering in a front yard. “She hates me,” Scroggins said. Victor Furman, head of a progas landowners’ group in New York’s Chenango County, said Rapp and Scroggins are part of a “fringe group” that relies on emotion rather than science to build opposition. “They hold meetings that are full of lies and misinformation,” said Furman, a retired technical writer for IBM. “They do have some legitimate concerns, but they don’t want to talk about the mitigations to address those concerns,” such as storing fracking wastewater in closed tanks instead of open ponds and requiring multiple layers of well casing to protect ground water. The industry-funded Energy In Depth sometimes sends its own camera-toting representatives to tail Scroggins’ tours and rebut what she says. The group posted video on its website of Scroggins shouting personal insults and obscenities at Phelim McAleer, a pro-fracking filmmaker who tried to talk to Ono and Sarandon during their January tour. McAleer tried to tell them the Environmental Protection Agency had determined the drinking water in question was safe, not contaminated by drilling. “I admit that I lost it that day,” Scroggins said. “It wasn’t my finest hour.” Yet, she posted her own video of the encounter online. While drilling hasn’t come to New York, Rapp said the industry has already changed community life. “They’ve fractured our communities,” she said. “You can’t go to the grocery store or anywhere else without everybody knowing where everyone stands.”


CLASSIFIEDS Apartments /Townhouses

Pets

Appliances

1, 2 & 3 bedrooms Call for availability attached garages Easy access to I-75 (937)335-6690

KITTENS, grey, adorable & healthy, approximately 7-8 weeks old, using litter box, FREE to loving forever indoor home with responsible owner, (937)778-8657 if no answer (937)214-4969.

WASHER AND DRYER, Roper brand, 2 years old, $300 OBO (937)524-6946

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www.hawkapartments.net

Lost & Found

View each garage sale listing and location on our Garage Sale Map! Available online at troydailynews.com

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ANTIQUE OAK WASH STAND TABLE, if you purchased this at garage on June 21st, please call (937)623-6628 VERY IMPORTANT!

DODD RENTALS Tipp-Troy: 2 bedroom AC, appliances $550/$450 plus deposit No pets (937)667-4349 for appt.

Child / Elderly Care

LOST CAT Persian, big blue eyes, answers to Sammy, in or around Woodlawn/Winmere Subdivision Tipp City, if found call (937)668-6577 Memory / Thank You

Lost & Found

1,2 & 3 BEDROOM, Troy ranches and townhomes. Different floor plans to choose from. Garages, fireplaces, appliances, washer/ dryers. Corporate apartments available. Visit www.firsttroy.com, Call us first! (937)335-5223

To all my loyal customers, good friends and great colleagues; Thanks for making the last few years working in Troy a gratifying end to my retail career. Greg

LAWN TRACTOR, Craftsman 19.5 horsepower, 42" cut, 6 speed, good condition, $600. Call (937)524-9209 or (937)667-4017. <DUG 6DOH TROY, 935 Oak Hill Court, Friday, 7/12 and Saturday, 7/13, 9:30-4:00. Something for everyone! Many items for baby, toddler, hunter, fisherman, homeowner. Tools, 12 pc setting Cannes china, baby furniture, gently used toddler toys, sewing machine, touch pad computer, band saw, Boyd bears, tumbling mat, Vera Bradley articles, dorm frig, to name only a few.

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Continental Contractors

Please email resume to: drvantreese@gmail.com or mail to 2627 N Broadway Ave Sidney, OH 45365

3 Bedroom, 1 bath, Double, $675 (937)216-5806 EversRealty.net IN TROY, small 2 bedroom upper apartment, nice location, all utilities furnished, Metro welcome, $550 month, (937)773-2829 after 2pm. LOVELY AREA, 3 bedroom, 2 full baths, garage, appliances, washer/ dryer hookup, $795 monthly, (937)335-5440 PIQUA, Colonial Terrace Apts., Water, Sewer, Trash, Hot Water, Refrigerator, Range included. 2 BR $480, 1 BR $450. Washer/ Dryer on site. Pets welcome. No application fee. 6 or 12 month lease. (937)7731952. TIPP/ TROY, near I-75, 2 bedroom townhouse, 1.5 bath, all appliances, AC, no dogs, $490, (937)335-1825 TROY area, 2 bedroom townhouses, 1-1/2 bath, furnished appliances, W/D hookup, A/C, no dogs, $500. (937)339-6776.

Other BE YOUR OWN BOSS

TROY, 3 bedroom, stove/ refrigerator, water paid, no pets, no washer/dryer hookup, $495 month, (937)829-8999

Has a great opportunity for an individual wanting to start their own delivery business by becoming an owner/ operator of a

TROY, 509.5, East Main, clean, Large 1 Bedroom, upstairs, appliances, $400, monthly lease possible, (937)207-7306

This GREAT opportunity comes with SUPER SECURITY and UNLIMITED Earning Potential. This is YOUR opportunity to work with the #1 Home Improvement Center!!

Gutters â&#x20AC;¢ Doors â&#x20AC;¢ Remodel Voted #1 in Shelby County by Sidney Daily News Readers 40194080 40058924

Call: 715-876-4000

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1999 CHEVY CORVETTE automatic convertible with approximately 67,000 miles. This car is in great condition. $20,500 or best offer. Call Craig at (937)776-0922

2001 FORD TAURUS loaded, immaculate condition inside & out, beautiful navy blue, only 108K miles, 32 mpg hwy, $4350 (937)552-7786 Troy 2001 FORD TAURUS, SE, white, 4 door, new tires, 73,500 miles, $4,250. Call (937)778-8286

1, 2 & 3 Bedroom, Houses & Apts. SEIPEL PROPERTIES Piqua Area Only Metro Approved (937)773-9941 9am-5pm Monday-Friday

Miscellaneous COUNTRY CONCERT TICKETS, close to the concert area campsite R4 , 3 day pass, parking, 6 wrist bands. $550. (937)492-3927. KINDLE FIRE, slightly used, with case $150. Call (937)4923927 Tickets RACE TICKETS, (5) Brickyard 400, 7/28 NASCAR race in Indianapolis, Paddock Box in shade near start/finish line, $90 each face value. (937)5966257. 6(59,&(  %86,1(66 ',5(&725<

HERITAGE GOODHEW â&#x20AC;¢Standing Seam Metal Roofing â&#x20AC;¢New Installation â&#x20AC;¢Metal Roof Repairs â&#x20AC;¢Pole Barn Metal $2.06 LF. â&#x20AC;¢Standing Seam Snap Lock Panels

Appliances

WEST MILTON, 3 bedroom, ground level apartment, Metro approved, no dogs! (937)5736867. 2 BEDROOM upstairs condo, Tipp City, large rooms, newly painted, CA, deck, garage, $650, (937)339-3961. Houses For Rent Price Reduced 2 bedroom, garage, $600 monthly, 1 month deposit, available now, 1144 Patton (937)552-9644

2 BEDROOM, washer/dryer hook-up, CA, off street parking, quiet cul-de-sac $475 monthly, Metro approved, (937)603-1645

RIDING MOWER, Wheel Horse, 36" cut, good condition, $300 call (937)499-4140

765-857-2623 2002 GMC SIERRA 1500 Regular cab, fiberglass high top camper, aluminum running boards, 2 wheel drive, 5300 Vortec engine, excellent condition, $8750. Call (937)538-1294

Condominiums

Apartments /Townhouses

Landscaping & Gardening RIDING LAWNMOWER, Wheelhorse, completely rebuilt, New battery, tuneup, rebuilt carburetor, seat, paint, new blades, Runs great!!, $400, (937)492-1501 RIDING MOWER, John Deere 212, 47 inch cut, Engine needs work, (937)726-9170

FORD 2000 Super Dexta diesel. 45hp, live pto, 90% rubber, 2400 hours. May trade. (937)489-1725.

DELIVERY TRUCK!

Roofing â&#x20AC;¢ Siding â&#x20AC;¢ Windows

937-492-5150 937-492-5150

DENTAL ASSISTANT Hiring full time Dental Assistant who is passionate about providing excellent patient care. Candidate must have 5+ years experience, current radiographer license and references. Benefits and pension.

Farm Equipment

TROY, 2 Bedroom Townhomes 1.5 bath, 1 car garage, $725

ATTENTION: 29 serious people to work from home using a computer. Up to $1500$5000, full time/ part time. www.mbincome4unow.com. HIRING NOW GENERAL LABOR plus CDL TRUCK DRIVERS Training provided Excellent wage & benefits Apply at 15 Industry Park Ct Tipp City (937)667-6772

SIBERIAN HUSKEY, male puppy, full blooded, no papers. Mother and Father on site. First shots and De-wormed. $150.00! (937)417-5856.

EVERS REALTY

Help Wanted General

Medical/Health

Miscellaneous

FREE ES AT T ES IM

CHILD CARE OPENINGS, daytime hours, hot meals and snacks included, big yard to play in. Please call (937)5701059.

MINIATURE DACHSHUND PUP, red, long coat female, AKC, 2nd shots, wormed, written guarantee, crate training and doing well! $350 (937)6671777

Furniture & Accessories BEDROOM SET, 7 piece queen, $1200. Large solid oak roll top desk, $300. Blue & Cream plaid sofa and oversized chair with ottoman, $600. All excellent condition. OBO on each. (937)332-1419

PIQUA NEAR 1-75, very nice 3 bedroom, 2 bath, 2 car garage, includes appliances, no pets, $890 monthly, 18 month lease, (937)778-0524

Child / Elderly Care

DAYCARE

Motorcycles 2003 HONDA Reflex, automatic, 250cc, yellow scooter, gas saver, about 70 mpg, great shape, never been laid down, $2650 (937)339-3360

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40043994

937-606-1122 Land Care

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40200304

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40277626

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â&#x20AC;¢ Tree Trimming & Removal â&#x20AC;¢ Shrub Trimming & Removal â&#x20AC;¢ Stump Removal

Mobile Veterinary Service Treating Dogs, Cats & Exotics

937-947-4409 937-371-0454

40260164

Self performing our own work allows for the best prices on skilled labor.                            25 years combined experience FREE estimates (937)573-7357 InerrantContractors@gmail.com

Paving & Excavating

COOPERâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S GRAVEL

875-0153 698-6135

(937) 473-2847 (937) 216-9361

Construction & Building

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11

40296906

40296891

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40294410

40251556

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2385772

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Monday, July 8, 2013

40200155

TROY DAILY NEWS â&#x20AC;¢ WWW.TROYDAILYNEWS.COM

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SPORTS TROY DAILY NEWS • WWW.TROYDAILYNEWS.COM

CONTACT US ■ Sports Editor Josh Brown (937) 440-5251, (937) 440-5232 jbrown@civitasmedia.com

JOSH BROWN

12 July 8, 2013

TODAY’S TIPS

■ Tennis

• TENNIS: The Troy Recreation Department is again sponsoring the Frydell Junior Open Tennis Tournament Wednesday through Saturday at Troy Community Park. The tournament is for boys and girls ages 18 and under. To register, download and print the form at www.troyohio.gov/rec/programregforms.html. All forms must be received by Friday. For more information, contact Dave Moore at (937) 368-2663 or (937) 418-2633 or by email at frydelldcm@gmail.com. • SKATING: Hobart Arena will hold public skating sessions this summer. All public skating sessions are held Fridays from 8-10 p.m. Tickets are $5 for adults, $4 for Children (14 and under) and $2.50 for skate rental. The dates for public skating this summer are July 19 and 26. • RUNNING: The Piqua Optimist Club’s fifth annual Bob Mikolajewski Memorial 5K Run and Walk will be held at 8:30 a.m. Saturday at the Piqua High School Alexander Stadium. Pre-registrations must be received by July 6 to ensure a race T-shirt. Go online to www.PiquaOptimist5k.com to download the event registration flyer. Online registration is also available through www.alliancerunning.com. Race day registration will begin at 7:15 a.m. The cost to participate in the event is $15, and prizes will be awarded to the overall and age category winners. • HOCKEY: Registrations are now being accepted for the Troy Recreation Department’s Summer Youth Introduction to Hockey Program held at Hobart Arena. The program is for youth ages 5-10 years old and includes three dates: July 16, 23 and 30 from 7:308:30 p.m. The program is for those who have never participated in an organized hockey program. An equipment rental program is available. The cost of the program is $10 for all three sessions. To register, visit the Recreation Department located in Hobart Arena, 255 Adams St. or visit www.hobartarena.com on the “registrations” page and print off a registration form. Contact the Recreation Department at 339-5145 for further information. • COACHING: Bethel High School has three coaching positions open for the upcoming school year. For the asst. varsity football coach position, contact head coach Kevin Finfrock at (937) 216-5036. For the boys junior varsity basketball position, contact Eric Glover at (937) 510-7795 or at coacheglover@aol.com. The seventh grade volleyball coaching job is also open. For more information, contact Tim Zigler at (937) 845-9487. • SUBMIT-A-TIP: To submit an item to the Troy Daily News sports section, please contact Josh Brown at jbrown@civitasmedia.com or Colin Foster at colinfoster@civitasmedia.com.

The wait is over

SPORTS CALENDAR TODAY No events scheduled

Britain’s Murray captures Wimbledon title LONDON (AP) — Andy Murray needed one more point, one solitary point, to win Wimbledon a title he yearned to earn for himself, of course, and also for his country. Britain had endured 77 years since one of its own claimed the men’s trophy at the revered tourAP PHOTO nament referred to simply as Andy Murray reacts as he wins against Novak Djokovicduring the The Championships, and now men’s singles final match Sunday at the All England Lawn Tennis here was Murray, on the brink of Championships in Wimbledon, London. triumph after 3 hours of grueling

tennis against top-seeded Novak Djokovic under a vibrant sun at Centre Court. Up 40-love, Murray failed to convert his first match point. And his second. And then, yes, his third, too. On and on the contest, and accompanying tension, stretched, Murray unable to close it, Djokovic unwilling to yield, the minutes certainly feeling like hours to those playing

■ Major League Baseball

■ Auto Racing

Daytona domination Johnson sweeps both races at track

AP PHOTO

Cincinnati Reds relief pitcher Aroldis Chapman throws against the Seattle Mariners in the ninth inning of a baseball game Sunday in Cincinnati. The Mariners won 3-1.

Losing their edge Reds’ offense struggles in 3-1 defeat

TUESDAY Legion Baseball Muncie IBPA at Troy Post 43 (8 p.m.)

WHAT’S INSIDE Television Schedule..............13 Scoreboard ............................13 Cycling..................................14 Soccer ...................................14

■ See WIMBLEDON on 14

CINCINNATI (AP) — After an offensive outburst on Saturday, the Cincinnati Reds thought they could keep slugging away on Sunday. Especially against a Seattle Mariners pitcher who had allowed 15 earned runs in four previous starts against them. Instead, Joe Saunders shut them down. The Reds managed just six hits and a run off the left-hander in a 3-1 loss that manager Dusty Baker said wasn’t as bad as it seemed. “We hit the ball a lot harder than the scorebook showed,”

Baker said. “We didn’t have a lot to show for it. I tell the guys to just keep swinging the bats.” Saunders pitched seven efficient innings, allowing only two baserunners to reach third in the first six and retiring 11 consecutive batters before Chris Heisey doubled into the leftfield corner with one out in the fifth inning. “We’ve hit Saunders well in the past,” Baker said. “I thought we’d manage more than one run.” Saunders (7-8) walked none and struck out two while winning back-to-back starts for the

first time this season. Charlie Furbush pitched a 12-3 eighth and Tom Wilhelmsen was perfect in the ninth for his 18th save, helping the Mariners pick up their second win of the three-game series and improve to 10-2 against the Reds since interleague play began in 1997. The Reds went down in order in six of their nine innings. Nick Franklin and Justin Smoak accounted for all of Seattle’s runs with homers off Bronson Arroyo (7-7), who overcame a 32-pitch first inning to

DAYTONA BEACH, Fla. (AP) — There’s one certainty about racing at NASCAR’s most unpredictable tracks: a chaotic ending. Jimmie Johnson dominated the latest restrictor-plate race Saturday night, winning at Daytona International Speedway for the second time this year and joining another exclusive list at the famed venue. The five-time Sprint Cup champion became the first driver since Hall of Famer Bobby Allison in 1982 to sweep both points races at Daytona in the same season. Fireball Roberts (1962), Cale Yarborough (1968) and LeeRoy Yarbrough (1969) also accomplished the feat. Johnson joined them after leading 94 of 161 laps, including 55 of the final 57. But like so many other races at Daytona and Talladega, where horsepower-sapping plates generally keep speeds below 200 mph, it came with a frantic finish. There were two multi-car wrecks on the final lap, the second one just a few feet shy of the finish line. “Be glad you were sitting in the stands and not in the cars,” runnerup Tony Stewart said. Scott Speed and Carl Edwards got together in turn 2, starting a six-car pileup. Instead of ending the race under caution, NASCAR decided to let the cars race to the line. With drivers maneuvering for position through the final turns, David Gilliland and Danica Patrick got tangled, turning Patrick’s car into several others. Kyle Busch, Ryan Newman, Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Jeff Burton and other were involved. “I asked my crew when the checkered fell to remind me why I do this,” driver/owner Michael Waltrip said. “What’s fun about it? … I just know that 200 miles an hour pushing and shoving — this is fun for the fans and it’s going to be fun to watch back on TV. I wasn’t having any fun doing it. “I was too nervous. I’d much rather watch. Why don’t I just watch all the time? I’ve got that option. I don’t know what’s wrong with me.” There’s little drivers can do to avoid all the turmoil that comes with plate racing. It happens at just about every race at Daytona and Talladega, where drivers, fans and everyone watching are always waiting for “the big one.” It usually happens late, too.

■ See REDS on 14

■ Major League Baseball

Brantley’s homer lifts Indians to win Martin takes 9th stage at Tour Left alone and with his teammates far behind, Chris Froome held off repeated attacks to retain the Tour de France lead Sunday as the three-week race left the Pyrenees mountains. See Page 14.

CLEVELAND (AP) — Michael Brantley’s two-run homer in the eighth inning off Al Alburquerque helped Cleveland snap a seven-game skid against Detroit and gave the Indians an 9-6 win on Sunday, trimming one game off the Tigers’ lead in the AL Central. Brantley hit a solo homer in the sixth and had a career-high five RBIs. He drove a 3-1 pitch

from Alburquerque (1-2) over the wall in right as the Indians recovered after their bullpen blew a five-run lead. Detroit had overpowered Cleveland in the first two games of the four-game series, and the Tigers rallied to tie it 6-all in the eighth on Torii Hunter’s three-run homer. Cody Allen (4-1) got one out in the eighth and Chris Perez gave up a single in the ninth

before getting his ninth save. Detroit had its five-game winning streak snapped. Carlos Santana hit a two-run homer and Lonnie Chisenhall added a solo shot as the Indians moved within 2 1-2 games of the first-place Tigers. Hunter had four RBIs and Miguel Cabrera homered and had four hits for Detroit, which lost to the Indians for just the fourth time in 15 games.

AP PHOTO

Jimmie Johnson celebrates his victory Saturday night in Daytona Beach, Fla.

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SCOREBOARD

TROY DAILY NEWS • WWW.TROYDAILYNEWS.COM

Scores

BASEBALL Baseball Expanded Standings All Times EDT AMERICAN LEAGUE East Division W L Pct Boston 54 35 .607 Baltimore 49 40 .551 49 40 .551 Tampa Bay 48 40 .545 New York 43 45 .489 Toronto Central Division L Pct W Detroit 48 39 .552 Cleveland 46 42 .523 41 44 .482 Kansas City 37 48 .435 Minnesota 34 51 .400 Chicago West Division L Pct W Oakland 52 37 .584 Texas 51 37 .580 Los Angeles 42 45 .483 39 49 .443 Seattle 32 57 .360 Houston NATIONAL LEAGUE East Division W L Pct Atlanta 50 38 .568 Washington 46 42 .523 43 46 .483 Philadelphia 37 48 .435 New York 32 55 .368 Miami Central Division W L Pct Pittsburgh 53 34 .609 St. Louis 53 34 .609 Cincinnati 50 38 .568 38 48 .442 Chicago 35 52 .402 Milwaukee West Division L Pct W Arizona 47 41 .534 Los Angeles 42 45 .483 Colorado 42 47 .472 San Francisco 40 47 .460 40 49 .449 San Diego

GB WCGB — — 5 — 5 — 5½ ½ 10½ 5½

L10 8-2 6-4 8-2 6-4 4-6

Str L-1 W-1 W-4 L-1 W-1

Home 31-16 25-17 28-18 25-19 25-21

Away 23-19 24-23 21-22 23-21 18-24

GB WCGB — — 2½ 2½ 6 6 10 10 13 13

L10 6-4 6-4 5-5 2-8 2-8

Str L-1 W-1 L-1 L-1 L-3

Home 26-16 25-17 22-22 21-23 19-20

Away 22-23 21-25 19-22 16-25 15-31

GB WCGB — — ½ — 9 6 12½ 9½ 20 17

L10 7-3 6-4 8-2 5-5 2-8

Str W-1 W-1 W-1 W-1 L-1

Home 28-14 27-19 23-25 21-22 17-32

Away 24-23 24-18 19-20 18-27 15-25

GB WCGB — — 4 4 7½ 7½ 11½ 11½ 17½ 17½

L10 5-5 7-3 5-5 5-5 5-5

Str L-1 W-4 W-1 W-1 L-3

Home 29-13 27-18 21-19 17-27 18-24

Away 21-25 19-24 22-27 20-21 14-31

GB WCGB — — — — 3½ — 14½ 11 18 14½

L10 6-4 5-5 5-5 6-4 3-7

Str L-2 W-3 L-1 W-2 L-1

Home 29-15 25-16 30-16 19-23 20-25

Away 24-19 28-18 20-22 19-25 15-27

GB WCGB — — 4½ 7½ 5½ 8½ 6½ 9½ 7½ 10½

L10 5-5 7-3 3-7 2-8 1-9

Str W-5 W-1 L-3 L-1 L-9

Home 24-16 25-21 26-21 25-17 25-18

Away 23-25 17-24 16-26 15-30 15-31

AMERICAN LEAGUE Saturday's Games N.Y. Yankees 5, Baltimore 4 Minnesota 6, Toronto 0 Kansas City 4, Oakland 3 Detroit 9, Cleveland 4 Cincinnati 13, Seattle 4 Tampa Bay 3, Chicago White Sox 0 Houston 9, Texas 5 L.A. Angels 9, Boston 7, 11 innings Sunday's Games Baltimore 2, N.Y. Yankees 1 Cleveland 9, Detroit 6 Toronto 11, Minnesota 5 Seattle 3, Cincinnati 1 Tampa Bay 3, Chicago White Sox 1 Oakland 10, Kansas City 4 Texas 5, Houston 4 Boston at L.A. Angels, 8:05 p.m. Monday's Games Detroit (Scherzer 13-0) at Cleveland (Kazmir 4-4), 7:05 p.m. Kansas City (Guthrie 7-6) at N.Y. Yankees (P.Hughes 4-7), 7:05 p.m. Oakland (Colon 11-3) at Pittsburgh (Locke 8-1), 7:05 p.m. Texas (D.Holland 6-4) at Baltimore (Feldman 0-0), 7:05 p.m. Minnesota (Deduno 4-3) at Tampa Bay (Ro.Hernandez 4-10), 7:10 p.m. Chicago Cubs (Garza 4-1) at Chicago White Sox (H.Santiago 3-5), 8:10 p.m. Boston (Lester 8-4) at Seattle (F.Hernandez 8-4), 10:10 p.m. Tuesday's Games Kansas City at N.Y. Yankees, 7:05 p.m. Oakland at Pittsburgh, 7:05 p.m. Texas at Baltimore, 7:05 p.m. Toronto at Cleveland, 7:05 p.m. Chicago White Sox at Detroit, 7:08 p.m. Minnesota at Tampa Bay, 7:10 p.m. L.A. Angels at Chicago Cubs, 8:05 p.m. Houston at St. Louis, 8:15 p.m. Boston at Seattle, 10:10 p.m. NATIONAL LEAGUE Saturday's Games St. Louis 5, Miami 4 Chicago Cubs 4, Pittsburgh 1 Washington 5, San Diego 4 Cincinnati 13, Seattle 4 Atlanta 13, Philadelphia 4 San Francisco 4, L.A. Dodgers 2 Milwaukee 7, N.Y. Mets 6 Arizona 11, Colorado 1 Sunday's Games Seattle 3, Cincinnati 1 Philadelphia 7, Atlanta 3 Washington 11, San Diego 7 N.Y. Mets 2, Milwaukee 1 St. Louis 3, Miami 2 Chicago Cubs 4, Pittsburgh 3, 11 innings L.A. Dodgers 4, San Francisco 1 Arizona 6, Colorado 1 Monday's Games Oakland (Colon 11-3) at Pittsburgh (Locke 8-1), 7:05 p.m. Washington (Haren 4-9) at Philadelphia (Lannan 1-3), 7:05 p.m. Atlanta (Minor 8-4) at Miami (Slowey 3-6), 7:10 p.m. Chicago Cubs (Garza 4-1) at Chicago White Sox (H.Santiago 3-5), 8:10 p.m. Cincinnati (H.Bailey 5-6) at Milwaukee (Lohse 4-6), 8:10 p.m. L.A. Dodgers (Greinke 6-2) at Arizona (Delgado 1-2), 9:40 p.m. Colorado (Chatwood 4-2) at San Diego (Volquez 6-6), 10:10 p.m. N.Y. Mets (Harvey 7-2) at San Francisco (Lincecum 4-9), 10:15 p.m. Tuesday's Games Oakland at Pittsburgh, 7:05 p.m. Washington at Philadelphia, 7:05 p.m. Atlanta at Miami, 7:10 p.m. L.A. Angels at Chicago Cubs, 8:05 p.m. Cincinnati at Milwaukee, 8:10 p.m. Houston at St. Louis, 8:15 p.m. L.A. Dodgers at Arizona, 9:40 p.m. Colorado at San Diego, 10:10 p.m. N.Y. Mets at San Francisco, 10:15 p.m. Sunday's Major League Linescores AMERICAN LEAGUE Baltimore . .000 000 002—2 6 0 New York . .010 000 000—1 6 0 Hammel, McFarland (6), Patton (8), O'Day (8), Ji.Johnson (9) and Wieters; Kuroda, D.Robertson (8), M.Rivera (9) and C.Stewart. W_O'Day 5-0. L_M.Rivera 1-2. Sv_Ji.Johnson (30). HRs_Baltimore, A.Jones (16). Detroit . . . .100 000 230—6 13 0 Cleveland .410 001 03x—9 8 0 Fister, E.Reed (7), Alburquerque (8), Putkonen (8) and Avila; Kluber, J.Smith (7), Pestano (8), Allen (8), C.Perez (9) and C.Santana. W_Allen 4-1. L_Alburquerque 1-2. Sv_C.Perez (9). HRs_Detroit, Mi.Cabrera (28), Tor.Hunter (6). Cleveland, C.Santana (11), Chisenhall (5), Brantley 2 (7). Minnesota .000 021 020—5 5 0 Toronto . . .000 24140x—11 13 2 Diamond, Swarzak (5), Roenicke (6), Duensing (7), Fien (8) and Doumit; Redmond, Loup (6), McGowan (7),

Cecil (8), Wagner (8), Janssen (9) and W_Redmond 1-1. Arencibia. L_Diamond 5-8. HRs_Minnesota, Hicks (7), Plouffe (9). Toronto, Col.Rasmus (16), Reyes (4), R.Davis (2). Chicago . . .000 001 000—1 8 0 Tampa Bay .100 010 10x—3 5 0 Joh.Danks, Lindstrom (8) and Phegley; Price and J.Molina. W_Price 3-4. L_Joh.Danks 2-6. HRs_Chicago, Phegley (1). Oakland . . .052 001200—10 15 1 Kansas City010 012 000—4 10 0 Griffin, Blevins (6), J.Chavez (6) and Jaso, D.Norris; Mendoza, B.Chen (2), W.Smith (6), J.Gutierrez (9) and Kottaras. W_Griffin 7-6. L_Mendoza 25. Sv_J.Chavez (1). HRs_Oakland, Reddick (4), Lowrie (6), Sogard (1). Kansas City, Kottaras (4), A.Gordon (9). Houston . . .020 110 000—4 8 1 Texas . . . . .301 010 00x—5 7 2 Bedard, Clemens (7), W.Wright (8) and Corporan; Grimm, Burns (5), Soria (6), Frasor (7), Cotts (8), Nathan (9) and Pierzynski. W_Burns 1-0. L_Bedard 3-5. Sv_Nathan (29). HRs_Houston, Krauss (1). Texas, Pierzynski (8), A.Beltre (18). INTERLEAGUE Seattle . . . .102 000 000—3 6 1 Cincinnati .000 000 100—1 6 1 J.Saunders, Furbush (8), Wilhelmsen (9) and Zunino; Arroyo, Simon (7), M.Parra (8), Chapman (9) and Hanigan. W_J.Saunders 7-8. L_Arroyo 7-7. Sv_Wilhelmsen (18). HRs_Seattle, Franklin (6), Smoak (7). NATIONAL LEAGUE San Diego .001 201 210—7 12 2 Washington 106 04000x—11 11 1 Erlin, T.Ross (5), Thayer (7), Vincent (8) and Hundley; Strasburg, Stammen (7), Storen (8), Clippard (9) and W.Ramos. W_Strasburg 5-6. L_Erlin 12. HRs_San Diego, Amarista (5). Washington, Zimmerman (10), Rendon (3). Atlanta . . . .000 010 200—3 10 1 Philadelphia200 212 00x—7 10 0 Medlen, A.Wood (6), Ayala (7), D.Carpenter (8) and McCann; Pettibone, Diekman (6), De Fratus (6), J.Ramirez (7), Bastardo (7), Papelbon (9) and Ruiz. W_Pettibone 5-3. L_Medlen 6-8. HRs_Atlanta, C.Johnson (6). Philadelphia, D.Brown (23). New York . .000 101 000—2 11 0 Milwaukee .000 000 100—1 3 2 Hefner, Edgin (8), Parnell (8) and Recker; Gorzelanny, Mic.Gonzalez (7), Kintzler (7), Axford (9) and Lucroy. W_Hefner 4-6. L_Gorzelanny 1-2. Sv_Parnell (15). HRs_Milwaukee, Lucroy (10). Miami . . . . .010 100 000—2 9 0 St. Louis . .102 000 00x—3 6 0 Fernandez, Da.Jennings (7), Webb (8) and Mathis; Lynn, Rosenthal (8), Mujica (9) and T.Cruz. W_Lynn 11-3. L_Fernandez 5-5. Sv_Mujica (23). HRs_St. Louis, Holliday (12). Los Angeles010000 003—4 7 0 San Francisco001000000—1 4 1 Kershaw, Jansen (9) and A.Ellis; Gaudin, S.Rosario (8), J.Lopez (8), Romo (9), Dunning (9) and Quiroz. W_Kershaw 8-5. L_Romo 3-4. Sv_Jansen (9). Colorado . .000 000 010—1 3 0 Arizona . . .013 011 00x—6 11 0 Oswalt, Escalona (2), Outman (5), Belisle (7), Brothers (8) and W.Rosario; Corbin, Collmenter (9) and M.Montero. W_Corbin 10-1. L_Oswalt 0-4. HRs_Colorado, J.Herrera (1). 2013 All-Star Rosters Rosters for the MLB All-Star game on Tuesday, July 16 at Citi Field in New York (x-injured, will not play; y-injury replacement): AMERICAN LEAGUE STARTERS Catcher_Joe Mauer, Minnesota First Base_Chris Davis, Baltimore Second Base_Robinson Cano, New York Third Base_Miguel Cabrera, Detroit Shortstop_J.J. Hardy, Baltimore Outfield— Mike Trout, Los Angeles; Adam Jones, Baltimore; Jose Bautista, Toronto Designated Hitter_David Ortiz, Boston RESERVES Catcher_Jason Castro, Houston; Salvador Perez, Kansas City Infielders_Prince Fielder, 1b, Detroit; Jason Kipnis, 2b, Cleveland; Manny Machado, 3b, Baltimore; Dustin Pedroia, 2b, Boston; Jhonny Peralta, ss, Detroit; Ben Zobrist, 2b, Tampa Bay Outfielders_Nelson Cruz, Texas; Alex Gordon, Kansas City, Torrii Hunter, Detroit Designated Hitter_Edwin Encarnacion, Toronto PITCHERS x-Clay Buchholz, Boston; Brett Cecil, Toronto; y-Bartolo Colon, Oakland; xJesse Crain, Chicago; Yu Darvish, Texas; Felix Hernandez, Seattle;

AND SCHEDULES

SPORTS ON TV TODAY MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 7 p.m. ESPN — Washington at Philadelphia 8 p.m. FSN — Cincinnati at Milwaukee

TUESDAY CYCLING 8 a.m. NBCSN — Tour de France, stage 10, Saint-Gildas-des-Bois to Sain-Malo, France MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 7 p.m. MLB — Regional coverage, Texas at Baltimore or Kansas City at N.Y. Yankees 8 p.m. FSN — Cincinnati at Milwaukee WNBA BASKETBALL 9 p.m. ESPN2 — Atlanta at Minnesota

WEDNESDAY CYCLING 8 a.m. NBCSN — Tour de France, stage 11, Avranches to MontSaint-Michel, France MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 12:30 p.m. MLB — Regional coverage, Atlanta at Miami or Cincinnati at Milwaukee (2 p.m. start) 2 p.m. FSN — Cincinnati at Milwaukee 7 p.m. ESPN — Oakland at Pittsburgh 8 p.m. WGN — L.A. Angels at Chicago Cubs SOCCER 8:30 p.m. ESPN2 — MLS/Liga MX, exhibition, Club America at Chicago Hisashi Iwakuma, Seattle; Justin Masterson, Cleveland; Joe Nathan, Texas; y-Glen Perkins, Minnesota; Mariano Rivera, New York; Chris Sale, Chicago; Max Scherzer, Detroit; Justin Verlander, Detroit NATIONAL LEAGUE STARTERS Catcher_Yadier Molina, St. Louis First Base_Joey Votto, Cincinnati Second Base_Brandon Phillips, Cincinnati Third Base_David Wright, New York Shortstop_Troy Tulowitzki, Colorado Outfield_Carlos Beltran, St. Louis; Carlos Gonzalez, Colorado; Bryce Harper, Washington RESERVES Posey, San Catcher_Buster Francisco Infielders_Pedro Alvarez, 3b, Pittsburgh; Everth Cabrera, ss, San Diego; Matt Carpenter, 2b, St. Louis; Allen Craig, 1b, St. Louis; Paul Goldschmidt, 1b, Arizona; Marco Scutaro, 2b, San Francisco; Jean Segura, ss, Milwaukee Outfielders_Domonic Brown, Philadelphia; Michael Cuddyer, Colorado; Carlos Gomez, Milwaukee; Andrew McCutchen, Pittsburgh PITCHERS Madison Bumgarner, San Francisco; Aroldis Chapman, Cincinnati; Patrick Corbin, Arizona; Jose Fernandez, Miami; Jason Grilli, Pittsburgh; Matt Harvey, New York; Clayton Kershaw, Los Angeles; Craig Kimbrel, Atlanta; Cliff Lee, Philadelphia; Jeff Locke, Pittsburgh; Adam Wainwright, St. Louis; Travis Wood, Chicago; Jordan Zimmermann, Washington. Midwest League At A Glance Eastern Division W L Pct. GB Great Lakes (Dodgers)13 5 .722 — Bowling Green (Rays) 12 6 .667 1 Lake County (Indians) 12 6 .667 1 x-South Bend (D-backs)11 7 .611 2 8 10 .444 5 Dayton (Reds) West Michigan (Tigers) 8 10 .444 5 Fort Wayne (Padres) 5 12 .294 7½ Lansing (Blue Jays) 2 15 .11810½ Western Division W L Pct. GB 12 4 .750 — x-Beloit (Athletics) Cedar Rapids (Twins) 12 5 .706 ½ Quad Cities (Astros) 12 5 .706 ½ 9 8 .529 3½ Clinton (Mariners) Peoria (Cardinals) 7 9 .438 5 Wisconsin (Brewers) 6 11 .353 6½ 5 12 .294 7½ Burlington (Angels) Kane County (Cubs) 4 13 .235 8½ x-clinched first half Saturday's Games West Michigan 4, Lake County 3, 6 innings Clinton 6, Cedar Rapids 5, 11 innings Dayton 5, South Bend 1 Fort Wayne 7, Great Lakes 4 Burlington 7, Wisconsin 6 Peoria 4, Beloit 3 Quad Cities 5, Kane County 0 Bowling Green 1, Lansing 0 Sunday's Games Lake County 8, West Michigan 4 Quad Cities 12, Kane County 5 South Bend 5, Dayton 1 Burlington 5, Wisconsin 3 Clinton 5, Cedar Rapids 3 Great Lakes 8, Fort Wayne 4 Beloit at Peoria, 6 p.m. Bowling Green 7, Lansing 1 Monday's Games Lansing at Bowling Green, 1:05 p.m. West Michigan at Lake County, 7 p.m. South Bend at Dayton, 7 p.m. Great Lakes at Fort Wayne, 7:05 p.m. Wisconsin at Burlington, 7:30 p.m. Quad Cities at Kane County, 7:30 p.m. Beloit at Peoria, 8 p.m. Cedar Rapids at Clinton, 8 p.m. Tuesday's Games No games scheduled

CYCLING Tour de France Results BAGNERES-DE-BIGORRE, France (AP) — Results Sunday from the 165kilometer (103-mile) Stage 9 from Saint-Girons to Bagneres-de-Bigorre of the Tour de France: 1. Daniel Martin, Ireland, Garmin Sharp, 4 hours, 43 minutes, 3 seconds. 2. Jakob Fuglsang, Denmark, Astana Pro Team, same time. 3. Michal Kwiatkowski, Poland, Omega Pharma-Quickstep, 0:20 behind. 4. Daniel Moreno Fernandez, Spain, Katusha Team, 0:20. 5. Joaquin Rodriguez Oliver, Spain, Katusha Team, 0:20. 6. Cadel Evans, Australia, BMC Racing Team, 0:20. 7. Wouter Poels, Netherlands,

Vacansoleil-DCM Pro Cycling Team, 0:20. 8. Bauke Mollema, Netherlands, Belkin Pro Cycling, 0:20. 9. Daniel Navarro, Spain, Cofidis, Solutions Credits, 0:20. 10. Maxime Monfort, Belgium, RadioShack - Leopard, 0:20. 11. Alejandro Valverde, Spain, Movistar Team, 0:20. 12. Andy Schleck, Luxembourg, RadioShack - Leopard, 0:20. 13. Alberto Contador, Spain, Team Saxo-Tinkoff, 0:20. 14. Christopher Froome, England, Sky Pro Cycling, 0:20. 15. Roman Kreuziger, Czech Republic, Team Saxo-Tinkoff, 0:20. 16. Mikel Nieve Iturralde, Spain, Euskaltel - Euskadi, 0:20. 17. Laurens Ten Dam, Netherlands, Belkin Pro Cycling, 0:20. 18. Jean-Christophe Peraud, France, AG2R-La Mondiale, 0:20. 19. Nairo Alexander Quintana Rojas, Colombia, Movistar Team, 0:20. 20. Rui Alberto Costa, Portugal, Movistar Team, 0:20. 21. Hubert Dupont, France, AG2R-La Mondiale, 0:20. 22. Robert Gesink, Netherlands, Belkin Pro Cycling, 0:25. 23. Steve Morabito, Switzerland, BMC Racing Team, 0:25. 24. Romain Bardet, France, AG2RLa Mondiale, 3:54. 25. Jon Izaguirre Insausti, Spain, Euskaltel - Euskadi, 3:54. Overall Standings 1. Christopher Froome, England, Sky Pro Cycling, 36 hours, 59 minutes, 18 seconds. 2. Alejandro Valverde, Spain, Movistar Team, 1:25 behind. 3. Bauke Mollema, Netherlands, Belkin Pro Cycling, 1:44. 4. Laurens Ten Dam, Netherlands, Belkin Pro Cycling, 1:50. 5. Roman Kreuziger, Czech Republic, Team Saxo-Tinkoff, 1:51. 6. Alberto Contador, Spain, Team Saxo-Tinkoff, 1:51. 7. Nairo Alexander Quintana Rojas, Colombia, Movistar Team, 2:02. 8. Daniel Martin, Ireland, Garmin Sharp, 2:28. 9. Joaquin Rodriguez Oliver, Spain, Katusha Team, 2:31. 10. Rui Alberto Costa, Portugal, Movistar Team, 2:45. 11. Mikel Nieve Iturralde, Spain, Euskaltel - Euskadi, 2:55. 12. Jakob Fuglsang, Denmark, Astana Pro Team, 3:07. 13. Michal Kwiatkowski, Poland, Omega Pharma-Quickstep, 3:25. 14. Jean-Christophe Peraud, France, AG2R-La Mondiale, 3:29. 15. Andy Schleck, Luxembourg, RadioShack - Leopard, 4:00.

GOLF Greenbrier Classic Scores¢ Sunday At The Greenbrier Resort, The Old White TPC Sulphur Springs, W.Va. Purse: $6.3 million Yardage: 7,287; par 70 Final Jonas Blixt (500), $1,134,00066-67-67-67—267 S. Bowditch (184), $415,800.65-67-69-68—269 Matt Jones (184), $415,800..69-66-66-68—269 J.Wagner (184), $415,800 ....62-70-64-73—269 Jim Walker (184), $415,800 ..69-65-64-71—269 Pat Perez (92), $211,050.......71-65-66-69—271 Ted Potter, Jr. (92), $211,050.69-66-69-67—271 Brian Stuard (92), $211,050..71-66-67-67—271 Bill Haas (65), $140,963........68-67-67-70—272 D.H. Lee (65), $140,963.........66-68-68-70—272 D.Lingmerth (65), $140,963 ..71-66-67-68—272 Davis Love III (65), $140,963 67-70-68-67—272 Tim Petrovic (65), $140,963..69-68-67-68—272 Tag Ridings (65), $140,963 ...65-69-68-70—272 R.Sabbatini (65), $140,963 ...70-65-67-70—272 Summerhays (65), $140,963.65-67-73-67—272 Ben Curtis (52), $85,260.......67-66-71-69—273 B. de Jonge (52), $85,260.....66-68-73-66—273 Bill Lunde (52), $85,260 ........66-66-71-70—273 George McNeill (52), $85,26066-71-68-68—273 Bryce Molder (52), $85,260 ..71-67-66-69—273 L.Oosthuizen (52), $85,260...67-68-69-69—273 K.J. Choi (45), $53,100..........71-67-68-68—274 M. Hoffmann (45), $53,100 ...69-67-67-71—274 Greg Owen (45), $53,100 .....67-66-72-69—274 Jordan Spieth, $53,100 .........67-67-67-73—274 Scott Stallings (45), $53,100 .70-67-67-70—274 Cam Tringale (45), $53,100...73-66-67-68—274 Nick Watney (45), $53,100 ....72-67-65-70—274 Brian Davis (38), $36,619......67-68-70-70—275 G. DeLaet (38), $36,619........69-70-66-70—275 Russell Henley (38), $36,61967-65-72-71—275 Jim Herman (38), $36,619 ....72-67-71-65—275 Billy Horschel (38), $36,619 ..69-70-67-69—275 Cameron Percy (38), $36,61971-68-65-71—275 John Senden (38), $36,619 ..70-68-69-68—275 Bubba Watson (38), $36,619 68-69-69-69—275 Matt Every (32), $28,980.......69-62-74-71—276 Tom Watson (32), $28,980 ....68-69-72-67—276 Michael Kim, $0......................70-69-67-70—276 Robert Streb (24), $20,121 ...69-70-70-68—277

Monday, July 8, 2013 Chad Campbell (24), $20,12169-66-72-70—277 Kevin Chappell (24), $20,12167-68-71-71—277 Brad Fritsch (24), $20,121.....68-71-66-72—277 Tommy Gainey (24), $20,12162-71-69-75—277 James Hahn (24), $20,121....72-67-68-70—277 Jason Kokrak (24), $20,121 ..66-71-68-72—277 Richard H. Lee (24), $20,12168-70-70-69—277 Troy Matteson (24), $20,121 .69-70-66-72—277 Kenny Perry (24), $20,121 ....68-67-73-69—277 A. Romero (24), $20,121.......68-71-69-69—277 Webb Simpson (24), $20,12164-73-70-70—277 Brendan Steele (24), $20,12166-70-72-69—277 James Driscoll (15), $14,515 66-68-71-73—278 Martin Flores (15), $14,515...71-65-74-68—278 A.Gonzales (15), $14,515 .....71-68-70-69—278 D.A. Points (15), $14,515.......70-65-73-70—278 Charlie Wi (15), $14,515........73-65-67-73—278 Luke List (11), $13,986..........71-67-69-72—279 Jeff Overton (11), $13,986 ....68-68-72-71—279 Shawn Stefani (11), $13,986.70-69-70-70—279 Ryan Palmer (8), $13,608 .....68-71-70-71—280 Chez Reavie (8), $13,608 .....70-69-68-73—280 Gary Woodland (8), $13,608.69-70-64-77—280 Tom Gillis (5), $13,230...........67-71-71-72—281 Brian Harman (5), $13,230 ...68-70-70-73—281 Jin Park (5), $13,230..............64-73-71-73—281 Carl Pettersson (3), $12,978 .69-70-70-73—282 William McGirt (2), $12,852...69-70-71-73—283

AUTO RACING NASCAR Sprint Cup-Coke Zero 400 powered by Coca-Cola Results¢ Saturday At Daytona International Speedway Daytona Beach, Fla. Lap length: 2.5 miles (Start position in parentheses) 1. (8) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 161 laps, 140.7 rating, 48 points, $327,961. 2. (13) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 161, 91.4, 42, $254,490. 3. (26) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 161, 77.3, 41, $219,101. 4. (3) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 161, 80.6, 40, $182,073. 5. (7) Michael Waltrip, Toyota, 161, 74.4, 39, $141,365. 6. (22) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 161, 103.7, 38, $150,485. 7. (27) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 161, 112.4, 38, $148,185. 8. (16) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 161, 96.3, 36, $130,715. 9. (19) Casey Mears, Ford, 161, 88.5, 35, $140,373. 10. (21) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 161, 64, 34, $147,198. 11. (9) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 161, 84.5, 33, $158,191. 12. (1) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 161, 95.4, 33, $160,488. 13. (32) J.J. Yeley, Chevrolet, 161, 60.5, 32, $109,555. 14. (11) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, 161, 80.9, 30, $108,655. 15. (28) David Gilliland, Ford, 161, 64.6, 30, $125,813. 16. (17) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 161, 52.7, 29, $115,180. 17. (10) Greg Biffle, Ford, 161, 75.6, 27, $125,630. 18. (40) Travis Kvapil, Toyota, 161, 64.8, 27, $132,413. 19. (39) Terry Labonte, Ford, 161, 47.2, 25, $116,063. 20. (20) Trevor Bayne, Ford, 161, 73.4, 0, $104,755. 21. (15) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 161, 88.1, 23, $152,746. 22. (38) David Ragan, Ford, 161, 52.8, 23, $119,627. 23. (34) Bobby Labonte, Toyota, 161, 56.1, 21, $109,305. 24. (43) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, 161, 37.6, 0, $100,580. 25. (37) Josh Wise, Ford, 161, 41.8, 0, $100,380. 26. (25) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 161, 85.9, 18, $126,294. 27. (42) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, 161, 36.3, 0, $95,430. 28. (36) Scott Speed, Ford, 161, 49.4, 16, $94,805. 29. (12) Carl Edwards, Ford, 161, 66.3, 15, $132,155. 30. (41) David Reutimann, Toyota, 159, 51.1, 14, $98,405. 31. (29) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet, 157, 50.5, 13, $94,230. 32. (4) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, accident, 155, 95.4, 12, $117,105. 33. (2) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 154, 82.6, 12, $129,996. 34. (23) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, accident, 151, 68.3, 10, $140,766. 35. (33) A J Allmendinger, Chevrolet, accident, 149, 55.6, 9, $101,655. 36. (24) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, accident, 149, 72.8, 9, $113,305. 37. (35) David Stremme, Toyota, accident, 127, 56.5, 7, $93,317. 38. (30) Aric Almirola, Ford, accident, 127, 61.3, 6, $124,571. 39. (14) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet, 126, 61.9, 5, $110,849. 40. (18) Joey Logano, Ford, 105, 69.2, 4, $107,543. 41. (5) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, accident, 97, 65.9, 3, $107,710. 42. (31) Michael McDowell, Ford, vibration, 33, 24.9, 2, $72,135. 43. (6) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, engine, 23, 46.3, 1, $97,626. Race Statistics Average Speed of Race Winner: 154.313 mph. Time of Race: 2 hours, 36 minutes, 30 seconds. Margin of Victory: 0.107 seconds. Caution Flags: 6 for 27 laps. Lead Changes: 18 among 11 drivers. Lap Leaders: M.Kenseth 1; Ky.Busch 2-25; J.Yeley 26; Ky.Busch 27-30; J.Johnson 31; Ky.Busch 32; J.Johnson 33-70; D.Gilliland 71; D.Ragan 72; D.Hamlin 73-92; J.McMurray 93-100; T.Kvapil 101; J.Wise 102; J.McMurray 103-104; J.Johnson 105-128; J.Yeley 129; J.Burton 130; J.Johnson 131-161. Leaders Summary (Driver, Times Led, Laps Led): J.Johnson, 4 times for 94 laps; Ky.Busch, 3 times for 29 laps; D.Hamlin, 1 time for 20 laps; J.McMurray, 2 times for 10 laps; J.Yeley, 2 times for 2 laps; D.Gilliland, 1 time for 1 lap; J.Burton, 1 time for 1 lap; T.Kvapil, 1 time for 1 lap; D.Ragan, 1 time for 1 lap; J.Wise, 1 time for 1 lap; M.Kenseth, 1 time for 1 lap. Top 12 in Points: 1. J.Johnson, 658; 2. C.Bowyer, 609; 3. C.Edwards, 587; 4. K.Harvick, 585; 5. D.Earnhardt Jr., 548; 6. M.Kenseth, 540; 7. Ky.Busch, 533; 8. G.Biffle, 516; 9. Ku.Busch, 501; 10. T.Stewart, 499; 11. M.Truex Jr., 493; 12. K.Kahne, 490. NASCAR Driver Rating Formula A maximum of 150 points can be attained in a race. The formula combines the following categories: Wins, Finishes, Top-15 Finishes, Average Running Position While on Lead Lap, Average Speed Under Green, Fastest Lap, Led Most Laps, Lead-Lap Finish.

TENNIS Wimbledon Results Sunday At The All England Lawn Tennis & Croquet Club London Purse: $34.9 million (Grand Slam)

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Surface: Grass-Outdoor Singles Men Championship Andy Murray (2), Britain, def. Novak Djokovic (1), Serbia, 6-4, 7-5, 6-4. Doubles Mixed Championship Daniel Nestor, Canada, and Kristina Mladenovic (8), France, def. Bruno Soares, Brazil, and Lisa Raymond (1), United States, 5-7, 6-2, 8-6. Wimbledon Men's Finals Results 2013 — Andy Murray def. Novak Djokovic, 6-4, 7-5, 6-4. 2012 — Roger Federer def. Andy Murray, 4-6, 7-5, 6-3, 6-4. 2011 — Novak Djokovic def. Rafael Nadal, 6-4, 6-1, 1-6, 6-3. 2010 — Rafael Nadal def. Tomas Berdych, 6-3, 7-5, 6-4. 2009 — Roger Federer def. Andy Roddick, 5-7, 7-6 (6), 7-6 (5), 3-6, 1614. 2008 — Rafael Nadal def. Roger Federer, 6-4, 6-4, 6-7 (5), 6-7 (8), 9-7. 2007 — Roger Federer def. Rafael Nadal, 7-6 (7), 4-6, 7-6 (3), 2-6, 6-2. 2006 — Roger Federer def. Rafael Nadal, 6-0, 7-6 (5), 6-7 (2), 6-3. 2005 — Roger Federer def. Andy Roddick, 6-2, 7-6 (2), 6-4. 2004 — Roger Federer def. Andy Roddick, 4-6, 7-5, 7-6 (3), 6-4. 2003 — Roger Federer def. Mark Philippoussis, 7-6 (5), 6-2, 7-6 (3). 2002 — Lleyton Hewitt def. David Nalbandian, 6-1, 6-3, 6-2. 2001 — Goran Ivanisevic def. Pat Rafter, 6-3, 3-6, 6-3, 2-6, 9-7. 2000 — Pete Sampras def. Pat Rafter, 6-7 (10), 7-6 (5), 6-4, 6-2. 1999 — Pete Sampras def. Andre Agassi, 6-3, 6-4, 7-5. 1998 — Pete Sampras def. Goran Ivanisevic, 6-7 (2), 7-6 (9), 6-4, 3-6, 62. 1997 — Pete Sampras def. Cedric Pioline, 6-4, 6-2, 6-4. 1996 — Richard Krajicek def. MaliVai Washington, 6-3, 6-4, 6-3. 1995 — Pete Sampras def. Boris Becker, 6-7 (5), 6-2, 6-4, 6-2. 1994 — Pete Sampras def. Goran Ivanisevic, 7-6 (2), 7-6 (5), 6-0. 1993 — Pete Sampras def. Jim Courier, 7-6 (3), 7-6 (6), 3-6, 6-3. 1992 — Andre Agassi def. Goran Ivanisevic, 6-7 (8), 6-4, 6-4, 1-6, 6-4. 1991 — Michael Stich def. Boris Becker, 6-4, 7-6 (4), 6-4. 1990 — Stefan Edberg def. Boris Becker, 6-2, 6-2, 3-6, 3-6, 6-4. 1989 — Boris Becker def. Stefan Edberg, 6-0, 7-6 (1), 6-4. 1988 — Stefan Edberg def. Boris Becker, 4-6, 7-6 (2), 6-4, 6-2. 1987 — Pat Cash def. Ivan Lendl, 76 (5), 6-2, 7-5. 1986 — Boris Becker def. Ivan Lendl, 6-4, 6-3, 7-5. 1985 — Boris Becker def. Kevin Curren, 6-3, 6-7 (4), 7-6 (3), 6-4. 1984 — John McEnroe def. Jimmy Connors, 6-1, 6-1, 6-2. 1983 — John McEnroe def. Chris Lewis, 6-2, 6-2, 6-2. 1982 — Jimmy Connors def. John McEnroe, 3-6, 6-3, 6-7 (2), 7-6 (5), 6-4. 1981 — John McEnroe def. Bjorn Borg, 4-6, 7-6 (1), 7-6 (4), 6-4. 1980 — Bjorn Borg def. John McEnroe, 1-6, 7-5, 6-3, 6-7 (16), 8-6. 1979 — Bjorn Borg def. Roscoe Tanner, 6-7, 6-1, 3-6, 6-3, 6-4. 1978 — Bjorn Borg def. Jimmy Connors, 6-2, 6-2, 6-3. 1977 — Bjorn Borg def. Jimmy Connors, 3-6, 6-2, 6-1, 5-7, 6-4. 1976 — Bjorn Borg def. Ilie Nastase, 6-4, 6-2, 9-7. 1975 — Arthur Ashe def. Jimmy Connors, 6-1, 6-1, 5-7, 6-4. 1974 — Jimmy Connors def. Ken Rosewall, 6-1, 6-1, 6-4. 1973 — Jan Kodes def. Alex Metreveli, 6-1, 9-8, 6-3. 1972 — Stan Smith def. Ilie Nastase, 4-6, 6-3, 6-3, 4-6, 7-5. 1971 — John Newcombe def. Stan Smith, 6-3, 5-7, 2-6, 6-4, 6-4. 1970 — John Newcombe def. Ken Rosewall, 5-7, 6-3, 6-3, 3-6, 6-1. 1969 — Rod Laver def. John Newcombe, 6-4, 5-7, 6-4, 6-4.

TRANSACTIONS Sunday's Sports Transactions BASEBALL American League BOSTON RED SOX — Placed LHP Andrew Miller on the 15-day DL. Recalled RHP Alfredo Aceves from Pawtucket (IL). CLEVELAND INDIANS_Optioned RHP Carlos Carrasco to Columbus (IL). Purchased the contract of RHP Preston Guilmet from Columbus. DETROIT TIGERS_Placed LHP Darin Downs on the 15-day DL. Recalled RHP Evan Reed from Toledo (IL). NEW YORK YANKEES_Claimed 1B Travis Ishikawa off waivers from Baltimore. Transferred INF Kevin Youkilis to the 60-day DL. TEXAS RANGERS_Reinstated RHP Joakim Soria from 60-day DL. Recalled RHP Cory Burns from Round Rock (PCL). Placed DH Lance Berkman placed on 15-day DL and RHP Nick Tepesch on 15-day DL, retroactive to July 6. National League PITTSBURGH PIRATES_Activated RHP A.J. Burnett from the 15-day DL. Optioned RHP Ryan Reid to Indianapolis (IL). SAN DIEGO PADRES_Placed C Yasmani Grandal on the 60-day DL. Selected C Rene Rivera from Tucson (PCL). SAN FRANCISCO GIANTS_Activated RHP Chad Gaudin from the 15-day DL. Optioned LHP Mike Kickham to Fresno (PCL). WASHINGTON NATIONALS_Placed LHP Ross Detwiler on the 15-day DL, retroactive to July 4. American Association AMARILLO SOX_Signed 1B/OF Austin Gallagher. EL PASO DIABLOS_Signed LHP Jake Wortham. GRAND PRAIRIE AIR HOGS_Released LHP Jorge Lugo. KANSAS CITY T-BONES_Signed C Petey Paramore. ST. PAUL SAINTS_Signed RHP Drew Gay. WINNIPEG GOLDEYES_Released LHP Ryan Sasaki. Can-Am League QUEBEC CAPITALES_Released INF Issael Gonzalez. Signed C Mike Grieco. Frontier League EVANSVILLE OTTERS_Signed RHP Brandon Adkins and RHP Trevor Walch. Released RHP Pat Goelz and LHP Jason Ridenhour. FRONTIER GREYS_Signed RHP Mark Pope.


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SPORTS

Monday, July 8, 2013

■ Tennis

TROY DAILY NEWS • WWW.TDN-NET.COM

■ Cycling

■ Soccer

Wimbledon ■ CONTINUED FROM 12 and those watching. Along came three break points for Djokovic, all erased. Finally, on Murray’s fourth chance to end it, Djokovic dumped a backhand into the net. The final was over. The wait was over. A year after coming ohso-close by losing in the title match at the All England Club, the No. 2-ranked Murray beat No. 1 Djokovic of Serbia 6-4, 7-5, 6-4 Sunday to become Wimbledon’s champion in a test of will and skill between a pair of men with mirror-image defensive styles that created lengthy points brimming with superb shots. “That last game will be the toughest game I’ll play in my career. Ever,” said Murray, who was born in

Dunblane, Scotland, and is the first British man to win the grass-court Grand Slam tournament since Fred Perry in 1936. “Winning Wimbledon I still can’t believe it. Can’t get my head around that. I can’t believe it.” For several seasons, Murray was the outsider looking in, while Roger Federer, Rafael Nadal and Djokovic collected 30 out of 31 Grand Slam titles. But now Murray has clearly and completely turned the Big 3 into a Big 4, having reached the finals at the last four major tournaments he entered (he withdrew from the French Open in May because of a bad back). And he’s now a two-time Slam champion, having defeated Djokovic in five sets at the U.S. Open in September.

Crew snaps 3-game skid Anor’s goal sparks 1-0 win AP PHOTO

Daniel Martin crosses the finish line ahead of Jakob Fuglsang, rear, to win the ninth stage of the Tour de France cycling race Sunday over 168.5 kilometers (105.3 miles) with start in Saint-Girons and finish in Bagneres-deBigorre, Pyrenees region, France.

Martin wins 9th stage

■ Major League Baseball

Froome retains lead at Tour de France

Reds

BAGNERES-DEBIGORRE, France (AP) — Left alone and with his teammates far behind, Chris Froome held off repeated attacks to retain the Tour de France lead Sunday as the three-week race left the Pyrenees mountains. Dan Martin of Ireland, a 26-year-old GarminSharp rider, won Stage 9 following a two-man sprint against Denmark’s Jakob Fuglsang after they escaped Froome and the other pre-race favorites on the last of five tough climbs along the 105-mile trek from Saint-Girons to Bagneres-de-Bigorre in

■ CONTINUED FROM 12 complete six, allowing five hits and three runs with one walk and six strikeouts. The right-hander retired 10 of the last 11 batters he faced despite facing a lineup loaded with eight left-handed batters. He wasn’t surprised that the Mariners relied on the long ball. “They have a bunch of unknown guys,” he said. “We don’t know much about American League teams, especially in the West (Division). They came out and hit the ball out of the ballpark, and that was the difference in the series. I

was never really in a groove. It was a hard-fought battle. They had eight left-handers in the lineup. I needed a lot of max-effort pitches. “I had to take every inning as a do-or-die effort just to give us a better shot at getting back in the game.” Franklin hit Arroyo’s 10th pitch of the game 380 feet into the right-field seats for his sixth home run of the season and second in the first inning in three games. He hit a two-run homer Friday off Mike Leake, also in the first inning.

COLUMBUS (AP) — Bernardo Anor's early goal helped the Columbus Crew defeat Portland 1-0 on Sunday to end the Timbers' 15game unbeaten streak. Portland (7-2-9) had gone 7-0-8 since March 9 while the Crew (6-8-5) ended a three-game losing streak. Anor scored in the fourth minute off a restart from Federico Higuain for the second straight match with a snap header from 6 yards to the inside of the left post. But Higuain failed to increase the lead seven minutes later as he missed his second penalty kick in six attempts this season by shooting the ball left of the net. Schoenfeld Aaron drew the penalty and a red card to Pa-Modou Kah in the 11th when the defender stuck his right foot into the face of Schoenfeld.

southwest France. As the race neared its first rest day Monday, Froome was relieved he was able to quash four attacks by Movistar’s Nairo Quintana on the last climb la Hourquette d’Ancizan despite his Sky teammates lagging behind. They were worn out after a strong team effort to help him win the yellow jersey a day earlier. “That was one of the hardest days I’ve ever had on a bike,” Froome said. “I’m really happy with how I came through today … It’s not easy to follow Quintana in the climbs. He’s a light little

Colombian who can fly up hills so to cover his attacks definitely wasn’t easy.” “But yeah, I was quite ready for more attacks, and I’m quite glad there weren’t,” he said, adding that it was “quite understandable” that his teammates weren’t with him after Saturday’s effort. The Briton kept an eye on his top rivals to win the title in Paris on July 21, including Spaniard pair Alberto Contador, of the Saxo Bank team, and Alejandro Valverde one of five Movistar riders in the front bunch of about two dozen riders.

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