Page 1

HYU LIM

林 恒 宇


SCI ARC PORTFOLIO

HYU LIM

林 恒 宇


CONTENTS

PA G E 3

TITLE S TAT M E N T

7 8 12 15

4B 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4

VERTICAL STUDIO INTRODUCTION WORK SAMPLES PROCESS D E TA I L E D P R O C E S S

16 17 18 19

4B 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4

A D V. C O N S T U C T I O N D E L I V E R Y COVER PLANS SECTIONS D E TA I L S

21 22 23

4A 3.1 3.2 3.3

DESIGN STUDIO INTRODUCTION PLANS DIAGRAMS

24 25 26 28 29 30 31

4A 4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4 4.5 4.6 4.7

DESIGN DEVELOPMENT INTRODUCTION STRUCTURES D E TA I L E D C H U N K S EGRESS + ADA DIAGRAMS H VA C + S Y S T E M S D I A G R A M S E N V I R O N M E N TA L D IA G R A M S ACOUSTIC DIAGRAMS

32 34 35 36 37 38 40 42

3B 5.1 5.2 5.3 5.4 5.5 5.6 5.7 5.8

DESIGN STUDIO INTRODUCTION SITE DIAGRAMS CONCEPT DIAGRAMS SITE DIAGRAMS II PLANS S E C T I O N S + E L E VA T I O N C H U N K D E TA I L MODEL PHOTOS

45 46 47 48 50 52 54 58

3A 6.1 6.2 6.3 6.4 6.5 6.6 6.7 6.8

DESIGN STUDIO INTRODUCTION PLANS SECTION C H U N K D E TA I L DIAGRAMS SITE DIAGRAMS STRUCTURES DIAGRAMS MODEL PHOTOS

62 64

3 A V I S UA L S T U D I E S 7.1 INTRODUCTION 7.2 WORK SAMPLES CONTINUED >

| P1


P2 |


CONTENTS

PA G E

TITLE

66 68 70 74

3A 8.1 8.2 8.3 8.4

TECTONICS INTRODUCTION D E TA I L S E N V I R O N M E N TA L A NA LY S I S C H U N K D E TA I L S

77 78 80 82

2B 9.1 9.2 9.3 9.4

DESIGN STUDIO INTRODUCTION PLANS SECTIONS STUDIES

84 86

2 B V I S UA L S T U D I E S 10.1 INTRODUCTION 10.2 WORK SAMPLES

88 90 92 96 98 100

2A DESIGN STUDIO 11.1 INTRODUCTION 11.2 DIAGRAMS 11.3 PLANS 11.4 SECTION 11.5 SITE DIAGRAMS 11.6 RENDERS

104 105

2 A V I S UA L S T U D I E S 12.1 INTRODUCTION 12.2 DIAGRAMS

111 112 114 116 121 154

1B DESIGN STUDIO 13.1 STUDIES AND DIAGRAMS 13.2 CONCEPT DIAGRAMS 13.3 CONCEPT DIAGRAMS II 13.4 PLANS 13.5 MODEL PHOTOS 13.6 PRECEDENCE

167 168

1 B V I S UA L S T U D I E S 14.1 INTRODUCTION 14.2 DIAGRAMS

185 186 190 192 196

1A DESIGN STUDIO 15.1 STUDIES AND DIAGRAMS 15.2 DIAGRAMS 15.3 PLANS + SECTION CUTS 15.4 RENDERS 1 5 . 5 F O U N DAT I O N S T U D I E S

229 234 238 242 246 250

A C A D E M I C E S S AY S 16.1 INTIMACIES FROM THE... 16.2 PLASTIC HEARTS... 1 6 . 3 T H E T R AG E DY O F B E AU T Y 1 6 . 4 P R O PA G A N D A A N D I D E N T I T I E S 16.5 THE CONTROVERSIAL AND... 1 6 . 6 PA N O P T I C O N : G R E E N E Y S

| P3


STATEMENT

I have always been incredibly drawn and passionate with design across various scales and mediums. Whether its a product, graphic design, a website a film or a building. There is an inherent beauty in this priviledge to be able to learn on one medium and apply it to another, breaking the boundaries and rules of a specific medium, overwriting new philosophies and spurring new innovation. In some sense, this idea and passion for a cross contamination of mediums and experimentation has expanded during my academic career at SCI-Arc. This portfolio features projects and written works from the Southern California Institute of architecture, comprising of academic essays, architectural studies and visual works which revolves around the preliminary discourse of architecture aimed at uncovering and developing an understanding of space , forms and function.

P5 | STATMENT


P6 | 4B STUDIO


OF MEMORIES AND MACHINES CYBORD MISPRISON II - DAVID RUY VERTICAL Vertical Studio Spring 2019

Instructor : David Ruy

Course Overview : The premise of the studio begins with an exploration of various architectural typologies with the use of A.I. tools to crossbreed various architectural styles in hopes of breaking certain habits otherwise often known and lost to man. The final project resulted in a different kind of aesthetic which was derived out of a kind of fear and anxiety over the detachement of control and a break from my own habits, it begins to be heavily aestheticized towards an insecurity driven reclaimation with the use of heavy romanticsms, salvaging what was left of the project and what was left within control.

4B STUDIO | P7


P8 | 4B STUDIO


4B STUDIO | P9


P10 | 4B STUDIO


4B STUDIO | P11


P12 | 4B STUDIO


4B STUDIO | P13


P14 | 4B STUDIO


1 Convolutional neural network The project began with experimenting with various styles of architectural design and non architectural designs with the use of computer vision machine learning to apply certain styles towards another. Therefore creating new architectural typologies

2 developing with rhino The next step of the project was to expand on a selected new typology by modelling it. I chose to begin modelling with Rhino to develop some basic frames and geometries.

3 Texture mapping with zbrush The geometries were then imported from Rhino into Zbrush to further develop on the texture mapping and material developing. Geometries were also further detailed in Zbrush.

4 immersion and rendering with unreal engine The entire model were then imported into Unreal Engine to build and populate the new environment. The end result is an environment created from a new architectural typology. A film was created in this environment and is acessible via http://bit.ly/ruyvert or the QR code.

4B STUDIO | P15


CONSTRUCTION DELIVERY ADVANCED CONSTRUCTION PROJECT DELIVERY Group 1 : Chuwen Ong Hengyu Lim Nicholas Wu Sally Lwin Sicheng Hu

Instructor : Pavel Getov Kerenza Harris

Studio : 4B Spring 2019

Course Overview : The rapid development of digital technologies and the intertwinement of design and construction processes present an opportunity to develop a new kind approach to project delivery. The The course responds to this opportunity by taking on the question of advanced architecture, is which is considered by many to represent the the information age what modern architecture represented to the industrial age. It Advanced architecture demands digitally based integrated building models that realign the traditional relationships between project stakeholders. The class primary objective of the course is to teach cConstruction dDocumentation in the context of the contemporary methods of advanced project delivery as a tool for the implementation COVER of PAGE 1 advanced architecture.

P16 | 4B CONSTRUCTION DELIVERY


CONSTRUCTION DELIVERY | PLANS

A

B

C

D

E

F

G

H

A

I

B

C

D

E

F

G

H

I

A3.2 1 138' - 1 1/2"

19' - 2"

112.1

ELEV

ELEV

001

002

A3.3.2 A3.3

WA-5

WA-5

14' - 8"

106.2

RETAIL

106.1

105.2

104.2

103.3

11' - 3 1/2"

100.5

RETAIL CONCIERGE

WA-5

4

100

WA-3

11' - 7"

WA-5

102.1

101.2

CL

101.1

CL

0"

CL

102.2

CL

14' - 9"

WA-5

1 A4.1

WA-5

16' - 1"

10' - 6"

100.6

WA-2

5

STAIRS

100.1

002

WA-3

RETAIL

101.3

101

ELEV

WA-1

DN

003

WA-2

50' - 4"

MAIN ENTRANCE

UP

24 R @ 7 1/2"

RETAIL

WA-5

102

44' - 7"

WA-3

100.2

6

6

WA-5

A

B

C

D

E

F

G

H

WA-2

BASEMENT

18' - 4"

18' - 4"

CL

18' - 4"

19' - 2"

CL

A

9' - 11 1/2"

A4.3

ELEV

ELEV

001

002

1

WA-1

Description

A1.1

1" = 6'-8"

PICO BLV

C

19' - 2"

D

18' - 4"

E

18' - 4"

CL

13' - 2"

960 E 3rd ST. LOS ANGELES, CA, 90012

No.

FIRST FLOOR PLAN

1

F

G

H

I

SWINE

18' - 4"

18' - 4"

19' - 2"

9' - 11 1/2"

ARCHITECTS

16' - 6"

CHUWEN ONG HENGYU LIM (HYU) NICHOLAS WU SALLY LWIN (NANDAR) SICHENG HU (DEX)

0 A7.3

SCI-ARC

CL

15' - 3 1/2"

WA-1

CL

39' - 3 1/2"

WA-1

CL

26' - 0 1/2"

1

300.1

WA-1

STAIR

ELEV

ELEV

001

002

001

WA-2

960 E 3rd ST. LOS ANGELES, CA, 90012

WA-1

2 A7.3

FS02 METAL TUBE FRAME

SCI-ARC

CL

15' - 3 1/2"

26 R @ 6 15/16"

DN

Date

No.

Description

Date

CL

WA-1

15' - 0 1/2"

001

1

A3.1.2 A3.1

138' - 1 1/2"

CHUWEN ONG HENGYU LIM (HYU) NICHOLAS WU SALLY LWIN (NANDAR) SICHENG HU (DEX)

Concrete Slab 12 200.1

STAIRS

14' - 10 1/2"

11' - 2 1/2"

26 R @ 6 15/16"

B

ARCHITECTS

16' - 6"

CL

26' - 0 1/2"

CL

DN

2 A7.3

WA-5

1 A4.2

SWINE

18' - 4"

CL

52' - 0 1/2"

UP

WA-1

FS02 METAL TUBE FRAME

WA-4

I

0 A7.3 WA-1

WA-3

A1.0

1" = 6'-8"

138' - 1 1/2"

19' - 2"

NOTES 1. Any Inconsistencies Or Unforeseen Conditions To Be Reviewed By The Architect Prior To Proceeding With Construction. 2. All Dimensions Are Too Face Of Structure Unless Otherwise Noted. 3. Do Not Scale From Drawings. 4. Contractor Shall Provide, Erect, And Maintain All Temporary Barriers And Guards, And All Temporary Shoring And Bracing As Required By City And State Regulations. 5. Contractor Shall Provide Adequate Weather Protection For The Building And Its Contents During The Course Of The Work. 6. Contractor Shall Provide Temporary Sanitary Facilities As To Least Impact Neighbors And As Directed By City Regulations. 7. All Door And Window Dimensions To Be Centerline

WA-1

1

FIRST FLOOR PLAN

1

WALL LEGEND 3/16" = 1'-0"

CL

WA-3 WA-4

GALLERY ENTRANCE

BASEMENT

CL

WA-2

1 A4.3

15' - 0 1/2"

WA-1

A3.1.2 A3.1 1 A4.2

10' - 8 1/2"

NOTES 1. Any Inconsistencies Or Unforeseen Conditions To Be Reviewed By The Architect Prior To Proceeding With Construction. 2. All Dimensions Are Too Face Of Structure Unless Otherwise Noted. 3. Do Not Scale From Drawings. 4. Contractor Shall Provide, Erect, And Maintain All Temporary Barriers And Guards, And All Temporary Shoring And Bracing As Required By City And State Regulations. 5. Contractor Shall Provide Adequate Weather Protection For The Building And Its Contents During The Course Of The Work. 6. Contractor Shall Provide Temporary Sanitary Facilities As To Least Impact Neighbors And As Directed By City Regulations. 7. All Door And Window Dimensions To Be Centerline

WA-1

15' - 2 1/2"

WA-1 1

WALL LEGEND 3/16" = 1'-0"

GEO FORWARD INC.

RETAIL

THE

THE

22' - 10"

WA-1

B02

GEOTECHNICAL ENGINEER BYER GEOTECH

SOIL

1/2"

WA-1

MECHANICAL

WA-4

22' - 10"

002

WA-1

103

LANDSCAPE ARCHITECT STUDIO - MLA

3

105

109.2

14' - 5 1/2"

5

STAIR

RETAIL

104

MEP ENGINEER GLUMAC INC.

A3.4

CL

UP

WA-1

RETAIL

CIVIL ENGINEER VCA ENGINEERS INC.

1

14' - 8

1172 ROBERTSON BOULEVARD LOS ANGELES CA 90034

14' - 9"

1

003

110.3

103.2

105.1

106

STRUCTURAL ENGINEER

ENGLEKIRK STRUCTURAL ENGINEERS

CL

14' - 8"

89' - 6"

109.1

RETAIL 109

4

WA-2

WA-5

WA-5

ELEV

REST ROOM

WA-5

110

WA-3

109.3

WA-1

WA-5

CL

GEO FORWARD INC.

WA-4

000

WA-5

OPEN TO ATRIUM ABOVE

WA-1

WA-4

110.2

ATRIUM

1

CONSULTANTS

1172 ROBERTSON BOULEVARD LOS ANGELES CA 90034

GEOTECHNICAL ENGINEER BYER GEOTECH

SOIL

Date

2

111

110.1

B01

A4.1

WA-2

REST ROOM

111.1

103.1

107.1

107

WA-1

BASEMENT

4

111.3

RETAIL

107.3

- 7 9/16"

Concrete Slab 24"

A7.2

6

WA-5

104.1

LANDSCAPE ARCHITECT STUDIO - MLA

3

5

WA-4

WA-5

MEP ENGINEER GLUMAC INC.

A3.4

113

108.1

108

111.2

3

Description

CL

CL 26' - 7"

22' - 3"

RETAIL

JANITOR CLOSET

112.3

WA-2

107.2

CIVIL ENGINEER VCA ENGINEERS INC.

1

26' - 10 1/2"

WA-5

STRUCTURAL ENGINEER

1

WA-2

112

CONSULTANTS

WA-1

0 A7.2

CL

LOBBY

No.

15' - 0 1/2"

WA-1

WA-2

22' - 3"

001

14' - 8"

100.3 STAIRS

WA-1

112.2

ENGLEKIRK STRUCTURAL ENGINEERS

960 E 3rd ST. LOS ANGELES, CA, 90012

WA-1

DN

2 A7.3

WA-5

R 26'

19.8%

1

26 R @ 6 15/16"

UP

100.4

FS02 METAL TUBE FRAME

89' - 6"

WA-1

Date

2

A3.3.2 A3.3

CHUWEN ONG HENGYU LIM (HYU) NICHOLAS WU SALLY LWIN (NANDAR) SICHENG HU (DEX)

SCI-ARC

CL

17' - 3 1/2"

CL

13.1%

Description

70' - 5"

3' - 0"1' - 3" CL

960 E 3rd ST. LOS ANGELES, CA, 90012

No.

ARCHITECTS

16' - 6"

5' - 7"

WA-1

9' - 11 1/2"

3' - 0"

002

19' - 2"

3' - 4"

ELEV

001

SWINE

18' - 4"

Concrete Slab 12

3' - 0"

ELEV

15' - 0 1/2"

WA-1

001

18' - 4"

OFFICE & RESIDENTIAL ENTRANCE

RAMP

0.2 STAIR

18' - 4"

0 A7.3 CL

SCI-ARC

1 2 A7.3

18' - 4"

CHUWEN ONG HENGYU LIM (HYU) NICHOLAS WU SALLY LWIN (NANDAR) SICHENG HU (DEX)

WA-1

UP

RAMP

ARCHITECTS

16' - 6"

5' - 7"

9' - 11 1/2"

3' - 0"

19' - 2"

4' - 9 1/2"

18' - 4"

13' - 0"

27 R @ 6 7/32"

SWINE

18' - 4"

3' - 4"

18' - 4"

CL

18' - 4"

10' - 8 1/2"

19' - 2"

15' - 4 1/2"

138' - 1 1/2"

CL 15' - 4"

22' - 3"

STUDIO - MLA

303.3

48' - 10"

304

302.12

302.13

302.14

302.15

2' - 9" 2' - 1 1/2" CL

8' - 0"

3' - 2 1/2"

12' - 1 1/2"

CL

CL

5

002

303.15

303.14

WA-2 24 R @ 7 1/2" ELEV

2' - 7 1/2"

27' - 0"

WA-2

DN

003

303.13 CL

WA-2

CL

2' - 0 1/2" CL

32' - 10"

THE

3' - 3"

WA-6 302.11

302.10 19' - 0"

10' - 6"

304.2

WA-1 302.9

WA-2

CL

STAIR 303.12

BEDROOM

BEDROOM

302.8 1' - 11" CL

14' - 9"

304.1

CL

7' - 0 1/2"

4

WA-4

BATHROOM

8' - 0"

A7.1

WA-3

6

SECOND FLOOR PLAN

1

WA-1 WA-2 WA-3 WA-4 WA-5

A3.1.2 A3.1

1

A4.2

A4.3

SECOND FLOOR PLAN

WA-1

WA-3

A1.2

1" = 6'-8"

THIRD FLOOR PLAN

1

WALL LEGEND 3/16" = 1'-0"

WA-2

1

1172 ROBERTSON BOULEVARD LOS ANGELES CA 90034

303

WA-6

302.4

302.7

3

UNIT

WA-6

14' - 1 1/2"

5' - 2"

CL

WA-6

22' - 10"

THE

22' - 10"

8' - 2 1/2"

CL

CL

13' - 5 1/2"

WA-3

CL

1/2"

1/2"

WA-2

23' - 11 1/2"

A4.1

4

0 A7.1

WA-2 BATHROOM

6

1

GEO FORWARD INC.

302.5

WA-6 302.3

CL

14' - 8

UP

DN

003

8' - 11"

WA-3

NOTES 1. Any Inconsistencies Or Unforeseen Conditions To Be Reviewed By The Architect Prior To Proceeding With Construction. 2. All Dimensions Are Too Face Of Structure Unless Otherwise Noted. 3. Do Not Scale From Drawings. 4. Contractor Shall Provide, Erect, And Maintain All Temporary Barriers And Guards, And All Temporary Shoring And Bracing As Required By City And State Regulations. 5. Contractor Shall Provide Adequate Weather Protection For The Building And Its Contents During The Course Of The Work. 6. Contractor Shall Provide Temporary Sanitary Facilities As To Least Impact Neighbors And As Directed By City Regulations. 7. All Door And Window Dimensions To Be Centerline

SOIL

WA-6 303.11

303.1

302.2

302.6 1

CL

5 14' - 8

002

ELEV

CL

1172 ROBERTSON BOULEVARD LOS ANGELES CA 90034

WA-2

24 R @ 7 1/2"

WA-1

WA-2

WALL LEGEND 3/16" = 1'-0"

GEOTECHNICAL ENGINEER BYER GEOTECH

3

14' - 8"

303.10

A3.4

89' - 6"

302.1

GALLERY SPACE

40' - 9 1/2"

4' - 8"

303.4

302

14' - 9" 10' - 6"

208.1

CL

LANDSCAPE ARCHITECT

303.9

BATHROOM

OPEN TO ATRIUM BELOW

WA-4

15' - 0"

4

13' - 0" 3' - 4"

CL

CL

MEP ENGINEER

1

WA-2

WA-4

208.3

OFFICE PATIO

VCA ENGINEERS INC.

WA-2

40' - 5 1/2"

WA-6

UNIT

CL

23' - 2"

67' - 9"

CIVIL ENGINEER GLUMAC INC.

303.8

GEO FORWARD INC.

208

STAIR

14' - 5 1/2"

WA-3

STRUCTURAL ENGINEER

ENGLEKIRK STRUCTURAL ENGINEERS

BEDROOM

WA-4

000

303.2

208.2

GALLERY RECEPTION

WA-2

CL 18' - 10 1/2"

206.1

SOIL

ATRIUM

WA-4

301.2

207

WA-4

20' - 5 1/2"

1

OFFICE

206

WA-4

CL

A3.3.2 A3.3

303.7

BEDROOM

1 32' - 11"

7' - 4 1/2"

WA-4

WA-4 CONFERENCE ROOM

WA-2

CONSULTANTS

300.2

303.5

301

301.1 14' - 8"

WA-4

A4.1

205.2

205

207.1

2

WA-4

BATHROOM

301.3 UNIT

RESIDENTIAL PATIO

89' - 6"

WA-2 206.2

GEOTECHNICAL ENGINEER BYER GEOTECH

3

3' - 0"

0 A5.5 OPEN TO ATRIUM BELOW

22' - 3"

3' - 0"

WA-4 REST ROOM

CL

19' - 8"

303.6 WA-6

LANDSCAPE ARCHITECT

7' - 4"

205.1

WA-5

BEDROOM

GLUMAC INC.

A3.4

WA-2

BATHROOM

WA-6

301.4

MEP ENGINEER

1

CL

7' - 2 1/2"

301.6

VCA ENGINEERS INC.

CL

52' - 0"

000

206.3

STRUCTURAL ENGINEER

ENGLEKIRK STRUCTURAL ENGINEERS

CIVIL ENGINEER

STUDIO - MLA

202

ATRIUM

1

204.2

204

204.1

RECEPTION

201

A3.3.2 A3.3

CONSULTANTS

6' - 5 1/2"

203

WA-4 REST ROOM

301.5

CL

203.2

STORAGE

WA-2 OFFICE

FS02 COMPOSITE PANEL CLADDING

15' - 2 1/2"

WA-2 203.1

WA-3

2

63' - 8 1/2"

2"

CL

FS02 COMPOSITE PANEL CLADDING

CL

CL

CL 4"

WA-2

26' - 10 1/2"

3' - 0" 2' - 2" CL

CL

WA-4 WA-5

NOTES 1. Any Inconsistencies Or Unforeseen Conditions To Be Reviewed By The Architect Prior To Proceeding With Construction. 2. All Dimensions Are Too Face Of Structure Unless Otherwise Noted. 3. Do Not Scale From Drawings. 4. Contractor Shall Provide, Erect, And Maintain All Temporary Barriers And Guards, And All Temporary Shoring And Bracing As Required By City And State Regulations. 5. Contractor Shall Provide Adequate Weather Protection For The Building And Its Contents During The Course Of The Work. 6. Contractor Shall Provide Temporary Sanitary Facilities As To Least Impact Neighbors And As Directed By City Regulations. 7. All Door And Window Dimensions To Be Centerline

A3.1.2 A3.1 1

1

A4.2

A4.3

THIRD FLOOR PLAN

1

A1.3

1" = 6'-8"

CONSTRUCTION DELIVERY | ELEVATION

A

B

C

D

E

F

G

H

SWINE

I

18' - 4"

18' - 4"

A

ARCHITECTS

B

C

D

E

CHUWEN ONG HENGYU LIM (HYU) NICHOLAS WU SALLY LWIN (NANDAR) SICHENG HU (DEX)

138' - 1 1/2"

19' - 2"

18' - 4"

18' - 4"

19' - 2"

9' - 11 1/2"

16' - 6"

SCI-ARC

18' - 4"

960 E 3rd ST. LOS ANGELES, CA, 90012

No.

Description

F

G

H

SWINE

I

ARCHITECTS

CHUWEN ONG HENGYU LIM (HYU) NICHOLAS WU SALLY LWIN (NANDAR) SICHENG HU (DEX)

138' - 1 1/2"

19' - 2"

18' - 4"

18' - 4"

18' - 4"

19' - 2"

9' - 11 1/2"

1

1

A4.2

A4.3

16' - 6"

SCI-ARC 960 E 3rd ST. LOS ANGELES, CA, 90012

Date

No. FS02 METAL TUBE FRAME

ROOF PLAN 50' - 0"

Description

Date

ROOF PLAN 50' - 0"

FS01 COMPOSITE PANEL CLADDING

CONSULTANTS

CONSULTANTS

STRUCTURAL ENGINEER

STRUCTURAL ENGINEER

ENGLEKIRK STRUCTURAL ENGINEERS WA-2

302.8

302.9

302.10

302.11

302.12

302.13

302.14

302.15

303.15

303.14

ENGLEKIRK STRUCTURAL ENGINEERS

CIVIL ENGINEER

303.13

CIVIL ENGINEER

VCA ENGINEERS INC.

VCA ENGINEERS INC.

MEP ENGINEER

RESIDENTIAL PATIO

MEP ENGINEER

GLUMAC INC.

GLUMAC INC.

LANDSCAPE ARCHITECT THIRD FLOOR PLAN 30' - 0"

LANDSCAPE ARCHITECT

STUDIO - MLA

THIRD FLOOR PLAN 30' - 0"

GEOTECHNICAL ENGINEER BYER GEOTECH

SOIL

STUDIO - MLA

GEOTECHNICAL ENGINEER BYER GEOTECH

SOIL

GEO FORWARD INC.

GEO FORWARD INC.

206.1

WA-3

WA-3

OFFICE PATIO

THE

GALLERY ENTRANCE

100.1

FIRST FLOOR PLAN 0"

100.2 MAIN ENTRANCE

GALLERY ENTRANCE

FRONT ELEVATION 1

FRONT ELEVATION 1" = 6'-8"

A3.1

1

FRONT ELEVATION W/ SKIN 1" = 6'-8"

4B CONSTRUCTION DELIVERY | P17

1172 ROBERTSON BOULEVARD LOS ANGELES CA 90034

FIRST FLOOR PLAN 0"

100.2 MAIN ENTRANCE

THE

100.1

SECOND FLOOR PLAN 15' - 0"

1172 ROBERTSON BOULEVARD LOS ANGELES CA 90034

SECOND FLOOR PLAN 15' - 0"

FRONT ELEVATION WITH SKIN

A3.1.2


CONSTRUCTION DELIVERY | RCP

CONSTRUCTION DELIVERY | DETAILS 1

4 HANGING WIRE

GLAZING EXTRUDED ALUMINUM RETAINER CAP FRAME

G

VINYL GLAZING TAPE CONDENSATION GUTTER & WEEP HOLES

SWINE

ASSEMBLY SCREW FASTNER METAL FLUSHING

PARAPET CAP

GUARDRILL

RIGID INSULATION

FLOOR FINISH

TAPERED EDGE

THIRD FLOOR PLAN 30' - 0"

CONCRETE ROOF

RIDIG INSULATION

TAPERED EDGE

PLYWOOD SHEATING

SEALANT & BACKER ROD

WOOD BLOCKING

ARCHITECTS

CHUWEN ONG HENGYU LIM (HYU) NICHOLAS WU SALLY LWIN (NANDAR) SICHENG HU (DEX)

BATT INSULATION

UNDER DECK CLAMP SNAP CAP CAST IRON DRAIN BOWL

DRAINAGE PATH

SCI-ARC

METAL BASE CONCRETE ROOF

MULLION

12X24 CONCRETE BEAM

SEALED GLAZING UNIT

960 E 3rd ST. LOS ANGELES, CA, 90012

No.

2X6 WOOD STUD

960 E 3rd ST. LOS ANGELES, CA, 90012

Description

Date

GYPSUM BOARD

CONCRETE BEAM

SECOND FLOOR PLAN 15' - 0"

WATERPROOFING

WOOD DECK

SCI-ARC

CONCRETE FLOOR SLAB

CONCRETE ROOF

SWINE

WATERPROOFING

CHUWEN ONG HENGYU LIM (HYU) NICHOLAS WU SALLY LWIN (NANDAR) SICHENG HU (DEX)

WOODEN CURB

1"X1" WALL ANGLE

CONCRETE FLOOR SLAB

LEAD FLASHING

ARCHITECTS

WATERPROOFING

CONCRETE WALL WATERPROOFING

2'X2' ACT TILES

CAST IRON DOME

No.

Description

Date

2X6 WOOD STUD

BATT INSULATION

SEALANT & BACKER ROD SILL PAN

CONSULTANTS

STRUCTURAL ENGINEER

CONSULTANTS

STRUCTURAL ENGINEER

MULLION

ENGLEKIRK STRUCTURAL ENGINEERS

ENGLEKIRK STRUCTURAL ENGINEERS

GLAZING

CIVIL ENGINEER

CIVIL ENGINEER

VCA ENGINEERS INC.

6

PARAPET ROOF DETAIL

SKYLIGHT DETAIL

5

2" = 1'-0"

4

2" = 1'-0"

1

VCA ENGINEERS INC.

MEP ENGINEER

SLAB TO WALL CONNECTION

GLUMAC INC.

2" =1'-0"

STUDIO - MLA

MEP ENGINEER

LANDSCAPE ARCHITECT

7

GEOTECHNICAL ENGINEER

1

ROOF DRAINAGE DETAIL

6

2" = 1'0"

CURTAIN WALL TO SLAB CONNECTION

5

2" = 1'-0"

SLIDING DOOR TO DRYWALL DETAIL 2" = 1'-0"

GLUMAC INC.

LANDSCAPE ARCHITECT STUDIO - MLA

GEOTECHNICAL ENGINEER

BYER GEOTECH

BYER GEOTECH

SOIL

SOIL

GEO FORWARD INC.

GEO FORWARD INC.

CONCRETE WALL

H WATERPROOFING

GYPSUM BOARD

CONCRETE WALL

SEALED GLAZING UNIT

WATERPROOFING

MULLION

GYPSUM BOARD

A

GYPSUM BOARD

TOPPING SLAB WATERPROOFING BASEMENT -14' - 0"

BATT INSULATION

SNAP CAP

1172 ROBERTSON BOULEVARD LOS ANGELES CA 90034

CONCRETE FLOOR SLAB

FIRST FLOOR PLAN 0"

FLOOR FINISH

DRAINAGE PATH MEMBRANE TIE-IN

ANGLE WITH SLOT

RIGID INSULATION

CONCRETE FLOOR SLAB

METAL BASE WATERPROOFING

GAVEL

FIRST FLOOR PLAN 0"

RIGID INSULATION

THE

CONCRETE CURB

EARTH

WATERPROOFING

BATT INSULATION

PRESSURE PLATE

REBAR

SLOTTED INSERT

FLOOR FINISH

CONCRETE FLOOR SLAB

GRAVEL

EARTH

SNAP CAP

2X6 WOOD STUD

ALUMINUM ANGLE

GLAZING

FLOOR FINISH

SECOND FLOOR PLAN 15' - 0"

2X6 WOOD STUD SECOND FLOOR PLAN 15' - 0"

CONCRETE FLOOR SLAB

1172 ROBERTSON BOULEVARD LOS ANGELES CA 90034

GAVEL THREADED ROD WITH NUTS & WASHER

CONCRETE FLOOR SLAB

TOPPING SLAB

MULLION

MULLION

RIGID INSULATION PLYWOOD

CONCRETE CURB

SNAP CAP

WOOD BLOCKING

THE

RIGID INSULATION

FLOOR FINISH

FLOOR FINISH GAVEL

FIRST FLOOR PLAN 0"

PLYWOOD SHEATING

METAL BASE

FIRST FLOOR PLAN 0"

CONCRETE FLOOR SLAB

MULLION CONCRETE FLOOR SLAB

BATT INSULATION SEALED GLAZING UNIT

EXTERIOR DETAILS 3

GROUND CONNECTION DETAIL

FOUNDATION DETAIL

2

2" = 1'-0"

1

2" = 1'-0"

CURTAIN WALL TO GROUND CONNECTION DETAIL

3

DRYWALL TO SLAB CONNECTION 2" = 1'-0"

4

INTERIOR WALL TO SLAB CONNECTION 2" = 1'-0"

CURTAIN WALL TO SLAB CONNECTION 2

8

2" = 1'-0"

1

EXTERIOR DETAILS

SLIDING DOOR TO SLAB CONNECTION 2" = 1'-0"

A6.2

2" = 1'-0"

A6.3

CONSTRUCTION DELIVERY | SECTION

A

B

C

D

E

F

G

H

SWINE

I

6

ARCHITECTS

5

4

3

2

SWINE

1

ARCHITECTS

CHUWEN ONG HENGYU LIM (HYU) NICHOLAS WU SALLY LWIN (NANDAR) SICHENG HU (DEX) 138' - 1 1/2"

19' - 2"

18' - 4"

18' - 4"

SCI-ARC

18' - 4"

18' - 4"

19' - 2"

9' - 11 1/2"

960 E 3rd ST. LOS ANGELES, CA, 90012

16' - 6"

No. 0 A5.1

0 A5.2

FS01 COMPOSITE PANEL CLADDING

CHUWEN ONG HENGYU LIM (HYU) NICHOLAS WU SALLY LWIN (NANDAR) SICHENG HU (DEX)

Description

22' - 10"

14' - 9"

14' - 8"

22' - 3"

960 E 3rd ST. LOS ANGELES, CA, 90012

15' - 0 1/2"

Date

ROOF PLAN 50' - 0"

100.0

SCI-ARC

89' - 6"

No. 0 A5.2

FS01 COMPOSITE PANEL CLADDING

0 A5.1

0 A5.1

100.0

CONSULTANTS

FS02 METAL TUBE FRAME

STRUCTURAL ENGINEER

ENGLEKIRK STRUCTURAL ENGINEERS 302.3

303.1 WA-4 UNIT

UNIT 302

WA-4

BEDROOM

302

ENGLEKIRK STRUCTURAL ENGINEERS

CIVIL ENGINEER

CIVIL ENGINEER

VCA ENGINEERS INC.

303.4 UNIT

MEP ENGINEER

GALLERY SPACE

303

302.1

GLUMAC INC.

304

LANDSCAPE ARCHITECT THIRD FLOOR PLAN 30' - 0"

BEDROOM

302.14

WA-3

CONFERENCE ROOM

OFFICE 201

206.3

GEOTECHNICAL ENGINEER

206.2

207.1

MEP ENGINEER GLUMAC INC.

1 1/4"

106.1

105.2

104.2

GEOTECHNICAL ENGINEER BYER GEOTECH

SOIL

GEO FORWARD INC. WA-3

WA-1 CONFERENCE ROOM WA-4

OFFICE PATIO

208

206

200.1

SECOND FLOOR PLAN 15' - 0"

109.2

STUDIO - MLA THIRD FLOOR PLAN 30' - 0"

GEO FORWARD INC.

WA-1

109.3

LANDSCAPE ARCHITECT

300.1

84"

BYER GEOTECH

GALLERY RECEPTION

206

VCA ENGINEERS INC.

301.1

WA-4

BATHROOM

302.6

STUDIO - MLA

SOIL WA-2

Date

CONSULTANTS

STRUCTURAL ENGINEER WA-2

RESIDENTIAL PATIO

Description

ROOF PLAN 50' - 0"

FS02 METAL TUBE FRAME

WA-1

SECOND FLOOR PLAN 15' - 0"

103.3 RETAIL CONCIERGE

Concrete Slab 24"

RETAIL 101

101.2

105.2

RETAIL 105

105.1

107.1

108.1

100.3 FIRST FLOOR PLAN 0"

BASEMENT B01

0.2 BASEMENT -14' - 0" Concrete Slab 24"

LONGIDUTINAL SECTION 1

P18 | 4B CONSTRUCTION DELIVERY

LONGIDUTINAL SECTION 1" = 6'-8"

A4.1

1172 ROBERTSON BOULEVARD LOS ANGELES CA 90034

BASEMENT -14' - 0"

THE

B01

THE

FIRST FLOOR PLAN 0"

WA-1

BASEMENT

1172 ROBERTSON BOULEVARD LOS ANGELES CA 90034

100

CROSS SECTION 1

CROSS SECTION 1" = 6'-8"

A4.2


CONSTRUCTION DELIVERY | WALL SECTION 5

5

A

0 A6.1 0 A6.1

FACADE SYSTEM, SEE A5.1

A

0 A6.1

B

0 A6.1

B

0 A6.1

WALL TYPE B, SEE A0.0

WALL TYPE B, SEE A0.0

WALL TYPE B, SEE A0.0

FLOOR FINISH

FLOOR FINISH

CONCRETE SLAB

CONCRETE SLAB

0 A6.1 WALL TYPE D, SEE A0.0

ROOF PLAN 50' - 0"

SITE PLAN 45' - 0"

SITE PLAN 45' - 0"

SW

ARCHITECTS

0 A6.1

FACADE SYSTEM, SEE A5.1

WALL TYPE B, SEE A0.0

ROOF PLAN 50' - 0"

FACADE SYSTEM, SEE A5.1

FACADE SYSTEM, SEE A5.1

WALL TYPE B, SEE A0.0

WALL TYPE B, SEE A0.0

FLOOR FINISH

FLOOR FINISH

CONCRETE SLAB

CONCRETE SLAB

0 A6.1

0 A6.1

CHUWEN ON HENGYU LIM NICHOLAS W SALLY LWIN SICHENG HU

SCI-

960 E 3rd ST. L 90012

No.

THIRD FLOOR PLAN 30' - 0"

0 A6.1

Des

THIRD FLOOR PLAN 30' - 0"

CONSULTANTS

STRUCTURAL E

WALL TYPE D, SEE A0.0

ENGLEKIRK STRUCTUR

CIVIL ENGINEER VCA ENGINEERS INC. 0 A5.5

MEP ENGINEER

0 A5.5

GLUMAC INC.

LANDSCAPE AR STUDIO - MLA

GEOTECHNICA BYER GEOTECH

SOIL

DROP CEILING

DROP CEILING

WALL TYPE C, SEE A0.0

WALL TYPE C, SEE A0.0

WALL TYPE D, SEE A0.0

WALL TYPE D, SEE A0.0

WALL TYPE F, SEE A0.0

WALL TYPE F, SEE A0.0

0 A6.2

FOUNDATION

0 A6.3

0 A6.3

0 A6.2

DROP CEILING

DROP CEILING

WALL TYPE D, SEE A0.0

WALL TYPE D, SEE A0.0

PERIMETER DRAIN

PERIMETER A6.1 DRAIN

FOUNDATION

FOUNDATION

0

GEO FORWARD INC.

SECOND FLOOR PLAN 15' - 0"

FIRST FLOOR PLAN 0"

FIRST FLOOR PLAN 0"

BASEMENT -14' - 0"

BASEMENT -14' - 0"

0 A6.3

0 A6.1

THE

0 A6.3

SECOND FLOOR PLAN 15' - 0"

FOUNDATION

WALL S

WALL SECTION 3 WALL SECTION 3 2

2

1/4" = 1'-0"

A5

WALL SECTION 4 WALL SECTION 4 1

1

1/4" = 1'-0"

1/4" = 1'-0"

1/4" = 1'-0"

CONSTRUCTION DELIVERY | WALL SECTION + DETAILS 2

1

G

4

H A ROOF PLAN 50' - 0"

STEEL ANGLE

ROOF PLAN 50' - 0" 0 A6.2

ROOF DRAINAGE

SWINE

DOUBLE-GLAZED SKYLIGHT

0 A6.2

ARCHITECTS

ARCHITECTS

CHUWEN ONG HENGYU LIM (HYU) NICHOLAS WU SALLY LWIN (NANDAR) SICHENG HU (DEX)

0 A6.3

WALL TYPE F, SEE A0.0

WALL TYPE B, SEE A0.0

SWINE

FS01 COMPOSITE PANEL CLADDING

PARAPET CAP

SCI-ARC

WALL TYPE B, SEE A0.0

CHUWEN ONG HENGYU LIM (HYU) NICHOLAS WU SALLY LWIN (NANDAR) SICHENG HU (DEX)

PARAPET CAP

FS02 METAL TUBE FRAME

WATERPROOFING

FS02 METAL TUBE FRAME

SCI-ARC

WATERPROOFING

CONCRETE CURB

960 E 3rd ST. LOS ANGELES, CA, 90012

TAPERED EDGE

960 E 3rd ST. LOS ANGELES, CA, 90012

TAPERED EDGE CONCRETE CURB FLOOR FINISH

No.

FLOOR FINISH

FLOOR FINISH

Description

Date

RIDIG INSULATION RIDIG INSULATION

CONCRETE SLAB

CONCRETE SLAB

CONCRETE SLAB

THIRD FLOOR PLAN 30' - 0"

0 A6.2

W12X26 I BEAM

STEEL BRACKET

L-SHAPED ANGLE CONNECTION

L-SHAPED ANGLE CONNECTION

No.

L-SHAPED ANGLE CONNECTION

Description

Date

W12X26 I BEAM

DROP CEILING DROP CEILING

W12X26 I BEAM

FS01 COMPOSITE PANEL CLADDING

CONSULTANTS

CONSULTANTS

STRUCTURAL ENGINEER

ENGLEKIRK STRUCTURAL ENGINEERS

CIVIL ENGINEER

CONCRETE ROOF

STRUCTURAL ENGINEER

SITE PLAN 45' - 0"

VCA ENGINEERS INC.

WALL TYPE B, SEE A0.0

ENGLEKIRK STRUCTURAL ENGINEERS

CIVIL ENGINEER

MEP ENGINEER

VCA ENGINEERS INC.

MEP ENGINEER

GLUMAC INC.

LANDSCAPE ARCHITECT

GLUMAC INC.

LANDSCAPE ARCHITECT

STUDIO - MLA

GEOTECHNICAL ENGINEER SECOND FLOOR PLAN 15' - 0"

STUDIO - MLA

FACADE TO PARAPET ATTACHEMENT DETAIL

4

1 1/2" = 1'-0"

FACADE ATTACHMENT DETAIL 2

2

1 1/2" = 1'-0"

1 1/2" = 1'-0"

GYPSUM BOARD

0 A6.3

GEO FORWARD INC.

THE

BASEMENT -14' - 0" FOUNDATION

STEEL ANGLE

FS01 COMPOSITE PANEL CLADDING

FS01 COMPOSITE PANEL CLADDING

FS02 METAL TUBE FRAME

FLOOR FINISH

2X6 WOOD STUDS STEEL BRACKET FS01 COMPOSITE PANEL CLADDING

STEEL BRACKET

THIRD FLOOR PLAN 30' - 0"

DEJO GRATE

14X6 STEEL TUBE

FLOOR FINISH

FLOOR FINISH STEEL PLATE

DEJO GRATE

T-BEAM CONCRETE FLOOR SLAB

THIRD FLOOR PLAN 30' - 0"

WELDED CATWALK ASSEMBLY

2X6 CONCRETE BEAM

FOUNDATION

FS02 COMPOSITE FRAME RAILING STEEL BRACKET

WELDED CATWALK ASSEMBLY

0 A6.2

FOUNDATION

A

GLAZING

BATT INSULATION

1172 ROBERTSON BOULEVARD LOS ANGELES CA 90034

PERIMETER DRAIN

FIRST FLOOR PLAN 0"

BOLT

TOPPING SLAB

T-BEAM

RIGID INSULATION

CONCRETE FLOOR SLAB

GAVEL

FIRST FLOOR PLAN 0"

WATERPROOFING

MULLION

EARTH

WALL SECTION

GLAZING

EXTERIOR DETAILS

CONCRETE FLOOR SLAB

CONCRETE WALL

WALL SECTION 1 1/4" = 1'-0"

SOIL

A

FS02 METAL TUBE FRAME

0 A6.3

WALL TYPE F, SEE A0.0

0 A6.2

3

GEOTECHNICAL ENGINEER BYER GEOTECH

0 A6.3

WALL TYPE F, SEE A0.0

PERIMETER DRAIN

FACADE TO WALL ATTACHMENT

THE

WALL TYPE C, SEE A0.0

6

SOIL

GEO FORWARD INC.

0 A6.3

WALL TYPE C, SEE A0.0

BYER GEOTECH

2

WALL SECTION 2 1/4" = 1'-0"

1

WALL SECTION 5 1/4" = 1'-0"

A5.1

5

FACADE TO SLAB ATTACHEMENT DETAIL 1 1/2" = 1'-0"

3

FACADE ATTACHMENT DETAIL 1 1/2" = 1'-0"

1

1172 ROBERTSON BOULEVARD LOS ANGELES CA 90034

DROP CEILING

FACADE TO GROUND ATTACHMENT DETAIL 1 1/2" = 1'-0"

4B CONSTRUCTION DELIVERY | P19

A6.1


P20 | 4A STUDIO


BOYLE HEIGHTS DUPLEX RESIDENCE AMIGGA POSITIONS Instructor : Ramiro Diaz

Studio : 4A Fall 2018

Course Overview : The final studio in the core sequence introduces students to independent thinking and integrative design through an open yet defined framework. With one foot in core and one pointed towards thesis, the pedagogy is based on culminating all previous core studios by charging the students with constructing a disciplinary position and formal agenda as it relates to advanced notions of Precedent, Tectonics, Aesthetics, & Composition. This four-fold structure is intended as an underlay for students to think about and produce a multi-dimensional architectural proposal. The studio, as a whole, works on the same project type and area with different trajectories within this framework according to the guidance of each instructor. This provides an experimental platform for students to test ideas and their execution, with the crafting of a position having as much currency as the crafting of the project and its representations.

4A STUDIO | P21


P22 | 4A STUDIO


4A STUDIO | P23


DESIGN DEV. D E S I G N + A N A LY S I S D E V E L O P M E N T Group 1 : Chien-Han Yen Hengyu Lim Jacky Wong TingYan Zhu Nancy Ai Ryan Yap Michael Liu

Instructor : Scott Uriu Pavel Getov Genelle Dedek Jamey Lyzun

Studio : 3B Spring 2018

Course Overview : This course investigates issues related to the implementation of design: technology, the use of materials, systems integration, and the archetypal analytical strategies of force, order and character. The course includes a review of basic and advanced construction methods, analysis of building codes, the design of structural and mechanical systems, the development of building materials, the integration of building components and systems, fire/life safety and ADA planning, and the introduction of sustainability measures. The intent of this course is to develop a cohesive understanding of how architects communicate complex building systems for the built environment and to demonstrate the ability to document a comprehensive architectural project and demonstrate Stewardship of the Environment.. A series of built case studies will be presented by the instructors along with visiting professionals in the field who are exploring new project delivery methods. These case studies will be shown indepth with construction photographs, 3D renderings, and technical drawings and details. Pertinent specific topics for the course will be highlighted in each presentation, with a focus on the evolution of building design from concept to built form.

P24 | 4A DESIGN DEVELOPMENT

WALL SECTION CHUNK


DESIGN DEVELOPMENT | STRUCTURES

PRIMARY STRUCTRURES

SECONDARY STRUCTURES

TERTIARY STRUCTURES

4A DESIGN DEVELOPMENT | P25


DESIGN DEVELOPMENT | DETAILED CHUNKS

P26 | 4A DESIGN DEVELOPMENT


4A DESIGN DEVELOPMENT | P27


DESIGN DEVELOPMENT | ADA diagram BATHROOM STALLS BATHROOM STALLS REQUIRES THE INSTALLATION OF HANDRAILS AT SPECIFIC HEIGHT AND DIMENSIONS AS ILLUSTRATED BELOW

2 11/16’ BY 2 1/8 ‘ WITH 2’6” ENTRANCE CLEARANCE

TEAM 1 52.00

5'-0"

40.00

5'-0"

ADA ACCSSIBLE ELEVATOR 2

ADA ACCESSIBLE RAMPS ARE LOCATED ON THE EXT. TERRACE

2'-8"

ADA ACCSSIBLE RAMPS

2 11/16’ BY 2 1/8 ‘ WITH 2’6” ENTRANCE CLEARANCE

3'-6"

ADA ACCSSIBLE ELEVATOR 1

A-KLL+W.

3'-0"

36" 12.00

34"

1'-6"

24"

APPLIED STUD Design Develop Fall Semester 2

6"

3'-6"

9.00

Chien-Han Yen Hengyu Lim (H Jacky Wong TingYan Zhu (M

1'-0"

1'-6"

INSTRUCTORS Scott Uriu Pavel Getov

CONSULTANTS

6'-9 3/4"

ARUP: NOUSE:

Mixed Use Retail

4 '-2"

2'-8"

3'-0"

2'-1"

5'-0"

1'-6"

1'-6"

ADA REQUIREMENTS FOR BATHROOM STALLS BATHROOM STALLS REQUIRE A MINIMUM CLEARING OF 34IN FOR ENTERING AND A CLEARING OF 1,7/8 FT OF CLEARING FOR WHEELCHAIR ACCESSIBILITY

0 11/16" 0 1/4"XMAX.

2 3/8" MIN.

36" MIN.

5'-0" MIN.

0 11/16"

1 7/8"XMIN.

24" MIN.

DESIGN DEVELOPMENT | EGRESS diagram

1 1/8"XMIN.

GENERAL NO

34" MIN.

CL

1 5/8" MIN.

0 11/16"

CL

1 5/8" MIN.

0 1/2"XMAX.

CL

2'-8" MIN.

0 1/4"XMAX.

0 11/16"XMIN.

CL

0 1/2"XMAX.

CL1 7/16"XMIN.

LEVEL 4

EGRESS AXONOMETRIC DIAGRAM ADA ACCESS VIA EXTERIOR STAIRS ALL THEADS MUST BE MARKED

STAIRWELL 2 EGRESS STAIR CORE A 30 X 10 FT 2HR FIRE PROOF RATED

STAIRWELL 1 EGRESS STAIR CORE A 30 X 10 FT 2HR FIRE PROOF RATED

LEVEL 3 3 1/8" MIN.

OCC: TYPE B THEATER LOAD 1/100 7,640 SQ FT OCC. LOAD 76 4'-4 3/4"

5'-0"

OCC: TYPE B THEATER LOAD 1/100 6.655 SQ FT OCC. LOAD 66

3'-6" MIN.

4'-4 1/2"

CONSULTANTS

5'-3 1/2"

ARUP: NOUSE:

26"

DN

18"

LEVEL 2 3'-4 1/2"

3'-6" MIN.

TEAM

Chien-Han Yen (Hann Hengyu Lim (Hyu) Jacky Wong TingYan Zhu (Murk)

INSTRUCTORS Scott Uriu Pavel Getov

8'-7 1/4"

9'-5 3/4"

2.2 A9

12"+ 1 TREAD

DESCRIP

DESIGN DESIGN DESIGN DESIGN DESIGN DESIGN DESIGN

APPLIED STUDIES 30 Design Development ADA Fall Semester 2018

6'-1 3/4"

2" MIN.

OCC: TYPE B RETAIL LOAD 1/100 2590 SQ FT OCC. LOAD 25

2 1/8" MIN.

2" MIN.

2 1/8" MIN.

DN 12"

LANDING

LANDING

2 11/16" MIN.

LEVEL 3

Area of Refuge

UP

NO.

2 3 4 5 6 17 8

A-KLL+W. 1 DESIGN

2.2 A9

6"

12"+P1 TREAD

STAIRWELL 3 EGRESS STAIR CORE A BUTTONS SHOULD BE 20 X 10 FT ACCESSIBLE BY 2HR FIRE PROOF RATED EITHER WAYS

LEVEL 4 ADA ELEVATOR DIMENSIONS OCC: ELEVATOR TYPE B AND MINIMUM FOR AVERAGE DIMENSIONED REQUIREMENT FOR ADA RETAIL ELEVATORS LOAD 1/100 4830 SQ FT OCC. LOAD 48

42"

1 A9

DRAWING REV

OCC: TYPE B RETAIL TYPICAL LOAD CORE 1/100 LAYOUT 3,077EXAMPLE SQ FT OF ADA COMPLIANT ILLUSTRATED OCC.ADA LOAD 30 CORE WITH ACCESSIBLE ELEVATORS

A11.0

OCC: TYPE B RETAIL LOAD 1/100 4,250 SQ FT OCC. LOAD 42

STAIRWELL 2 EGRESS STAIR CORE A 25 X 10 FT 2HR FIRE PROOF RATED

LEVEL 1 OCC: TYPE B RETAIL LOAD 1/100 4,550 SQ FT OCC. LOAD 45

LEVEL 1

2.1 A9

2.1 A9.0

Mixed Use Retail Shopping Mall

LEVEL 2

EXIT TO BUCARELI STREET

2.2 A9.0

EGRESS KEY PLAN DIAGRAM A

OCC: TYPE B RETAIL LOAD 1/100 5,425 SQ FT OCC. LOAD 54

EGRESS KEY PLAN DIAGRAM B

2.1 A9

MAXIMUM DISTANCE

MAXIMUM DISTANCE

35’

58’

DRAWING REVISION

42’

13’

8’

13

13

35’

GENERAL NOTES

NO.

DESCRIPTION

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

DESIGN DESIGN DESIGN DESIGN DESIGN DESIGN DESIGN DESIGN

23’

12

LEVEL 1 OCC: TYPE B RETAIL LOAD 1/100 9,975 SQ FT OCC. LOAD 99

P28 | 4A DESIGN DEVELOPMENT

12’

12’

34’

EGRESS LEVEL 3.5 OCC: TYPE B THEATER + RETAIL LOAD 1/100 12,479 SQ FT OCC. LOAD 124

A9.0

DEVELOP DEVELOP DEVELOP DEVELOP DEVELOP DEVELOP DEVELOP DEVELOP


DESIGN DEVELOPMENT | SYSTEMS + HVAC DIAGRAMS A-KLL+W.

A-

TEA

TEAM 1 Chien-Han Yen (Hannah) Hengyu Lim (Hyu) Jacky Wong Tingyan Zhu (Murk)

Chie Hen Jack Ting

Michael Liu Nancy Ai Ryan Yap

APP Des Fall

INS Sco Pav

CON

ARU NOU

APPLIED STUDIES 3034 Design Development Fall Semester 2018 INSTRUCTORS Scott Uriu Pavel Getov CONSULTANTS ARUP: NOUSE:

GEN

3 1 A10

Mixed Use Retail Shopping Mall

1 M3

Bucareli 50, Colonia Centro, Centro, 06600 Ciudad de México, CDMX, Mexico

DRA

LIGHTING SYSTEMS: REFLECTED CEILING PLAN

REFLECTED CEILING PLAN: FIRE SPRINKLERS HVAC DIAGRAM

M5

NO.

LEGEND 2’X2’ Enclosed Ceiling Luminaire 2’X2’ Luminaire Ceiling Mount 6” Recessed Luminaire 6” Recessed Wall Wash Light 6” Recessed Floor Light

Track Light Fire Sprinklers

M

MECH AIRFLOW 45,600 SF = 45,600 CFM MULTI - HEATING/ COOLING PACKAGED UNIT 145,000 CFM / 2

RETURN RISER 3X5 SQ FT

DRAWING REVISIONS

1 Hr Fire Separation

1 Hr Fire Separation

1 Hr Fire Separation

2.1 M5

HVAC KEY PLAN DIAGRAM A

2.2

HVAC KEY PLAN DIAGRAM B

S = Buildings equipped throughout with an automatic sprinkler system installed in accordance with Section 903.3.1.1. M5installed in accordance with Section 903.3.1.1. NS = Buildings not equipped throughout with an automatic sprinkler system N = No separation requirement. NP = Not permitted. a. See Section 420. b. The required separation from areas used only for private or pleasure vehicles shall be reduced by 1 hour but to not less than 1 hour. c. See Section 406.3.4. d. Separation is not required between occupancies of the same classification. e. [SFM] Group I and F1 occupancies and Group R-2.1 and F-1 occupancies shall have a 3 hour separation. f. [SFM] Commercial kitchens not associated with cafeterias and similar dining facilities in Group I-2 and Group R-2.1 shall have a 2-hour separation and shall be protected by an automatic sprinkler system.

NO.

DESCRIPTION

DATE

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

DESIGN DESIGN DESIGN DESIGN DESIGN DESIGN DESIGN DESIGN

10.05.15 10.12.15 10.19.15 10.26.15 11.02.15 11.09.15 11.16.15 11.23.15

DEVELOPMENT DEVELOPMENT DEVELOPMENT DEVELOPMENT DEVELOPMENT DEVELOPMENT DEVELOPMENT DEVELOPMENT

FIRE SEPARATION

LEVEL 3.5

A10.0

LI

Batten Fluorescent Light

SUPPLY RISER 3X5 SQ FT

GENERAL NOTES

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

SUPPLY RISER RETURN RISER

ELECTRIC ROOM I.T ROOM

SUPPLY DUCT

RETURN DUCT

4A DESIGN DEVELOPMENT | P29


DESIGN DEVELOPMENT | ENVIRONMENTAL DIAGRAMS I M/S

N NNW

NNE

20.88

NE

NW

C

N NNW

13.20<

NNE

30.00< NE

NW

18.56 WNW

ENE

16.24

24.50 WNW

ENE

13.92 W

E

11.60

W

E

9.28 ESE

WSW

6.96

ESE

WSW

4.64

SE

SW

SE

SW

2.32 SSE

SSW

21.75

kWh/m2

19.00

1799.08<

16.25

1619.17

13.50

1439.26

10.75

1259.35

8.00

1079.45

5.25

899.54

<2.50

719.63

SSE

SSW

<0.00

S

Humiodity Ratio [kg/ water / kg air]

Psychometric Chart Mexico City 1 Jan 1:00 - 31 Dec 24:00

27.25

S

539.72 Wind-Rose Diagram Mexico City 1 Jan 1:00 - 31 Dec 24:00 Hourly Data : Wind Speed (m/s) Calm for 38.63% of the time = 3384 hours. Each closed polyline shows frequency of 0.7% = 57 hours

Wind-Rose Diagram Mexico City 1 Jan 1:00 - 31 Dec 24:00 Hourly Data : Dry Bulb Temperature (C) Calm for 38.63% of the time = 3384 hours. Each closed polyline shows frequency of 0.7% = 57 hours

359.82 179.91 <0.00

Operative Tempreture [°C]

DESIGN DEVELOPMENT | ENVIRONMENTAL DIAGRAMS II 1.1 M1

MAKE SHIFT VENTS

ARTIFICIAL CHIMNEY

PLAZA FACING VENTS

CHINMNEY EFFECT

The existing skylight could potentially be replaced with louvres which not only diffuses the slight but also helps provide the building natural ventillation

The exist building form allows for warm air to be exhausted from openings which resembles a chimney on the top.

Apertures could potentially be deployed towards the plaza facing area to allow cool air to enter and ventilate the building this would work its way to the atrium

The building was designed with the chimney effect in mind with apertures and openings from the lower end and openings on the top for exhaustion.

1.2 M1

DAYLIGHTING DIAGRAM SHADOW ANALYSIS 2 M2

55 FT 50 FT

RADIATION ANALYSIS

1.3 M1

DAYLIGHTING DIAGRAM PV ANALYSIS

APPROX. 1800 kWh/m2

N 30.00

330.00

DAYLIGHTING DIAGRAM

45 FT 300.00

60.00

40 FT 35 FT W

M/S

C

13.20<

30.00<

20.88

27.25

18.56

24.50

16.24

21.75

13.92

19.00

11.60

16.25

kWh/m2 1799.08< APPROX. 1000 kWh/m2

1619.17 1439.26 1259.35

PV Panels 7622 sq.ft

1079.45

E

30 FT 2 5 240.00 FT 20 FT

120.00

150.00

210.00 S

899.54 APPROX. 300 kWh/m2

719.63

9.28

13.50

6.96

10.75

539.72

4.64

8.00

359.82

2.32

5.25

179.91

<0.00

<2.50

<0.00

15 FT 10

Shadow Analysis Diagram FMexico T City 1 Jan 1:00 - 31 Dec 24:00

Radiation Analysis Mexico City 1 Jan 1:00 - 31 Dec 24:00

Radiation Analysis Mexico City 1 Jan 1:00 - 31 Dec 24:00

05FT

2 M1

DAYLIGHTING SECTION DIAGRAM SKYLIGHT

PV HOTSPOT

ANGLED CLERESTORY

CLERESTORY

The skylights are located on certain openings which compliments with the interior spaces, such as the circulation and corridors while a seperate shell / volume is

The roof experiences a considerably high amount of solar radiation due to the orientation on site. It experiences between 1620 - 1800 kWh/m2

The terraces however receives a great amount of sunlight providing the occupants a contrasting experience from the sheltered indoor shell

The terraces however receives a great amount of sunlight providing the occupants a contrasting experience from the sheltered indoor shell

55 FT 50 FT 45 FT 40 FT 35 FT 30 FT 25 FT 20 FT 15 FT 10 FT 05FT

CONFIGURED OPENINGS FOR PROGRAMS

REDUCED SUNLIGHT

AN OUTDOOR EXPERIENCE

DIFFUSED

The skylights are located on certain openings which compliments with the interior spaces, such as the circulation and corridors while a seperate shell / volume is used for the theater

The ground floor and plaza is mostly sheltered, receiving minimal sunlight and provides the occupants just the right amount of sunlight

The terraces however receives a great amount of sunlight providing the occupants a contrasting experience from the sheltered indoor shell

The terraces however receives a great amount of sunlight providing the occupants a contrasting experience from the sheltered indoor shell

P30 | 4A DESIGN DEVELOPMENT


DESIGN DEVELOPMENT | ACCOUSTIC + WIND DIAGRAM A-KLL+W.

3.1 M4

3.2 M4

ACOUSTIC INSULATION DETAIL ONE

3.3 M4

ACOUSTIC INSULATION DETAIL TWO

ACOUSTIC INSULATION TYPOLOGIES

1 M4

KEY PLAN VIEW

A

TEAM 1 Chien-Han Yen (Hannah) Hengyu Lim (Hyu) Jacky Wong TingYan Zhu (Murk)

TE

Nancy Ai Ryan Yap Michael Liu

1. DOUBLE STACKED EXTERIOR

AP De Fal

ACOUSTIC FOAM INSULATION ACOUSTIC FOAM INSULATION

ALUMINIUM PANEL MOUNTS INSTRUCTORS Scott Uriu Pavel Getov

3 1/2 IN ALUMINIUM STUDS

INS Sco Pav

3 1/2 IN ALUMINIUM STUDS

CO

CONCRETE TOPPING

WOOD PANEL FINISHING

CONSULTANTS STEEL DECKING ARUP: NOUSE:

GYPSUM ASSEMBLY 0.5 IN STACKED

GYPSUM ASSEMBLY 0.5 IN STACKED

APPLIED STUDIES 3034 Design Development Fall Semester 2018

Ch He Jac Tin

1. SINGLE EXTERIOR

1. DOUBLE STACKED INTERIOR

1. DOUBLE STACKED INTERIOR

STEEL DECKING

ACOUSTIC FOAM INSULATION

AR NO

ACOUSTIC FOAM INSULATION

3 M4

NNW

2 M4

Bucareli 50, Colonia Centro, Centro, 06600 Ciudad de México, CDMX, Mexico

Mixed Use Retail Shopping Mall

3 1/2 IN ALUMINIUM STUDS

STREET+N TRAFFIC NNE APPROX, DECIBLE: 60dB

W

N CONCESSION + TICKETING APPROX, NNW DECIBLE : 60dB

20.88

ENE

3.2 M4

C RETAIL SPACE APPROX, DECIBLE : 70dB 30.00<

NNE

NE

NW

3.3 M4

18.56 16.24

WNW

11.60

SE

6.96 4.64

W

E

ESE

WSW

SE

SW

2.32 SSE

SSW S

S

DRAWING REVISIONS

Humiodity Ratio [kg/ water / kg air]

21.75

kWh/m2

19.00

1799.08<

16.25

1619.17

13.50

1439.26

10.75

1259.35

8.00

1079.45

5.25

899.54

<2.50

719.63

SSE

SSW

<0.00

PLAZAPsychometric / Chart COURTYARD NOISE Mexico City APPROX, 1 JanDECIBLE 1:00 - 31: 80dB Dec 24:00

24.50

9.28

SW

ACOUSTIC INSULATED WALLS

27.25

ENE

13.92 E

ESE

WSW

GENERAL NOTES

ACOUSTIC WALLS IN PLAN

8IN THICK WALL W/ TERTIARY STRUCTURES FOR GFRC PANELS

M/S CORRIDOR TO THEATER APPROX, DECIBLE13.20< : 40dB

NE

NW

WNW

2 M4

ACOUSTIC PARTIAL SECTION

539.72

NO. DESCRIPTION DATE Wind-Rose Diagram 1 DESIGN DEVELOPMENT 10.05.15 Mexico City 1 Jan 1:00 Dec 24:00 2 - 31 DESIGN DEVELOPMENT 10.12.15 Hourly Data Speed (m/s) 3 : WindDESIGN DEVELOPMENT 10.19.15 Calm for4 38.63% ofDESIGN the time = 3384 hours. DEVELOPMENT 10.26.15 Each closed shows DEVELOPMENT frequency of 0.7% = 57 11.02.15 hours 5 polylineDESIGN 6 DESIGN DEVELOPMENT 11.09.15 7 DESIGN DEVELOPMENT 11.16.15 8 DESIGN DEVELOPMENT 11.23.15

Wind-Rose Diagram Mexico City 1 Jan 1:00 - 31 Dec 24:00 Hourly Data : Dry Bulb Temperature (C) Calm for 38.63% of the time = 3384 hours. Each closed polyline shows frequency of 0.7% = 57 hours

359.82

GE

DR

NO. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

179.91 <0.00

Operative Tempreture [°C]

A

ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS

55 FT

MAKE SHIFT VENTS

ARTIFICIAL CHIMNEY

PLAZA FACING VENTS

CHINMNEY EFFECT

The existing skylight could potentially be replaced with louvres which not only diffuses the slight but also helps provide the building natural ventillation

The exist building form allows for warm air to be exhausted from openings which resembles a chimney on the top.

Apertures could potentially be deployed towards the plaza facing area to allow cool air to enter and ventilate the building this would work its way to the atrium

The building was designed with the chimney effect in mind with apertures and openings from the lower end and openings on the top for exhaustion.

M2

50 FT 45 FT 40 FT 35 FT 30 FT 25 FT 20 FT 15 FT 10 FT 05FT

4A DESIGN DEVELOPMENT | P31

M


MIXED USE PROJECT IN MEXICO CITY AMIGGA ARTICULATION AND TECTONICS II Instructor : Jenny Wu Partner : Neno Videnovic

Studio : 3B Spring 2018

Course Overview : The Studio introduces students to the comprehensive design and development of a large scale, building on an urban site. Advancing on the pedagogy established in previous studios (AMIGAA: Architecture as Mass, Interiority, Ground, Aperture and Articulation), this studio focuses on the design, development, and tectonic logic of the building envelope and its ability to articulate contemporary formal organizations. Assemblage versus monolithic form, surface versus mass, iconicity and image, the intentional obscuring of hierarchical mass, layered, and graphic assemblies, tectonics and materiality, constitute a range of concerns in the design work. Beyond design competence, students are expected to articulate and argue for conceptual and disciplinary positions in relation to issues of AMIGAA in anticipation of more advanced work in vertical and thesis studios.

P32 | 3B STUDIO


3B STUDIO | P33


3B STUDIO | SITE + CONCEPT DIAGRAMS AV M O R A L E S

THE URBAN CORRIDOR: P R E S E R VAT I O N

I N R E S O N S E T O O U R U R B A N FA B R I C A N A LY S I S , W E WA N T E D TO A P P R O AC H T H E D E S I G N BY P R E S E R V I N G THE INHERENT CORRIDOR CONDITION.THE MASSES W E R E C O N F I G U R E D A N D C A L I B R AT E D A R O U N D T H E E X I S T I N G B U I L D I N G S W H I L E B A R E LY T O U C H I N G E AC H OT H E R TO P R O D U C E A N T E R R AC I N G VA L L E Y CONDITION FOR THE PLAZA THIS DIAGRAM SHOWS THE URBAN CORRIDOR, ITS ENTRACE POINTS, AND HOW THE MASSING AIMS TO I N T E N S I F Y T H E C I R C U L AT I O N V E R T I C A L LY T H R O U G H THE BUILDING. A D J A C A E N T PA R T S O F T H E C O R R I D O R S W E R E U S E D T O A R T I C U L AT E A N D A G G R E G AT E T H E S PA C E S F O R T H E VA L L E Y A N D T E R R AC E

LI ARE BUC

AY U N TA M I E N T O

U R B A N FA B R I C : THE URBAN CORRIDOR

THE PROJEC T RESPONDS TO A WIDER SCOPE OF U R B A N C U LT U R E O F M E X I C O C I T Y, P R O M I N E N T I N T H E U R B A N FA B R I C O F T H E C I T Y. B Y L I V I N G I N T H E C I T Y O N E E X P E R I E N C E S T H E C O N F I G U R AT I O N O F T H E C I T Y T H R O U G H WA L K I N G AC R O S S I T S U R B A N L A N D S C A P E W H I C H F E AT U R E S A VA S T N U M B E R O F PERMEABLE OPPORTUNITIES IN CUTTING ACROSS P L A Z A S A N D B LO C K S TO G E T TO W H E R E W E WA N T. T H E D I A G R A M C ATA L O G S T H O S E M O M E N T S A N D A C T S A S A S TA R T I N G P O I N T O F O U R P R O J E C T DEVELOPMENT

URBAN CORRIDOR

ROADS

PA S S A G E / S O R T C U T S

P34 | 3B STUDIO

U R B A N FA B R I C : THE URBAN CORRIDOR

PA S S A G E / S O R T C U T S

THE PROJEC T RESPONDS TO A WIDER SCOPE OF U R B A N C U LT U R E O F M E X I C O C I T Y, P R O M I N E N T I N T H E U R B A N FA B R I C O F T H E C I T Y. B Y L I V I N G I N T H E C I T Y O N E E X P E R I E N C E S T H E C O N F I G U R AT I O N O F T H E C I T Y T H R O U G H WA L K I N G AC R O S S I T S U R B A N L A N D S C A P E W H I C H F E AT U R E S A VA S T N U M B E R O F PERMEABLE OPPORTUNITIES IN CUTTING ACROSS P L A Z A S A N D B LO C K S TO G E T TO W H E R E W E WA N T.

T H E D I A G R A M C ATA L O G S T H O S E M O M E N T S A N D A C T S A S A S TA R T I N G P O I N T O F O U R P R O J E C T DEVELOPMENT

URBAN CORRIDOR

ROADS

PA S S A G E / S O R T C U T S

URBAN CORRIDOR


CORRIDOR AXIS

TY

T

PA

CI

TY

CI

PA

T

CI

PA

+8

0%

+2

O

0F

TY

O

0%

+1

+6

0%

+1

+4

5F

O

0F

T

IN

T

/

EX

T

BR

EA

K

THE CORRIDOR AXIS ACTS AS THE R E G I S T R AT I O N L I N E F O R T H E A G G R E G AT I O N O F G E O M E T R I E S WHICH IN TURN PRODUCE A MORE I N T I M AT E S C A L E AT T H E A R E A O F THE CORRIDOR AND ALSO PRODUCE AN INDOOR/OUTDOOR TERRACING CONDITION.

E3

+38FT

+32FT

E2

+24FT

+20FT

+15FT

+00FT

+10FT

E1

+00FT

WORMS EYE

TY

T

PA

T

TY

CI

0F

PA

O

+2

0%

+30FT

+8

O

TY

CI

5F

0%

PA

O

+1

0%

+4

+20FT

+6

+1

CI

0F

T

+10FT

+40FT

3B STUDIO | P35


U R B A N C I R C U L AT I O N + L O C A L C I R C U L AT I O N U R B A N C I R C U L AT I O N UC RA BA T INO N + LO L NC ICR ICRUCLUALTAI O T+H LE OC C I RACLU LCAITRI O E NNT R Y W A S O R I E N T E D A N D C NU LA AN TD I O C A L I B R AT E D T O WA R D S T H E I N H E R E N T U R B A N

I DL O CN O NADN IDT IEONNT RT YH EW A C SI ROC RUILEANTTIEODN AFNRDO M T H E CCOI RR CR U A TRI O EA TGERDO TUONW D ERXDTSE TR H I OE RI NT H O T H E TI NUTREBRAI N OR ALSO CALT I BH TB HRG E C U LFAIA T IDO NI T A NWDA YE NWTERRRAYE PNW ANSGOAR RI EONUTNEDD TAHNED NRISRCC TOO C O RC R EA I DLOII B ND D ITTNO I OWNA TRS H ES CT IHREC UI NL H AP T II O N FROM AN R A T E D XRTOE U RN I ODR ETXETRERRAI OC RI NTGO STPHAEC IENST, EIERNRI TOEERNNTAS LIUFSRYOBI N G THE THEE G CO OR RR R II D DO OR R C CON ND D II TT II O ON N T H E C I R C U L ALT AI OE N F R O M BEGC D O W RWA IPTPHI NVGE RATRIOC U TI NHSHE ATGO R FOI UN N DI TE.SX W T EARY I O R T O T H E I N T E RNI D O RT HA EL S O E X T EI N R I O RB TI TEARTRIAOCNI N G S PA C E S , I N T E N S I F Y I N G T H E B E G I N S T O F I N D I T S WAY W R A P P I N G A R O U N D T H E CORRIDOR CONDITION WITH VERTICLAE E X T E R I O R T E R R A C I N G S PA C E S , I N T E N S I F Y I N G T H E I N H A B I TAT I O N . CORRIDOR CONDITION WITH VERTICLAE I N H A B I TAT I O N .

U R B A N C I R C U L AT I O N THE HIGHLIGHTED GEOME TRIES SHOWS THE EXTERIOR FLOOR

U R B A N C PI RL ACTUE LS AATNIDO TNH E R E S P E C T I V E C I R C U L A T I O N F L O W F R O M T H E

I N T E R I O R T O E X T E R I O R S PA C E S . T H E H I G H L IUG R HB T EADNG ECOI M WS THE EXTERIOR FLOOR R ECTUR ILEAS TS IHOON P L AT E S A N D T H E R E S P E C T I V E C I R C U L AT I O N F L O W F R O M T H E I N T E R I O R T TOH EEX H T EI GR H I OLRI GSHPTAECDE SG. E O M E T R I E S S H O W S T H E E X T E R I O R F L O O R P L AT E S A N D T H E R E S P E C T I V E C I R C U L AT I O N F L O W F R O M T H E I N T E R I O R T O E X T E R I O R S PA C E S .

I N T E R I O R C I R C U L AT I O N I N T E R I O RT HCEI RHCI GUHLLAI GT HI O T END G E O M E T R I E S S H O W S T H E I N T E R I O R S T A I R S A N D C I R C U L AT I O N PAT H A C R O S S VA R I O U S L E V E L S T H E H I G H L I G H T E D G E O M E T R I E S S H O W S T H E I N T E R I O R S TA I R S A N D C I R C U ILN A TTI E OR N I POA R T H CAICRRCOU S SL V AATRI IOO UNS L E V E L S

T H E H I G H L I G H T E D G E O M E T R I E S S H O W S T H E I N T E R I O R S TA I R S A N D C I R C U L AT I O N PAT H A C R O S S VA R I O U S L E V E L S

E G R E S S A N D E L E VAT O R S E G R E S S A N D E L E VAT O R S

T H E H I G H L I G H T E D G E O M E T R I E S S H O W S T H E E G R E S S S TA I R S A N D T H E H I G H L IEGLHE TV EADT OGRESO M E TTRHI EES I SNHT O ON E RWI SO RT H E E G R E S S S T A I R S A N D E L E VAT O R S O N T H E I N T E R I O R

E G R E S S A N D E L E VAT O R S

P R O G R A M M AT I C DIAGRAM

T H E H I G H L I G H T E D G E O M E T R I E S S H O W S T H E E G R E S S S TA I R S A N D E L E VAT O R S O N T H E I N T E R I O R

T H E P R O J E C T I S A M I X E D U S E E S TA B L I S H M E N T M A I N LY C O M P R I S I N G O F R E TA I L S PA C E S , G A L L E R I E S A N D A T H E AT E R . O N E S I D E O F T H E M A S S H O S T S C O M M E R C I A L P R O G R A M S S U C H A S R E TA I L S H O P S , R E S TA U R A N T S A N D C A F E S . W H I L E T H E O T H E R H O S T S M O R E A R T S P R O G R A M S S U C H A S A T H E AT E R A N D A R T G A L L E R Y.

T H E AT E R

LEVEL 2 - 3 1,500 SQ FT 10% OF OVE

T H E AT E R L O B B Y

LEVEL 2 - 3 2,700 SQ FT 16% OF OVE

T H E AT E R C H U N K

LEVEL 2 - 3 20,000 SQ F 26% OF OVE

E X T E R I O R S PA C E S

LEVEL 3/4 1,200 SQ FT 8% OF OVER

R E S TA U R A N T

LEVEL 5 2,990 SQ FT 18% OF OVE

T H E C O N F I G U R AT I O N O F T H E S PA C E S A N D G E O M E T R I E S P R O V I D E S A N I N T E R E S T I N G S PA C E F O R T H E PROGRAMS DUE TO ITS TERRACING ON THE EXTERIOR AND INTERIOR

COMMERCIAL + R E TA I L S PA C E GALLERY + T H E AT E R

AY

AV

M

O

RA

LE

U

N

TA

IE

N

TO

S

G A L L E R Y + R E TA I L S PA C E

C O M M E R C I A L + R E TA I L S PA C E

BUC

P36 | 3B STUDIO

M

ARE

LI

LEVEL 2 - 4 7,200 SQ FT 36% OF OVE

LEVEL 1 - 3 7,000 SQ FT 32% OF OVE


H I J

E LI

K

BUCA R

L

12

11

10

9

8

7

A B

6

C E F G 5

4

3

2

1

AYUNTAMIENTO

0m

10m

20m

15

14

H

13

I J

RELI

K L

BUCA

12

11

10

9

8

7

A B

6 C E F G 5

4

3

2

1

AYUNTAMIENTO

0m

10m

20m

3B STUDIO | P37


55 FT

50 FT

45 FT

40 FT

35 FT

30 FT

25 FT

20 FT

15 FT

10 FT

05FT

P38 | 3B STUDIO


ELEVATION +SECTION The elevations and section shows the interaction and intersections between the plaza, the first mass, the second mass. It also illustrates the concept of breaking interiority and exteriority of the floor plates meandering in and out of the outdoor terrace and back to the interior space

3B STUDIO | P39


materials and tectonics. A

The chunk diagram shows the various materials deployed for the project. It also highlights certain assembly for the project such as how the curtain wall system is structured. It also shows how interior spaces were organized. A grid system was used for various deloyment of structural system to internal spatial organization.

CLADDING DETAILS

5 5 4

3 2 1

MATERIALS + ASSEMBLY 1. CERAMIC TILING 2. VAPOR BARRIER + TILING BASE 3. STEEL BRACKETS + SCREWS 4. RECEIVING BACKET + SCREWS 1/4 IN 5. STEEL COLUMN ( CLADDING FRAME ) 6. CONCRETE CAVITY + INSULATION

P40 | 3B STUDIO


EXTERIOR FLOOR DETAIL

CERAMIC TILES

VAPOR BARRIER COAT

CONCRETE TOPPING INSULATION FOAM SPRAY CORRUGATED STEEL DECKING SQUARE STEEL BEAM 10 x 3 STEEL I-BEAMS

RAISED FLOOR DETAIL GLAZING

FLOOR PEDESTALS

DROP CEILING

+55FT

+50FT C

+45FT B

+40FT

+35FT

+30FT

+25FT

+20FT

+15FT

+10FT

+05FT

+00FT

H G F E D C B A

3B STUDIO | P41


P42 | 3B STUDIO


3B STUDIO | P43


P44 | 3A STUDIO


DTLA MIXED USE TOWER PROJECT AMIGGA ARticulation + TECTonics I Instructor : Dwayne Owyler Partner : Neno Videnovic

Studio : 3A Fall 2017

Course Overview : In this final assignment the objective was to design a mixed use tower located in downtown Los Angeles. The project aims to explore and develop into site specificities, curtain wall tectonics and systems as well as programatic and spatial organization along a vertical axis for the tower. Prior to the project, precedential analysis was done on previous tower projects based on similar height and programatic arrangements. Prompt: The prompt was to design a tower which features commercial programs, office programs and a hotel within the tower while meeting ADA, egress and structural requirements.

3A STUDIO | P45


LEVEL 38 : HOTEL

1

2

3

4

5

A

A

B

B

C

C

D

D

1

2

3

4

5

LEVEL 22: OFFICES

1

2

3

4

5

A

A

B

B

C

C

D

D

1

2

3

4

5

LEVEL 1 : LOBBY

1

2

3

4

5

A

A

B

B

C

C

D

D

P46 | 3A STUDIO


48

44

43

50

Roof

48

Mechanical

Mechanical

Sky Lobby/Restaurant

Mechanical

33

Hotel

32

Mechanical

3A Design Studio/ AMIGAA: Articulation and Tectonics I/Griffin, Oyler ,Rochas, Spina

3A Design Stu

44

Sky Lobby/Restaurant

43

Mechanical

33

Hotel

32

Mechanical

05

Office

04

Mechanical

03

Commercial

02

Office Lobby

01

Hotel Lobby

P3

Garage 0

25â&#x20AC;&#x2122;

3A STUDIO | P47 50â&#x20AC;&#x2122;


Chunk Axon / 3A Studios Hyu Lim Hengyu + Neno Videnovic 2HR FIREPROOF RATED CORE FIRE STAIR SHAFT SERVICE ELEVATOR SHAFT

ELEVATOR SHAFT

UTILITY CLOSET

STEEL ENFORCED COLUMNS

TRIPLE GLAZING PANEL EXTRUDED ALUMINIUM MULLIONS

materials and tectonics.

POLYCARBONATE MATERIAL

The chunk diagram shows the various materials deployed for the project. It also highlights certain assembly for the project such as how the curtain wall system is structured. It also shows how interior spaces were organized. A grid system was used for various deloyment of structural system to internal spatial organization.

A B C D E

P48 | 3A STUDIO

F


FLOOR SLABS STEEL COLUMNS FLOOR CLADDING FLOOR JOIST I - BEAM STEEL DECKING STEEL PLATE

WINDOW PANE LEVEL 42 HOTEL 565 FEET

TRIPLE PANE GLAZING

MULLION

LEVEL 41 HOTEL 555 FEET

LEVEL 39 HOTEL 545 FEET

LEVEL 38 HOTEL 535 FEET

1’ - 1/4” DETAILED SECTION

CLADDING JOIST IBEAM

MULLION

TRIPLE GLAZING PANEL

CONCRETE FLOOR TOPPING DROP CEILING

1’ - 1/8” DETAILED SECTION

9

8 7 6 5 4 3 2

3A STUDIO | P49


MASSING ITERATIONS

SCHEME ONE

SCHEME TWO

SCHEME THR

The massing was arrived after iterating several massing strategies across a single tower condition, a twin tower condition and a slab tower condition. Two out of the several iterations were chosen to produce new taxonomies as a combination of the two to arrive at the final massing.

The massing aims at creating diverse spatial conditions across various programs with the core cutting through every program yet detaching and attaching itself to different programs when deemed necessary. The separation of volumes create an interesting courtyard space. However it lacks efficiency in some core - programs districution

The massing aims at creating diverse spatial conditions across various programs with the core cutting through every program yet detaching and attaching itself to different programs when deemed necessary.The iteration though, explores a possibility of having individual open space access for all programs across multiple levels.

In this single tower con two cores are allocated opposite sides of the to equal distribution of cir However the allocation cores defeats the purp having a single tower c tion.

SKY LOBBY OFFICE HOTEL COMMERCIAL CORE OPEN PLAZA

PROGRAMATIC DIAGRAM

LEVEL 50 : ROOFTOP BAR

CIRCULATION DIAGRAM

CORE PLAN DIAGRAM

LEVEL 50 : ROOFTOP BAR TWIN CORE LAYOUT

LEVEL 45 - 49 : SKY LOBBY + GYM + POOL

LEVEL 45 - 49 : SKYLOBBY CIRCULATION

The tower core is divided in two to accomodate the different programs. The core on the left accomodates the office programs from the segregated office lobby, While the core on the right caters to the hotel programs and levels

LEVEL 45 : HOTEL MECHANICAL

LEVEL 34 - 44 : HOTEL LEVEL CIRCULATION

LEVEL 34 - 44 : HOTEL LEVEL CIRCULATION

LEVEL 1 - 4 LOBBY + COMMERCIAL CORE TO FOOTPRINT RATIO : 8%

LEVEL 42 - 44 : LUXURY HOTEL SUITES

LEVEL 34 - 42 : STANDARD HOTEL ROOMS

LEVEL 33 : OFFICE MECHANICAL

LEVEL 5 - 32 : VISITOR + EMPLOYEE ENTRANCE

LEVEL 5 - 32 : BOARD ROOMS

LEVEL 5 - 32 : OPEN OFFICE PLAN

LEVEL 1 - 4 LOBBY + COMMERCIAL CORE TO FOOTPRINT RATIO : 10%

LEVEL 5 - 32 : EMPLOYEE ENTRANCE

LEVEL 5 - 32 : EXEC OFFICE CHUNK

LEVEL 3: COMMERCIAL CIRCULATION LEVEL 4 : COMMERCIAL MECHANICAL LEVEL 2: OFFICE ENTRANCE LEVEL 3 : COMMERCIAL OPEN LEVEL 1 : HOTEL ENTRANCE

LEVEL 3 : COMMERCIAL CHUNK LEVEL 2 : OFFICE LOBBY LEVEL 1 : HOTEL LOBBY

P50 | 3A STUDIO

LEVEL 1 - 4 LOBBY + COMMERCIAL CORE TO FOOTPRINT RATIO : 12%


SCHEME FOUR

SCHEME FIVE

In this massing iteration, the programs were stacked one above the other while maintaining a void in the middle to provide sunlight across multiple programs. The core cuts across all programs with the office at the top followed by the hotel and commercial space

In this single tower configuration, the office is facing 7th street while the hotel remains closer to the ground level near the prublic spaces and programs such as commercial space and the side walk, following the hierarchy of private/ public setting. The core is situated in the middle of the two, allowing simple and accessible access to both.

circulation + program.

The circulation diagrams shows the circulation for the towers by highlighting individual circulation for the two main programs - the hotel and the offce spaces and the egress diagram for the evacuation route between the different plans.Circulation + Egress diagram.

EGRESS DIAGRAM

The programatic diagrams shows the programatic scheme chosen for the tower which comprises of stacked programs , the core layout shows the core scheme chosen for the tower which is a twin core layout catering to each the offce and the hotel zonesCore Layout +Program Diagram

MAXIMUM DISTANCE

40’

13’

63’

10’

10’

34’ 13’

MAXIMUM DISTANCE

91’

MAXIMUM DISTANCE

76’

24’

32’

26’

6’

14’

18’

14’

MAXIMUM DISTANCE

48’ 44’

EGRESS TO EXIT

44’

58’

48’

EE

nfiguration, d on ower for rculation. n of two pose of configura-

44’ - 48’

3A STUDIO | P51


BUILDING

The tower is loc high rise and low tower with a uni skyline. Program oriented toward verticle conditio

S I T E A N A LY S I S The tower is located between the transition of high rise and low rise tower, providing the tower with a unique and diverse view of the skyline. Programs were calibrated and oriented towards the different site and verticle conditions

Site specificities.

110 FWY NORTH EXIT 110 FWY SOUTH EXIT

S U M M E R A N A LY S I S TIME : 10 AM SHADOW LOCATION : LOS ANGELES, 7TH AND BIXEL STREET

S PAT I A L BETWEE

The diagram s lated from the across differe turn, compete exterior pocke conditions

The top diagrams shows various site conditions on a global and local scale, leading to site specifc strategies deployed on the ground level. The various diagrams show the different building distribtion across the city, site circulation and localized circulation. The annual sun diagram shows a simulation of different sunlight and shadow condition on the site across various noons throughout the year, the pockets and o sets of space provide diverse light and shadow condition throughout the tower and di erent programs. Allowing the occupants to experience better light through different times of the

F A L L A N A LY S I S TIME : 10 AM SHADOW LOCATION : LOS ANGELES, 7TH AND BIXEL STREET

W I N T E R A N A LY S I S TIME : 10 AM SHADOW LOCATION : LOS ANGELES, 7TH AND BIXEL STREET

ANNUAL

The diagram s sunlight and s across various pockets and o light and shad tower and diff occupants to e different times

S P R I N G A N A LY S I S TIME : 10 AM SHADOW LOCATION : LOS ANGELES, 7TH AND BIXEL STREET

P52 | 3A STUDIO

SITE SE

A site section proposition fo between the b towers, offeri towards diffe


BUILDING HEIGHT DISTRIBUTION The tower is located between the transition of high rise and low rise tower, providing the tower with a unique and diverse view of the skyline. Programs were calibrated and oriented towards the different site and verticle conditions

S I T E C I R C U L AT I O N LOW RISE BUILDINGS HIGH RISE BUILDINGS

LO C A L I Z E D C I R C U L AT I O N

The tower located on 7th and Bixel requires quite a detour from the 110 fwy, though observation, higher traffic density converges on 7th street.

Due to the convergence of higher traffic on the axis of Bixel street, the tower calibrates certain ground geometries and public spaces towards Bixel axis such as the hotel and retail entrance.

110 FWY NORTH EXIT 110 FWY SOUTH EXIT

OFFICE LOBBY ENTRACE HOTEL / RETAIL LOBBY

HIGH PUBLIC TRAFFIC AXIS

MIXED ENTRANCE

50FT FROM CORE

40FT FROM CORE

20FT FROM CORE

110 FWY NORTH EXIT 110 FWY SOUTH EXIT

S PAT I A L D E F I N I T I O N BETWEEN GRID SYSTEMS The diagram shows the geometries extrapolated from the different grid systems from across different levels from the core. Which in turn, competes to define the interior and exterior pockets of space and diverse shadow conditions

50 FT FROM CORE 40 FT FROM CORE

20 FT FROM CORE

SUMMER SHADOW

FALL SHADOW

WINTER SHADOW

SPRING SHADOW

ANNUAL SUN SHADOW

The diagram shows a simulation of different sunlight and shadow condition on the site across various noons throughout the year, the pockets and offsets of space provide diverse light and shadow condition throughout the tower and different programs. Allowing the occupants to experience better light through different times of the year.

780 FT

SITE SECTION

680 FT 630 FT

A site section clearly indicates the interesting proposition for the tower given its location between the border of low and high rise towers, offering inhabitants an exposure towards different vertical urban elements

650 FT

645 FT 625 FT 565 FT 565 FT

580FT

565 FT

420FT

3A STUDIO | P53


15 FT EVELOPE TO COLUMN DISTANCE

DESIGN DEVELOPMENT | STRUCTURES 20FT COLUMN TO COLUMN DISTANCE

The diagrams shows the different structural systems deployed in the tower with foor plate dimensions, core dimensions, column grid organization and Ibeams located within the tower. The diagram also shows the core to footprint ratio which varies according to various elevation yet meeting the programatic requirements for each level. STRUCTURAL ORGANIZATION : STRUCTURAL ORGANIZATION : SYNTHESIZES STRUCTURES

STRUCTURAL ORGANIZAT I - BEAMS ORGANIZATION

COLUMN ORGANIZATIONAL GRID

5:33

2'

13

' 65

10

4'

32

'

635'

CORE TO FOOTPRINT DIMENSIONS

P54 | 3A STUDIO

DISTANCE OF FLOOR PLATE + CORE TO PERIMETER + FOOTPRINT TO CORE


18FT I - BEAM WIDTH :

TION : NAL GRID

STRUCTURAL ORGANIZATION : CORE - COLUMN EQUDISTANCE GRID

Max Core to Perimeter 116' Core = 15.3% Max Core to Perimeter 109' 13' Core = 16.8% Max Core to Perimeter 109' 13' Core = 17.4% Max Core to Perimeter 109' 13' Core = 18.0% Max Core to Perimeter 100' 13' Core = 18.3%

STRUCTURAL ORGANIZATION : AXON PLAN GRID DIAGRAM

48 47 46 45 44

Max Core to Perimeter 100' 20' Core = 18.3% Max Core to Perimeter 116' Core = 17.0% Max Core to Perimeter 119' Core = 16.6% Max Core to Perimeter 119' Core = 16.5% Max Core to Perimeter 119' Core = 16.4% Max Core to Perimeter 119' Core = 16.3% Max Core to Perimeter 119' Core = 16.1% Max Core to Perimeter 119' Core = 15.3% Max Core to Perimeter 119' Core = 15.2% Max Core to Perimeter 119' Core = 15.2% Max Core to Perimeter 119' Core = 15.3%

43 10' 42 10' 41 10' 40 10' 39 10' 38 10' 37 10' 36 10' 35 10' 34 10'

Max Core to Perimeter 119' 20' Core = 15.6% Max Core to Perimeter 119' 13' Core = 15.9% Max Core to Perimeter 119' 13' Core = 16.1% Max Core to Perimeter 119' 13' Core = 16.4% Max Core to Perimeter 119' 13' Core = 16.6% Max Core to Perimeter 119' 13' Core = 16.9% Max Core to Perimeter 119' 13' Core = 17.0% Max Core to Perimeter 119' 13' Core = 17.1% Max Core to Perimeter 119' 13' Core = 17.3% Max Core to Perimeter 117' 13' Core = 17.4% Max Core to Perimeter 106' 13' Core = 18.6% Max Core to Perimeter 104' 13' Core = 18.4% Max Core to Perimeter 107' 13' Core = 17.9% Max Core to Perimeter 113' 13' Core = 17.3% Max Core to Perimeter 119' 13' Core = 15.7% Max Core to Perimeter 116' 13' Core = 16.7% Max Core to Perimeter 119' 13' Core = 15.9% Max Core to Perimeter 118' 13' Core = 16.2% Max Core to Perimeter 116' 13' Core = 16.7% Max Core to Perimeter 116' 13' Core = 16.9% Max Core to Perimeter 116' 13' Core = 17.2% Max Core to Perimeter 116' 13' Core = 17.5% Max Core to Perimeter 116' 13' Core = 17.9% Max Core to Perimeter 116' 13' Core = 18.1% Max Core to Perimeter 116' 13' Core = 18.1% Max Core to Perimeter 000' 13' Core = 18.2% Max Core to Perimeter 116' 13' Core = 18.3% Max Core to Perimeter 115' 13' Core = 18.5% Max Core to Perimeter 104' 20' Core = 17.9% Max Core to Perimeter 104' 17.5' Core = 18.1% Max Core to Perimeter 104' 17.5' Core = 18.4% Max Core to Perimeter 104' 17.5' Core = 18.4%

33

32 31 30 29 28 27 26 25 24 23 22 21 20 19 18 17 16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6

STRUCTURAL SYSTEM : COLUMNS ORGANIZATION

STRUCTURAL SYSTEM : COLUMNS ORGANIZATION

5

4

3

2

1

3A STUDIO | P55


LEVEL 33 : FLOOR HEIGHT: 17.5’ OFFICE MECHANICAL

LEVEL 33 : FLOOR HEIGHT: 17.5’ OFFICE MECHANICAL

LEVEL 34 - 44 : FLOOR HEIGHT: 10’ HOTEL

LEVEL 34 - 44 : FLOOR HEIGHT: 10’ HOTEL

LEVEL 33 : FLOOR HEIGHT: 17.5’ OFFICE MECHANICAL

LEVEL 33 : FLOOR HEIGHT: 17.5’ OFFICE MECHANICAL

LEVEL 5 - 32 : FLOOR HEIGHT: 13’ OFFICE

LEVEL 5 - 32 : FLOOR HEIGHT: 13’ OFFICE

LEVEL 4 : FLOOR HEIGHT: 17.5’ MECHANICAL

LEVEL 4 : FLOOR HEIGHT: 17.5’ MECHANICAL

LEVEL 1 - 3 : LEVEL 1 - 3 : FLOOR HEIGHT: 17.5’ FLOOR HEIGHT: 17.5’ HOTEL / OFFICE LOBBY HOTEL / OFFICE LOBBY +COMMERCIAL +COMMERCIAL

STRUCTURAL ORGANIZATION STRUCTURAL : ORGANIZATION : SYNTHESIZES STRUCTURES SYNTHESIZES STRUCTURES

15 FT EVELOPE TO COLUMN DISTANCE

15 FT EVELOPE TO COLUMN DISTANCE

20FT COLUMN TO COLUMN DISTANCE

20FT COLUMN TO COLUMN DISTANCE

STRUCTURAL ORGANIZATION STRUCTURAL : ORGANIZATION : COLUMN ORGANIZATIONAL COLUMN ORGANIZATIONAL GRID GRID

2'

13

5:33

2'

'

65

13

'

65

5:33 1 04 ' 32 '

18FT I - BEAM WIDTH :

STRUCTURAL ORGANIZATION STRUCTURAL : ORGANIZATION : I - BEAMS ORGANIZATIONAL I - BEAMS ORGANIZATIONAL GRID GRID

10

4'

32

'

Max Core to Perimeter 116' Core = 15.3%

Max Core to Perimeter 116' Core = 15.3%

Max Core to Perimeter 109' 13' Core = 16.8% Max Core to Perimeter 109' 13' Core = 17.4% Max Core to Perimeter 109' 13' Core = 18.0% Max Core to Perimeter 100' 13' Core = 18.3%

P56 | 3A STUDIO

18FT I - BEAM WIDTH :

Max Core to Perimeter 100' Core = 18.3% Max Core to Perimeter 116' Core = 17.0% Max Core to Perimeter 119' Core = 16.6% Max Core to Perimeter 119' Core = 16.5% Max Core to Perimeter 119' Core = 16.4%

20'

10' 10' 10' 10'

48

48

47

47

46

46

45

45

Max Core to Perimeter 109' 13' Core = 16.8% Max Core to Perimeter 109' 13' Core = 17.4% Max Core to Perimeter 109' 13' Core = 18.0% Max Core to Perimeter 100' 13' Core = 18.3%

44

Max Core to Perimeter 100' 20' Core = 18.3%

43Max Core to Perimeter 116'

Core = 17.0%

10'

Core = 16.6%

10'

Core = 16.5%

10'

Core = 16.4%

10'

42Max Core to Perimeter 119' 41Max Core to Perimeter 119' 40Max Core to Perimeter 119' 39

44

43 42 41 40 39


1

A

A

B

B

C

C

D

D

21

32

43

54

5

structural systems

The diagram shows the various structural systems deployed over a synthesized grid and system across various intervals from the core. It also illustrates how the different systems meets in assemble to distribute and transfer the load of the tower.

STRUCTURAL STRUCTURAL ORGANIZATION ORGANIZATION : : CORE - COLUMN COREEQUDISTANCE - COLUMN EQUDISTANCE GRID GRID

STRUCTURAL ORGANIZATION : STRUCTURAL ORGANIZATION : AXON PLAN GRID AXONDIAGRAM PLAN GRID DIAGRAM

3A STUDIO | P57


P58 | 3A STUDIO


3A STUDIO | P59


P60 | 3A STUDIO


3A STUDIO | P61


CODING FORMS VISUAL STUDIES 4 Partners : Dex SiCheng Hu Wilson Chan

Instructor : Satoru Visual Studies Spring 2018

Course Overview : The Studio introduces students to the comprehensive design and development of a large scale, building on an urban site. Advancing on the pedagogy established in previous studios (AMIGAA: Architecture as Mass, Interiority, Ground, Aperture and Articulation), this studio focuses on the design, development, and tectonic logic of the building envelope and its ability to articulate contemporary in anticipation of more advanced work in vertical and thesis studios.

P62 | 3A VISUAL STUDIES


3A VISUAL STUDIES | P63


EXPERIMENT 1 QUAD SUBDIVISION X CATMULL CLARK X WB Leading up to the end result as seen on the cover page, the project started with using a mix of custom python codes for quadratic subdivision of the geometries as well as components from catmull clark and weaver bird.

P64 | 3A VISUAL STUDIES


EXPERIMENT 2 RADIAL SUBDIVISION X CATMULL CLARK X RANDOM For this second experiment leading up to the final project, we experimented with other parameters of subdivision and fractions. We also used a different formula to create curvilinear forms .

3A VISUAL STUDIES | P65


TECTONICS + MATERIALITY BIRDâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S EYE CHUNK

Precedence: Helvetia Headquarters By Herzog de Meuron Vegetated Roof

Partners : Chien-Han Yen Nancy Ai Ryan Yap

Instructor : Maxi Spina David Ross

1

Artemide Steel Body Lamp

Course Overview : The courses focuses on tectonics (predominantly building envelopes) and performance (largely consisting of technical, technological, cultural, and environmental dimensions). Working in groups throughout the semester, students analyze and document a precedent in order to formulate a series of hypotheses in an attempt to construct a number of interrelated tectonic conjectures. In scrutinizing building assemblies, the class will attempt to position construction analysis so as to produce both technical knowledge and critical awareness of embedded cultural habits. The class will thus seek out an alternative understanding of the tectonics, one that not only mirrors the realm of construction ? materials, methods, sequences, tolerances, etc.- but also embraces architectural processes of expression, encompassing issues of geometry and technique; posture and character.

2

Exterior Facade: Steel Window Framing System Steel Columns: Primary Structure Framed Polyester Blinds: Adjustable Sun Shading System

Steel Handrails

Z

5 ft

1 ft 1 ft

1 ft

Y

P66 | 3A TECTONICS

X


1

Planting Lightweight Engineered Soil Drainage Layer Root Barrier and Insulation Waterproof Membrane/ Moisture Retention Layer Metal Flashing Steel Roof Deck Ceiling Panel

1

Planting

Steel I-Beam

Lightweight Engineered Soil Drainage Layer Root Barrier and Insulation Waterproof Membrane/ Moisture Retention Layer Metal Flashing Steel Roof Deck Ceiling Panel Steel I-Beam Z

1 ft

1 ft 1 ft

2

Y

Z

X

1 ft

1 ft 1 ft

2

Y X

Carpet Galvanized Steel Pedastals Space for HVAC Supply Air Plenum and Return Duct Triple Chamber Profiles for Max Insulation Carpet Galvanized Steel Pedastals Space for HVAC Supply Air Plenum and Return Duct Triple Chamber Profiles for Max Insulation

Steel Cementitious Core Planel Electric + Cable Tray Housing Stainless Steel Flashing Galvanised Steel Reinforcement

Thermal Insulation Steel Cementitious Core Planel

Steel Deck

Electric Cable Tray Housing Steel+I-Beam Stainless Steel Flashing

PVCu External Window Cill

Galvanised Steel Reinforcement

Thermal InsulationSolar Control Shades (Exterior) Steel Deck Roller Shading Device (Interior) Steel I-Beam

Ceiling Panel Exterior Casing

PVCu External Window Cill

Ceiling Panel Triple-Pane Insulating Glass Water-Proof Polyster Blend Fabric Exterior Casing

Solar Control Shades (Exterior) Roller Shading Device (Interior) Triple-Pane Insulating Glass Water-Proof Polyster Blend Fabric

3A TECTONICS | P67


STRUCTURAL SYSTEMS

structural systems 6

The diagram shows the various layers of structural systems deployed for the Helvetia Headquarters which includes several layers such as horizontal, vertical columns and beams, glazing frame and railings and the floor package.

5

4

3

2

1

Z

2 ft

2 ft Y

P68 | 3A TECTONICS

Precedent Study: Helvetia Headquarters Envelope System: Structural Steel Columns + Panelized Window Frame

2 ft X


3

6

RAILING SYSTEM

Deployment : Lateral Array Number of Units : 45 Material : Steel

Deployment : Perimeter Number of Units : 288 Material : Steel

I - Beams were deployed along the short side of the Helvetia Headquartes to work in conjunction with the columns to provide optimum structural ridgitity. An array of 15 I Beams were used on each levels across 4 levels followed by the concrete and steel decking layered system.

The railings add a finishing touch to the enevelope stuctures / Facade, It braces all 144 window panels and units across two separate railings.

5

2

ENVELOPE STRUCTURAL SYSTEM

STEEL COLUMNS SYSTEM Deployment : Vertical Perimeter Number of Units : 76 Material : Steel

Deployment : Perimeter Number of Units : 144 Material : Steel

Pairs of columns were used instead of one to work seamlessly with the aesthetics of the facade. The steel columns not only play a structural role in the Helvetia headquarters but it also represents and uphold the system of the facade. It is distributed along the perimeter to provide the Helvetia Headquarters and open and undisrupted office floor plan

The enveloping structure which is also the facade of the Helvetia Headquarters comprises of 144 window units which works collectively to brace the interior structures. The window panels then have railings added which acts as the bracing mechanism for the envelope.

4

I - BEAMS

CONCRETE WITH STEEL DECKING FLOOR PLATE SYSTEM 1

Spacers Deployment : Grid Arrangement Floor Cladding Deployment : Stacked Steel Decking : Stacked Number of Spacers : 4,500 Number of Steel decking : 10 Number of Floor Cladding : 4 Material : Steel

FOUNDATION Deployment : Base Material : Steel The foundation piece is the first to be layed on the ground and is constructed as a bold and unified form mainly out of steel. It rests on a thicker coolumn deployed into the ground

Floor spacers were used to provide the helvetiaa headquarters more flexibility in utility, allowing the gap between the floor cladding and the structuresa heating DOUBLE COLUMN The Helvetia Headquarters uses a unique configuration of a double column setting rather than the typical single columnto maintain its aesthetic quality even in its interior and for a better distribution of load

SINGLE COLUMN A Single column has a less efficient load absorbsion if attemping to flush the railing towards the edge of the glass panel STEEL COLUMN ABSORBED LOAD

Layered floor plate Concrete with steel decking

Floor spacers

First layer I - beams

Tectonics AS3 Nancy Ai, Hyu Lim, Ryan Yap, Hannah

3A TECTONICS | P69


ENVIRONMENTAL

PPD

WINTE R G LAZ ING C O MF ORT A N A LY S I S Due to its location in St.Gallen and its cold weather conditions found in Switzerland. Heat insulation is crucial to the sustainability of the building towards its environment. After some analysis, it is assumed that the Helvetia Headquarters uses a triple paned glass system to insulate and trap heat within the building in the cold climate. A simulation and analysis was ran to produce the diagram on the right.

PPD

10

10

8

8

6

6

4

TRIPLE PAN ED GLASS PAN ELS

2

Triple paned glass panels were assumed to be used by the Helvetia Headquarters to help insulate heat better in the harsh cold climate condition found in switzerland. The diagram shows a simulation of heat insulation efficiency with a triple paned glass panel assumed to put the window panes within the window UV rating of 0.3 - 0.8

0 -2 -6

-4

-8 -10

4 2 0 -2 -6

-4

-8 -10

S U M M E R R ADIATIO N W I T H R OL L E R B L I N D S The Helvetia Headquarters uses roller blinds to manually control heat and light penetration into the offices. Some radiation analysis and simulation were ran to illustrate the different conditions with the blinds up and down during the summer season

Wh/m2 852.00<=

766.80

766.80

681.60

681.60

596.40 511.20 426.00 340.80 255.60 170.40

RAD IATIO N W ITH BLIN D S The Helvetia Headquarters was designed with manual roller blinds to control light and heat emission towards the interior of the building. A simulation was run to provide an analysis on the heat contrubuted with the roller blinds rolled down.

596.40 511.20 426.00 340.80 255.60 170.40

85.20

85.20

<=0.00

<=0.00

Precedent Study: Helvetia Headquarters Envelope System: Structural Steel Columns + Panelized Window Frame

P70 | 3A TECTONICS

Wh/m2

852.00<=


PPD

NE L S

S S PAN E LS etia s were at the Helvetia sulate he heat climate eat erland. The tion of heat ut hdow a triple med to put n the window

ds L I NtoDS

ers ng. was A oller blinds to mission with e building. A ovide an trubuted with own.

PPD

10 8

10

6

8

4

6

2

4

0

2

-2

0

-4

-2

-6

SIN GLE PANED GLASS PANELS The diagramSIN on the shows GLEleftPAN EDa GLASS PAN ELS simulation of a single paned glass The on theglass left shows a panel instead of diagram a triple paned simulation of 4-8 a single paned glass panel. It shows a PPD of instead of a triple paned glass towards the panel window area indicating panel. It shows poor insulation of heat whichaisPPD of 4-8 the window area indicating crucial to antowards environment like Switpoor insulation of heat zerland. Thus proving a single panedwhich is environment glass panel crucial system to faran less efficient like SwitThus proving a single paned that the triplezerland. glass panels glass panel system far less efficient that the triple glass panels

-6

-4 -8 -10

-8 -10

Shadow Diagram - Latitude : 51.15 Annual Sun, 24 Hours Shadow Diagram - Latitude : 51.15 St. Gallen, Switzerland Annual Sun, 24 Hours St. Gallen, Switzerland m/s 14.90< m/s 13.41

14.90<

11.92

13.41

10.43

11.92

8.94

10.43

7.45

8.94

5.96

7.45

4.47

5.96

2.98

4.47

1.49

2.98

<0.00

1.49 <0.00

Wh/m2 852.00<= 766.80 852.00<= 681.60 596.40 511.20 426.00 340.80 255.60 170.40

Wh/m2

766.80 681.60 596.40 511.20 426.00

RA DIATION W ITH OUT BLINDS

Wind Rose Diagram - Latitude : 51.15 Calm for 6.88% of the time = 603 Hours St. Gallen, Switzerland Wind Rose Diagram - Latitude : 51.15 Calm for 6.88% of the time = 603 Hours St. Gallen, Switzerland

The Helvetia Headquarters was designed with manual RAD IATIOroller N Wblinds ITHOtoU T BLIN D S control light and heat emission Helvetia towards the The interior of theHeadquarters building. A was designed manual simulation was run to with provide an roller blinds to and heatwith emission analysis on control the heatlight contrubuted towards theup. interior of the building. A the roller blinds rolled simulation was run to provide an analysis on the heat contrubuted with the roller blinds rolled up.

Wh/m2 852.00<= 766.80

Wh/m2

681.60

852.00<=

596.40

766.80

511.20

681.60

85.20

426.00

596.40

<=0.00

340.80

511.20

255.60

426.00

170.40

340.80

85.20

255.60

<=0.00

170.40

340.80

85.20

255.60

<=0.00

170.40

85.20 <=0.00

Sun - Path Diagram - Latitude : 51.15 Hourly Data Global Horizontal Radiation Wh/m2 St. Gallen, Switzerland

Sun - Path Diagram - Latitude : 51.15 Tectonics AS3033 Hourly Data Global Horizontal RadiationNancy Wh/m2 Ai, Hyu Lim, Ryan Yap, Hannah Yen St. Gallen, Switzerland

Tectonics AS Nancy Ai, Hyu Lim, Ryan Yap, Hanna

3A TECTONICS | P71


OPTION 2

OPTION 3

Angled Window Frame System

Inverted Window Modules: Windows able to open for ventilation

Steel Columns Shadow Diagram Section

Shadow Diagram Section

ITERATIONS + SIMULATION

For this assignment of the project, The prompt was to iterate several on: choices and suggestions for betation, the window panes has its rotations multiplied toter accentuate the enegry efficiency based on the ensionality of the overal surface, a tactile quality of theanalysis facade on a and simulation done on the le. Though this iteration accentuates quality of the Helvetiainitial headquarters,it Helvetia Headquarters. The t energy efficient iteration prompt also required a considernd subtle configuration ation based on a geological relocaeisoscopic effect is kept tion and a new understanding based Wh/m2

852.00<= 766.80 681.60 596.40 511.20 426.00 340.80 255.60

170.40

85.20

Description: In this iteration, the facade has been inverted and the interior elements such as the railings and columns are shown on the exterior. The intermitting space between the exterior frame acts as a buffer and a brise soleil to prevent direct heat penetration to its interior.Thus, proving the most energy efficient among the rest. However it loses its aesthetics quality of the pivoted and alternating frames.

<=0.00

ergy efficient

nalysis

Summer Analysis

Pros - Great energy efficiency - Angle of window panels are difficult to notice

Wh/m2 852.00<= 766.80 681.60 596.40 511.20 426.00 340.80 255.60 170.40

Pros - Relatively energy efficient

85.20 <=0.00

Cons - Requires more maintenanc - Total loss of initial aestheti

Cons - Requires more maintenance Winter Analysis

Description: in this iteration, the columns with a louver which cuts acro building. The louvers are pla the window allowing some s this iteration maybe relativel design requires more mainta

Summer Analysis

Winter Analysis

Wh/m2

Wh/m2 Wh/m2

852.00<= 766.80

852.00<=

681.60

766.80

596.40

681.60

511.20

596.40

426.00

511.20

340.80

426.00

255.60

340.80

170.40

255.60

85.20

170.40

<=0.00

85.20 <=0.00

ers olumns + Panelized Window Frame

P72 | 3A TECTONICS

Wh/m2

852.00<=

852.00<=

766.80

766.80

681.60

681.60

596.40

596.40

511.20

511.20

426.00

426.00

340.80

340.80

255.60

255.60

170.40

170.40

85.20

85.20

<=0.00

<=0.00


OPTION 2

OPTION 3

Inverted Window Modules: Windows able to open for ventilation

Indented Window Facade

Steel Columns New Brise Soleil System Shadow Diagram Section

Description: In this iteration, the facade has been inverted and the interior elements such as the railings and columns are shown on the exterior. The intermitting space between the exterior frame acts as a buffer and a brise soleil to prevent direct heat penetration to its interior.Thus, proving the most energy efficient among the rest. However it loses its aesthetics quality of the pivoted and alternating frames. Pros - Great energy efficiency - Angle of window panels are difficult to notice

Wh/m2 Wh/m2 852.00<= 766.80 681.60 596.40 511.20 426.00 340.80 255.60 170.40

Description: in this iteration, the columns are extruded outwards with a louver which cuts across each level, bracing the building. The louvers are placed within a distant from the window allowing some sunlight between. Though this iteration maybe relatively energy efficient, this design requires more maintainence and engineering. Pros - Relatively energy efficient

85.20 <=0.00

852.00<= 766.80 681.60 596.40 511.20 426.00 340.80 255.60 170.40 85.20 <=0.00

Cons - Requires more maintenance - Total loss of initial aesthetics

Cons - Requires more maintenance Winter Analysis

Shadow Diagram Section

Summer Analysis

Winter Analysis

Summer Analysis

Wh/m2

Wh/m2 Wh/m2 852.00<= 766.80 681.60 596.40 511.20 426.00 340.80 255.60 170.40 85.20 <=0.00

Wh/m2

852.00<=

852.00<=

852.00<=

766.80

766.80

766.80

681.60

681.60

681.60

596.40

596.40

596.40

511.20

511.20

511.20

426.00

426.00

426.00

340.80

340.80

340.80

255.60

255.60

255.60

170.40

170.40

85.20

85.20

85.20

<=0.00

<=0.00

170.40

<=0.00

Tectonics AS3033 Nancy Ai, Hyu Lim, Ryan Yap, Hannah Yen

3A TECTONICS | P73


CHOSEN SOLUTION

1

Vegetated Roof 1

2

FINAL DESIGN 2

Exterior Facade: Steel Window Framing System

The diagram shows the developed tectonics for the chosen final iteration which features and adjustable window which collapses to open. This allows the occupants to control tempreture and sunlight better as well as natural ventillation. The propsed concept also preserves the aesthetics of the Helvetia Headquarters to a certain degree

Air Chamber

Steel Slab Structure Steel Columns: Primary Structure

Precedent Study: Helvetia Headquarters Envelope System: Structural Steel Columns + Panelized Window Frame

P74 | 3A TECTONICS


Winter Air Flow

Winter Analysis

1 Wh/m2 852.00<= 766.80

Planting Lightweight Engineered Soil Drainage Layer Root Barrier and Insulation Waterproof Membrane/ Moisture Retention Layer Metal Flashing Steel Roof Deck Ceiling Panel Outer Frame Stainless Steel Flashing

Roof

681.60 596.40 511.20 426.00 340.80 255.60 170.40 85.20 <=0.00

Shadow Diagram Section

Interior Analysis

Wh/m2 852.00<= 766.80 681.60 596.40

2

511.20 426.00 340.80 255.60 170.40 85.20 <=0.00

Steel Columns Steel Frame External Pane: Low E Glass

Summer Air Flow

Summer Analysis

Internal PaneDouble-Pane Insulating Glass

tem

Wh/m2 852.00<= 766.80 681.60 596.40

Pivot Bar

511.20 426.00 340.80 255.60

Tilt Restrictor

170.40 85.20 <=0.00

mber

ture

ture

Weatherpile Steel Cementitious Core Panel Meeting Rails Space for HVAC Supply Air Plenum and Return Duct Warm Edge Spacer Bars Triple Chamber Profiles for Max Insulation Galvanized Steel Pedastals Thermal Reinforcing Steel Deck GI Reinforcement Triple Chamber Profiles for Max Insulation PVCu External Window Sill

Description: In this iteration, The facade are rotated even further in reference to iteration two. Addition spacing is also added between eachwindow panes and they have a much wider space between each glazing of the individual pane, creating an insulated chamber within each channel. the result provides the interior more energy efficiency while accentuating more three dimensionality with a wider gap between the window panes

Annual Analysis

Wh/m2 852.00<= 766.80 681.60 596.40 511.20 426.00 340.80 255.60 170.40

Pros - Great energy efficiency - Accentuated exterior design - Overall initial aesthetics are kept including the gaping window framing and kaleidoscopic qualities - Mechanical and natural ventilation

85.20 <=0.00

Cons - Maintenance within the chambers

Tectonics AS3033 Nancy Ai, Hyu Lim, Ryan Yap, Hannah Yen

3A TECTONICS | P75


P76 | 2B STUDIO


MAterial cinematheque Objects to the world : GROUND TO APERTURES II Instructor : Jacklin Hah Bloom Partner : Eron Kumar

Studio 2B Spring 2016

Course Overview : The Studio introduces students to the comprehensive design and development of a large scale, building on an urban site. Advancing on the pedagogy established in previous studios (AMIGAA: Architecture as Mass, Interiority, Ground, Aperture and Articulation), this studio focuses on the design, development, and tectonic logic of the building envelope and its ability to articulate contemporary in anticipation of more advanced work in vertical and thesis studios.

2B STUDIO | P77


SOUTH BROADWAY

4

SYNTHESIS 1

The plan of the cinematheque shows the interactions and relationships established across the two different theaters which were developed from the previous exercise based off an individual projects, the plans also illustrates certain tensions between each individual forms and programs which were resolved through a unique circulation which wraps and oscillates back and forth the two separate volumes.year.

5

3 2

B

LEVEL ONE

1. TICKETING COUNTER 2. CAFE & BISTRO 3. KITCHEN 4. THEATER ONE 5.RESTROOM

P78 | 2B STUDIO A


H BROADWAY

SOUTH BROADWAY

SOUTH BROADWAY

SOUTH BROA

13

13

11 10

10 9

9

8

8

6

5

12

7

12

7

B

TWO

SSION BOOKSTORE

B

B

B

LEVEL THREE

LEVEL THREE

12. THEATER TWO 13. PROJECTION ROOM

12. THEATER TWO 13. PROJECTION ROOM

TAGE BATHROOM N ROOM AGE

2B STUDIO | P79 A

A

A


B

9

2

L3

8 1

L2 7

3

L1

4

5

6

B SECTION A

1. THEATER ONE 2. PROJECTION ROOM 1 3. BACKSTAGE STORAGE 4. THEATER STORAGE 5. TICKETING COUNTER 6. CAFE + BISTRO 7. FILM AND BOOKSTORE 8.THEATER TWO 9. PROJECTION ROOM 2

P80 | 2B STUDIO


A

A

A

8

8

7

8

7

7

6

6

5

4

3

2

6

5

5

4 3

3

2

4

2

1

1

A

1

A

A

SECTION B

SECTION B

SECTION B

1. THEATER ONE 2. PROJECTION ROOM 1 3. BACKSTAGE STORAGE 4. THEATER STORAGE 5. TICKETING COUNTER 6. CAFE + BISTRO 7. FILM AND BOOKSTORE 8.THEATER TWO 9. PROJECTION ROOM 2

1. THEATER ONE 2. PROJECTION ROOM 1 3. BACKSTAGE STORAGE 4. THEATER STORAGE 5. TICKETING COUNTER 6. CAFE + BISTRO 7. FILM AND BOOKSTORE 8.THEATER TWO 9. PROJECTION ROOM 2

1. THEATER ONE 2. PROJECTION ROOM 1 3. BACKSTAGE STORAGE 4. THEATER STORAGE 5. TICKETING COUNTER 6. CAFE + BISTRO 7. FILM AND BOOKSTORE 8.THEATER TWO 9. PROJECTION ROOM 2

2B STUDIO | P81


79.11°

3.27”

3.27”

3.9”

79.11° 76.57° 86.65° 66.25°

69.95°

96.53°

3.27”

5”

72.13° 69.14° 54.11°

79.11°

3.27”

79.11°

MATERIAL ONE 0.03”

69.95°

78.95° 3.27”

87.95° 126.32° 132.95° 113.95°

79.11° 74.21°

35.44°

27”

13.71° 27.65° 37.34°

3.27”

5.05“

FAUX WHITE WOOD

3.9”

53.16° 33.17° 101.31°

78.95°

1.31“

Exercise one

101.31° 103.31° 58.06°

87.95° 1.31“ 27.70° 75.61°

102.85°

126.32°

5.05“

132.95° 113.95° 5”

35.44° 39.82°

76.96° 19.09° 98.53°

13.71° 27.65° 37.34° 3.27”

P82 | 2B STUDIO

Exercise one begins with extrapolating geometries from the box through various actions like folding and unrolling, the geomtries are establish by projecting shadowns and apertures as a result of the folds and are used to introduct the materials in the latter part of the assignment.


3.27”

3.9”

79.11° 76.57° 86.65° 66.25°

69.95°

96.53°

5”

72.13° 69.14° 54.11° 79.11°

3.27”

3.27” FAUX WHITE WOOD

78.95°

3.27”

87.95° 126.32° 132.95° 113.95°

79.11° 74.21°

35.44° 13.71° 27.65° 37.34°

°11.211 5.05“

53.16°

Exercise TWO

3.9”

33.17° 101.31°

1.31“

101.31° 103.31° 58.06°

The image on the right shows the interior of the materialised box with the applied materials of the pink plush material extrpolated from the Barabara D’ Arcy precedence with the Faux white wood extrapolated from the santa monica house by Frank Ghery

1.31“ °07.72 °16.57

102.85° 5.05“

”5

39.82°

76.96° 19.09° 98.53°

3.27”

2B STUDIO | P83


P84 | 2B VISUAL STUDIES


BANANAS! VISUAL STUDIES 3 Instructor : Jenny Wu Mira Henry

VS : 2B Spring 2016

Course Overview : The project objective was to develop complex compositional skills across forms, colors, textures, shadows and highlights, each carefully controlled and articulated in a rendering environment. The project begins with the modeling of a fruit, followed by a fruit and a cloth and followed by and additional fruit and a folded sheet of paper in the final exercise. The objective was to explore new means of formal exploration through maya and to navigate the skills required to develop intermediate forms through the modeling of fruits in maya. The project also comprises of complex geometries from the creasing and folding of cloth. 2B VISUAL STUDIES | P85


P86 | 2B VISUAL STUDIES


FRUIT + CLOTH + PATTERN

The second exercise was to model a fruit based off a photograph of the fruit and cloth carefull in consideration of composition and its visual qualities . Mainly focusing of several aspects including tonality and highlights and jusxtaposition. After modelling the fruit using Maya software, colors and texture palettes are applied to the fruit and cloth after evaluating and experimenting with several combination of colors, materials and textures to arrive at a compostion which allows the fruit, cloth and texture to work in synchrony.

2B VISUAL STUDIES | P87


BOYS & GIRLS CLUB, HOLLYWOOD,CA OBJECTS TO WORLD : GROUND TO APERTURES I

Instructor : John Southern

Studio : 2A Spring 2014

Course Overview : In this final assignment the objective was to develop a boys and girls club based on geometries and forms extracted from the previous assignment. The forms are then calibrated carefully and meticulously by certain conditions from the site, mainly focusing on an indepth exploration towards understanding new relationships established between the figure and the site. Prompt: The prompt was to design a 56,000 sq feet boys and girls club located in hollywood Los Angeles which includes various programs such as swimming pool, game rooms, career center, library, apartments and art center Introduction: Taxonomies of various forms constructed by posturizing stuffed animals were used to extrapolate forms as part of the prescent study. Theses were then reconfigured to fall in line with site specific conditions.

P88 | 2A STUDIO


2A STUDIO | P89


P90 | 2A STUDIO


SYNTHESIS

The form leverages on several systems which are introduced and synthesized across several different methods, layers of systems which plays a part as a response to the site, program and forms are introduced and carefully orchestrated towards a unified form. This drawings shows an exploded axonometric of the form and identifying the several modular systems of organization and how it orchestrates holistically

2A STUDIO | P91


HEY GIRL, WHATS THE PLAN?

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Aperturesâ&#x20AC;? defines an opening, similary like windows or even possibly, in a more ambigious terms it could be defined as a void.This segment of the assingment was to begin to develop or carving out voids within the previous form. Ultimately, gently eroding part of the previous form to create voids that would compliment or juxtapose with its positive space. In this segment of the assignment, the form begins to erode to form a mobius strips, incidentally, developing a void which would interlock with its positive form, introducing a visual juxtaposition of the positive and negative. This assignment also entails introductory section drawings to

P92 | 2A STUDIO


LEVEL ONE

2A STUDIO | P93


P94 | 2A STUDIO

LEVEL TWO


LEVEL THREE

2A STUDIO | P95


H E Y B O Y, C U T I T O U T

The section shows the relationship between positive and negative spaces which were carefully subtracted to create programs such as an outdoor auditorium and swimming pools. the geometries were subtracted at various intermitting angles to accommodate the geometrical requirements of certain programs illustrate the area of â&#x20AC;&#x153;aperturesâ&#x20AC;?

P96 | 2A STUDIO


2A STUDIO | P97


S I T E A N A LY S I S

These diagrams shows site specific strategies which varies from programatic distribution to circulation and form specified orientation.

P98 | 2A STUDIO


2A STUDIO | P99


P100 | 2A STUDIO


2A STUDIO | P101


P102 | 2A STUDIO


2A STUDIO | P103


TECHNOLOGIES OF DESCRIPTION I VISUAL STUDIES 2 Instructor : Anna Neimark

VS : 2A Fall 2014

Course Overview : This section will focus on drawing a technical object: the light bulb. Based on the historical exhibition of light bulbs in the Burndy Object Collection at the Huntington Library, students will measure, construct, and intersect these late 19th and early 20th century nearly spherical specimens through drawing, projection, and rendering. Emphasis will be placed on the problem of differentiating between formal geometric descriptions and pixel based images.

P104 | 2A VISUAL STUDIES


2A VISUAL STUDIES | P105


P106 | 2A VISUAL STUDIES


2A VISUAL STUDIES | P107


0.125

0.125

4

0.25

5

3

2.75

4 0.4

4 0.5

0.5

1.5

0.5

P108 | 2A VISUAL STUDIES


2A VISUAL STUDIES | P109


P110 | 1B STUDIO


los angeles center for architecture MASS AND INTERIORITY II Instructor : David Freeland

Studio : 1B Spring 2016

Course Overview : In this final assignment the objective was to develop spaces from precedential geometries ,while using these precedential geometries as an organizational tool. We were to create a rich and intricate plan , implementing multiple layers of systems and principles found in its precedence. However, these systems and principles may begin to adapt towards the spatial requirements for developing these inhabitable spaces. Prompt: The prompt was to design a museum for â&#x20AC;&#x153;Los Angeles Center of Architecture featuring eight main programs, exhibition space, lecture hall, a lobby, a cafe, a bookshop, an office, WC and a storage space within a 75 x 75 feet boundary. Introduction: Some key principles found in the Hagia Sophia includes a use of local and global symmetry, These principles are carried forward to this assignment as tools to organize and articulate the final plans.

1B STUDIO | P111


conceptual diagrams 1

Field extraction :

2

re-intergration of frame :

3

site calibration :

4

l ay e r d i s t r i b u t i o n :

The plan is extracted from the field, aimed at capturing organizational behaviour and characteristics of the field which will be used as a tool to help define and articulate the final plan. Ideally it could be seen as developing spaces from a former geometries.

The frames begins to take on the same role as it did in the field, as a transitional structure between two components of the plan which begins to divide during the layer distribution(below). acting as a key transitional space, an axis for the plan.

FRAME

75’x75’

L2

The plan is then calibrated into the site boundary of 75’ X 75’ , using the the field to establish a grid to expand and contract simultanously to intergrate the programs while retaining certain mathematical proportions of aesthetics.

While calibrating to the site, the plan is then organized into seprate layers vertically, offering the programs a different variety of floor plan catered to its individual requirements. entirely wrapping a three dimensional courtyard. while using the frame as a connecting structure between the cantilevering top chuck to the bottom chunk.

circulation diagram : L1

P112 | 1B STUDIO

The two chunks circulate in opposite direction from the key frame, when layered it balances out the movement within the building. The exit from level 2 also reaches to a landing which accesses the outdoor lecture hall and patio on the top deck of level one.


CONCEPTS & strategies The overall concept revolves around strategically mapping the programs into the plan while the plan simulataously shapes itself towards its own form to accomodate to the programs ,establishing an inter - dependent relationship between both plan and programs while using the field is used as an organizational tool of shaping to carve out walls to divide, sub - divide and redirect circulation.

LACA PLAN+ PROGRAM DIAGRAM

In this project, the plan is seperated into two seperate chunks, allocating retail and archive on the first level, while allocating the exhibition space and office on the second level using the bottom chunk as a pedastal for the exhibition space. Featuring mostly glazed panels, it projects the exhibits furthur from an elevated point. The bottom chunk allocates the retail space for public access and cafe being accessible from the street and the courtyard. Giving the courtyard cafe an initimate setting with chunk wrapping around it. The plan is also developed in a way to form a three dimensional courtyard, allowing the courtyard to be seen from different elevations. EXHIBIT

ARCHIVE

KITCHEN

CAFE +

LECTURE HALL/EVENT (OUTDOOR)

Program Analysis: The programs which include diverse spatial requirements, are categorized using a graphical analysis W C to intergrate them into the plans which begins to alter towards the program requirements with the aid of the organizational field. W C

W C

LOBBY

STORES

5

OFFICE

P R O G R A M I N T E R G R AT I O N & A N A LY S I S BOOKSHOP

EXHIBIT

ARCHIVE

KITCHEN

CAFE +

LECTURE HALL/EVENT (OUTDOOR)

W C

W C LOBBY

OFFICE +STORES

OFFICE

PUBLIC SPACE BOOKSHOP RESTROOM CAFE + KITCHEN LECTURE HALL LOBY EXHIBITION SPACES

2500 SF

2500 SF

1000 SF

1000 SF

800 SF

500 SF

500 SF

500 SF

200

STORAGE PRIVATE SPACE : OFFICE ARCHIVES

1B STUDIO | P113


2

1

3

Retail access By orienting the retail space towards the intersection, it takes advantage of the existing traffic which densifies at the intersection.

4

5

courtyard access tion space. Featuring mostly glazed panels, it projects the exhibits furthur from an elevated point. The bottom chunk allocates the retail space for publ

6

9

8

7

P114 | 1B STUDIO


s i t e c o n c e p t. The museum developed with several different components which each plays a prominent role in its individual orientation. some segments of the museum are oriented to utilize pre existing traffic and circulation of the street for retail advantages while some segment aims at displaying the interior content of the museum. Pedastal: The exhibition space is located at the top chunk using the archive as a kind of pedastal, allowing the exhibits to be seen through the glazed panels , this open display concept allows the exhibits to be seen from a distance due to its elevation. The top layer is projected towards the intersection where there is a higher traffic, of people and vehicals , allowing the display to be seen from a more dense location. Events / outdoor lecture hall: The events and outdoor lecture space are also projected towards the intersection from an elevated view, Displaying certain commotions in an open space while seperated signifcantly apart from the exhibition space, allowing the exhibition space to remain a more quiete environment. 2

1

3

4

5

6

9

8

7

1B STUDIO | P115


8

7

7

7

6 10

10

7 5

3

2

2

ARCHIVE

1 5

4

9

2

3

PLAN:ONE 1. A R C H I V E 2. B O O K S H O P 3.C A F E + K I T C H E N 4. L O B B Y 5. S T O R E

P116 | 1B STUDIO

PLAN:ONEHALF 9. OUTDOOR : LECTURE SPACE


7

10

1

7

HYBRID DRAWINGS.

These hybrid plan + section drawings were created to show the three - dimensional forms of the plan which was an obstacle due to the nature of the different floor plans. The overall form was not part of any extrusion process which made the layers difficult to read from individual plans and sections. Hence, the plans and sections are incorporated to show a visual reference to where the cuts are made and in overall, portray a clear and succint visual description of the project. The thicker reference lines also references the top layer of the museum while the thinner projection line references the bottom layer. The rotation of the plans + section also gave a clearer illustration of the form. 6

9

8

7

PLAN:TWO 6. E X H I B I T I O N S P A C E 7. O F F I C E 8. W C 9. L E C T U R E H A L L 10. C O U R T Y A R D

1B STUDIO | P117


A

B

2

1

3

C

4

B

5

C A

PLAN:ONE 1. A R C H I V E 2. B O O K S H O P 3.C A F E + K I T C H E N 4. L O B B Y 5. S T O R E

P118 | 1B STUDIO


A

B

6

C 9

8

7

B

C A

PLAN:TWO 6. E X H I B I T I O N S P A C E 7. O F F I C E 8. W C 9. L E C T U R E H A L L 10. C O U R T Y A R D

1B STUDIO | P119


1/4 inch scale Section model Exhibition space

WC

Patio + lecture

Archive

Exhibition space

P120 | 1B STUDIO


1B STUDIO | P121


P122 | 1B STUDIO


1B STUDIO | P123


P124 | 1B STUDIO


1B STUDIO | P125


P126 | 1B STUDIO


figures

The figures were developed from the poche of the Hagia Sophia, Extrapolating new meaning and forms from the former two - dimensional silhoutte , in this instance, the form is developed using principles of local and global symmetry as found in the Hagia Sophia. It also begins to created new experimental shapes fron other axis from the creation og the form.

1B STUDIO | P127


P128 | 1B STUDIO


1B STUDIO | P129


P130 | 1B STUDIO


1B STUDIO | P131


P132 | 1B STUDIO


figures II

The prompt leading on to the the second figure was based on a transformation from the first figure while re - intergrating a secondary degree of systems and principle on the first figure. While the first figure experiments modes of addition and con-figuration of geometries, this second figure experiments with the subtraction of forms, ultimately subtracting stacked components to achieve a sub - â&#x20AC;&#x153;unifiedâ&#x20AC;? form.

1B STUDIO | P133


P134 | 1B STUDIO


1B STUDIO | P135


P136 | 1B STUDIO


1B STUDIO | P137


P138 | 1B STUDIO


FRAMES

The frames are idealised as a mediator between figures, engaging the figure from a rather ambigious degree with no implication of a defined positive or negative space. It can be seen as spatial possibilities and option for expansion beyond the figures. However, the frames remains mostly as a kind of dialogue between figures. In this instance, the frames are created from the void between two figures.

1B STUDIO | P139


P140 | 1B STUDIO


1B STUDIO | P141


P142 | 1B STUDIO


FRAMES II

The second frame was Developed using a different configuration, where two different figures are oriented in a symmetrical manner. projection lines between the void of the figures are drawn to create the frames. capturing the transition between one figure to another.

1B STUDIO | P143


P144 | 1B STUDIO


1B STUDIO | P145


P146 | 1B STUDIO


FIELD

The final segment of the assignment â&#x20AC;&#x153;Fieldâ&#x20AC;? encompasses the collaboration of the figures and the frames , experimenting ways where both realms of figures and frames begin to engage in a kind of implied organization between them and begins to expand in a systematic kind of network. In this assignment, the field results in a configuration where frames operate as a dialogue between figures, and creates a kind of structural inter-dependency as seen in the photograph. This unique config-uration then begins to develop the field in a three - dimensional aspect rather than a two dimensional one.

1B STUDIO | P147


P148 | 1B STUDIO


1B STUDIO | P149


P150 | 1B STUDIO


Iterations (Radial Field) : The drawings illustrate another iteration of a field developed using a radial system, similarly to the Hagia Sophia, the figures are deployed in intervals using the rotation of the arcs and begins to branch out in mathematical proportions by the rotation of other sub - components. It begins to develop in another axis as well.

1B STUDIO | P151


P152 | 1B STUDIO


1B STUDIO | P153


P154 | 1B STUDIO


“precedences” understanding from the past Studio : 1B

| Instructor : David Freeland

Overview : In this assignment “ Precedences” is the formal analysis of prior or parental elements in architecture. The assignment aims to develop an understanding of plans based on mathematical and proportional context by analyizing and studying certain plans which had been allocated to us. Allowing an indepth understanding of how forms are derived from precedential geometries. Prompt: The prompt was to analyze the plan of the Hagia Sophia, and to “reverse - engineer” the plan to be able to develop an understanding of how each geometries relate to each other in forms of sysmtems and principles which were used as a tool to develop the plan. After which we are to re - construct the plan based on our understanding , implementing the use of these systems of mathematical proportions and alogrithmic increments to full develop ten layers of plans in sequential form which leads on to the final plan. Introduction: A few of the common principles and systems found in the hagia sophia includes local and global symmetries and hybrid systems of both radial and grid fields. The plan is them broken down based on the increments between geometries and technique used to develop the radial grid to unravel and re - develop the plans.

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hagia sophia geometrical autopsy

The plan of the Hagia sophia was constructed based on mathematical proportions and systematic principles. In this study, the prompt was to re-construct the plan based on its basic geometry. Hence, leading on the the term â&#x20AC;&#x153;Geometrical Autopsyâ&#x20AC;?. Generally dissecting the geometries and analyzing thier roles in the overall plan to re - construct them from a blank canvas. some prominent principles found in the manifestation of the plan includes principles of symmetry and incremental shifts leading on the the formation of grids which acts as a guiding tool to furthur deploy sub - geometries.

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Layer one: Through analysis, most geometries were formed from the center out. Starting with only a circle, the plan begins to lay out axis of symmertry and other guiding tools.

Layer six: Ceiling plan is formed via the articulation of the grids patterns of increments are noted on the grids.

Layer two: using the square as a guiding tool, the plan begins to construct the semi dome structures and a bounding box

Layer seven: Details are added to the columns and more increments begins to ripple out from the grid

Layer three: The deployment of sub - domes are from based on proportions and earlier guiding tools

Layer eight: The deployment of seconday columns, along the base of the sub - dome based on radial increments.

Layer four: The organizational grid begins to be more defined and articulate based on sub - increments.

Layer nine: Projection of arcs and circles are used to define columns and smaller scaled elements.

Layer five: The deployment of primary columns begins to appear between grids, allocating in a sparse manner.

Layer ten: The arrival of the final plan , including poache and two highlighted figures which are used for futhur study.


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P166 | 1B VISUAL STUDIES


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One : precision The prompt was to develop a simple printer calibration sheet, featuring an array of colours , gradients, hues, and various lineweight and linetype. The objective was to develop an understanding of the different result that may vary from different machines. It also develops basic organizational skill in a user - friendly reading of the calibration sheet.

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material OFFSET The promt of the final assignemnt was to re - develop an three - dimensional object digitally using tools and commands which were taught throughout the semester. The object assigned was an industrial box and we were tasked to translate the unfolded object into a digital form and re - create the box digitally with included material thickness, the objective was to allow an understanding of material thickness and to account for intersections and the folds of these materials..

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REST WORK LOUNGE GALLERY action

MASSING DIAGRAM distribution of space:

Action + Gallery:

Work:

The intergration of programs are based on several different factors, including circulation between spaces, verticle distribution [perspectives from the top and bottom] , the balance between public and private space, also finally the overall aesthetics of the form.

The action space , techinically a free space registers as the entrance , as well as the opening for the gallery, this space then begins to merge with the gallery through several process due to the nature of its ambiguity. both spaces can also be seen as leisure programs. Hence, they are allocated at the bottom, where there are more interaction with the public. The gallery space is generally a space for the display and viewing of art piece.

The working space is allocated on a higher elevation, giving the subject a better visual experience while remaining off the ground and far from distraction.

The overall concept, is conceived as a twisted ribbon, swerving upward from one end of the ribbon. the ribbon is being broken down into several different components:

Lounge:

Rest: The Resting place, is located at the end of the extremeties of the ribbon, the program is the most segregated from any other spaces due to the nature of its privacy requirement.

the louging space is utilized as a place of business and pleasure, allocated outside the gallery as the artworks begin to spill in the lounging area.

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foundation: TRUNCATED ICOSAHEDRON

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Studio : 1A

| Instructor : Bryonny Roberts

OVERVIEW: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Foundationâ&#x20AC;? marks the begining of a new chapter , in this first chapter we will delve into the foundations of architectural study by understanding the construct of a basic three dimensional objects from two dimensional geometries. The object allocated in this prompt was the Truncated Icosahedren a geometry also found in the traditional soccer ball, comprising of 16 hexagona and 24 pentgons in its construct, each having a distinctive network of tension working collectively in the holistic form. TRANSFORMATION: The prompt then engages us to study the possibilities of manifestations within a set boundary, extrapolating new forms while retaining certain principles, allowing us to understand simple and basic architectural element without any scale of disruption, APERTURES : Following next is a study of apertures, understanding the possibilities of a negative space within a positive volume,analyzing the juxtaposition and and balance between both realm. ANOTHER MEDIUM : The final study revolves around the transformation of the object towards a curvilinear form. looking into a different aspect of the three dimensional form as a medium.

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TRUNCATED ICOSAHEDRON The prompt begins with the end product, specifically allocated to each student is a complex three dimensional geometry comprising of a network of sub - geometries working collectively to form the final object. In this case study, the object allocat-ed was a Truncated Icosahedron, consisting of 12 hexagona and 24 pentagons, it begins with the construction of the hexagons on a two-dimensional plane, using primarily mathematical proportions and basic rules of trigonometry to create the hexagons, followed by the projections of arc on a different (z)axis to find the point where both geometries begin to tessellate, leading to the folding up of the form.

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T R U N C AT E D I C

w

HYU LIM HEN

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TRANSFORMATION WITHIN BOUNDARIES Following the formation of the Truncated Icosahedron is the first transformation process, the prompt was to elaborate a second figure based on certain principle or system from its primary geometry (the Truncated icosahedron) , The principle chosen here was the outline of the original geomtery, while retaining its outline, the shape begins to manifest itself using its outline as a boundary, while extruding each surfaces to form a unique and robust figure. This technique also engages in the mathematical relationship of the truncated icosahedron , with each extrution acting as an amplification of its factes, each edges turns into a facet of its own. Hence, elaborating the figure in terms of multiplication.

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APERTURES “Apertures” defines an opening, similary like windows or even possibly, in a more ambigious terms it could be defined as a void.This segment of the assingment was to begin to develop or carving out voids within the previous form. Ultimately, gently eroding part of the previous form to create voids that would compliment or juxta-pose with its positive space. In this segment of the assignment, the form begins to erode to form a mobius strips, incidentally, developing a void which would inter-lock with its positive form, introducing a visual juxtaposition of the positive and negative. This assignment also entails introductory section drawings to illustrate the area of “apertures” Conceptual drawing by Hyu Lim (left)

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T R A N S F O R M E D T RUNCAT E D I CO S A HE DRO N STUDIO | P217 HYU L I M HENGYU / 1A 1A Fall 2013


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DIFFERENT MEDIUMS This final segment of the assignment explores the transition of the final from to-wards a curvilinear one using basic computer aid tools to develop an understanding of materiality and other complex geometries. This segment also studies the geomet-rical information of the form by its contouring layers on two different axis. The final edition of the form had been simplified due to the nature of its complex and opulent materiality , nonetheless still retaining key essence of the juxtaposition developed in the previous segment.

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1 H O R I Z O N TA L L AY E R P R O F I L E S 2D LASERCUT PROFILE Y

SOFT TRANSFORMED TRUNCATED ICOSAHEDRO

HYU LIM HENGYU / 1A Fall 201

1 V E R T I C L E L AY E R P R O F I L E S 2D LASERCUT PROFILE X

SOFT TRANSFORMED TRU N C ATED ICOSAHED R O N HYU L IM HENGYU / 1 A F all 2013

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GENERAL STUDIES LIBERAL ARTS HISTORY THEORY CULTURAL STUDIES

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academic essays A collection of essay written by : Hyu L.Hengyu

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Intimacies from The Deceleration of Technology P1/3 | 3A : Film I

| Spring 2018 | Instructor : Michael Stock |

Flying cars plague the skies, occupying and transporting people and goods across various verticals, skyscrapers packed into blocks after blocks towards a new degree of urban density, high tech retina scanners secures buildings at their entry points and holograms of corporate icons and propaganda illuminate the streets propagating political and capitalistic agendas through a new medium. These descriptions depicts a probable idea or concept of a futuristic dystopia commonly envisioned by some science fiction films such as “Blade Runner”, “Back to the Future”, “Maze Runner”, “Minority Report” and more. The future seemed bright and innovative too, but as we approach the dates of our predictions, we’re faced with disappointment (or maybe not) year after year. There lies a huge disparity and disconnect between the realities of life and technology and how we envisioned the future to be, given the fact that there is barely any resemblance of our current state to the 2017 depiction of Los Angeles from the first “Blade Runner” Film. What is responsible for that disparity and divide between our ideas of the future portrayed in films and the current progress in technology? what makes it dystopian? Is it the lack of intimacy or human interaction with the presence of technology? It might just be that same fear which holds back our strive towards progression. Do we really need flying cars and laser guns? Or do we need FaceTime, dog filters on snapchat, eggplant and peach emoji?

An analysis on the science fiction portrayed in films depicted occasionally under dystopic social and technological models and principals illustrates a clear preference of progress, A preference of automation in replacement of man labor, self-driving vehicles and synthetic intimacies from A.I. assistants and virtual relationships. However, it’s far from where we are and where we’re headed. What drives our progress and doesn’t rely on solely our conscious decision but also our subconscious decisions collectively as a society. After all, we are under a capitalism model, which merely just accelerates and responds to the demand of the people and society, feeding us what we consume. Perhaps to better understand, we should also analyze the repercussions and consequences of the capitalistic model. There are staggering layers of complexities in the dynamics between the consumer, the creator and the capitalist, the capitalistic machines today in contrast to our projections and concepts of the future is one that is perfectly exemplified also by 24 City by Jia Zhangke, which clearly depicts a vicious cycle of consumerism fueled by capitalism, which in turn, drives the demand of creators and labor. This notion almost pin points the truth which is responsible for the deviation towards progress as a result of our own demand.

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P230 | ACADEMIC ESSAYS


Intimacies from The Deceleration of Technology P2/3 | 3A : Film I

| Spring 2018 | Instructor : Michael Stock |

Although at first the capitalistic machine is seemingly the antagonist of this dynamic, it however remains a neutral and unbiased mechanism towards the selection and selectivity of progression which means progress is based off our demand and consumption. Allowing us to understand a little more about the complex relationship between the consumer, the creators, the capitalist, the progress and the traditions of lost intimacies. But what we consume might also tell us a lot about ourselves, do we innately yearn for intimacy collectively as a society? What if what we yearn for is just social intimacy and being connected? Perhaps that’s why Facebook and other social media may be valued just as much or more high-tech companies responsible for interstellar space inhabitation (Space X). Companies with ambitions as great as interspace inhabitation share the same valuation as low-tech companies offering nothing more than video streaming, texting and photo sharing. This comparison allows us to understand how we put a valuation towards the different technologies, exemplifying a valuing of intimacy more than high technologies, expelling the myth depicted in mainstream films and media as an idea of the future. Is there something that we can learn from this distinct disconnect to understand the innate human interest and desire of intimacy?

Comparing the presence and role of technology in Blade Runner and Blade Runner 2049, or for that matter, what are now considered the traditional/ standard of the science fiction cities in either of these films, in the new film, these deceleration of technology was reflected in “Blade Runner 2049” , we begin to see more classic architectural element resurface and vintage objects used to portray, encapsulate and frame a more realistic truth of the ambition of man’s idea of a future which features a humanly innate desire of searching a kind of truth in his past, a type of intimacy which was lost in the first “Blade Runner”. The disconnect between the two films and its portrayal of future technologies also exemplifies that technological acceleration may procures towards a relapse of an innate desire of intimacies. This was illustrated through the introduction of virtual girlfriends and the desire of vintage or historical objects, ornaments or architecture which were more prominently displayed throughout in contrast to than the first film. This dichotomy between tradition and progress, intimacy and technology has often been overlooked as the films and ideas behind the science fiction are often forgotten and merely consumed as temporal entertainment. However, an interrogation towards this divide remains as a grey and haunting question,

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Intimacies from The Deceleration of Technology P3/3 | 3A : Film I

| Spring 2018 | Instructor : Michael Stock |

One which transcends beyond the philosophy of film and imagination towards a provocation of our understanding of intimacy and progress within reality. It would also be interesting to understand how this provocation of questioning the push backs of intimacies operate at an architectural scale and if our preconception of corridors and other intimate spaces are what restrains a paradigm shift from the re- imagination of what else the future could hold.

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PLASTIC CUPS, PLASTIC HEARTS P1/2 | 1A : Collegiate writting

It is a Friday night and for several weeks, you’ve been stuck in the same office with the same people with the same pursuits in the exact same rat race. The rat race to escape the financial bondage from unpaid home loans, cars and your college tuition. Hence, you found yourself stuck here in the corporate jungle, except in this jungle only the colors of black and white exist, you realize everyone’s shirts, suit, ties and briefcases seemed to be from the same wardrobe, the array of whites, black, occasionally navy blue and leather all clearly dictated by the corporate norms and etiquette of business. Individuality dies a little each day. The office was illuminated with the same fluorescent tube echoing down the hallways in its distinct artificial manner. The same fluorescent tube which has been mass produced which transcends a kind of mundanity and banality, You love it here. And you hear the same clicking of pens thru every meetings, you love it here, the same grids of numbers and spreadsheets on every computer screens, you love it here. And the same unbearable sound of printers running its inkjet along its track printing stacks of papers that don’t make sense to you. You love it here. So some time along that devastatingly mundane outcome of your life that you certainly did not hope for, you decided that you were going to head out. You wanted to live the remaining youth you have. you wanted a controversial life. And just like every other corporate animals you dwell in hard liquors, substances, adrenaline and fast cars for your “getaway”.

| Fall 2013 | Instructor : Claire Phillips

Money can buy you happiness. You don’t have the time to invest in perfect relationships like those in the movies, after awhile you stop believing the lies they try to sell you and you start counting the money they make from selling those novels. You don’t have a “home” to go to; no place called home where you know that mom and dad will always be. No one to tell you they’ll be there no matter what. What doesn’t kill you makes you stronger is the new lie you try to sell yourself. Ten feet away, the muffled bass from behind the door starts enticing you and your friends, you know it’ll be another “memorable” night. You step in and bass gets louder the colors got brighter and the morals got looser. Neon lights of pink, yellow, green and blue flashes in sync with the music, colors that you have not seen for almost a week. your adrenaline builds up and your ego follows along. You pop a bottle and a few girls decide to join. You pop a bigger bottle, more girls decide to join. You note the trend but ignorance’s a bliss, ignorance’s a curse. This is what the superficial & mainstream world is made of : lyrics of fast expensive cars and pretty babes , alcohol and drugs and flashing light, you know you are disgusted . But somehow you can’t find the courage to separate ourselves from the norm. Because you don’t want to be alone. Because nobody wants to be alone or at least being the minority better known as the misfits of society had a heavy price to pay.

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PLASTIC CUPS, PLASTIC HEARTS P2/2 | 1A : Collegiate writting

thru the evolution of society, the outburst of social media platforms, society became more dependent of acceptance of the mass, stirring up the drive and hunger of fame & followers and and you know you don’t want to miss out no matter how disgusted you are. Because once again, you’re afraid of being alone. Imitation intimacies, blooming throughout the floor . Plastic jugs that filled plastic hearts, plastic hearts with an endless void. Ironically, the most memorable nights are the ones we can barely remember. But what was the pursuit? somehow we can’t remember. But we were chasing something. A mystical concoction of liquor and substances took a toll on your body. On the second bottle, you blacked out.

| Fall 2013 | Instructor : Claire Phillips

Sitting on the wheelchair, you start to sober up. You find yourself attached to tubes of other substances, you look around you, you look at the people around you, people fighting colon cancer, people with amputated limbs from diabetes, and you are shamed by the way you ended up here , in the same line waiting to be treated , a sense of guilt engulfed upon you when you start realizing the fact that the people here in the same hospital had their serving of misfortunes thru a certain fate that was uncontrolled. and you? you ended up here by choice. Then you thought to yourself: maybe the mundane isn’t so bad after all, the cycle never fails to continue. a short story by Hyu Lim

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Intimacies from The Deceleration of Technology P1/2 | 1A : Visual Rhetorics

| Fall 2013 | Instructor : Stephen Phillips

We live in a capitalistic world controlled by mass corporations, living lives dictated by social norms which are created by ideologies fed to us from television and mass media. Slowly we become what we hear and see. Billboards after billboards of pretentious, perfect commercial smiles, driving us towards the idea that everything communicates better with beauty. Television and advertising are often sexualized because sex sells and we see fake and plastic happy looking people on loan advertisements, which could never quite possibly happen in reality. All of which seems to be a great distraction to the everyday people, “assuring” their life is fine , inciting more expenditure despite the inevitable financial bondages from tuitions and home loans, creating more distractions that makes us neglect the repercussions of over consuming , However despite the constant tsunamis of pretentious smiles and perfect life television and mass media is trying to sell, a portrait of a beautiful tragedy photographed during a violent protest suddenly becomes the world press photo of the year. The photo, captured by Samuel Aranda during a street protest against the thirty three year long regime of authoritarian president Ali Abdul Saleh in Sanaa, Yemen. It depicts Fatima al – Qaws in a traditional Hajib, which veils her entire body and expression while cradling her son zayed in a warm and intimate embrace while he was suffering the effects of tear gas after the violent protest. The photograph not only encapsulates a certain kind of tenderness from the embrace between the mother and her son with her arms wrapped around him in a gentle manner which posture resembles much of a renaissance painting, but it also creates a great juxtaposition with the mysterious elements from the veil of the mother, which inevitably masks her most probable expression of agony.

It also accentuates their innocence as victims of the violent retaliation from the government, making the photograph proof and evidence as a form of social awareness for the adversity of such political outrages in the world, Shedding light to the degree of agony caused by politics towards a world sugar coated by corporate entities. A sugar coated world by corporate entities trained to digest easier with the apparatus of beauty. Perhaps it is why the photograph looks shockingly poetic and tragic and the same time. Despite the occurrence of tragic moments within the picture, the photograph had been strongly aestheticized and captured in a provocative manner which most likely had contributed to the success of the photo which prior to becoming the press photo of the year, underwent a vigorous amount of curating and vetting by judges and juries who critiques a photographs based on aesthetic means for a media company which seeks to serve the masses. But why is such demand of beauty within a photograph that also seeks to serve the truth so critical and vital? And if such means of curating happens does it not neglect certain information from photographs that are deemed “not beautiful enough” to be publicized? It might all just be due to the way society reads and understand, with beauty and aesthetics being the supreme mediator between information and us. Although the shot is composed by a man with neither understanding of such circumstances nor understanding of such agony, it eventually leads on to unintentionally portraying the subjects under some misconceptions, but nonetheless some truth towards the agony of the subject resonates and shakes the modern society which is driven by beauty. Then maybe it comes into realization that the beauty and aestheticism is merely a great apparatus in propagating such controversial photographs.

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THE BEAUTY OF TRAGEDY P2/2 | 1A : Visual Rhetorics

| Fall 2013 | Instructor : Stephen Phillips

Despite the fact that some truth may never shed light in a world driven by aesthetics and beauty, where things are often prioritized based on the mixed agenda of media companies between profits and journalism there can be a great distortion of information based on the misinterpretations of speculators at times. However, most publications hold a striking balance between truth and beauty, and sometimes only truth can be heard with beauty as an a p p a ra t u s.

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propaganda and identities P1/2 | 1A : Design Cultures

| Fall 2013 | Instructor : Dora Epstein Jones

Over the years, there has been many debates over the incorporation of multiple functions towards design, some might see this incorporation as a kind of taboo in the art of design with the belief that somehow multiple functions might compromise its aesthetics or reciprocates in a kind of fragility through the implementation of more functions. In this context we observe the mobile home, the caravan. Before the Airstream took a revolutionary turn on mobile living, caravans are deemed a poor invention due to the idea that a house cannot be a car or at least the combination of both a car and a house was not easily accepted due to the lack of “proper functioning” many were skeptical of this convergence of function and often fret over the idea that a house on wheels would create much issues and problems. The Idea of a caravan was often associated with hygiene, danger, poverty, ect. 1 However, Benham might argue that these ideologies behind the caravan were a mere result of perhaps, poor design.2 Is it an image based design issue that evokes a poor justification of its actual potential? or is the invention truly poor? Based on Benham’s “Taking it with you”, the airstream had successfully managed to retain its existing function as a caravan but however demolish its infamous relation with the “problems” associated with the caravan. How is this possible? According to Benham, it is the controversial new design which sets it aside from its predecessor, successfully manifesting a new, stronger, bolder, and intriguing image of its own3, Hence, successfully abolishing the previous identity of the caravan. This success propelled the design of the airstream to fame, turning it viral and globalizing it through the propagation of the media.

This phenomenon not only globalized the beauty in design of the airstream, but it also unintentionally encapsulates the American identity with its design, educating foreigners and strangers the sort of association between the design and America itself and therefore, creating a strong relationship between the two. This American identity4 can also be seen due to the fact that its creation is influenced by the American lifestyle, the “freedom” among civilians and the strong sense of wanderlust among most Americans, as portrayed in music videos and television, the vast skies, the endless freeways. Through this depiction, Americans had been associated with a kind of passion for venture, “vagabonds for life”. Hence, this invention was a clear manifestation of the culture of wanderlust and venture found among Americans. By analyzing the Airstream and its image, The American identity, hence, had been associated with features and certain design characteristics which had been implemented towards the Airstream such as the general anthropomorphic form, the contour and tapering of the edges and more. These elements such as the contours can be seen among other product designs as well. Whether intentional or not, these product designs emits a sense of American identity through the geometrical relationship established among the objects of many remarkable designs of the American history. One example would be Apple products. Apple products often feature a seamless tapered edge, contours and a clean and minimalistic finishing touch, these traits whether or not influenced by the Airstream, contain notable similarities between them, therefore, when analyzing might create a relationship between the two, and generalizing the features as a form of an American identity.

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propaganda and identities P2/2 | 1A : Design Cultures

| Fall 2013 | Instructor : Dora Epstein Jones

Whether or not Apple had the intention of associating the apple product design and its design characteristics / principles, the Apple Company had successfully managed to tie a strong bond between its product and the American identity. Generally when we think of apple design, America comes to mind. This inevitable association between the two could be due to the fact that Appleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mass produced products are stamped with the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Designed in Californiaâ&#x20AC;? text which confirms the bond between the two. Also, in contribution to the image, the exponential sales of the apple products reciprocates in the globalizing of its design and its association with the American identity.

In conclusion, the American identity, just like any other cultural identity is constantly evolving to the rhythm of pop culture and many viral influences justified by the countries origin. These identities established by countries in modern societies are often controlled by giant corporations which hold the key to mass production and propagation; Similarly, like the apple company. In my opinion, this is somewhat a waste as most of these corporations true agenda is tied to the profit it makes; Hence occasionally the design could in turn have adverse repercussions on its identity. One example would be thing that are made in China which are often associated with lack of quality. Therefore, design plays a crucial part when it comes to mass production. I believe a successful design is one that is able to retain its function yet incorporates extreme aesthetics and beauty. Only then with such balance in form and function comes such beauty.

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P246 | ACADEMIC ESSAYS


the controversial & the commercial P1/2 | 1A : Design Cultures

| Fall 2013 | Instructor : Dora Epstein Jones

What constitutes to the success of a design? How does society play a role in designing? Should designs be a pure unguarded manifestation of the designer? if so, how does social influence come to play in design? The writings by forty and jones provides an in-depth analysis and investigation on these questions and studies an array of variable aspects of design ranging from the omnipotence as designers, cultural influences and technical aspects of design. We will look into how these factors contributes to the success of design and also emphasise on the cross discourse set between design, the designer and society itself. However, both authors illustrates different contrasting perspective on designs, are designers omnipotent in their freedom of expression? if so, why must society and sponsors be taken into consideration while conceiving a design? In this essay, we delve into both aspects “Design, Designers and the literature of design” written by Forty analyses the design of the lucky strike packaging which design was considered a success given it establishment of the american identity through a clean look with the use of simple and minimal colour tones of red and white. This choice of design created an new image for lucky strike and introduced the essence of the american through subtle and minimal means, which in turn made it a great success as the rise in immigrants yearning the partial acknowledgement of being an american contributed to great deal for the lucky strike company. This movement and choices which relates to the correlation between design and society’s demand can also be much related the writings “What is designing” By jones which offers an in-depth study of how great designs are associated with meeting sponsors, clients manufactures and distributor requirement in acquiring accessibility and meeting the mass. Jones also believed in a recipe to good design, however, forty might argue that the principles of design cannot be taught through typical means and might change with the ever evolving pace of culture and society.

One example of a successful design would be the everyday milk carton. it was not until the early 1906 when milk cartons were distributed in the city of san francisco, Before that, milk was transported with the use of glass bottles which was deemed too heavy which contributed in difficulties in transportation, hence, affected cost. it was also breakable and a great hassle for it to be cleaned and reuse.However, things took an interesting turn as G.W Maxwell found a remedy to the problem with the use of paper cartons,hence, the idea of the milk carton was conceived. The use of paper cartons lighten the weight of the milk which accommodates more for transportation, therefore more efficient through cost and time. the square packing also accommodates more room for transportation as it maximises the volume since glass bottle have a kind of contour which restricts appropriate stacking. finally, its unbreakable and easy to recycle. The milk carton is a great example of Jone’s means of design meeting manufacturing needs by finding a remedy to the problems of inefficiency, G.W maxwell designed the milk cartons in response to a problem and in turn was a great success. This idea of design was not only a solution but also created a new culture of its own. manifesting a new way of life on its own, which brings to a point about forty’s beliefs in the omnipotence as designers. Another classic example of great design that shaped the world was the Monobloc plastic chair designed by Italian designer Mico Magistretti in 1967 which then went into production with Allibert Group in the 1970s. Since then, The chair had created a widespread phenomenon and millions have been manufactured in countries including Russia, Taiwan, Australia, Mexico, the United States, Italy, France, Germany, Morocco, Turkey, Israel and China. This clearly illustrated the global influences that the chair had based on the omnipotence of a specific designer.

ACADEMIC ESSAYS | P247


P248 | ACADEMIC ESSAYS


the controversial & the commercial P2/2 | 1A : Design Cultures

| Fall 2013 | Instructor : Dora Epstein Jones

Who did not only designed a chair that was simply ingenious but also redefined the world there the revolution of his design. The mono bloc chair similar to the milk cartons is capable of maximum efficiency through the use to stacking and also light weight . By far, both examples being used illustrates the technical and commercial aspects of design possibilities and success, however ,ironically, or maybe paradoxically, adrian wrote that sometimes designers must be able to exercise omnipotence ignoring the fact that they are agents of ideology. But is it ever possible with the constant changing ever evolving world? if designers should be omnipotent in their own way,would it compromise the aesthetics for its patron?

Forty and Jone’s perspectives on design and it’s literature illuminated the astounding factors which contributes the success of design, both writing provided a critical analysis on both from commercial and controversial aspects, from manufacturing to the omnipotence of a designers being able to ignore the role as a mediator between clients and society. Despite the technicality of design and its realistic capacity set by Jone’s, Forty striked a balance in terms of expressing the power as designers and their freedom to design in their own means ignoring ideologies. Both authors provides views that are interdependent in creating the “perfect” design.

The Apple iPhone. One of the most revolutionary and successful phone in the world, assembled with simply a glass panel and aluminum backing, was the first phone to feature a minimalistic look with the use of only a singular home button, a power button, volume and silent switch. This design influenced many other brands which also featured similar properties. Why does so many companies follow the footsteps of Apple? And how did apple take such a huge leap of faith removing the conventional buttons that we use everyday yet make it such a huge success? Possibly this defines the omnipotence of a designer & the “recipe” of design which at that time conforms to the standards of mostly excessive plastic keypads. The design of the iPhone not only managed to redefine the phone but also in terms of Jone’s writings, managed to feature great efficiency in terms of their packaging and their minimalistic accessories which consist of far too little plastic compared to the norm.

ACADEMIC ESSAYS | P249


P250 | ACADEMIC ESSAYS


panopticon : green eyes. P1/2 | 1A : Collegiate writting

Panopticism by Foucault successfully describes the idea of power and discipline through the implementation of a fortress like architecture. The idea of Panopticism not only revolves around the physical mechanism of architecture itself, but it also refers to how it could potentially shape the disciplinary structure of society by introducing hierarchal principles and thus creates a self-sustaining environment independently. However, similarly to Foucault’s, there are strong elements from Panopticism that are seen implied among corporations, schools, hospitals and military organizations. Organizations that operate with a hierarchal & disciplinary mechanism which is the key to efficiency and daily operation. One example based on personal experience would be the military. The agenda of the military body is simple and concise, to protect and defend a nation from any possible threats, however these modes of physical training to arm soldiers with the amp skills to defend and protect requires extreme discipline and regimentation to be able to conquer and demolish the barrier of one’s physical and mental limits. However, ironically the motive and intension behind it is much softer, gentler and more humane; for our loved ones. Upon entering the military, every enlistee begins with shaving their head. The truncation of various styles, color, individuality all which subsides to a simple uniform length of a single millimeter. This symbolic ritual strips one’s identity and dictates one’s rank in the army, which upon entering would be a recruit. The recruit then receives a number tag which would be how one would be identified for administrative purposes. Similarly, like the inmates of a prison. This process subsides individuality to a homogeneous ground which demolishes room for any disparity among the recruits.

| Fall 2013 | Instructor : Claire Phillips

This ritual was pointed out by Foucault’s Panopticism as quote “individualities merging together, a collective effect, is abolished and replaced by a collection of separated individualities. From the point of view of the guardian, it is replaced by a multiplicity that can be numbered and supervised; from the point of view of the inmates, by a sequestered and observed solitude”. This quote that was based on an extraction of Bentham’s panopticon letters, clearly illustrates the function of the ritual and how it can be seen as a successful mechanism in the play of observation and supervision. However, this vicious process of abolishing individualities would not suffice to having ample control over one for total supervision and power as architecture and other elements features a huge contribution to panopticism. Subsequently, the recruits are then assigned to a company which usually consists of two hundred people. Within the company they are assigned a platoon which consist of approximately fifty people and under each platoon, they are assigned a section which consist of mainly twelve to fifteen people. A typical company would consist of four platoons which can be subdivided into four sections from each platoon, this segregation of the recruits is primarily to assist supervision. The company is then supervised by commanders which are allocated based on a hierarchy of power, a section is in charge by a sergeant, a platoon is in charge by a lieutenant and a company is in charge by a captain. This systematic hierarchal breakdown of supervision and power which can also be seen implemented among corporations, instills a great deal of efficiency

ACADEMIC ESSAYS | P251


P252 | ACADEMIC ESSAYS


panopticon : green eyes. P2/2 | 1A : Collegiate writting

and self-sustainability. As pointed by Foucault, “The penetration of regulation into even the smallest details of everyday life through the mediation of the complete hierarchy that assured the capillary function of power” This panoptic strategy assist the organization through the chain of command, allowing personnels of a certain power to make instantaneous decisions to remedy a problem or an issue. The segmentation of a company is also efficient in ways that large scale obstacle and training can be conducted on a company level while administrations and monitoring can be conduction on a section level, Hence maximizing time efficiency. However implementing these labels and position of authority, the key to Panopticon is mainly its fortress like architecture which is the key figure for the application of such hierarchy. The recruits are then allocated bunks based on their section and platoon. Each company has four levels, one for each platoon, each level has four bunks, one for each section, all of which are designed like a prison cell. The bunks are merely separated by walls, with only a corridor connecting them, each and every bunk can be observed from the center of the parade square, where all the companies are allocated around in a fortress-like manner with every corridor opened to be observed, guarded and scrutinized by the center of the parade square. The bunk beds are pre-labeled with their identification number tags, all of which aligned in a parallel manner on the left and on the right side of the room with each bed facing each other. This lack of privacy incorporates cross supervision and observations among each other. During meal times, the whole company would assemble in a contingent of rows and columns, in which the recruits are visible by the commanders, the line up and assembly of the soldiers in this manner makes it clear for any movement or disparity among them.The cookhouse, which is where the soldiers would have their meals, resembles much as those architecture organization of china factory like Foxcon ,

| Fall 2013 | Instructor : Claire Phillips

a line to pick their food up , endless rows of solid rectangular tables, aligned in a parallel manner, all of which are guarded and observed by the front row, which consist of mainly commanders and supervisors. The soldiers then quickly consume their food, trying to meet the time limit given to them. Soon, another batch would arrive and it would be their turn to consume. This system of surveillance can be seen as a panoptic phenomenon, as quote by Foucault, “Permanent visibility that assures the automatic functioning of power. So to arrange things that the surveillance is permanent in its effects, even if it is discontinuous in its action; that the perfection of power should be a machine for creating and sustaining a power relation independent of the people who exercise it”. This suggest that through this transparency between the subjects and the observer. it would assist the proper functioning of power as there is a visual constrain held between the observer and the subject. Although Foucault and Betham managed to illustrate the ideal structure of Panoticism, which can be seen successfully applied and operated among schools, hospitals, corporation and military by a fortress like architecture, hierarchy of control and social segregations, it may not be able to adapt to the ever-evolving changes within society as people have the tendency to change and hence with its new behavior deemed incompatible with the application of such structure. As the world progresses and through the globalization of different ideologies and concepts spreading among society, individuality becomes more diverse and impeccable. Making it difficult for people to conform to a singular uniform trait. People are becoming more interested in privacy and also, in power; the demand to be on top on the hierarchy. As a result of this evolution, Panopticism seems to be harder to implement in today’s society. People of our age tend to be fuelled by welfare and materials and not by surveillance and the abolishing of individuality.

ACADEMIC ESSAYS | P253


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HYU LIM SCI ARC PORTFOLIO 2019  

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