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FALL 2007

VOL. 27, NO. 1

NORTH YAR M O U T H ACA D E M Y

CHRONICLE

BICENTENNIAL KIDS THE 200TH CLASS ENTERS NORTH YARMOUTH ACADEMY

PLUS: PROFILES IN CHARACTER & INTELLECT


SPIRIT OF ˙07

The new NYA Class of 2014, gather in front of Russell Hall to recreate a class portrait from the 1800s (Shown Below)

NYA’S YOUNGEST STUDENTS HAVE BEEN DESIGNATED AS THE

TALENTS AND INTERESTS. THE SIXTH GRADE CLASS INCLUDES A

SCHOOL’S BICENTENNIAL CLASS BECAUSE THEY WILL GRADUATE

BOY WHO BUILDS JEWELRY STANDS WITH HIS GRANDFATHER,

IN 2014, 200 YEARS SINCE NYA’S FOUNDING. ALTHOUGH THE

SEVERAL GIRLS WHO WILL CONVERT THEIR FIGURE SKATING

NUMBER WILL GROW TO ABOUT 55 BY THE TIME THEY WALK

TALENTS TO ICE HOCKEY, A TENNIS PLAYER WHO HAS WON

ACROSS THE GRADUATION STAGE, THE CLASS OF 2014 IS START-

TOURNAMENTS THROUGHOUT NEW ENGLAND, A QUILT-MAKER,

ING OUT WITH 37 STUDENTS.

A BALLET DANCER, A BOY WHO SINGS IN THE BOY SINGERS OF MAINE, A GIRL IN THE WESCUSTOGO TRAINING CHOIR, A

THE CLASS OF 2014 BRINGS IMPRESSIVE GEOGRAPHIC DIVERSITY

THERAPEUTIC HORSE-RIDING VOLUNTEER, AN IRISH DANCER,

TO NYA. SIXTH GRADERS HAIL FROM 15 DIFFERENT TOWNS IN

SEVERAL GIRL SCOUTS AND BOY SCOUTS, AN ARCHERY MEDALIST,

MAINE, ALONG WITH A STUDENT WHO MOVED FROM CALIFOR-

HAPKIDO BLUE BELT AND EVEN A GIRL WHO OWNS TWO PIGS

NIA IN JULY. FOUR MEMBERS OF THE CLASS WERE BORN OUTSIDE

AND 22 CHICKENS.

THE U.S., ADOPTED AS INFANTS FROM CHINA AND RUSSIA. An early 1800s North Yarmouth Academy class

FOLLOWING A SCHOOL-WIDE TREND, BRUNSWICK IS THE SIXTH GRADE’S TOP SENDING TOWN WITH SEVEN STUDENTS. FALMOUTH IS NOT FAR BEHIND (FIVE STUDENTS), FOLLOWED BY FREEPORT, PORTLAND AND YARMOUTH WITH THREE STUDENTS EACH. STUDENTS IN OUR CLASS OF 2014 ALSO COME FROM SEBAGO, CUMBERLAND, LEWISTON, POWNAL, TOPSHAM, SCARBOROUGH, LIMERICK, CAPE ELIZABETH, NORTH YARMOUTH AND HARPSWELL. SIXTEEN SIXTH-GRADERS (43%) ARE SIBLINGS OF CURRENT OR FORMER NYA STUDENTS. ALTHOUGH NOT EVEN TEENAGERS YET, THE CLASS IMPRESSED THE NYA ADMISSION COMMITTEE WITH ITS WIDE ARRAY OF

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CHRONICLE FALL 2007

poses on the lawn in front of Russell Hall


Dear NYA Community,

N O RT H YA R M O U T H ACA D E M Y

The beginning of a new school year always fills me with excitement as I think about all the wonderful events and experiences our students, faculty and parents will enjoy in the year ahead. Our fall sports teams are celebrating much success on the playing fields, and our bands and choruses have already performed their first public concerts for Grandparents’ Day. The first parent/ teacher conferences are happening as I write this message, and I believe we are all off to a stellar beginning. There is a good feeling all around campus, and it is contagious to all of us. Fall is also a good time for reflection on things past. North Yarmouth Academy has a wonderful and rich history of adapting to changing circumstances and the needs of its students. In September, I welcomed the bicentennial class of 2014 into the NYA community. In seven years, when this class graduates, we will celebrate 200 years of educating young people and helping to shape them into persons of great character, intellect and integrity. In my role as Headmaster, I have many opportunities to meet with NYA alumni, former parents, community members and others who have been influenced by their association with this school. Their stories are rich with the history of the time that they lived, learned and grew on Main Street and with how they have come to appreciate the impact NYA has continued to have on their lives and the paths they have chosen. There have been many changes at NYA in the ensuing years, and yet, Russell and Academy Halls remain the symbols for both NYA and the town of Yarmouth. Even with the changes to the campus, it still feels like home to all those who return to visit. Looking forward, I am very pleased to be working with Linc Merrill ’75 who was elected in June to become the first alumnus to Chair the Board of Trustees. Linc’s love for NYA and his great historical knowledge of the Academy and the town of Yarmouth further assure me that NYA will continue to thrive under his stewardship. I’m also very grateful to the former Chair, Bruce Poliquin, for his dedicated service to NYA. During his tenure leading the board, Bruce helped guide the Academy through the successful completion of the past capital campaign to bring major facility improvements to NYA. NYA has never been on firmer financial ground, and I thank Bruce profusely for his help and guidance over these past years. As we begin to formally come together to plan our bicentennial celebration, I welcome your input, your stories and especially your involvement. In the coming months and years, we will be soliciting all constituents for their advice and help in planning this grand celebration of our past, present and future. In the meantime, please don’t hesitate to share your stories and information and let us know what ideas you might have for our upcoming celebration.

CHRONICLE CONTENTS

FALL 2007 VOL. 27, NO. 1

SPIRIT OF ‘07

2

HEADMASTER’S LETTER

3

PROFILES OF CHARACTER & INTELLECT

4

TED SHARP: EDUCATORS & CHARACTER

10

JEFF THORECK

10

KIDS DIG HISTORY

12

TEACHING TRAVELS

12

GRANDPARENTS DAY

13

SPRING ‘06 ATHLETIC ACHIEVEMENTS

14

CLASS NOTES

16

EVENTS ROUNDUP

21

ALUMNI SURVEY

22

CLASS OF 2007

23

PHOTO CREDITS - Brian Peterson

- Brian Beard / Creative Images

- Chris Mazzurco - Pat Lawton

- Abbie Sewall

Finally, I wish to thank everyone who has supported NYA in the past year. You have allowed us to become a better school today so that we can fulfill our mission even more effectively in the years to come. This is an exciting time to be a part of the NYA community. I look forward to sharing the success and joy of our school with you. It is a very special and good place to be. Sincerely,

Peter W. Mertz, Headmaster

Headmaster Peter Mertz pictured with the incoming Class of 2014 © 2007 NORTH YARMOU T H ACA D E M Y


NYA BOARD OF TRUSTEES 2007-08 Linc Merrill ‘75, President Julie C. Moss, Vice President David J. Champoux, Vice President Thomas R. Newman, Treasurer Richard D. Abbondanza, Secretary John L. Carpenter MaryEllen FitzGerald Diana C. Garcia Charles P. Gendron Margaret E. Griswold Laurie Hasty Michael T. Healy John M. Kauffmann Betsy Mead Brian Noyes Lynn F. Noyes Charles A. Oestreicher ‘89 Bruce Poliquin R. P. Field Rider Tracey L. Russell Priscilla B. Savage Theodore Sharp ‘60 James A. Skillings ‘84 David Warren Eric J. Weinrich ‘85 Jean Wilkinson

HONORARY TRUSTEES Mary Anderson Stephen Anderson Mark Fasold Christopher Flower Margot Milliken C. David O’Brien Christopher Pierce Michael Savage Curtis Scribner John Staples Anita Stickney Peter W. Mertz, Headmaster

DEVELOPMENT OFFICE STAFF Kate Putnam Chief Development Officer Tara Johnson Assistant Director of Development Debora Hirshberg Noone Director of Alumni Relations Kristi Belesca Director of Community Development and Communications Jim Briggs Dee Post Designed By Hynesight | Brochu

Board President Linc Merrill now and then; left, addressing the new class in September, 2007 and on the right, his senior portait from North Yarmouth Academy in 1975.

ONE OF OURS Linc Merrill is the first alumnus to serve as President of the North Yarmouth Academy Board of Trustees. When we think of NYA institutions, many of us think of Linc Merrill. He might not have been around for the almost two hundred years of NYA’s existence, but he does know the entire history of The Academy. Linc has been a presence on campus since his “school boy” years, graduating in 1975, and two of his daughters are recent graduates. Everyone at NYA and in Yarmouth knows Linc. For years, he has mentored NYA students, called college coaches to put in a good word, informed the alumni office of college and professional achievements of alumni, coordinated NYA and Yarmouth events that celebrate our alumni, and linked the NYA community with local resources. As Linc puts it, he “keeps a log in his head of who can help whom,” and he often facilitates that process. Linc’s philosophy is “You’re here to do things to make things better in your community by leaving a legacy of goods works.” Both his mother and father exemplified these principals in their daily life, as scout leaders, choir members, and athletic team sponsors. In turn, Linc has given back to his community by serving on the Board of the North Yarmouth Historical Society, a fourteen year stint on the University of New England Board overseeing the merger of two campuses, as President of the Maine Historical Society, and member of many area organizations: the Pine Tree 4-H Foundation, the Cumberland Farmers Club (owners and organizers of the Cumberland Fair), the Board of United Society of Shakers and the Future Land Committee of North Yarmouth. He is now serving his fourth term on the NYA Board of Trustees. One of his Board President goals is to support the growth plan for the school, ensuring that we grow our physical plant and endowment as we add to the student population. Linc notes the tremendous amount of work done over the years to get the school on a secure financial footing, and he vows to keep it that way as NYA looks to the future. As Board President, he believes his greatest gift is his ability to be a conduit or liaison connecting people. Linc sees himself as a “simple guy, who wants to give back.” As for being an NYA institution, he probably won’t agree that he is, although those of us who work with him know the truth. In fact, he is amazed that so many people are now seeking him out to talk about their ideas and concerns. Those who know Linc understand he will give every idea and concern his full attention and pass them on to the appropriate entities. To Linc, it’s not who gets the credit for the ideas and the effort to implement them, but that the work gets done. “Mentoring. Stewarding. I love it!”

Printed By Printmail of Maine NORTH YARMOUTH ACADEMY

www.nya.org


N YA PROFILES IN

CHARACTER AND

INTELLECT North Yarmouth Academy is an independent, college preparatory, coeducational day school serving students in grades six through twelve. The school offers a structured program that sets clear standards and high expectations in an environment that emphasizes values of mutual respect, trust and community. North Yarmouth Academy is dedicated to fostering integrity, character and intellect in young adults. The North Yarmouth Academy program encourages students to develop: - Problem-solving skills based on sound analytical and creative thought; - Sophistication in writing, speaking and artistic expression; - Appreciation for the importance of athletic activity, teamwork and cooperation; - Self-confidence and self-respect through a breadth of experiences that extend beyond the classroom; - Concern for the larger community and an appreciation for the natural environment; - Desire to continue the process of lifelong learning.

In June of 1998, the North Yarmouth Academy Board of Trustees voted to approve the School Mission Statement above. This mission statement is read before each and every board meeting, at most, if not all, formal student and school gatherings and occasions and is reprinted in all the Academy’s published literature. We pride ourselves as an institution in not just espousing the words of the mission statement, but of teaching and living the tenets so described. “Fostering character and intellect in young adults.” “Encouraging students to continue the process of lifelong learning.” These are noble intentions, but is NYA, as an institution, truly providing the foundation that helps fulfill these statements? The following profiles represent a tiny sampling of the NYA community. The constant themes we hear when speaking with our current students and alumni about their time at North Yarmouth Academy all resonate with lasting friendships, respect given and received, and the lasting values of learning teamwork, open and honest discussions and appreciating oneself and ones peers because of their differences—not their sameness.

CHRONICLE 2007

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Dave Reid,1973

N YA P R O F I L E S I N

CHARACTER AND

INTELLECT

DAVE REID

Dave Reid is a family man. He grew up in Portland, Maine as one of eight children in a poor, Irish Catholic family. His parents were devoted to each other, their community and making sure their children got good educations and good opportunities in life. Dave graduated from Portland High School in 1972 and by his own admission was “a better football player then a student.” Both his mother and guidance counselor recommended he spend a post-graduate year at North Yarmouth Academy to improve his academic performance and still keep his gridiron skills honed. “I remember going up to Yarmouth for the first time and seeing this beautiful campus. It wasn’t just a campus, it was like the central part of the town.” As a day student, Dave commuted each day with his best friend Billy Aceto, another Portland High football player. “Sometime pretty early in the year, our ride situation fell apart. We didn’t have a way of getting back and forth to school and I thought I might have to leave NYA. But Jack Needham, who was the Headmaster at the time, found a way for Billy and me to stay on campus. We couldn’t afford to board, but somehow he worked it out so we stayed. We were thrilled to be on campus.”

“He was awesome—a warm, genuine guy. And for whatever reason, he took a special interest in me. I remember going in to see him right after I had moved into the dorm. I needed a job to earn a little money and was hoping he might have some ideas for me. I was nervous as all get out—I’d never been to a Headmaster’s office before—but he was really nice to me. Told me I could empty the trash in his office and do some odd-jobs around for him. I’m sure now that he paid me out of his own pocket—he was just that kind of guy.” Students doing a post-graduate year at NYA in the 1970’s were required to carry a heavy course load. Most took math, science, English, history, a foreign language and electives. “The classes were really small so no one could hide. Discussions were very lively and everyone’s opinion was important. My teachers were outstanding. The student body was very economically diverse back then, yet we were all treated equally by our teachers. It was a wonderful year for me academically, maybe the best I ever had. I worked my tail off, that’s for sure!”

Dave fondly recalls Jack Needham as “a great guy, one of the three most influential men in my life.”

In the spring of his post graduate year at NYA, Headmaster Jack Needham surprised him once again. “Mr. Needham called me into his office and told me we were taking a trip to Orono the next day. Three of us met him in the morning and we all drove up to UMaine with him. To be perfectly honest, my SAT scores still weren’t that terrific, but I’d worked really hard in my classes and Mr. Needham thought I should go to college. He had a friend there in the admissions office and he wanted

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to go up and talk to him. When we got to Orono, he handed me the keys to his very nice car, gave me $20, which was a lot of money in those days, and sent us off for lunch while he talked with his friend. We came back, met the friend and two weeks later I got a letter saying I was accepted to Maine. That’s the kind of man Jack Needham was and the kind of place NYA was—that day I felt very special, like I was one of the chosen ones. He trusted me and he believed in me. It was really nice.” In his write-up for the 1973 NYA yearbook, Dave said his ambition was to become a teacher and coach. He didn’t pursue a career in teaching, but his love of coaching has been his way of giving back to the community for many years. “I’ve coached all my children, Dave Jr., Margie and Matty, throughout the years they played in youth sports. In fact, one year I managed both the Cape Elizabeth Little League All-Star team and the Cape Softball All–Star team!” Dave has also coached some Little Lad football and served on the Board of the Purpoodock Golf Club. These days, Dave is busy building a new rental property business (www. absolutebeachrentals.com), taking courses to attain his realtors license and enjoying his family. “It may have been just one year that I spent at NYA, but it had a significant impact on my life. I made a lot of friends that year, had a terrific academic experience and learned a lot about myself. It was a great year!”


JESSICA LOVAAS Jessica Lovaas is an activist. Her passion for public service and being a contributor to the greater world community was instilled in her from birth. “I was raised in a way that it was ingrained in me that certain things were just not right and that your life was defined in not only being the best person you individually could be but in challenging those things that aren’t right. All my parents have been involved in public service jobs their entire lives, whether as social workers, hospital chaplains, ministers or policy workers. They have been the biggest role models and the constant spur to action,” she said. While at NYA, Jessica embraced both the academic challenges and the opportunities afforded to serve not only her school but the greater NYA community. Cathy Latvis, the Director of College Guidance during that time, wrote in her letter of recommendation for Williams College, “Jessica’s intellectual fervor and zeal are complemented by her extraordinary social consciousness and willingness to give of her time and energies to help others.” Besides excelling in the classroom, Jessica found time to play varsity basketball and tennis and to co-chair the Social Services Committee. She somehow found additional time to volunteer in the community at nursing homes, nursery schools, the Ronald McDonald House, the soup kitchen and work as an ESL (English as a Second Language) tutor at an elementary school in Portland. She spent part of her junior year studying abroad in Equador, honing her Spanish language skills and volunteering Left: World traveler Jessica in Zambia, near Victoria Falls. Above: Home in the United States, Jessica visited friends in Austin, TX this summer.

in an orphanage. Latvis fondly remembers Jessica as a remarkable young woman. “ Her dedication to community service was as strong as any student I’ve ever met—both locally and globally.” Reflecting on her NYA experience, Jess remarked, “My years at NYA influenced and fostered my commitment to activism directly through providing the beginning skills and vision necessary for a career in public service. My years on the Social Service Committee organizing blood drives, holiday baskets, and volunteer events were concrete and successful events that the institution facilitated and that launched me into the world of college activism. However, to a larger extent, my love of policy and commitment to public service was facilitated more broadly through NYA nurturing a confidence within me as an individual, through building an appreciation for the power of small communities and through providing dedicated role models who each day exemplified commitment to service.” Jess graduated from NYA in 2002 and continued her studies at Williams College. “After graduating from NYA, I spent four wonderful years at Williams, itself an extraordinary institution. I felt well placed to thrive in the academic rigor and take advantage of all that the small, intimate community afforded. I was active in the Student Global AIDS Campaign, the Writing Workshop, and the Lecture Committee, babysat for professor’s children, lived in a co-op, studied abroad in France, interned in Ecuador, and went on Winter Studies to Malawi and South Africa. It was a truly unbelievable experience in all aspects--professors, friends, classes, activism.”

Jessica’s father and stepmother were working as missionaries in South Africa for much of the time she was a student at NYA and at Williams. She and her twin sister, Mateal, would spend vacations and school breaks visiting their family in South Africa and doing volunteer work while there. “My parents were living in Cape Town, South Africa all throughout my undergraduate years at Williams. I would go home for two months in the summer and intern somewhere and then would go home for DecJan. Much of my passion for halting the HIV/AIDS pandemic came from my time at my parents’ home in Cape Town and having to negotiate the stark realities of life there compared with my existence in Williamstown. A homeless man, named January, slept on our porch--a constant reminder of the surreal inequalities--while my parents’ work in HIV/AIDS policy and counseling provided a new outrage into the political scandals and ineptitude directly contributing to the spread of the disease.” In her junior year, Jess won a Truman Scholarship and was able to intern for the World Bank Inspection Panel (the independent body of the Bank that addresses the grievances of individuals harmed by Bank projects) in Washington D.C. Following her senior year at Williams, she won the Martin-Wilson Scholarship for post-graduate study at Oxford, an award recognizing both academic and leadership success. “After my time at Williams, I moved directly onto graduate school at Oxford University to pursue a Master of Science in Medical Anthropology. I took classes on nutrition, Eastern medicine, infectious disease and other fascinating topics that complemented by past activism in healthrelated issues.” In early September, she handed in her dissertation, which focused on maternal and infant health in US prisons. Jessica is currently an Urban Fellow working for the City of New York on various health issues. What continues to drive Jessica’s passion to give back to her community and her world? “My love of people and community definitely plays a part in driving my passion—and so too does my anger and outrage at the injustices still seen and felt in this country and around the world. My teachers, my mentors and all my parents inspire me every day.”

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HILLARY KEACH

NYA P R O F I L E S I N

CHARACTER AND

INTELLECT Hillary Keach is a role model. She’s also a current junior at North Yarmouth Academy. Unequivocally, those who describe Hillary use the same adjectives— diligent, unselfish, dedicated, positive and upbeat. Her academic advisor, Margaret Perkins, said, “Always conscientious, engaged, and curious, Hillary is a fantastic role model for her classmates.”

“In my classes, I want to be working my hardest—speaking up about the things I care about and really putting my best foot forward,” she said.

In classes, in all school meetings and in all written NYA materials, Hillary has seen and heard the NYA mission statement repeated over and over. To some students, perhaps, the words are just that—words that you hear and read but don’t really pay too much attention too. For Hillary, the words have clear meaning and intent. “I believe that my teachers at NYA are serious about instilling the values put forward by the mission statement. I try to be friends with everyone and to be nice to everyone in the school. It’s really important to me that people see me as a person who cares about my school, my friends and my teammates. That’s the way I try to exhibit my character—being a caring person.

Outside of the classroom, athletics have come to play a strong role in her personal development. Playing soccer, basketball and tennis, Hillary has experienced teamwork at its best and relishes the role her coaches have played in her life at NYA. “My friends and teammates on the soccer team have been together for four years now. We’re really protective of each other—getting each other through the bad practice days we all have now and again and cheering each other on when we do something spectacular.

Hillary started her education at NYA in the eighth grade. “I thought NYA would be a better fit for me than Falmouth. The classes were smaller and teachers seemed more approachable,” she remembers. “I liked knowing I could be friends with everyone and that I could get to know a little something about everyone here.” Over the course of her years here, she has been active in numerous activities and sports. She has challenged herself academically and strived to be the best student she can be.

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NORTH YARM O U T H ACA D E M Y

Hillary was presented with the Coach’s Award last winter, honoring her dedication and play on the basketball court. Eric Austen, Hillary’s coach, said, “There were days when I was just floored with how hard she worked during practice, day after day after day. She never complained, she just worked hard. She is, quite simply, an incredibly dependable player who exhibits those hard-to-find traits that coaches absolutely love. She leads by example without actually trying to, she doesn’t complain when things get tough, she helps those around her by the way she acts, and she speaks up when her voice is needed.” In the early spring of her freshman year, Hillary came down with a serious illness that kept her out

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of school for much of that year. Her mother, Peggy, said that even then, Hillary worked diligently to keep up with her school work and come back strong and ready to go in the Fall. “Even when she’s been fifty percent physically able, she always given 110% effort,” said Jeff Thoreck, Hillary’s soccer coach. Giving back to her community is important to her and she has served on the Judiciary Council at the school for the past two years. She also worked as a volunteer this past summer at the Center for Grieving Children, a non-profit organization in Portland that helps children and families deal with the loss of a parent or loved one. The future seems very bright for this young woman. She is just beginning to look at colleges and seems quite passionate about going into medicine as a career. “Right now, I’m pretty interested in pediatric cardiology. When I was younger, one of my brothers had two open heart surgeries and that had a big impact on me. I really want to be able to help people live their lives,” she said. As for the idea of being a role model, Hillary said, “I just try to work my hardest in everything I do. I’m honored that my teachers and peers see that too!”


JARED KNIGHTON

Besides growing a garden to produce fresh vegetables for the local food pantry, Jared, shown left with some of the fruits of his labors, also taught youngsters at the Wolfe’s Neck Farm Summer Camp how to plant, sow, weed and harvest the vegetables.

I’m not sure that other schools are the same. We’re really focused on learning here.”

Jared Knighton is a quiet leader. He is an eighth grader in the Priscilla Savage Middle School at North Yarmouth Academy. Middle School Head, Paul Errickson describes Jared as a well-rounded and mature middle schooler. “He’s not the kid who’s waving his hand around in class and needing to have his opinions heard; instead, he’s the one whose classmates turn to him regularly for help and support. Virtuous comes to mind when I think of Jared—and his peers admire that in him.” Jared came to NYA two years ago as a sixth grader and says the school appealed to him and his parents because “everyone here wants to learn. It’s different from my old school. The classes are really small and the teachers make learning fun. I feel very comfortable in class because we can talk about anything and everyone really respects everyone else’s opinions.” Developing students of strong character and intellect are at the core of an NYA education. Jared believes that he exhibits his character by “doing the right things—working my hardest in my classes and trying to set a good example for my friends and other students. Our teachers set standards of how they want us to act in class and on our sports teams.

Sports play an important part in Jared’s life at NYA. He plays goalie for the hockey team, runs cross country and plays baseball in the spring. Joe Silvestri, the Director of Admission and middle school baseball, coach describes Jared as a player who is able to see the big picture for what’s better for the team. “For a boy his age, he is unusually mature and dependable. We don’t have team captains in middle school sports, but if we did, he would be the natural choice.” This past summer, Jared completed the work for his Eagle Scout badge for the Boy Scouts. “I decided to grow a community garden at Wolfe’s Neck Farm and donate the produce to the Freeport food pantry. My family grows a lot of gardens and I thought it would be a fun project and one that’s a little different from the typical Eagle Scout project,” he said. He got interested in the Boy Scouts just two years ago and has done an incredible job fulfilling the twenty one merit badges needed to earn the Eagle Scout designation. The garden project required him to map out the space, till the soil, determine what produce to grow and then plant and tend the vegetables. “I worked about four or more hours a week at the garden all through the summer. I decided to plant

a salad garden—tomatoes, lettuce, cucumbers, zucchini, green peppers, beans and summer squash. As soon as the garden had produce to pick, I made a weekly vegetable donation to the food pantry.” One day when he made his weekly drop-off there was a family “shopping” at the food pantry who were delighted to receive fresh vegetables instead of the usual canned offerings. “It was really neat to see how I helped people out with my project,” he said. Jared dropped off his last load of fresh vegetables at the end of September. “Fostering character and intellect in young adults.” “Encouraging students to continue the process of lifelong learning.” It’s hard not to notice, when reading the stories of the four NYA community members profiled above, the threads of commonality amongst them. Their teachers and mentors all remark on their quiet strength of leadership, their passion for helping others and giving back to their greater communities. All four have been recognized for their intellectual natures and all have garnered the respect of their peers, teachers and coaches. Institutionally, if these four are indeed a representation of the remarkable student bodies of today and yesterday, then we should all be proud of our continued commitment to the principles espoused by the mission of NYA. Jessica Lovaas summed it up well when she said, “I’m not sure if there is one definition of character. Each person is different and how they achieve happiness and negotiate the challenges of our world is uniquely their own.”

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TED SHARP THE ROLE OF EDUCATORS IN

DEVELOPING CHARACTER

Ted Sharp, NYA class of 1960 and current Board of Trustee member, has been on the forefront of developing character education in schools since the early 70’s. “Our founding fathers understood from the beginning that we had a responsibility to educate our children not only in the cognitive areas of traditional education but also in helping them connect the conditions of human kind. They recognized two major responsibilities in providing free public education—making students smart and good,” he said. What is character education? According to the Boston University Center for the Advancement of Ethics and Character (CAEC), “character education is not an educational trend or the school’s latest fad. It is an essential and inescapable mission of schools. The goal of character education is to help children to develop good dispositions that will enable them to flourish intellectually, personally and socially.

Character education does not amount to simply a lesson or course, a quick-fix program, or a slogan posted on the wall. It is an integral part of school life. With intentional, thoughtful character education, schools can become communities in which virtues such as responsibility, hard work, honesty and kindness are taught, expected, celebrated and continually practiced.” Paul Errickson, head of the Priscilla Savage Middle School, has become more intrigued lately with the ways our schools are teaching character education and, more specifically, how NYA is already doing it and how we can do it better. “I think we do talk a lot about respect and responsibility in our classrooms and even in our faculty meetings. We as a faculty are always looking for the ‘teaching moments’ when we can emphasize and discuss with our students the principles of integrity, personal character and even courage,’ he said. Sharp, who is the superintendent of schools in Gorham, Maine, as well as a former Assistant Dean of the CAEC, says that schools have a responsibility to young people to help them become good people. “The two pillars of a character education curriculum are respect and responsibility. It also encompasses integrity, courage and loyalty. Humankind has come to understand that you need these principles in order to exist and excel. But, you have to work at it every day in order to ‘set the table’ for faculty and students to have an on-going discussion. It’s not ‘talking at people’ but rather seizing the moments that arise in the common course of the day and talking about good decisions, right and wrong and having the courage to stand by your convictions.” During the course of his career as an educator, Sharp has come to realize the necessity of schools addressing the issues of developing character and integrity in students. “In the late 1950’s, schools got away from integrating character education into their daily lessons. I think it was for a variety of reasons, but mainly there was a lot of societal questioning about the schools’ responsibility to teaching those principles. Gradually, incorporating lessons on developing students’ integrity, respect and personal responsibility lost focus in curriculums,”

JEFF THORECK Jeff Thoreck is celebrating his 7th year as the Athletic Director at NYA and coming off one of his best years to date. Since he began as AD, NYA teams have won twenty-five state championships. This year alone, NYA teams captured three regional crowns and six state championships, including the two teams Thoreck coaches. “Championships are great, but for me, it’s the success of knowing the kids are working to 100% of their abilities and creating relationships that will last until way after they graduate. I am most proud of providing an environment where kids are doing their very best and having a lot of fun doing it,” Thoreck said. Requiring students to play a sport each trimester, Thoreck explained, has many benefits. “When the seasons change, it renews the kids’ sense of passion for that upcoming season. In this age of specialization, where kids pick one sport when they are as young as five or six, this keeps things fresh. For the less athletic kids, it opens up a whole realm of possibilities; exposing kids to team dynamics and challenging them outside their perceived comfort zones,” he said.

Athletic Director Jeff Thoreck with Henry Gerrity, varsity lacrosse player

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Besides spending untold hours managing the athletic department, Thoreck somehow finds time in his busy administrative schedule to coach two varsity sports—girls varsity soccer in the fall and boys varsity lacrosse in the spring. “Getting on the field with the kids is my favorite time of the day. It gets a little dicey sometimes around 3:30 when everyone needs me at once, and I have a practice or game scheduled, but there is nothing else I’d rather be


he said. “When I was teaching in Cape Elizabeth in the 1970’s, it became apparent to faculty and administration that it was indeed our responsibility to do this and that’s when I began getting interested in developing a tangible curriculum exploring the issues of character development.” In the 1980’s, Sharp served in Washington, DC as Chief of Staff for Bill Bennett, who was the Secretary of Education under Ronald Reagan. “Bill was a real leader in this area. He felt schools had a critical charge to help children develop their own moral compass. It was a very exciting time to be part of that dialogue and the ensuing conversations,” Sharp said. After taking a summer course about character education, taught by Ted Sharp, Errickson sees several possibilities for enhancing what we are already doing at NYA in respect to this area of our curriculum. “We do a pretty good job now of providing some leadership training for our students, but developing a summer leadership course for middle schoolers would give students another avenue for enhancing those skills. As an institution, we pride ourselves on our one-to-one relationships with our kids. We must continually find and create the character building moments that occur when kids are with us” he said. Prompted by the work he did this summer, Errickson is in the process of forming a faculty committee to formally study what we are already doing around character education at NYA and to perhaps formulate a plan for enhancement. “In middle school especially,”said Nate Smith, a NYA 7th grade teacher, “character education is mostly about integrity—being honest and not afraid to do the right thing, even when your friends might not be. We do a lot of trust building with them in groups and also as individuals.” Both Sharp and Errickson agree that in order for a true character education curriculum to be successful, it must be within the framework of a partnership between parents and teachers. “It requires constant conversation between school and home. Children need to see it carry over in all aspects of their lives. Each family will have its own moral compass, and that’s good, but there is common ground among all of us,” said Sharp.

doing,” he said. “I feel really lucky to work at a school that allows me to coach two sports as well as be an administrator.” Coaching kids allows him to see them in a whole different situation, which he feels enables him to be more effective in his job. “NYA is a small school, and I would say the majority of the faculty also coach a team or two. Having that crossover from classroom to playing field is enormously helpful. Our coaches really know the kids. They know how each individual learns best and that makes all the difference. I think because of those close teacher/coach/student relationships, kids truly learn to care about each other. It’s not superficial, they really support each other through thick and thin,” he said.

STATE CHAMPIONSHIPS UNDER JEFF THORECK GIRLS SOCCER

2000 2003 2004 2005 2006

BOYS SOCCER  

2000 2002 2005

BOYS CROSS COUNTRY 2001 2002 GIRLS CROSS COUNTRY 2002   GIRLS ICE HOCKEY  

2003 2005 2007

BASEBALL

2000 2002 2004

BOYS LACROSSE

2001 2007

BOYS OUTDOOR TRACK 2006 2007 GIRLS TENNIS

2000 2004 2007

BOYS TENNIS

2007

As for what makes him a state championship winning coach, Thoreck said it’s appreciating the differences between male and female athletes and making the adjustment in his coaching style to help his teams be successful. “These kids are doing so much, in the classroom, volunteering, athletics, it’s important to loosen up a little bit and have some fun at practice. As a coach, I try to strike the balance between the times when they need to be a little lighter and fun and the time to be more about the business at hand,” he said. “Coaching both girls and boys teams makes me a better coach—their needs and expectations of their coach are very different.” Praising the motivation level of the NYA athletes, Thoreck said their high expectations of themselves and their teammates makes the job as coach that much easier. “These kids are really motivated. They want to be the best and they all want to be playing in that final game of the season. They appreciate what it takes to reach a state championship, and it gives them something to aspire too.” His athletes, past and present, praise his influence on their lives both on and off the playing field. His peers in the coaching world also appreciate his talents and named him the NSCAA All New England small school Coach of the Year in 2007. A father of four young children, Thoreck is involved in their athletic pursuits as well. “Let me tell you, my biggest challenge as a coach came this summer. I was conducting a skills clinic for a girls under-10 year old soccer program. I’d never coached girls that young before, and man oh man, it certainly is different! Just the social piece of who would play next to whom and who would pass to whom was more than most coaches could figure out. I’m telling you, there were parent volunteers just shaking their heads, and I’m sure, doubting my sanity for agreeing to do it. But I think, at the end of the day, they all learned a little bit. It sure was a long day though!”

C H R O N I C L E 2007

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KIDS DIG HISTORY

Thunder Jugs, Begone! When the NYA Summer Program’s “We Dig History” Archaeology camp discovered the privy of the Joseph Woods house site found on the north front lawn of Curtis Building, they had no idea it would be a powerful indicator of a turning point in Yarmouth’s history. This summer, in the corner of the privy in the Woods Barn, a group of middle school campers excavated the abandoned cistern discovered in 2005. What they pulled from these once important holes in the ground tells a story of one of the turning points of Yarmouth history. In September, Jay Robbins, father of Hugh ’99 and Fenna ’07, presented the findings of four years’ worth of summer camp excavations to the Yarmouth Historical Society. The Joseph Woods home, built around 1847, was demolished in 1930 to create room for NYA’s Curtis Building. The foundation of the home and outbuildings has lain buried under the front lawn of Curtis ever since. Generations of the Woods family were witness to the changing Yarmouth history. In 1887, because of rampant sickness and death from various diseases, including scarlet fever, diphtheria and typhoid, the Yarmouth Board of Health decreed that there be pure water for all. By 1895, over 20,000 feet of the new water and sewer system crisscrossed the town and the river. A system we all take for granted today virtually annihilated the killer contagious diseases. The citizens of Yarmouth, now hooked up to the modern system, could turn on the tap when water was wanted, throw away their thunder jugs or chamber pots, and fill in their privies and cisterns.

WHAT WE DID ON OUR SUMMER VACATION In June, French teachers Rhonda Barker and Margaret Perkins accompanied a group of seven Middle and Upper School students on a six day tour of Paris. In addition to Paris, they took day trips to Versailles and Chartres. This was the first international trip sponsored by NYA in over six years and, we hope, the first of many!

PARIS

From left to right: Laura Michaud, Lily O’Brien, Hayley Bennett, Ashleigh Taylor, Ashley Eaton, Rhonda Barker, Abby Smith, Christina Reese

SPAIN Heidi O’Connor, Middle School Spanish teacher, traveled to Spain for four weeks this summer. She began in Madrid for an intensive two-week teacher training course at Enforex Madrid. The two-week program included lectures and practical workshops examining various aspects of how to teach Spanish effectively. After the course, she traveled to Barcelona, Burgos, Bilbao and San Sebastian.

When Jay and the campers excavated the privy and cistern, they found remnants of broken chamber pots and a variety of other items that the Woods had disposed of as modern conveniences made life more pleasant. Joseph Woods’ descendants could not have imagined what they considered dump worthy would someday be used to show how everyday village life changed so dramatically in late 19th century Yarmouth.

MONTANA & TEXAS Danielle Barschdorf, Middle School Science Teacher, traveled to Montana and Texas to take a Conservation Across Boundaries course - a graduate course that takes a systems approach comparing two distinct ecological regions of North America. Mrs. Barschdorf is using the knowledge she learned through Conservation Across Boundaries to enhance her seventh grade Earth Science class. Currently, the seventh graders are working on a project to survey the Royal River in Yarmouth to find out the biodiversity of fish and macroinvertebrates and to study the water quality of the river.

COLORADO

Last July, Middle School Math teacher Bob Gross attended the Nuts and Bolts Symposium in Boulder, Colorado. The symposium centered on the practical, proven, day-to-day activities that work in the education of elementary, middle level, and high school students. Bob enjoyed meeting teachers from around the country and sharing ideas with them.

N O RT H YA R M O U T H ACA D E M Y

www.nya.org


CATCHING UP WITH

BILL HALLETT

Bill Hallett retired from NYA in 2006 after fifteen years of teaching - part of a forty-five year teaching career. During his time at NYA, he served as Head of the Upper School and Chair of the History Department. He also coached NYA’s fencing team and was a reader for the Advanced Placement Program. Hallett is a resident of Nobleboro, Maine, where he is preparing for a trip to Tuscany with friends. In addition to his upcoming trip to Italy, he has visited his children and driven to Southwest Texas, stopping to see old friends along the way. He volunteers with Tri-County Literacy, teaching adults to read and write, and he volunteers in the Skidompha Public Library’s Secondhand Book Shop, which raises money for the library. Most of all, he is devoting himself to his painting. Hallett has been painting for twenty-six years, but only full time now that he has retired. In August, he opened an exhibit of his work in Curtis Hall entitled “New Light, Old Images.” He uses mostly acrylic on canvas, and the focus of his work for the past year has been still lifes and Maine landscapes. With his painting, he seeks to enhance nature and “maybe uncover some aspect of it by shocking the eye into recognition, and to find the extraordinary in the ordinary daily visual experience.” He has exhibited at many Maine galleries and will be at Bowdoin College’s Smith Union-Lamarche Gallery in the fall 2008. When he reflects about his time at NYA, he misses his colleagues and the students most. “Every year, there was a different crop of kids, and they always kept things interesting. If things weren’t going well, the kids always made up for it. They had a different perspective, and that was refreshing,” said Hallett. He said NYA was a great place to end a career, “and it’s only getting better. There is diversity in character in the students, they are motivated and want to be at NYA.” CLOCKWISE FROM TOP; Doreen Peterson, Grant McPherson, Charlotte McPherson; Roland Burns and Hadley Gibson; Ben and Anne Devine, Conley Dion, Ferris and Carolyn Ray; Elizabeth Boothby and Taylor Gorman; Matt Hawkins and Martha Hull

What does the future hold? He plans to devote himself fully to his painting. If he stopped painting, he said, he’d go crazy. “There is so much still to learn.” Below; A landscape canvas by Bill Hallett, and the artist pictured at a recent opening for the exhibition of his work at Curtis Hall

GENERATIONS NYA GRANDPARENTS DAY

C H R O N I C L E 2007

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MAINE LAX CHAMPS

BOYS VARSITY LACROSSE: CLASS B STATE CHAMPIONS

BOYS OUTDOOR

TRACK & FIELD MAINE CLASS C

CHAMPIONS 1

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STUDENT-ATHLETE INDIVIDUAL HONORS

1 US Lacrosse All-American and Portland Press Herald/Maine Sunday Telegram Boys Lacrosse All-Star MVP Nathaniel Wellin ‘07 | 2 US Lacrosse Academic All-American: Molly Jordan ‘07 | 3 Portland Press Herald/Maine Sunday Telegram Boys Lacrosse All-Star: George Reiche ‘07

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NYA DOMINATES ‘07 STATE TENNIS BOYS VARSITY TENNIS CLASS C STATE CHAMPIONS WESTERN MAINE CLASS C CHAMPIONS

GIRLS VARSITY TENNIS CLASS C STATE CHAMPIONS WESTERN MAINE CLASS C CHAMPIONS

SPRING SPORTS ATHLETIC COUNCIL AWARD: Female: Grace Hyndman ‘07 (Right)

Male: Nicholas Lolar ‘07 (Far Right)

STEPHEN A. MORRIS AWARD: Female: Rhegan Flanagan ‘07 (Below) Male: Dinch Kelesoglu ‘07 (Below, 2nd from Right)

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| Girls Varsity Lacrosse First Team Western Maine Conference All-Stars: Ingrid Knowles ‘07, Kim Morse ‘07 and Rhegan Flanagan (picture 4 ) ‘07 | Girls Varsity Softball Western Maine Conference First Team All-Stars: Kate Merrill ‘07, Katie Knight ‘07, and Allie Tocci ‘08 (picture 5 ) | Portland Press Herald/Maine Sunday Telegram Boys Outdoor Track & Field All-Stars: 6 Dinch Kelesoglu ‘07 7 Pak Lul ‘08

C H R O N I C L E FA L L 2007

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CLASS NOTES

THE 50 YEAR REUNION FOR CLASS OF ‘57

Above; The Class of 1957’s 50th reunion cake proudly displays the NYA logo. Right; Class gathers for historic photo. Pictured left to right: Back Row: Carole Terrone Luce, Sheila Menchen Merrit, Cynthia Bartlett Autry, George L. Black, Jane Thompson Witzel, Sterlin C. Clockedile, Philip R. Sherwood, Byron W. Greenlaw, Judith Scott Jones, John B. Pride, Wm. H. Myers, Jr., Roland R. Hodsdon, Gordon M. Snow. Front row: M. Joan Bernard Estabrook, Retta Cleaves Granholm, Phyllis Clarke Chadbourne, Maria Parisi Vowles, Joanne Partridge Jones, Claudia Blackstone Newman, Jack B. St. Pierre. 1934 Rona Elfman Kowal writes: “On June 8, 2007, I will turn 90 - I am a widow, live alone - my 2 sons and 1 daughter live in other states and I have 2 great grandchildren ages 3 and 3 months living with their parents in England - I’ve done my job!” 1952 Samuel and Florence Plummer Whittemore let us know they are “looking forward to our 55th reunion in September! We are contacting other classmates at this time to join in the celebration.” 1954 Elinor Richards Jones has a granddaughter, Kayte Demont, in the Class of 2008 who is carrying on the NYA tradition

Jane Thompson Witzel, and her husband Erich, sent in photos of the Class of 1957 50th reunion celebration held on September 9 at the Stag Neck Inn in York Harbor. Joanne Partridge “Pheazie” Jones helped Jane and Erich organize the festivities. 1958 Judith Brooks writes that she is living in Tucson, AZ, retired and enjoying it!

1961 The Class of ‘61 enjoyed a great 45th reunion last fall. (See photo in Events Round-Up, on page 21) 1967 Donald Katzman writes: “Married Maryann Mitchell in 2000. We both had good careers in high tech. I’m retired.” Joe Hosmer writes that he is disappointed to not attend reunions this year, but will be enroute to Scotland and South Africa. He sends regards to his classmates and would love to get e-mails. (Note: Email the alumni office and we can direct you to Joe.) David Mitchell - While in California, Kate Putnam, Chief Development Officer, and Headmaster Peter Mertz met with former headmaster, Jack Mitchell, his wife Harriet, David and his wife Judy Bradley.

Lee Arsenault Butler ’57 November 13, 2004

John Edward Arsenault ’45 February 27, 2007

IN MEMORIUM

Frank R. Adams ’65 August 25, 2005

Lila Plummer MacKinnon ’47 March 13, 2007

WE REMEMBER THESE

Lawrence William (Bill) Gauthier ’55 January 27, 2007

Allan Prescott Jones ’44 March 14, 2007

Frederick F. Haley M/Sgt, USAF (Ret.) ’44 January 28, 2007

John W. Paul ’72 April 22, 2007

NYA ALUMNI

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1957 Sterlin Clockedile and Pat Barker Clockedile ’59 let us know they were sorry to miss the class’ 50th reunion on campus in September, 2007. “We will be in Tucson visiting our daughter and then traveling in our motor home until the 2nd week in December. Our best to all of our classmates!”


1972 Ralph Sparks writes: “Proud parent of a son who is heading into his sophomore year at Bentley (go figure). I live and work in the part of New England (RI) where I spent my summers as a boy and feel like I’m home in “Gods Little Acre.” Like to watch sports more than play them, although I do bowl. Hope to get up to NYA and say hello to some old friends.” William McPherson (Mac) Browning writes: “My wife, Jodi, and I live in Smith Pond, a short distance from Baxter State Park near Millinocket. We are both BSP Rangers and have been for many years.” Richard Burkhart, his wife Elizabeth, and two children visited NYA in July 2007. Rick enjoyed showing his family the NYA campus, especially his old dorm. They leafed through old year books as Rick reminisced. What fun! 1973 Russell Bradbury writes: “I have been working for CT Natural Gas for 20 years now on the service side of things. Keeping customers warm & happy through our New England winters. This time of year I ride my bicycle to work in hopes of keeping myself in shape! My wife Mary (of 26 years) and I enjoy walking & biking. We also spend much time keeping our perennial gardens thriving. We have 3 great children - Josh, who just left for the 2nd time to Iraq with the CT Air National Guard. Katelyn is a hairdresser & Sarah is going to graduate Nursing school next year. When I read these Alumni updates I’m hoping to see more names from ‘73. Would love to hear from you at llessur@comcast.net.” 1988 Patrick Brown and his wife Elizabeth caught up with Headmaster Peter Mertz in California, weeks before their move to Atlanta, GA in May 2007.

11th and weighing in at 8 lbs. 5 oz. and 22 inches long! Proud father Christopher, is vice president of development at PROPSYS with offices in Lewiston, Portland and Boston. Jessica Rutherford writes: “I’m living in St. Petersburg Florida with my fiancé Cameron Bard. We’re excited to announce the birth of our daughter Anastasia Margaret Bard born August 3rd 2007!” 1993 Alyssa Bogosian writes: “I got engaged on December 31, ’06, in Hollywood, CA, to Travis Colby (who is from Alaska!). We met on the set of the FOX reality show “Hell’s Kitchen.” The wedding is set for April, 2008 in Los Angeles. Alyssa graduated from The University of Southern California and is the CEO of Maineiac Productions in Hollywood, working in both film and television. Travis is the producer of “Hell’s Kitchen.”

ABOVE David Mitchell ’67 (left) and former headmaster Jack Mitchell (right) model new NYA hats brought to them by Headmaster Peter Mertz (center). Also pictured are David’s wife Judy Bradley and Jack’s wife Harriet. BELOW: Patrick Brown and his wife Elizabeth with Headmaster Peter Mertz.

Sarah King Taylor writes: On August 15th, Scott and I welcomed our daughter, Addison, into the world. She arrived three weeks early but still weighed 6lbs 3 oz and was 19 3/4 inches long. She is beautiful and my husband and I are totally in love with her! Johanna York Barth and Andrew Barth were able to join other alumni at the Denver alumni reception. Also present were Julia Chin, Head of Upper School, Headmaster Peter Mertz, and Chief Development Officer Kate Putnam who were attending a professional conference for independent school educators. Imagine their surprise when former headmaster Ed Good and his wife Judi stopped by to say hello. (for other photos of the event, see the alumni events page)

Grandmother and NYA Board of Trustees member, Peg Griswold writes: My son, Chris Thompson and wife Erica welcome a new son, Quinn Emerson, born at Maine Medical Center in Portland on September

1995 John Higgins writes: “Howdy everyone! Figured I’d give an update on what’s new for me. I’m still in Arizona making movies. We just moved into the big leagues with the distribution of our first major feature, The Decoy, a western (coming July 24 on DVD). We landed a domestic distribution deal across the US and Canada. It’s also making an appearance on Showtime! (Only about 100 in 20,000 films ever makes it this far, so it’s a pretty big deal for us). Not bad for a former under-achiever. I guess hard work really does pay off! ;-) Hope everyone’s doing great! Take care!”

Sandra Palmer Sloat ’52 May 29, 2007

Celia R. Phinney ’37 July 5, 2007

Thomas Vosmus ’38 May 30, 2007

Guy Lovell ’49 July 13, 2007

Addison Smith ’35 June 19, 2007

“Jay” James Weaver Jordan ’69 August 8, 2007

Thelma Stone Chamberlain ’53 June 25, 2007

Stanley Ellsworth Aubens ’39 September 11, 2007

1992 Virginia Flower Marvin writes: ““We’re living in the West End of Portland and expecting our second child in November. I recently got back in touch with Lisa Pellerin Taylor ’92 and Brooke Cotter ’92.”

NYA CALIFORNIA DREAMIN’

Elinor Richards Jones ‘54 gets a hug on Grandparents’ Day from her granddaughter’s friend Allie Tocci ‘08

CHRONICLE 2007

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CLASS NOTES (Continued)

NYA ALUMNI SERVING PROUDLY

Left to Right: Navy LT Rheanna Sinnett ‘99 on maneuvers, ILT Charles Weaver ‘00 deployed in Iraq, Charles and Melissa Heatley at their wedding. 1997 Justin Lafreniere let Bruce Myers know that he just graduated from Tulane Medical School. He was recommissioned as a LT and will be starting his Internal Medicine residency at the Naval Medical Center, Portsmouth, VA, in June 2007. He and Amy closed on a new house in May 2007. 1999 Rheanna Sinnett writes: “I’m currently stationed in Jacksonville, FL., and loving every second. I’m attached to HSL-48 (Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron Light 48) on Naval Station Mayport flying SH-60B’s. I’ll be putting on LT here in about a week. I just don’t know where the time goes! I’m slated to head out on deployment this fall with the Harry S. Truman Battlegroup; I’ll be detached on one of the destroyers in the battlegroup. I’ve sent a couple pictures . . . the first is a picture of me and my OIC hovering over the back of our boat during a VERTREP (vertical replenishment) evolution. It was a very exciting day for me and I’m fortunate that we

had other helos flying from our squadron to take the picture. I absolutely love all the guys I’m working with, especially those that are on my detachment. It’s like I instantly had 25 big brothers looking out for me. I’ll be sure to keep you updated as this year progresses. It’s shaping up to be very exciting! I am in love with flying helicopters and can’t wait to get over to where the action is! Also, my sister Jackie Sinnett Felber ‘01 has just checked into HSC-2 up in Norfolk, VA with her husband, Mike. They’ll be flying the SH-60S, a newer variant of the helicopter I fly. They’re in the process of moving, getting settled into a new squadron, and then heading up to SERE School this week, so needless to say, they’re quite busy.” 2000 Josh Wright: Josh’s wife let us know that Josh is currently at sea, as a LTjg in the Navy serving on the USS Key West submarine stationed at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii.

1996 Ben Stone - Amy Stone ’00 writes: My brother Ben (Class of 1996) is doing very well - he is an attorney in New York City.” Gillian Morejon Gutierrez: Jill writes: “Rob and I were married on July 9, 2007. We were thrilled to have so many of our family and friends with us, including NYA alums, Lisa MacKenzie Dolinich ‘94, Matt Kelley ‘96,  Kate Kennedy ‘96, Blueberry Hennin Beeton ‘96, Allison Huke ‘96, (Pictured at right) and my brother, Roy Morejon ‘99. Rob and I are also excited to be joining Kate Kennedy ‘96 in New York.” Jill is a federal employee - Emergency Manager with the US Department of Labor.

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Charles Weaver. His father writes: “1LT Charles Weaver was promoted to Captain June 20, 2007, with a ceremony at Fort Campbell, KY, home of the 101st Airborne. Just home from Iraq, he has been reassigned as the XO of the 101st fast strike Artillery Unit.” An updated note reads: “Charles’ brigade deploys to Afghanistan next year (April ’08). He is now an artillery commander with the 325th Artillery, 101st Airborne....no more Iraq for now...” Charlie and Melissa Heatley were married in the garden at the Harraseeket Inn in Freeport on August 4, 2007. In attendance from NYA were Steve Lawrence ’03, Colin Haley ’02, Devin Dobrowolski ’00, George LeBourdais ’00, Jon Morton ’00, Colleen Fasold ’03 and Lauren Hirshon ’00. Charlie deeply appreciated the generosity and friendship of his former baseball coach (and immediate past NYA Board Chair) Bruce Poliquin, and his wife Judy, who attended the wedding. Charlie’s wife, Melissa is a nutritionist at a medical facility in Clarksville, TN. After Charles’ deployment, they plan to move back to Maine and build a home.

Stacy Morris-White writes: “Hello- I just wanted to update the NYA community on a very important event for the Morris family. My twin sons Eben Tyler and Finn Stephen were born last week, on August 30th. Everyone is doing well. The twins join their cousin Stephen Henry, Emily’s son, who will be three in February. Stephanie ‘92 is a special ed teacher at MSAD 15, and is a wonderful Aunt. All in all the family is doing great.” Left to right: Morejon-Gutierrez Wedding Guests: Lisa (MacKenzie) Dolinich ‘94, Matt Kelley ‘96, Rob and Gillian Morejon Guiterrez ‘96, Blueberry Hennin Beeton ‘96, Allison Huke ‘99, Kate Kennedy ‘96

w w w. n y a . o r g

1997 Steve McBrady and wife Kris are living in Washington, DC, where they both practice law. Steve moved to DC 6 years ago after graduating


from Cornell, and Kris grew up there. So far, he has resisted pressure to become a Redskins fan. Justin Lafreniere (See NYA Alumni Serving Proudly special Class Notes section) Theo Tierney stopped by reunions to greet classmates, Johan Falt from Sweden, Nate Brown and his wife 1998 Anna Trafton – her mom writes: “Anna is finishing her second year of vet school and will be at the University of Oregon next year for her last year. She spent two weeks in South Africa this spring on a wildlife preservation. She did surgery on elephants and other wounded animals.” 1999 Mark Robert Swenson is engaged to Katherine Jane Thompson of Eagle River, Alaska. A May 12 wedding is planned. Mark works for Hattenburg, Dilley and Linnell in Alaska. Rheanna Sinnett (See NYA Alumni Serving Proudly special Class Notes section) Alisa Young: From the Portland Maine Sunday Telegram, Aug. 5, 2007: “FALMOUTH: Alisa Jeanne Young and Thomas Coleman Andrews IV (Coley) were married on, June 23, 2007, at the Spruce Point Inn in Boothbay Harbor. Alisa attended Middlebury College and now teaches school in Menlo Park, CA. Coley is a student at Stanford University’s Graduate School of Business. After a summer of travel, they will reside in Palo Alto, CA.” 2000 Josh Wright: (See NYA Alumni Serving Proudly special Class Notes section) Emily Clark – her mom writes that Emily is excited to begin her fourth and final year of Penn. College of Optometry...3 externships to go in Philadelphia, Bethesda, and Baltimore.”

ADDITIONS

Liz Bachelder writes: “I’m still in DC after graduating last year, and now I’m working as a tutor for kids with learning differences. It’s a long day, but it’s fascinating and rewarding work. I live up by the National Cathedral, just up the street from Kristi and Elyse. I’ll be sending applications in soon to pursue a PhD in French Literature (not much of a surprise I guess!). I’d love to hear from everyone else! ebachelder@gmail.com.

Charles Weaver (See NYA Alumni Serving Proudly special Class Notes section) Sally Kenway Anderson was married to Jeffrey Sebastian Anderson on July 7, 2007. According to the Portland Press Herald, the ceremony took place at Diamond’s Edge Restaurant on Great Diamond Island in Casco Bay. Sally graduated from the Parson’s School of Design and is currently employed as an interior designer at Great Falls Distinctive Interiors in Chantilly, VA. They reside in Fairfax, VA.

2001 Virginia Crocker writes: “Peter Busque and I were married in Negril, Jamaica, on May 15th. We’ll celebrate our marriage with a Maine reception in October.”

2003 Rachael Blanchard - From Wellesley College Press Release: Rachael was awarded a Bachelor of Arts degree at Wellesley College on Friday, June 1, 2007. She majored in Economics and minored in English and plans to work at BNP Paribas as a fixed income analyst in New York, NY after graduation. While at Wellesley, Rachael’s activities included Cross Country (captain), Track, Economic Students’ Association (Treasurer & Secretary), tutoring kindergarteners with reading comprehension, and Dance Collective (a modern dance organization). She also received First Year Distinction honors. Outside of the college she completed 2.5 years with the Massachusetts Alliance for Economic Development (MAED), a non-profit organization dedicated to promoting business growth within Massachusetts. In addition, she completed a semester in Spain at the University of Córdoba where she ran Cross Country and Track for the University.

2002 Lissa von Brecht writes: “Just wanted to fill everyone in that I, along with working at the marketing company I have been with for the past year, have also taken on the responsibility of Assistant Women’s

Chris Bixby: Chris was profiled on the Bowdoin College website. He has a double major in economics and government. Throughout his Bowdoin years he played on the golf team, officiated ice hockey for high school and preparatory leagues around New

Jon Morton and Lauren Hirshon became engaged on New Year’s Eve. Jon’s mother Jackie let us know that they plan to be married in Mexico in February 2008. The two currently reside in San Diego. Lauren graduated from Brown in ’05 and received her masters from Columbia in social work in ’06. She is working with children with severe emotional difficulties. In August 2006, Jon graduated from Wentworth in Boston with a Bachelors degree in construction management. He is a project manager for Swinerton in San Diego.

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Tennis Coach at Stonehill College, working under Pam Arpe! For the fall season, I have been practically running the team because Pam is also coaching field hockey. It’s been a great fall season and I can’t wait to continue more with the team!” (Editor’s note – Lissa hosted a nice turnout of classmates for the reunion party at her parent’s in Maine.)

Amy Stone writes: “Since graduating from Tufts University in 2004, I have been working as a paramedic in the Metro-Boston area and taking prerequisites for medical school. I will be starting at Boston University School of Medicine in August and I’m extremely excited! My brother Ben (Class of 1996) is doing very well - he is an attorney in New York City.”

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Halle Elizabeth Perkins on March 8, 2007 to Lisa and Doug Perkins ’90, Caleb Carpenter Thompson on March 19, 2007 to Rachel

and Joel Thompson ’90; Picture 1 Anastasia Margaret Bard born on August 3, 2007 to Cameron Bard and Jessica Rutherford ‘92 ; Picture 2 Sarah King Taylor ‘93 and daughter, Addison Smith Taylor - born on August 15, 2007; Picture 3 Kevin (‘90) Moss’s wife, Emily Hansen Moss (former NYA Alumni Director), with

their twins, Kiernan Charles and Bridgette Eleanor; Picture 4 Stacy Morris White ’96 with twins Eben Tyler and Finn Stephen - born on August 30, 2007; Picture 5 Chris Thompson ’92 and wife Erica with daughter Blythe Carson (age 4) and new son Quinn Emerson - born on September 11, 2007

C H R O N I C L E 2007

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CLASS NOTES (Continued)

LEFT: NYA Alumni gather to play basketball on Winter Sports Day in December 2006. Pictured are: Dani Rogers ’06, Peter Lowell ’06, Zeke Isaacson ’06, Scott Carpenter ’06, Harry Hanson ’06, Taki Pilitsis ’06, Mike Moody ’06, Rob Carpenter ’06, Brian Chin ’06, George Briggs ’99, Richie Pierce ’01, Chris LaChance ’02, Krista Rogers ’04 RIGHT:; Stonehill College forward Matt Curran was voted a 2006-07 Northeast All-Star by the ECAC 2003 Chris Bixby: (Continued from Page 19) England and coached lacrosse at Brunswick High School. He said “I have respected the time and effort that my youth and high school coaches have given me in the past, and I wanted to find the time to ‘pay it forward’.” Fall semester of his junior year, he studied in Stockholm, Sweden where he played club lacrosse and officiated semi-professional hockey games. He accepted a position as an analyst at Jefferies Investment Bank in New York City. The last two years, Chris has returned to NYA in January to participate in the Junior College Kick-off, a program that brings alumni back to tell Juniors about college experiences. 2004 Bobbi Dennison: from 7/25/07 edition of the Times Record: “BRUNSWICK - The Bowdoin College Women’s lacrosse team has been recognized as the top academic squad in the IWLCA’s (Intercollegiate Women’s Lacrosse Coaches Association) Academic Honors. The Polar Bears held a team grade-pointaverage of 3.49 for the 2006-07 academic year; leading all women’s lacrosse teams across the NCAA’s three divisions. Bobbi Dennison, of Freeport, received individual honors by being named to the IWLCA Academic Honor Roll for her work in the classroom. Dennison (Pre-Med) is a senior. Matt Curran: from Stonehill College, April 4, 2007, press release. Matt, a junior forward, was named to the 2006-2007 New England Hockey Writers ECAC Northeast All-Star Squad in a vote of league coaches and media members. He posted a record-

setting season for the Skyhawks, scoring a school single-season record 30 goals and adding 14 assists for 44 points in 26 contests, including a four-goal performance in a 6-2 victory over Assumption in the Northeast-10 Conference semi-finals as well as a three-point performance in the league championship series against Saint Anselm that resulted in Stonehill’s first-ever conference crown. Matt also earned first team all-Northeast-10 accolades for his performance this season: a team-best 16 power play goals, three shorthanded tallies and a pair of game-winners. His 30 goals this season eclipsed the previous high-water mark of 27 set during the 2002-2003 season. Tara Merrill and her sister, Chelsey Merrill ’06, created a coloring book for the town of North Yarmouth. Called “Coloring North Yarmouth” it is filled with local history for younger children. Published in early August, 2007, it will be distributed to schools, businesses and day cares in town. Linc Merrill ’75 (father of Chelsey and Tara) tells us that his son-in-law, Heath Tardiff, did the drawings for the coloring book. Tara is attending Westminster College and is majoring in English. 2006 Kelsey Walsh writes: “Right now I am completing my freshman year at Emory University. This summer I will be going on a study abroad trip to Ireland/ Scotland for a Psychology/Child Development program.” Lily Pike writes: After I moved from Yarmouth in 2004, I finished up high school in Ann Arbor, MI. Overall an interesting experience. Lots of great

people, huge college city, but going to a large suburb of Detroit public school from NYA was a bigger surprise than I thought. Sometimes it made me really appreciate the little sheltered NYA community that I missed. Right now I’m still in Ann Arbor, attending the University of Michigan in the fall of ‘07 in hopes of business school? Who knows; we’ll see. Hope to see you all again soon! Chelsey Merrill: her father Linc Merrill ’75 writes that Chelsey made the Deans List both semesters her freshman year at Marietta College where she is majoring in Education and hopes to teach elementary school. (Also see 2004 notes under Tara Merrill ’04) Emily Staszak let Alanna Olivadoti know that she is transferring to Bates College in Lewiston, ME.

FORMER FACULTY & STAFF Sam Robinson II, former NYA headmaster from 1981 - 1987, writes that he and his wife, Linda, live on the Charles River in Waltham, MA. He is still working with NEASC (New England Association of Schools and Colleges). He reports that his son, Samuel Robinson III ‘87, is a LEED certified architect in Philadelphia. He is married to Shari Hersh and they have a daughter Bella, born in December, 2004. His son, Lewis Robinson ’89, is writing fiction and teaching at Stonecoast, the MFA program at University of Maine. He is married to C.C. Davies who has a tutoring business for Portland area children.

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NORTH YARM O U T H ACA D E M Y

w w w. n y a . o r g


EVENTS ROUNDUP

COWBOY UP AUCTION 2007 “Rodeo At The Roy” revelers pictured – Top Left; Margie Hansel, Dick Moon, Karen and Ford Reiche; Top Right: Charlie and Anita Stickney, David Willauer; Bottom Right: Helen Poliquin, Garrett Bowne, Lucy Gerrity, Henry Gerrity, Kayte Demont

CLASS OF ‘61 45TH REUNION

NYA Class of 1961 held a 45 year reunion. Pictured here, starting at the left corner are: Allan Wilson, Craig Pride, Starr Knight Enquist, (back) Roger

Beverage, front Audrey Tufts Morrison, back Scott Dunham, front Patricia

Hewit Piela, back Arnold Strout, front Roland Morin, back Joel Bowie, front JoAnn Hoyt Gerry, Diane Rollins Skinsacos, back Rosemarie Cheney

Chelsley, front Beatrice (Bunny) Milvaney Osgood, back Brenda Kaulback, front Sharon Thornton Slavin, back Richard Wentworth, front Sharon Libby

Sharp, back Rick Wile, front Ron (Beanie) Gregor, back Jerry Williams, front Tom Kinnelly, back David Schroeder, front Ronald (Doug) Turner, back Dennis Beckwith, front David Day

MILE HIGH MEET-UP Alumni met in Denver with Headmaster Peter Mertz, Chief Development Officer Kate Putnam, and Head of Upper School Julia Chin, when they attend the annual NAIS (National Association of Independent Schools) conference. Also in attendance was former Headmaster Ed Good. Pictured on the Left: Peter Lowell ’06 and Head of Upper School, Julia Chin. On the Right; (L-R) Andrew Barth ‘93, Joanna York Barth ‘93, former Headmaster Ed Good, and Hilary Grimes ‘97

C H R O N I C L E 2007

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The breadth of experience and knowledge of all our alumni is a testament to the education they received at NYA. We would like to know more about our alumni. In the future, we may want to profile other alumni, ask them to speak on campus or at a regional alumni meeting, or ask their permission to mentor another alumnus who may be interested in pursuing a career in a similar profession. Please take a moment to fill out the enclosed alumni survey so that we may better know who our alumni are.

NYA ALUMNI SURVEY Name

Class Year

Years you attended NYA? I live in Maine. Yes � No � How do you stay connected to NYA? (check all that pertain) � Reading Alumni Magazine – Chronicle � Sending in Class Notes

� Visiting the NYA website � Contacting Faculty

� Contacting Classmates � Visiting Campus

� Attending formal Alumni events – reunions/homecoming, etc. � Giving to the Annual Fund

� Sending in Address Updates What is your preferred way of having NYA communicate with you? � Electronic

� Mail

� Phone

SINCE LEAVING NYA, TELL US ABOUT YOURSELF (1) List the colleges, universities, courses of study, and/or professional training you have been involved in since leaving NYA. Include your major and areas of interest. (2) Tell us about your current profession, including job title and a brief description of what you do. (3) What are your interests/hobbies? Feel free to give us a few sentences for the Class Notes section of the alumni website and the next issue of The Chronicle.

Thank you for answering our alumni survey. If you wish to be entered in the drawing to win NYA prizes, please fill out the information below. All entries received by Jan. 15, 2008 will be eligible to win. Prizes are: 1st – a framed Pen and Ink Drawing of Curtis Building, 2nd – an NYA throw blanket, or 3rd – a set of NYA travel mugs. Name Address Phone E-mail

Siobhan Anderson

Mount Holyoke College

Peter Bates

Denison University

Kevin Catir

Denison University

Alexander Champoux

Trinity College

Emily Clemetson

William Smith College

Sarah Drouin

Claremont McKenna College

Christopher Eaton

Hamilton College

William Eberle

University of Puget Sound

Christopher Engel

Boston College

Jacob Flagler

Boston University

Rhegan Flanagan

Belmont Abbey College

Zachery Garcia

The Honors College at The University of Maine

Colin Geiger

Stonehill College

Henry Gerrity

Sewanee: The University of the South

Stephen Hansel

University of Rhode Island


NORTH YARMOUTH ACADEMY CLASS 0F 2007

Sarah Holden

St. Lawrence University

Wesley Norton

St. Lawrence University

Grace Hyndman

Bowdoin College

Alexander Preston

St. Lawrence University

Margaret Jordan

Haverford College

Brooke Rayder

Hamilton College

Dinch Kelesoglu

Salem State College

George Reiche

Wheaton College (MA)

Robin Klasek

Quinnipiac University

Fenna Robbins

Northeastern University

Katherine Knight

Boston University

Katherine Rude

Elmira College

Ingrid Knowles

Bates College

Russell Simms

Junior Hockey: Northern Massachusetts Cyclones

Travis Kroot

University of Rochester

Georgia Smith

Franklin & Marshall College

Erin Lachance

Wake Forest University

James Sterling

University of Denver

Kristin Lawrence

Saint Anselm College

Robert Suva

Skidmore College

Nicholas Lolar

Boston University

Banak Thiwat

Saint Joseph’s College of Maine

Alexandra Mack

Sacred Heart University

Samuel Vary

University of Vermont

Kimberly Morse

St. Lawrence University

Simon Vickery

Haverford College

Kaitlin Nee

The University of Maine

Nathaniel Wellin

University of California Santa Barbara

Choul Ngoal

Saint Joseph’s College of Maine

CHRONICLE FALL 2007

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200 148 MAIN STREET • YARMOUTH, MAINE 04096

NYA Chronicle - Fall 2007  

The Chronicle is the bi-annual journal of North Yarmouth Academy, a nearly 200 year old private school in Yarmouth, ME. In this issue: NYA's...