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SEEDLINGS WHAT’S NEW TO BUY, TRY, OR DO

Dropping in on these Hudson Valley producers is easier than ever. Hop on the Black Dirt Distillery Tour Bus at Warwick Valley Winery and head to their new distilling facility just a few miles away. Buses run weekends, every hour on the hour, from 12–5pm. And, now you can visit Hudson-Chatham Winery on both sides of the river. Their satellite tasting room in Greene County on Main Street in Tannersville is open and ready for tasting. Call each winery for more information.

NIX THE GLASS MIX-UPS If you’ve ever worried about picking up the wrong wine glass at a party, or forgotten which dangling charm was yours, fear not! Wine Glass Writers can help you keep tabs. Use the pens’ colorful, non-toxic ink to personalize a glass with a name, design, or message. Your guests will appreciate the personal touch, and you’ll eliminate those unidentified half-finished glasses of wine at the end of the night. Ink dries in just a few minutes and won’t smudge or rub off. Cleanup is simple with warm, soapy water. www.wineglasswriter.com

BOOKS q

NEW SPACES

If your shelves are filled with books about beverages like ours are, make room for these two new additions:

GRAPES OF THE HUDSON VALLEY AND OTHER COOL CLIMATE REGIONS OF THE UNITED STATES & CANADA J. Stephen Casscles Foreword by Kevin Zraly Preface by Eric Miller

Excerpted from a review by John Hudelson, Associate Professor of Global Wine Studies, Central Washington University:

Stephen Casscles has written a book that satisfies a number of needs of those who attempt to grow grapes east of the Mississippi and north of the MasonDixon Line. It is an excellent history of viticulture in the northeast United States, as well as an outstanding guide to most hybrid grape varieties that have succeeded in this sometimes inhospitable environment. As the author mentions in the preface, today all grapes are hybrids, or crosses, of numerous varieties. We think that Riesling, Chardonnay and Merlot are pure, but they probably have been around for only 500 to 1,000 years. The hybrids Casscles so excellently reviews in Grapes of the Hudson Valley were developed not by accident but on purpose during the 19th century, when French and American botanists

scrambled to find a solution to the phylloxera root-sucking insect that destroyed almost all of Europe’s vinifera vineyards. The later hybridizers, also covered in the book, did the same for other characteristics such as cold-heartiness and a high tolerance to the mildews so common in Eastern America. Grapes of the Hudson Valley is beautifully laid out in well-conceived chapters from the early labrusca crosses—including Concord, the most abundant grape in the Americas—to the Minnesota hybrids which can withstand near-Artic temperatures. Casscles’s writing is casual and often humorous, and as a hybridizer himself his opinions are not lacking. He is thorough to a point, covering all the common hybrids found in America and quite a few rare varieties which the budding vineyardist might take note of. Grapes of the Hudson Valley provides excellent reading not just for grape growers, but for Eastern American wine lovers in general. Flint Mine Press | $29.95

BUY IT NOW

Save the Date! Author signing at Sip & Sign on Sat. Nov. 14 | see page 69

THE HISTORY OF WINE IN 100 BOTTLES FROM BACCHUS TO BORDEAUX AND BEYOND Oz Clarke

In typical Oz Clarke style, the author shares his enthusiasm for wine and provides an entertaining and informative romp through the evolution of wine in one hundred bottles. But, as Clarke explains, this book is not as much about bottles, or even about wine history, as it is about stories with wine at their center. The journey begins more than eight thousand years ago with the Georgians, who made wine by stomping grapes in a hollowed-out tree trunk and fermented them—juice, skins, stems, and all—in clay and beeswax jars (and, interestingly, who were the first to dub the resulting wine, gvino). The book ends with a look at counterfeiting, circa 2014, and the anti-fraud measures now in play to protect the big business of fine wine. In between, the author has chronicled the most important people, discoveries, events, achievements, and innovations that have played significant roles in shaping the world of viticulture throughout the ages. facebook.com/hudsonvalleywinemagazine twitter.com/HVWineMagazine pinterest.com/HVWineMagazine

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HUDSON VALLEY WINE • Fall 2015

Arguably, like any book of “lists” there are bound to be differences in opinions about what constitutes a major milestone or warrants making the list, but Clarke has cleverly interwoven one hundred wine-centric stories that made the cut into a compelling

Hudson Valley Wine Magazine Fall 2015  

The Fall issue features little-known but really great reasons to visit the Hudson Valley's craft beverage producers; local ports; wine caves...

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