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HUDSON VALLEY + CAPITAL REGION

U LT IM ATE CIDER + APPLE SPIRITS

GUIDE PREMIER ISSUE — 2016 —

PRESENTED BY

M AG AZ I N E


ULTIMATE CIDER + APPLE SPIRITS GUIDE Volume 1 Issue 1 Premier 2016

ROBERT BEDFORD LINDA PIERRO PUBLISHERS LINDA PIERRO MANAGING EDITOR / DESIGN DIRECTOR

U LT IM ATE CIDER + APPLE SPIRITS

GUIDE

CHERYL ELKINS SUSAN O’DONNELL

FEATURES

ADVERTISING SALES ROBERT BEDFORD

Apple-icious Adventure Awaits

WENDY CRISPELL

By Wendy Crispell

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CONTRIBUTORS TRACI L. SUPPA

Hudson Valley Applejack

COPY EDITOR

By Robert Bedford

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ADvERTISINg INqUIRIES: Contact us at info@HVCiderGuide.com or 518-731-1332.

Events

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SUBSCRIPTIONS: Order at www.flintminepress.com

Directory + Map EDITORIAL CONTRIBUTIONS: We invite ideas for articles, photographs, letters and other contributions from readers. Write us at the address below or email info@HVCiderGuide.com. A manuscript or artwork submitted by mail should be accompanied by a self-addressed, pre-paid envelope if you would like it returned. We are not responsible for the return or loss of submissions. CONTACT US: Cider Guide / Hudson Valley Wine Magazine PO Box 353, Coxsackie, NY 12051 Phone: 518-731-1332 Email: info@HVCiderGuide.com VISIT US: www.HVCiderGuide.com

The ULTIMATE CIDER + APPLE SPIRITS GUIDE is published annually by Flint Mine Press, a division of Flint Mine Group, llc. ©2016 Flint Mine Group, llc. All rights reserved. Hudson Valley Wine and the Ultimate Cider + Apple Spirits Guide are trademarks of Flint Mine Group, llc. Material may not be reproduced in whole or in part in any form without written permission. No statement in this publication is to be construed as a recommendation. Every effort is made to avoid errors, misspellings and omissions. PLEASE DRINK RESPONSIBLY. PHOTO: Courtesy Applewood Winery

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Angry Orchard Bad Seed Cider Co. Joe Daddy’s Hard Cider Kettleborough Cider House Naked Flock Hard Cider Nine Pin Ciderworks Orchard Hill Cider Mill Pennings Farm Cidery Standard Cider Co. Weed Orchards & Winery APPLE WINE

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Christopher Jacobs Winery SPIRITS

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Harvest Spirits Tuthilltown Spirits Distillery


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Apples to Apples:

Apple-ici us Adventure Awaits By Wendy Crispell

H

istorically speaking, the noble apple has played an integral part in some of the most interesting stories, legends, and tall tales of the world. It tempted Adam and Eve, sent Snow White into a deep sleep, helped gain William Tell his freedom, and hit Isaac Newton in the head thus formulating the theory of gravitation while he was simply seeking some shade to enjoy a cup of tea. Today, a new apple-centric story is unfolding in the Hudson Valley and Capital Region. It involves the passion and dedication devoted to the revival of an ancient beverage, hard cider, the drink of choice on the early American dinner table. With New York ranking the second-largest apple growing state in the country, it should be no surprise that the region is riding high on the crest of American orchard cider. Discriminating consumers are discovering the small number of craft cider makers claiming a stake in the farm to glass movement. Interest in the gluten-free lifestyle has also helped hard cider, a naturally gluten-free beverage, gain momentum. Currently there are nearly thirty cider producers in the Hudson Valley and Capital Region, and many have tasting rooms located in the rolling hills and scenic vistas that the region is known for. What are you waiting for? Plan a visit to apple country. Stroll the orchards filled with majestic beauty. Experience the passion and dedication crafted into apple-icious delight. Be a part of the new cider story unfolding, and be enticed with a taste of authentic, modern apple history.

Flagship Favorites + Tasting Room Exclusives Some cideries specialize in particular styles or have a flagship brand that has proven to be a crowd pleaser. Others produce a dizzying array of choices available on tap in the tasting room, where you can find seasonal specialties, or one-offs awaiting critical acclaim.

WHAT A DIFFERENCE A NAME MAKES Hard cider in the Hudson Valley and Capital Region runs the gamut from pleasantly fruit-forward to tongue curling bone dry, or those with a bit of interesting funk. There is something for every taste, yet the finished product depends on a number of different factors, including the variety of apple used. The decision to use cider apples, culinary apples, or a carefully selected blend of both depends on the style of cider desired. Traditional cider apple varieties that are used in England, Spain, and France are becoming popular again in New York. Although once widely planted here, many of these orchards were ripped out during Prohibition due to the fact that the apples weren’t suitable for eating or baking. Known as “spitters” (because of their bitter, acrid taste) their higher sugar content made them perfect for hard cider, but not quite the right choice for daily munching or mom’s apple pie. According to Tim Dressel of Kettleborough Cider House (who uses both cider and culinary apples), there are certainly specific varieties that are considered more valuable than others for cider, but overall it’s more about their classification: sweet, bittersweet, bittersharp, and sharp. English and French style cider producers concern themselves with getting the right ratio of these four categories. Other cider makers prefer to use a blend of culinary or dessert apples that naturally contain less pectin and tannin. Scrumptious when freshly picked off the tree, these varieties produce hard cider that’s filled with local terroir. Many of these producers are sourcing apples from local family farms passed down from generation to generation. With thousands of different apple varieties available (some popular ones on page 4), it’s up to the individual cider maker to select the type of fruit that will create the balance of sweet, bitter, and sharp qualities they are looking for in the glass. Then the decision of finishing in steel, inert vessels, or oak comes into play, but more on that at another time!

Each tasting room is a unique experience filled with friendly, knowledgeable guides ready to help you navigate your cider journey. Read on for more about some of these unique producers and what influences their individual style. Whatever style your palate prefers, you’re sure to find a few new favorites.

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PHOTO: Karen Gardy

The abundance of fresh berries, herbs, and culinary genius in the region has led to sometimes geeky, yet tasty, experimentation. Collaborations with local distillers, coffee roasters, hop farms, and vineyards have resulted in wildly popular results.

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Fermenting Family History BAD SEED CIDER is the brainchild of

lifelong friends Albert Wilklow and Devin Britton. Devin’s love of home brewing and Albert’s gluten intolerance resulted in their first cider made with fruit from Wilklow Orchards, a six-generation family farm owned by Albert’s family. A range of dry hard cider and flavors are available in the tasting room with favorites including a bourbon barrel-aged cider, a Raspberry tasting room exclusive, and IPC (aka India Pale Cider), a true dry cider brewed with American Ale yeast and Cascade hops. For those fans of traditional IPAs and pale ales, this is the cider for you. A cold brew infused cider, a recent collaboration with a local coffee roaster, is quickly gaining an enthusiastic fan following. JOE DADDY’S CIDER is the newest

addition at Brookview Station Winery, where husband and wife team Ed Miller and Sue Goold Miller are no strangers to the orchard to glass movement. The winery was started in 2006 with their first wine made from apples sourced from the adjoining orchard, founded by Sue’s grandparents in 1910. Joe Daddy’s Cider is a semidry blend of culinary and cider apples using English yeast and years of experience to charm just the right blend of flavors from the Hudson Valley’s noble apple. Available on draft only in the tasting room with growlers to go, Joe Daddy’s Original, Apple Cranberry, and the seasonal Pomegranate ciders are making a splash in the cider world. KETTLEBOROUGH CIDER HOUSE

is owned and operated by one-man show

Tim Dressel, who had originally planned on a small farm winery. The cider movement, and the availability of fruit sourced from Dressel Farms owned by his family, caused a change in gears. As a participant in Glynwood’s 2011 cider exchange program in France, Tim’s cider has a French influence with the terroir of the Hudson Valley. Styles include a flagship Dry Cider, reminiscent of a clean and crisp Prosecco; Honey Honey, a slightly off-dry sweetened with local honey; and a Strawberry Cider made with berries from Dressel Farm. Kettleborough is a must-visit for seasoned cider drinkers and newbies looking to gain insight into small farmhouse cider production using only estate grown fruit. WEED ORCHARDS & WINERY is

a relative newcomer on the craft beverage scene, but this farm operation has been delighting U-Pickers with an array of fresh produce and homebaked goodness for decades. Fifth-generation owner John Weed along with his wife and daughters are now crafting their prize-winning fruit into ciders including Blueberry and just-picked Peach, both on the sweeter side of their semidry signature Homegrown Hard Cider. HARDSCRABBLE CIDER is new from

Harvest Moon Farm and Orchard, where they press and produce farm-to-bottle hard cider from apples picked on-site. Along with a lineup of classic American style ciders ranging from dry to sweet, this first generation family-owned farm also offers fresh eggs, grass-fed beef, pasteurized pork, seasonal produce, and other local goodies.

POPULAR CULINARY APPLES Wine Sap An American heirloom apple dating back to the 18th century, it can be eaten fresh but is primarily a baking apple, popular for juice and cider production. Empire With Red Delicious and McIntosh for parents, this apple was destined for greatness. Developed at Cornell University in the ’40s, its sweet-tart combination is at home in pies, tarts, lunch boxes, and in a glass.

Northern Spy This historic variety is as versatile as apples come. It can be served raw, baked, roasted, sauteed, or slow cooked. Perfect in classic apple preparations such as pies, tarts, cobblers and cider! Esopus Spitzenburg Named in the 1800s after the town in Ulster County, NY, this American variety is one that should appeal to European tastes. It has an aromatic flavor with dense yellow flesh, and the rich sharpness of a highquality dessert apple. Eating a Spitzenburg is a thoroughly enjoyable experience, and said to have been a favorite of Thomas Jefferson.

POPULAR CIDER APPLES Brown Snout A traditional hard cider variety discovered in 1850 in England, its name derives from the “brown eye” at the base of the apple. It produces a sweet, slightly astringent juice and makes a mild to medium bittersweet cider.

Bedan This bittersweet apple is one of the most favored in Normandy, used for cider and the famous Calvados brandy produced in the region. It’s known for its intriguing flavors, which can include notes of clove, banana, and licorice. Dabinett Hailing from England this is one of the easier bittersweet apples to grow, favored for its reliability to yield stellar fruit annually. It can be used to make a single variety cider, or blended.

Make a Day of It DOC’S DRAFT HARD CIDER from Warwick Valley Winery & Distillery was the first hard cider introduced to the Hudson Valley more than twenty years ago. Today, a range of seasonal ciders and apple-based spirits can be paired with a relaxing day away. Features include an on-site cafe, informative tastings, and an endless roster of events. Take a sip and savor the beginnings of New York’s craft cider movement! NAKED FLOCK CIDER at Applewood Winery was founded by Jonathan Hull, who sources fruit from his family’s orchard, named “Apple Dave” after his father, a trained Pomologist. The highly-prized Naked Flock Cider, with its eye-catching label and zany backstory (see page 16),

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has a dedicated following both in the tasting room and beyond. The Original, made with Champagne yeast and sweetened with local honey, and Draft style, made with Belgian yeast and finished with maple syrup, are balanced and refreshing. In the tasting room, a selection of drafts are available for sampling and to go in growlers. Seasonal favorites and experimental flavors such as Pumpkin, Black Tea, and Currant Saison await, in addition to a line of red and white wines. Food pairings at the Cider Café, weekend festivities, and general merriment are abundant at this cider destination. PENNINGS FARM CIDERY is part

farm stand, pub, hop farm, orchard, grill, cider tasting room and music venue.

Pennings offers something for everyone in the family including hard cider on tap, and in a number of housemade specialties, such as cider-infused pulled pork and onion soup made from local Black Dirt onions. A dedication to keeping it local keeps the Pennings family busy innovating new ways to showcase their own products along with the best of what the Hudson Valley has to offer. It’s the perfect day trip destination. Tour the farm, bring the kids to Pennings’ petting zoo, sample American farmhouse cider and beer, settle in for lunch or dinner, and shop for locally grown fruits and veggies, baked goods, and cheeses before you go.


Age Worthy Bottle Beauties ORCHARD HILLS CIDER MILL, located next to the Soons Orchard farm store, produces elegant ciders and a decidedly different apple aperitif, both with a nod to French style. Their Red Label Cider is a stellar example of second fermentation in the bottle. Red Label is a dry, crisp champagne-style cider with fine bubbles and delicate flavors, drinking beautifully on release, or aged for a few years to gain a bit of savory complexity. A must-try is their Ten 66 Gold Label, a single-barrel Pommeau that combines apple brandy with freshly pressed apple juice, then aged nine years in French oak. This advantageous marriage of apple-based products creates a magical elixir that must be tasted to be believed.

Creative, Modern Flavor Flair ANGRY ORCHARD was founded as an R&D facility and tasting

room owned by The Boston Beer Company. Head cider maker Ryan Burk favors the English cider style using a blend of culinary and cider apples. An impressive barrel room houses experimental ciders taking a nap in used bourbon, cognac, red wine, and sauterne casks, as well as crisp styles aged in stainless steel. While Angry Orchard’s Crisp Apple flagship cider is widely available, a number of specialties will only be available on-site. Standouts include Wooden Sleeper, aged for five months in bourbon barrels, and Dear Brittany, a wild ferment aged in cognac barrels. There is a style for every palate here with many new releases planned. NINE PIN CIDERWORKS is popular with both city dwellers and visitors seeking New York farm flavor. Founder Alejandro del Peral uses only locally grown fruit (pressed in the orchard) to craft a head-spinning selection of cider in an urban setting. Signature, their flagship slightly off-dry cider is tasty and refreshing, but quirky, experimental ciders are something not to be missed here. Cardamom, sarsaparilla, dandelion, black walnut, aloe, and rye and rum barrels are just a few things used to create buzz-worthy ciders available in the tasting room. Must-tries include the Cider Monster, made with 87 different apple varieties; and any of the yarrow-infused ciders. The plan this year is to release 26 different ciders in a two-week rotation. Frequent visitors can sign up to become a “26er” – a cider club of sorts that includes a challenge to sample all 26 flavors!

Be a True Believer STANDARD CIDER is produced by Brotherhood, America’s Oldest Winery, where you can wander the historic hand-dug cellars, tour the grounds, and settle in for a glass and a bite at the Vinum Café. Standard Ciders are made from fresh apple juice sourced from 100% culinary apples and finished in stainless steel (with the exception of the Reserve) to achieve a fresh American style. Favorites include True Companion, a rich, slightly sweet sparkling cider produced with the addition of ginger. Its sweet and spicy ending is the perfect companion for sushi, Thai, or Indian cuisine. Rebel Reserve, their barrel-aged cider, is smooth, deliciously off dry, with a full, juicy finish, and just the thing to serve with smoky BBQ or hard cheeses.

GETTING HERE: TOURS + TRANSPORTATION

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CIDER RIDER Seasonal tours from NYC | www.sourfishevents.com THE LITTLE WINE BUS Private tours and tastings from NYC and the Hudson Valley | www.thelittlewinebus.com FARM TO GLASS TOURS Customized, educational visits to producers in the upper Hudson Valley | www.farmtoglasstours.com

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Cheesy Collaborations, Perfect Pairings! It’s no coincidence that the world’s best cider regions are also known for their cheeses. Here in the Hudson Valley and Capital Region there are a number of creameries producing cheeses that create magical combinations when paired with local hard ciders, and many are available in tasting rooms, farm stores and markets.

Cocktail Corner Artisanal hard cider is refreshing straight up, but it also shines in these classic cocktails blended with local craft spirits.

HUDSON DARK AND STORMY In general, drier styles of cider pair well with mild, fresh goat cheeses, while off-dry, fruit infused or barrel-aged styles favor cheddars and Gouda. Sweeter-style ciders, and Orchard Hill’s Pommeau, are the perfect ending to any meal accompanied with a spicy blue cheese. Some cideries are collaborating with local dairies and cheese caves to create their own special cheeses. Try one of the following for an ideal marriage of cider and cheese: Nine Pin Ciderworks has recently teamed up with Nettle Meadows Farm to create Pins and Nettles, a mixed goat and cow’s milk tomme washed with cider, then rubbed with bright green tarragon and sea salt. It’s a delicious, crumbly, hard cheese with ginger undertones. A seasonal favorite from Murray’s Cheese in NYC is Little Big Apple (below) using apple leaves from Warwick Valley Winery’s orchard. After soaking the leaves in apple brandy, they are wrapped around a triple crème tomme and aged in caves on Bleeker Street in the West Village. If you’re lucky enough to score a piece of this, sit down and pour yourself a glass of Warwick’s Black Dirt Apple Jack or their aged American Fruits Apple Liqueur. Pure perfection! Consider Bardwell Farm Slyboro is a raw goat milk cheese, washed in hard cider from Slyboro Cider House in Granville. Aged for about two months, this cheese has sweet grassy notes and a hint of apple lingering on the rind. Local cheeses are also available at Bad Seed Cider Co., Brookview Station Winery, Applewood Winery, and Nine Pin Ciderworks. Discover your own favorite pairings with the region’s ciders and recreate the experience at home!

1 ounce Taconic Rum 4 ounces Nine Pin Ginger cider Fill a tall glass with ice. Add rum and top with cider. Stir and garnish with a lime wedge.

APPLE ROYALE

4 ounces of your favorite dry hard cider 1/2 ounce local cassis or black currant liqueur Fill a flute glass with chilled cider. Add cassis and garnish with a lemon peel.

EASTSIDE

2 ounces Applewood Gin 1 ounce Naked Flock Citra cider 3/4 ounce simple syrup 8 mint leaves 2 slices cucumber Lightly muddle cucumber and mint leaves in a shaker. Add the liquid ingredients and shake well. Strain into a chilled glass and garnish with a thin slice of cucumber.

r o v a S

The Hudson Valley

FREE E TIME? Actually, it’s priceless. Make sur sure e you’r you’re e spending it wisely. Come the Hudson Valley. Valley. a Distinctly Dutchess getaways Include local bounty, awar d-winning wines, farmers’ far mers’ markets, specialty food award-winning stitute of America, and d multi-ethnic m lti th i rrestaurants. estaurants. shops, The Culinary Institute

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dutchesstourism.com dutchesstourism.com


ANGRY ORCHARD

A BOUT US

Established 2011

THE CIDER MAKERS at Angry Orchard have been experimenting with apple varieties, ingredients and aging processes to develop hard cider recipes for more than 20 years. The cider making team has traveled the world to find the best apples for cider making and to choose specific varieties based on each cider’s desired flavor profile. In fall 2015, Angry Orchard opened a new home for research and development, the Innovation Cider House, on its historic 60-acre apple orchard in Walden, NY. Here, the cider makers will continue to drive experimentation, and drinkers are welcome to visit for samples of exclusive ciders made on-site. Despite the recent growth of hard cider in the US, and the prevalence of cider in the Hudson Valley, the category is still small and relatively unknown. Angry Orchard is committed to drinker education and awareness-building to help grow the category for all craft cider makers. As part of the experience at the Innovation Cider House, drinkers are invited to take a self-guided tour that features vintage cider making equipment, an interactive exhibit about the history of cider in the US, as well as an in-depth look at the cider making process. Visitors will then spiral down through the cider production area to experience how cider is made firsthand, including experimental small batch and barrel-aged ciders from Angry Orchard’s cider makers. Finally, guests will make their way into the tasting room where drinkers 21+ can sample a complimentary flight of three Angry Orchard ciders while enjoying the scenic view from outside on the lawn, next to the fire pit, or at the rustic table tops of the taproom. Angry Orchard makes a variety of year-round craft cider styles, including Angry Orchard Crisp Apple, a crisp and refreshing fruit-forward cider that blends the sweetness of culinary apples with dryness and bright acidity from bittersweet apples for a balanced flavor profile. Angry Orchard also makes The Cider House Collection specialty ciders, as well as a variety of seasonal ciders. The Angry Orchard is open for tours and tastings – check www.angryorchard.com/ our-orchard/visit-our-orchard for details on special events as well as dates, hours and directions. To find where Angry Orchard hard cider is served near you, visit the “cider finder” at www.angryorchard.com/find-angry-orchard/.

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MEET THE CIDER MAKER RYAN BURK

Ryan Burk is Angry Orchard’s head cider maker, based on-site at the Angry Orchard in the Hudson Valley. Ryan’s New York roots run deep. He grew up in Upstate New York and began hanging out on orchards around age six. He has always been interested in making cider and brewing beer, and experimented with both of these crafts during college and even after, during his brief stint in law school. After realizing that his passion was in making hard cider, Ryan decided to leave law school in favor of brewing school. Prior to joining the Angry Orchard team, Ryan racked up years of professional craft cider making experience, with a particular focus on cider barrel aging and varying fermentation processes.

. . . SAMPLE A COMPLIMENTARY FLIGHT ENJOYING THE SCENIC VIEW FROM OUTSIDE ON THE LAWN, NEXT TO THE FIRE PIT, OR AT THE RUSTIC TABLE TOPS OF THE TAPROOM.


IN THE SPOTLIGHT THE ORCHARD GLASS

Cider is a unique beverage that walks a line somewhere between wine and beer. And while there are many glasses out there, developed to enhance the flavor of wine or craft beer, the cider makers couldn’t find a glass they felt did the same for craft cider. The cider making team decided to enlist the help of several cider and sensory experts to create a new glass from scratch, specifically designed for the unique, fresh apple flavor profile of Angry Orchard’s most popular cider, Crisp Apple. The end result of the project, the Orchard Glass, enhances the cider’s crisp, fruit forward, fresh apple taste and aroma. The Orchard Glass will be available at select bars and restaurants around the country that serve Angry Orchard. Purchase your own Orchard Glass at Angry Orchard’s e-store: www.angryorchardstore.com.

THE ESSENTIALS NAME ANgRY ORCHARD 

CLOSED New Year’s Day, Easter, Thanksgiving, Christmas, Mondays, Tuesdays

ADDRESS 2241 Albany Post Rd. Walden, NY 12586

TASTING FEE None

SIGNATURE PRODUCTS PHONE 845-713-5180

TOURS Donation based

GREEN APPLE

EMAIL TourRequests@angryorchard.com

FARM ACREAGE 66 acres

STONE DRY

WEBSITE www.angryorchard.com

MANAGER Jamie Corrao

OPEN Late April–Nov Wed–Sun: 11am–6pm

CIDER MAKERS Ryan Burk, head cider maker Anna Hasan, assistant cider maker

CRISP APPLE

ORCHARD'S EDGE KNOTTY PEAR ORCHARD'S EDGE OLD FASHIONED CIDER HOUSE COLLECTION WALDEN HOLLOW

EVENTS: OCTOBER 15

Haunted Orchard Festival (ticketed event)

MONTHLY OPEN HOUSE

Check our website for dates

SEASONAL SUMMER HONEY

FOLLOW US:

Visit our website for updates on events

/AngryOrchard @AngryOrchard @angryorchard #ExploreTheOrchard

GETTING HERE FROM I-84: Exit 5 to Albany Post Road at the intersection of Route 52.

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BAD SEED CIDER CO.

AB OUT US

Established 2011

IT’S THE KIND OF IDEA you get after a few drinks at the local pub. “Hey, let’s start a cider company!” Then it’s forgotten the next day. But Albert Wilklow and Devin Britton, two guys in Highland, NY, actually followed through with it.

MEET THE CIDER MAKERS

It didn’t hurt that Albert was a sixth generation apple farmer, and Devin enjoyed brewing and fermenting anything that sounded like it had promise to make a tasty beverage. But ever since the summer of 2011, when these two childhood friends banded together with meager savings and a love of cider, they have been crafting, selling, and talking everything cider. It’s their pastime, their passion, their life.

DEVIN BRITTON

Since the beginning, they have always had a single-minded goal to bring handcrafted, truly dry cider to the world. The Bad Seed tap room has a unique atmosphere, and the unique bar menu offers up tempting small bites that pair brilliantly with its unique ciders. It spans two floors, and offers a wide selection of ciders, all geared towards one goal – to advance the craft cider industry by combining both old and new cider techniques and craft beer influences. It’s not uncommon at Bad Seed to taste a cider fermented with an American Ale yeast and dry-hopped, next to a traditional dry French-style cider, or a raspberry cider made with raspberries grown right on the farm. Bad Seed ciders are made from 100% fresh pressed apples grown on this sixth generation family farm. There’s no alchemy involved – after all this is cider, not science. You won’t find the endless list of chemicals, artificial sweeteners, and excuses on a Bad Seed label, because they aren’t used.

IT’S NOT UNCOMMON AT BAD SEED TO TASTE A CIDER FERMENTED WITH AN AMERICAN ALE YEAST AND DRY-HOPPED, NEXT TO A TRADITIONAL DRY FRENCH-STYLE CIDER, OR A RASPBERRY CIDER . . .

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“I like to drink cider.” That’s Devin Britton’s mantra; the Bad Seed cider maker says it several times over the course of a tour of Bad Seed’s facility. His more than 10 years of crafting ciders has done nothing to dampen his enthusiasm for downing a cider or three. It’s what drives him to create new twists on classic styles. His signature Bad Seed Cider? “The IPC, our hopped cider. It’s really dry, but I basically dry-hop the hell out of it with two additions of big American hops, so it has a neat, hoppy aroma, and some fruity, tropical flavors.” ALBERT THE FARMER

“Because Bad Seed is located on our apple orchard, we source fruit as much as possible from our own farm,” Albert says. “So, when we make something and say it’s locally handcrafted, it means we’ve picked it, we’ve processed it – it’s literally gone from fruit to glass right here.” His signature Bad Seed Cider? “The Original Dry, absolutely. It’s light and dry, actually dry with 0 grams of sugar.”


IN THE SPOTLIGHT TAP ROOM WEEKENDS

It’s been quite a ride to get the tap room doors open, but Bad Seed offers a plethora of rotating cider taps at two bars. Stop in and see what’s new.

TOURS

If it’s a tour you’re after, they run every Saturday and Sunday, from September 1st to November 1st. Just come on in – Bad Seed likes to pull back the curtain and show you how they do things. Taking you from the orchard to the bottling room, they cover it all.

SIGNATURE PRODUCTS

BOURBON BARREL RESERVE CIDER ORIGINAL DRY HARD CIDER IPC (INDIA PALE CIDER) APPLE PIE DRY CIDER RASPBERRY HARD CIDER

THE ESSENTIALS NAME BAD SEED CIDER CO. ADDRESS 43 Baileys gap Rd. Highland, NY 12528

TOURS $10.00 Sept–Oct 

EMAIL badseedcider@yahoo.com

FARM ACREAGE 200+

WEBSITE www.BadSeedCider.com

PRODUCTION 5,000 cases

OPEN April–Aug  Sun: 12–6pm Sept–Dec  Sat–Sun: 12–6pm

OWNERS Albert Wilklow, Devin Britton

SEPT–OCT

FROM I-87: Exit 18 (New Paltz/Poughkeepsie)  to NY-299 E. Continue 2.3 miles and turn right onto Highland-Lloyd Rd./New Paltz Rd. Turn right onto Pancake Hollow Rd. Drive 2.8 miles then make slight left onto Baileys gap Rd. Follow Baileys gap Rd. to Bad Seed Cider on the left.

TASTING FEES Tasting paddle – $10.00

PHONE 845-236-0956

EVENTS:

GETTING HERE

CLOSED New Year’s Day, Easter, Thanksgiving, Christmas

CIDER MAKERS Albert Wilklow, Devin Britton

FOLLOW US: Cider Tours

/badseedcider

FARM MARKETS:

@badseedcider

Fort Greene Park, Brooklyn

@badseedcider

Grand Army Plaza, Brooklyn

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JOE DADDY’S HARD CIDER

A BOUT US

Established 2013

THE GOOLD ORCHARD STORY began in April of 1910 when James and Bertha Goold arrived by rail at a small train station in Brookview, NY – the Brookview Station. Together they walked a mile to the apple farm they had recently purchased. During the mid-1970s Goold Orchards expanded the business and began pressing and distributing fresh apple cider year-round. The Brookview Station Winery was added in 2006 by third generation owner Sue Goold Miller and her husband Edward. When they opened the doors there was just one wine, an apple wine. That year, “Whistle Stop White” was chosen over 70 others and was awarded the Cornell Cup as the Best Wine in the Hudson River Region. Since then the winery has added 12 additional wines and a line of Joe Daddy’s Hard Ciders. Next time you’re visiting the farm and winery, stop by the tasting room for a free sample of Joe Daddy’s English Style cider, Apple Cranberry, or one of Joey’s specialty hard cider blends. “As year-round cider producers, Ed and I enjoy seeing the resurgence of both fresh cider and hard cider markets,” says Sue Goold Miller of Goold Orchards, a third generation apple grower. “It’s very exciting to have apple farming and cider processing back in the spotlight.”

NEXT TIME YOU’RE VISITING THE FARM AND WINERY, STOP BY THE TASTING ROOM FOR A FREE SAMPLE OF JOE DADDY’S ENGLISH STYLE CIDER, APPLE CRANBERRY CIDER, OR ONE OF JOEY’S SPECIALTY HARD CIDER BLENDS.

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MEET THE CIDER MAKERS JOE CICCOLELLA

For more than 35 years, Joe Ciccolella has been the cider master and packhouse foreman at Goold Orchards. Joe inspects all of the fruit grown and pressed in the cider mill making certain it is a premium fresh blended cider. What Joe, aka “Joe Daddy,” knows about fruit and cider making could only come with his many years of experience. JOE MOLESKY

In 2012, Joe Molesky, a jack-of-all-trades in the tasting room, wanted to try his hand at making hard cider. After all, the home brewers have long known that if they timed their hard cider making just right, Joe C. would fill their ferment buckets with fresh cider. So, why not give it a go? “Cidermaster Joe” blended a batch of his fresh cider and Joe M. went to work fermenting. Several months—and a dozen or so test batches later—Joe Daddy’s Hard Cider by Brookview Station was introduced. Joe M. makes two kinds of hard cider year-round and one specialty cider that changes seasonally.


IN THE SPOTLIGHT HOPPIN' JOEY HOPPED HARD CIDER

Hoppin’ Joey is a triple-hopped hard cider. Guests like to refer to it as an IPA hard cider – great golden color, beautiful citrus-floral bouquet. It’s wildly popular. One of the most notable things about Hoppin’ Joey is that it is incredibly smooth. People don’t realize how many different varieties of hops are grown right here in New York. The hops that are blended for this cider are not in any way like a bitter beer hops, and that really surprises people.

THE ESSENTIALS

SIGNATURE PRODUCTS

ENGLISH STYLE ALE CIDER APPLE CRANBERRY HARD CIDER HOPPIN’ JOEY HOPPED HARD CIDER APPLE WINES WHISTLE STOP WHITE SUNSET CHARLIE (ROSÉ) POMONA (APPLE-PEAR)

NAME JOE DADDY’S HARD CIDER ADDRESS 1297 Brookview Station Rd. Castleton, NY 12033

CLOSED New Year’s Day, Easter, Memorial Day,  Independence Day, Thanksgiving,  Christmas

PHONE 518-732-7317

TASTING FEES $6.00–$8.00  Private/group Tastings: By appointment only, price varies

WEBSITE www.brookviewstationwinery.com

TOURS No

OPEN Jan–Aug  Mon–Fri: 10am–4:30pm Sat: 10am–4pm Sept–Dec  Mon–Sun: 9am–5pm

FARM ACREAGE 100 acres OWNER Sue goold Miller, Ed Miller CIDER MAKERS Joe Ciccolella, Joe Molesky

GETTING HERE FROM I-87 [NYC]: Exit 21A (Castleton Thruway Bridge) to Exit B1. Continue on I-90 west toward Albany to Exit 11. Make a right onto Rts. 9 & 20 South. At stop light, make a right onto Rt. 150 South & West. Turn at the first left onto S. Old Post Road. Continue to the next right, Brookview Station Road. 

EVENTS:

FROM I-87 [AREAS NORTH]: Exit 7 (Alt. Rt. 7) and follow signs for Troy/Watervliet. Continue on Rt. 7 to Exit for I-787 South to I-90 East (Boston). Continue on I-90 East to exit 11E. At stop light, make a right onto Rt. 150 South & West, then follow directions above. 

FOLLOW US:

MAY 28–29

Annual Hudson Berkshire Wine & Food Festival

SEPT 3

Apple picking begins

SEPT 17

Joe Daddy's Classic Car Show (rain date Sept 26)

OCT 8–9

28th Apple Festival & Craft Show (featuring NY Wine Tent)

OCT 15

Joe Daddy's Sweet Cider Flow 5k

OCT 16

Halloween Pets on Parade

/Brookviewstation winery @gooldorchards

CIDER GUIDE • Premier 2016

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KETTLEBOROUGH CIDER HOUSE

AB OUT US

Established 2011

KETTLEBOROUGH CIDER HOUSE originated on Dressel Farms in New Paltz, NY, and began producing small-batch hard cider in 2012. After graduating from Cornell in 2007, Tim Dressel originally intended to open a craft winery, and immediately began growing wine grapes. While waiting for the new vineyard to come to maturity, the hard cider craze began sweeping the nation. Given how many apples Dressel Farms grew, it seemed only logical to shift attention from wine to hard cider. The winery dream never went away, however, and its ciders are noticeably influenced by winemaking techniques and styles. The mentality behind Kettleborough’s cidermaking practices is firmly rooted (pun intended) in its orchard-centric approach. Dressel Farms has been growing highquality apples for more than 60 years, so the makers understand that without good fruit, good cider isn’t possible. Ask any cider (or wine) maker and they’ll tell you that proper chemistry in their juice can make or break the final product. Kettleborough relies heavily on a scientific methodology to agriculture and cidermaking – working closely with Cornell Extension horticulturalists, pomologists, and entomologists to make sure it utilizes the most effective and sustainable growing techniques available today. Ironically, it has also planted numerous heirloom apple varieties that have been recently resurrected from near extinction for their superior hard cider qualities. While it’s easy to say that Kettleborough is out to make America a cider-drinking country again, its goal is simply to bring the best product possible to its customers. It’s still a very small operation, providing the advantage of freedom to experiment and create the way it wants to on its own agenda. Kettleborough believes that by making quality ciders and educating consumers on the dynamic range of flavors and styles that ciders can bring, it can ensure a bright future for hard cider in the USA.

DRESSEL FARMS HAS BEEN GROWING HIGH-QUALITY APPLES FOR MORE THAN 60 YEARS, SO THE MAKERS UNDERSTAND THAT WITHOUT GOOD FRUIT, GOOD CIDER ISN’T POSSIBLE.

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MEET THE OWNER TIM DRESSEL

Tim Dressel is a fourth generation apple grower on Dressel Farms in New Paltz, NY. He graduated from Cornell University’s College of Agriculture and Life Sciences in 2007 and returned to work on the family farm. While attending Cornell he developed an appreciation for the wine industry that thrives in the Finger Lakes, and wanted to bring the craft fermenting business home with him. He began experimenting with five-gallon batches of hard cider in his parents’ basement. They were not good. With some trial and error, along with instruction from a local winemaker, he finally began making something palatable – and Kettleborough Cider House was born.


IN THE SPOTLIGHT NEW PRODUCTION FACILITY

2016 will be the first full year of fermenting in Kettleborough’s newly-built production facility. Prior to this building, its volume capacity was drastically limited and innovation was nearly impossible. With the dramatic increase in space, Kettleborough will not only be able to produce more of the existing flavors, but have the ability to develop new, unique and exciting ciders that will define its place in the Hudson Valley cider scene.

THE ESSENTIALS NAME KETTLEBOROUgH CIDER HOUSE, llc

TASTING FEE $5.00

ADDRESS 277 State Route 208 New Paltz, NY 12561

TOURS No

PHONE 845-255-7717

SIGNATURE PRODUCTS

DRY CIDER HONEY HONEY CIDER PICNIC KNOLL WHITE STRAWBERRY CIDER

EMAIL info@kettleboroughciderhouse.com WEBSITE www.newpaltzcider.com OPEN Sept–Oct only Sat–Sun: 10–5pm

FARM ACREAGE 450 acres PRODUCTION 1,000 cases OWNER Tim Dressel MANAGER Kristin Dressel CIDER MAKER Tim Dressel

CLOSED New Year’s Day, Easter Thanksgiving, Christmas

EVENTS: Visit our website or facebook page

FOLLOW US:

/kettleborough

for updates on events

@newpaltzcider

GETTING HERE FROM I-87: Exit 18 (New Paltz). Turn left onto Route 299. Continue through New Paltz and turn left onto Route 208. Continue on Route 208 for about 2.5 miles to Dressel Farms.

@kettleboroughcider

CIDER GUIDE • Premier 2016

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NAKED FLOCK HARD CIDER

AB OUT US

Established 1996

NAKED FLOCK HARD CIDER is proud to be a pioneer in the Craft Beverage movement in the Hudson Valley. The company began making hard cider in 1996. “We’re introducing people to a true Hudson Valley hard cider,” says Jonathan Hull, creator of Naked Flock Hard Cider. “Our cider is for people who crave unique flavor and are on the hunt for quality.” When he created Naked Flock Hard Cider, the goal was to make a more natural style, and move away from the commercial ciders. Naked Flock Hard Cider began with two styles: Original, made with a Champagne yeast and local wildflower honey; and Draft, made with a Belgian Trappist Ale yeast and a hint of organic maple syrup. Later a seasonal Pumpkin was added, made with fresh roasted sugar pumpkins. In 2013, a Citra cider was made with Citra hops that produce a drier taste with a burst of citrus in the finish. Many have said it’s like an IPA meets a cider. The ciders are made from a blend of 100% locally grown Hudson Valley apples. Naked Flock Hard Cider isn’t made from apple juice concentrate and water, but from fresh pressed Hudson Valley apples. “That’s why you get a big apple nose when you open a bottle,” says Hull. As the cider market continues to grow, so does the Naked Flock. New flavors are always introduced, such as Lemon Ginger, Currant Saison, Black Tea, and Carrot Juice, that push the edges of how people think about cider. On any weekend in the tasting room, you can find a minimum selection of six styles on tap. Cider is offered by the glass, growler fills, bottles, and cans. Where does the name Naked Flock come from? It’s a story in local folklore about a local pastor who received a gift of poppy seeds from Moby Dick author Herman Melville. Geese got into the flowers and passed out in the field. Thought dead, they were plucked for their feathers. They awoke and staggered around naked, creating quite a stir in the pastor’s own flock, who demanded they be put down. But the pastor stood his ground. “The name is a tribute to our town and the pastor who celebrated the surprises in life,” added Hull.

ON ANY WEEKEND IN THE TASTING ROOM, YOU CAN FIND A MINIMUM SELECTION OF SIX STYLES ON TAP. CIDER IS OFFERED BY THE GLASS, GROWLER FILLS, BOTTLES AND CANS.

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MEET THE OWNERS Jonathan and Michele Hull are the owners of Naked Flock. Jonathan, the cidermaster, grew up on the family farm at Applewood. After living in New York City and graduating from New York University he returned to his agricultural roots. The idea of starting a winery and cidery was beginning to ferment. In 2012, after graduating from Cornell University, son Dylan Hull joined the family business. Dylan is responsible for introducing Naked Flock to the public, through restaurants, bars, and retail shops across New York and New Jersey. He attends craft cider events, offering tastings and finding out what people want. This enables him to work with Jonathan developing new styles and flavors. On a quest to define what a true Hudson Valley cider is, Hull says, “Hudson Valley cider should have a Hudson Valley taste. I’m not defining what a Hudson Valley taste is, but it should reflect the terroir and the culture. We are far more experimental in our approach than Old World ciders.”


IN THE SPOTLIGHT 2ND ANNUAL NAKED FLOCK SUMMER OF CIDER EVENT

Naked Flock Hard Cider celebrates Hudson Valley Cider Week with its 2nd Annual Summer of Cider event on June 11–12 from 12:00–5:00pm. Naked Flock Hard Cider will feature up to ten artisanal ciders available on tap, flights, growler fills and bottles. Special Cider “cocktails” like the Citra Mojito, Lemon Ginger Splash, and Blackberry Fizz will be served, along with cider-friendly treats from the café. The events will also feature tastings from local breweries, craft cocktails from local distilleries, and live music from Orange County’s own Black Dirt Bandits and Elizabeth Browne. Celebrate the Summer of Cider with the Flock. Beaks down, Bottoms Up!

SIGNATURE PRODUCTS

ORIGINAL DRAFT

CITRA

SEASONAL LEMON GINGER CURRANT SAISON PUMPKIN LIMITED/ROTATING “CIDER OF THE WEEKEND”

THE ESSENTIALS NAME NAKED FLOCK HARD CIDER ADDRESS 82 Four Corners Rd. Warwick, NY 10990 PHONE 845-988-9292 EMAIL info@applewoodwinery.com WEBSITE applewoodwinery.com OPEN Mar–Apr/Nov–Dec Fri–Sun: 11am–5pm May–Aug  Wed–Sun: 11am–5pm July–Aug  Wed–Fri, Sun: 11am–5pm Sat: 11am–6pm Sept–Oct:  Daily, 11am–5pm

CLOSED New Year’s Day, Easter Thanksgiving, Christmas TASTING FEES $6.00 $8.00 with glass TOURS No FARM ACREAGE 10 acres OWNERS Jonathan and Michele Hull CIDER MAKER Jonathan Hull

EVENTS:

FOLLOW US:

JUNE 11–12

Summer of Cider

GETTING HERE

JULY–AUG

Naked Flock Summer Concert Series

FROM I-87: Exit 16 (Harriman) for NY-17 W to Exit 127 greycourt Rd. Follow signs to Sugar Loaf and Warwick. Continue on CR-13 past Sugar Loaf for 3 miles, then turn right on Four Corners Road and proceed 1 mile. Entrance is on the left.

JULY 30–31 Bounty of the Hudson AUG 6–7

Smokin’ Grate BBQ & Blues

FARM MARKETS:

/nakedflock @nakedflock @nakedflock

Warwick Valley Farmers Market, Warwick

CIDER GUIDE • Premier 2016

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NINE PIN CIDERWORKS

AB OUT US

Established 2013

NINE PIN CIDERWORKS has its origins in the premier apple growing regions of the upper Hudson Valley where founder and cider maker Alejandro del Peral was raised. After graduating from McGill University in Montreal with a Biology degree, and working on a Masters Degree in Hydrology, Alejandro became enthralled and devoted to creating liquid art from science and local terroir. The idea of connecting the amazing orchards that had surrounded him where he was raised and his cider making skills deeply resonated with him. He returned to the upper Hudson Valley with true passion, eager to pull all of his knowledge together to create a true terroir-focused New York State cider. After convincing his family that his vision was supported by a solid plan, his mother, Sonya del Peral, signed on. Alejandro’s enthusiasm proved contagious. Creating Nine Pin Ciderworks was the culmination of his various life paths and Alejandro is honored to be able to work with family, friends and the world class orchards in the Capital Region. In 2013, using farm fresh fruit, including apples grown from seed on his small family farm, Alejandro began crafting his awardwinning Nine Pin New York Hard Cider at 929 Broadway in Albany. Nine Pin Ciderworks became New York State’s first licensed Farm Cidery and New York’s first urban cidery in February 2014. Nine Pin’s cider apples come from within 20 miles of its cidery in New York’s Capital, making it truly New York and a shining beacon of sincere localism. Nine Pin’s cider makers are dedicated to creating exceptional off-dry ciders, and to the orchards that make them possible including its partner, Samascott Orchards, Lyndseys Orchard, and Rogers Family Farm. Apple varieties are carefully selected and blended to achieve a complex, balanced flavor with a clean and pleasantly drinkable finish. Under New York State’s Farm Cidery law, Nine Pin was authorized to open its tasting room in Albany’s Warehouse District. Nine Pin sponsors the Gathering of the Farm Cideries each year at its facility, bringing together other New York Farm Cideries for a tasting and market event in celebration of the Farm Cidery law. In its tasting room, Nine Pin offers cider enthusiasts the opportunity to explore a range of ciders with its rotating selection of small batch experimental specialty ciders. Because of Nine Pin’s fortunate pairing with its distributor, Remarkable Liquids, Nine Pin ciders are now available throughout New York State. Recent developments at the cidery include the introduction of the Nine Pin can in both its Signature and Ginger styles. Nine Pin was instrumental in the creation of the Albany Craft Beverage Trail in 2015. In 2016, Nine Pin will expand its tasting room to foster local interest and encourage increased cider tourism.

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MEET THE CIDER MAKERS ALEJANDRO DEL PERAL

Named as the 2015 Local Hero Beverage Artisan by the readers of Edible Hudson Valley, Alejandro’s intense focus is the art and science of cider making. Born in Hudson, New York, Alejandro, 29, grew up on a family farm where his father started a small orchard from seed. Before starting Nine Pin Cider, Alejandro traveled extensively and his exposure to various food traditions continues to inform his experimental cider making. ETHAN WILLSIE

Cider maker Ethan Willsie, 27, was born and raised in the Helderberg Hilltowns, where he still resides today in the historic village of Rensselaerville. With a background in history, Ethan is interested in traditional styles and techniques of cidermaking. Ethan provides all of the hops used at Nine Pin which he cultivates on his family's farm. JACOB PLATEL

Jacob Platel, 25, of Delmar, New York, was born and raised in the Capital Region within a stone’s throw of countless orchards. Little did he know that his childhood passion for fresh-pressed cider and doughnuts would gracefully mesh with his keen interest in brewing and fermentation.


IN THE SPOTLIGHT SAME GREAT TASTE, NOW IN A CAN!

The availability of Nine Pin Cider in a can reflects Nine Pin’s innovative style. Perfect for the outdoor enthusiast, Nine Pin’s sleek, lightweight can travels easily and the new packaging serves as a great alternative when glass is undesirable or prohibited such as on hikes or at concerts. The Nine Pin name hails from the legend of Rip Van Winkle who drank so much cider during a game of ninepins hidden away in the Catskills that he fell asleep for 20 years. Nine Pin cans have already been featured by Nine Pin enthusiasts on New York mountaintops far and wide.

THE ESSENTIALS NAME NINE PIN CIDERWORKS ADDRESS 929 Broadway Albany, NY 12207

SIGNATURE PRODUCTS

SIGNATURE BELGIAN

GINGER BLUEBERRY

LIMITED RELEASE RASPBERRY FRUIT OF THE FOREST WILLSIE DRY HOP HUNNY PEAR THE IDARED

FROM I-90: Exit for 787 South to Colonie Street exit; turn right on Colonie Street, right on Erie Boulevard; left on N. Ferry Street and right on Broadway.

TOURS By appointment only

PHONE 518-449-9999

FARM ACREAGE 125 total acres

WEBSITE www.ninepincider.com

PRODUCTION 25,000 cases

OPEN Wed–Fri: 4–9pm Sat: 1–9pm Sun: 12–5pm And by appointment

OWNERS Alejandro del Peral Sonya del Peral

CLOSED New Year’s Day, Independence Day Thanksgiving, Christmas

EVENTS:

GETTING HERE

TASTING FEES 4 Cider Flight – $7.00 7 Cider Flight – $12.00

CIDER MAKERS Alejandro del Peral, Ethan Willsie Jacob Platel

FOLLOW US:

OCTOBER

Cider Sunday

NOVEMBER

Pressing Party

FEBRUARY

Gathering of the

/ninepincider @ninepincider

Farm Cideries

@ninepincider

FROM I-87: Exit 23 to 787 North to Clinton Street exit; off exit, turn right on Broadway. CIDER GUIDE • Premier 2016

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ORCHARD HILL CIDER MILL

AB OUT US

Established 2012

ORCHARD HILL HARD CIDERS express the apples they are made from, the land those apples are grown on, and the company’s devotion to quality. Orchard Hill’s mission to revive the tradition of authentic farm-based cider production began to be realized by partnering with Soons Orchards. This partnership expands the orchards’ 105-year history of apple growing expertise to include cider. Orchard Hill believes in quality over quantity, and the makers first and foremost create cider they like to drink. Therefore, they focus on food-friendly, drier styles that look to the great cider traditions of France, Spain, and the West Country of England for inspiration, while primarily being guided by the fruit to make quintessentially New York State cider. Using traditional fermentation and distilling methods, Orchard Hill products are made with a minimum of intervention, and never contain concentrates or artificial flavorings of any kind. While traditional and purist in outlook, this cider mill looks to innovate, so don’t be surprised to find bottlings that pleasantly surprise. For example, the Hudson Valley-produced Ten66 is highly acclaimed and breaks new ground by offering a serious look at “Pommeau,” a traditional Norman/French aperitif. Hospitality is paramount at the Orchard Hill Tasting Room, where guests receive a gracious welcome. Upon arrival they will find a one-of-a-kind selection of carefully curated, small batch, artisanal New York State cider, beer, wine, and spirits. Hosted at the Tasting Room are educational events, and special evenings of food, libations, and entertainment. The menus at these events offer a locavore approach, utilizing the expertise of their executive chef, trained at The Culinary Institute of America. The goal is to make optimal use of the bounty of the Hudson Valley. Orchard Hill’s food-friendly ciders really shine when enjoyed with expertly prepared local foods, especially while relaxing in their newly expanded cidery. The inviting and comfortable event space is in sync with their thoughtful approach to cider making; featuring classic salvaged architectural details from the surrounding area, and wood surfaces harvested from the orchards to create a harmonious environment. This is a multi-season destination, offering tastings, tours and events March through December. Spring and summer visits to the orchards are just as exciting as the fall high-season visits with the traditional harvest activities. Orchard Hill Cider Mill looks forward to welcoming you. Please check the website and Facebook page for announcements regarding hours and special events, as they are subject to change.

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CIDER GUIDE • Premier 2016

MEET THE CIDER MAKERS KARL DUHOFFMANN ANDREW EMIG JEFFREY SOONS

Karl, Andrew and Jeffrey were equally inspired to provide an alternative to the homogenized “big beer” cider that is most widely available today. Karl, a former Broadway “gypsy” and beverage industry veteran, began by asking why New York State didn’t have the variety of agro-beverage businesses he encountered in Europe, and ended up starting Orchard Hill. Karl is marketing and sales partner. Andrew Emig, a business sales consultant and classical trumpeter, was excited by the opportunity to create an authentic, lasting brand of cider, and partnered with Karl, and then Jeffrey, to make that a reality. Andrew is managing partner. Jeffrey grew up on the orchard and practiced law in New York City before environmental legal battles and the lure of the farm drew him back. Jeff is now facilities and production partner. All three partners make the cider. Orchard Hill embodies the unique experiences, perspectives, and skills represented.


IN THE SPOTLIGHT THE HUDSON VALLEY’S OWN POMMEAU

The year 1066 conjures visions of the Norman conquest of England and Haley’s Comet sightings in northern Europe. That history inspired the name for the Norman-inspired, Ten66. This apple aperitif features vanilla, baked apple, and spice in a tapestry of flavors woven with sweetness and 17–20% ABV. Ten66 is made according to the French regulations for “Pommeau de Normandie,” and was recently named Best of the Hudson Valley. It starts with apple brandy distilled from the cider and aged in French Oak wine barrels. The brandy is then blended with fresh unfermented cider and rests for further mellowing in the French Oak barrels. Nothing else but the careful blending of barrels makes for this unrivaled sensory experience.

THE ESSENTIALS SIGNATURE PRODUCTS

ORCHARD HILL CIDER RED LABEL

NAME ORCHARD HILL CIDER MILL ADDRESS 29 Soons Circle New Hampton, NY 10958

CLOSED New Year’s Day, Thanksgiving (open  until 1pm), Christmas TASTING FEE $5.00

ORCHARD HILL CIDER GOLD LABEL

PHONE 845-374-2468

TOURS Free

ORCHARD HILL CIDER DRAFT

EMAIL info@orchardhillnyc.com

FARM ACREAGE 34 acres

TEN66 RED LABEL

WEBSITE orchardhillcidermill.com

PRODUCTION 2,000 cases

OPEN Mar–Aug  Thurs–Fri: 11am–6pm Sat: 11am–10pm Sun: 12–6pm Sept–Dec Mon–Fri: 11am–6pm Sat: 11am–10pm Sun: 12–6pm

OWNERS Andrew Emig, Jeffrey Soons,  Carolyn duHoffmann

TEN66 GOLD LABEL

GETTING HERE FROM I-87: Exit 16 for NY-17 W/1-86 to Exit 123 for US-6 W toward Middletown/Port Jervis. Continue on US-6 W for about 3.6 miles, then turn left onto Lower Rd. Turn left onto Soons Circle. FROM I-84: Exit 3E for US-6 E/NY-17M E toward goshen. Continue on US-6 E for 1.4 miles. Turn right on Lower Rd., then turn left onto Soons  Circle.

MANAGER Donnan Sutherland CIDER MAKERS Andrew Emig, Jeffrey Soons,  Karl duHoffmann

EVENTS: MAR–DEC

FOLLOW US: Speakeasy every Saturday night from 6–10pm

/orchardhillcidermill

See website for special

@orchardhillnyc

holiday events

@orchardhillcidermill

CIDER GUIDE • Premier 2016

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PENNINGS FARM CIDERY

AB OUT US

Established 2016

PENNINGS FARM CIDERY is the next step for the multi-generational Pennings family of farmers who established both Pennings Apple Orchard and Pennings Farm Market in Warwick, NY. Concerned with maintaining a sustainable existence for the farm, siblings Tori and Stephen Pennings Jr. (SJ) are following in the footsteps of their parents, establishing Pennings Farm Cidery.

MEET THE OWNERS

Teaming up to take the family farm into the next generation, Tori and SJ saw an on-site cidery as an opportunity to showcase the fruits already grown on the farm, and for the farm to become more economically viable for both their parents and future generations. They share in the vision of other American apple-growers in rediscovering one of the country’s original libations, and the opportunity to produce cider from start to finish. Until the addition of the cidery, apples were picked at their orchard, pressed off-site, delivered to the local Warwick winery to ferment, then finally returned to Pennings and sold at the pub.

For siblings Tori and Stephen (SJ)—born and raised on the family farm in Warwick, NY— becoming purveyors of hard apple cider is taking Pennings’ farming legacy into its third generation. Advice from their parents—to broaden their life experience and carve out their individuality outside the family— encouraged them to seek professional futures in education and engineering.

SJ, Tori and their tight-knit team—more like family than staff—have hands-on involvement in the cider making process, producing high quality varieties of American style hard ciders, and fresh ciders made directly from the farm’s apples. The cidery team crafts cider with care from the ground up, literally, in order to produce an amazing experience for all to see and taste. They supply Pennings Apple Grader Pub, which currently sells more than 4,000 gallons of hard cider yearly; the Beer Garden at Pennings Farm Market; and the cidery’s own tap room. As the lead cider maker, SJ and a production staff produce a number of high quality ciders with close attention to apple varieties, yeast strains, and other factors. The tap room serves cider on tap by the pint or growler, by the bottle, or in tastings or flights. Light fare is served in the tap room from locally sourced products, including cheeses. Plans are underway to offer its products to local restaurants, pubs, and stores, as well as to develop a presence in New York City establishments. Nestled among the apple trees of the hillside orchard, the cidery and taproom provide visitors breathtaking views of the valley. The bucolic landscape and the country charm of the property, along with the existing Pennings Farm customer base, makes it a wonderful location for events. Pennings Farm Cidery hopes to eventually provide the perfect venue for special events including weddings, festivals, and corporate and group events.

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APPLE HEIRS – TORI PENNINGS AND STEPHEN PENNINGS JR.

While attending Cornell University, SJ spent breaks on the farm like he did growing up. During his first summer he planted hops on the farm with aspirations of brewing beer. After working the soil and becoming interested in brewing, fermentation, and cider making, SJ quickly transferred to Cornell’s Agricultural Science program. With scholarships in hand, Tori crossed the country to study education at Stanford University. Upon graduation, Tori accepted a California teaching position. She developed a love for the west coast, but missed the familial connection found on the farm and its community. Watching SJ return to his roots encouraged Tori to join him on the family farm and diversify the orchard. “Our ciders are crafted with care from the ground up, just like Tori and I were,” boasts SJ. “Like us, our tight-knit and fun-loving team is dedicated to delivering an amazing experience for all the senses.”


IN THE SPOTLIGHT GRAND OPENING IN 2016!

Pennings Farm Cidery opened its barn doors in May, joining a brotherhood of wineries, breweries and distilleries, rounding out the area’s craft beverage options. The cidery pours rotating varieties of Pennings Cider, and eventually will include signature ciders. The ciders are strategically crafted with a selection of more than 20 varieties of apples grown on the farm. Future plantings will include antique and American varieties such as Porter’s Perfection or Golden Russet to add some more complexity to the ciders. The focus of growing the apples will begin to shift to the production of high quality ciders. A few old blocks of antique varieties like Winesaps and Northern Spys that still grow on farm will eventually be resurrected. The taproom selection of Pennings Ciders will be complemented by a variety of New York State produced microbrews that feature Pennings hops, wine, champagne, ciders, and distilled spirits. The cidery, located in a newly-constructed barn, houses the production and bottling facility, refrigeration room, office and taproom, and features a locally hand-built bar constructed of reclaimed maple slabs and apple bins, and dining tables with live-edge maple table tops.

SIGNATURE PRODUCTS

THE PANTY-HOPPER MAPLE BLACK CURRANT ORIGINAL MAPLE

THE ESSENTIALS NAME PENNINgS FARM CIDERY ADDRESS 4 Warwick Turnpike Warwick, New York 10990

TASTING FEE 4 Cider Flight – $10.00 8 Cider Tasting – $20.00  TOURS Yes

PHONE 845-987-9922

FARM ACREAGE 100

EMAIL penningscidery@gmail.com

PRODUCTION 10,000 cases

WEBSITE penningscidery.com

OWNERS Stephen (SJ) Pennings Jr. and  Tori Pennings

OPEN Apr–Sept Fri–Sun: 12–sunset Oct–March  Fri–Sun: 12–6pm

MANAGER SJ Pennings and Tori Pennings CIDER MAKER Stephen (SJ) Pennings Jr.

CLOSED Easter, Thanksgiving, Christmas

GETTING HERE FROM GWB: Merge onto NJ-4 W via Exit  72A toward Paramus. Continue onto NJ-208 N/State Route 208. Merge onto I-287 S toward Oakland/Morristown. Exit 57 Skyline Drive toward Ringwood for about .22 miles. Keep right at the fork to Skyline Dr/County Hwy-692.Turn right onto greenwood Lake Turnpike/County Hwy-511. Continue to Union valley Rd/County Hwy-513. Stay straight onto Warwick Turnpike (Crossing into New York).Turn left onto State Route 94 S/NY-94. Pennings Farm Market is on the left.

FOLLOW US:

EVENTS: JUNE

Farm to Fork Fondo

SEPT

Cider Dinner Pairing

JAN

Wassail Party

/PenningsFarmCidery @PenningsFarmCidery

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STANDARD CIDER CO.

A BOUT US

Brotherhood, America’s Oldest Winery – Established 1839

BROTHERHOOD WINERY is the oldest, continuously operating winery in the United States. For 177 years, Brotherhood has been producing wines in New York. Located one hour north of New York City in the Hudson Valley, Brotherhood Winery has also been exposed to apple growing and cider making for many years. There are records of cider production at Brotherhood Winery dating back to earlier times, but since the 1980s cider making has been a constant part of its production. Having an abundance of orchards in the state of New York to choose from, Brotherhood Winery has partnered with two apple growers to source the apples used for its ciders. Red Jacket Orchards in Geneva (Finger Lakes region) is where delicious fresh apple juice is made by using only dessert apple varieties. The quality of work that Red Jacket Orchards does in the orchards is reflected by the amazing apples that they grow and the juice they press. Rebel Reserve barrel-aged cider is a product of a partnership with Roe Orchards, a local orchard in Chester that has been family-owned for almost 190 years. The fresh juice sourced from Roe Orchards is made from a blend of dessert and cider apples, which produces an amazingly delicious and complex juice which transforms into the barrel-aged Rebel Reserve Cider. After carefully selecting our apple growing partners, the fresh juice is fermented at Brotherhood Winery using carefully selected yeasts and top of the line filtering and bottling equipment, ensuring that all of the flavors and aromas of the apples are captured into each bottle. Cider market trends, as well as different styles of ciders produced in other regions around the world, are regularly evaluated so Brotherhood can offer consumers ciders made in various styles using different techniques. However, its products have a unique identity created by its talented team of cider makers. Brotherhood Winery’s focus is to continue producing premium hard apple cider here in the Hudson Valley and bring its craft-made ciders to enthusiasts around the United States and abroad. Brotherhood will continue to promote its hard cider products at the winery during this year’s season. Please check the website or follow on Facebook to learn more about upcoming events.

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MEET THE MAKERS MARK DAIGLE

Mark Daigle, production manager, has an extensive background including working in the vineyards of Chappelet in Napa Valley; Maison Bertrand Novack in Champagne, France; and in the cellars at Chanson Père et Fils in Beaune, France. His global winemaking experience, dedication, unique talents and over 35 years of experience at Brotherhood Winery supports the wine and cider making team. BOB BARROW

Bob Barrow is winemaker and head cider maker for Brotherhood. Bob graduated from Virginia Tech with a BS in Biology and a Chemistry Minor in 1998. He worked both in the vineyard and the winery at Williamsburg Winery in Virginia before starting at Brotherhood in 1999. A native of Dutchess County, Bob spends his time in the lab and the cellars creating Brotherhood’s blends and sparkling wines, as well as creating its line of ciders. STEPHANIE MUSER

Stephanie Muser, assistant winemaker and cider maker, has been working with Bob and Mark since 2013. Stephanie graduated from the University of Maryland with a MS in Biochemistry in 2013 and Northeastern University with a BS in Chemistry in 2009. Before obtaining her Masters degree she worked in quality control for Augustiner Brau in Munich, Germany and Boston Beer Company in Boston, MA. Stephanie spends her time in the lab and the cellars developing new products in the Standard Cider line of ciders and monitoring quality control plans.


IN THE SPOTLIGHT COMING IN 2016!

Two new cider projects will be released this year. First, a honey cider made using honey with a unique blend of fresh apple juice; perfect for any season or occasion. Second, a seasonal winter cider, made with unique spices that will conjure up memories of fun and cozy times with family and friends during those cold months.

THE ESSENTIALS NAME BROTHERHOOD, AMERICA’S OLDEST WINERY

CLOSED New Year’s Day, Thanksgiving,  Christmas

ADDRESS 100 Brotherhood Plaza Dr. Washingtonville, NY 10992

TASTING FEES Check website

PHONE 845-496-3661 EMAIL contact@brotherhoodwinery.net

SIGNATURE PRODUCTS

TRUE BELIEVER TRUE COMPANION TRUE COUPLE TRUE THIRST REBEL RESERVE

WEBSITE www.brotherhood-winery.com OPEN April–Dec Mon–Fri: 11am–5pm Sat: 11am–7pm Sun: 11am–5pm

PRODUCTION 6,000 cases OWNERS Chadwick, Castro and Baeza families MANAGER Hernan Donoso CIDER MAKERS Mark Daigle, Bob Barrow,  Stephanie Muser

EVENTS: SEPT–OCT

GETTING HERE FROM I-87: Exit 16 (Harriman) to NY-17 W to Exit 130. Take NY-208 N to NY-94 in Washingtonville. Make a right at the light onto NY-94 and proceed to the next light. Make a left onto Brotherhood Plaza Drive. Brotherhood is at the end of the road on the left.

FOLLOW US: Grape Stomping every weekend

/BrotherhoodWinery

after Labor Day until mid-October OCT 29

Halloween Costume Ball

@brotherhoodwine

DEC 2

Annual Tree Lighting

@brotherhoodwinery

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WEED ORCHARDS & WINERY

A BOUT US

Established 2014

WEED ORCHARDS & WINERY is happy to announce its first batch of Homegrown Hard Cider, a balanced brew of sweet and dry. With the help of local craft beverage producer Kristop Brown, Homegrown was brewed here on the fifth generation fruit farm, with its own apples. The next adventure: different types of hard ciders and apple wine, which will be available later this year. At 84 years old, Charles Weed is still farming his grandfather’s land in Milton. He takes pride in the quality and history of the apple trees on his farm. It is not unlikely when visiting Weed Orchards & Winery, a very tall man wearing an old, leather cowboy hat will approach you with a friendly smile and offer you a sample of an apple, right after he breaks it in half with his hands. The importance of meeting and educating the consumer about the fruit they eat is what Charles Weed has passed on to his son John, and now John to his three daughters. With new generations involved in the family business, there has been quite an evolution. When the Weed family opened its winery in 2014, they wanted to provide their customers with a unique experience. They started out by sampling and selling many local New York State wines, hard ciders and craft beers while they learned about production. The main focus was the food menu, monthly events, and finding local musicians to play every weekend. What makes this winery even more one-of-a-kind is that during summer and fall months you can pick your own produce. There is a huge selection of vegetables, peaches, plums, apples and more. Weekend festivals include hayrides, outside BBQs, a full bakery, a petting zoo, a large wooden playground for kids, facepainting and now, the Homegrown Hard Cider! Check the website for more details, and a produce schedule.

IT IS NOT UNLIKELY WHEN VISITING WEED ORCHARDS & WINERY, A VERY TALL MAN WEARING AN OLD, LEATHER COWBOY HAT WILL APPROACH YOU WITH A FRIENDLY SMILE AND OFFER YOU A SAMPLE OF AN APPLE, RIGHT AFTER HE BREAKS IT IN HALF WITH HIS HANDS.

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MEET THE CIDER MAKERS JOHN WEED

Owner of Weed Orchards & Winery, John Weed is a fifth-generation apple farmer who is excited about the comeback of America's most popular alcoholic beverage during the Colonial Era. “I am 55 years old, and all I know is fruit farming, especially apple farming. Being a first-time hard cider producer, it was important to me to find the right combination of apples, each adding their own characteristics to the complex flavor of the cider.” KRISTOP BROWN

Kristop Brown is a well-known local craft beverage producer and winemaker in the Hudson Valley who has decided to take on a new undertaking of hard cider production. “Making hard cider has helped me understand even more about the science of winemaking.” He feels it is important to “keep what you do interesting and to challenge yourself by learning new things.” Brown emphasizes the importance of using local produce to create the highest quality and freshest hard cider. Brown and Weed collaborated on the right blend of apples to create the fresh flavors in Homegrown.


IN THE SPOTLIGHT NEW RELEASES!

Weed Orchards’ new, original Homegrown Hard Cider is not too sweet or too dry, but perfectly crisp and refreshing. It’s made with three varieties of apples grown on the farm. The Blueberry Hard Cider, served in the tasting room with fresh blueberries, has a sweet start and a tart finish, with just the right amount of blueberry. Papa’s Peaches Hard Cider is on the sweeter side, with essences of Papa Weed’s awardwinning peaches.

THE ESSENTIALS NAME WEED ORCHARDS & WINERY

CLOSED Check website for holiday schedules TASTING FEE varies

COMING SOON

ADDRESS 43 Mt. Zion Rd. Marlboro, NY 12542

Gold Rush, perfect for dry hard cider lovers, will be released later this year, along with an Apple Wine.

PHONE 845-236-7848 845-236-2684

SIGNATURE PRODUCTS

HOMEGROWN HARD CIDER BLUEBERRY HARD CIDER PAPA'S PEACHES HARD CIDER COMING SOON

TOURS No FARM ACREAGE 100 acres

EMAIL info@weedorchards.com WEBSITE www.thewineryatweedorchards.com OPEN June–Oct Fri–Sun: 12–5pm Nov–May  Sat–Sun: 12–5pm  Pick Your Own Fruit Aug–Oct: 10am–5pm

OWNERS John Weed and Joann Weed MANAGER Nicole Weed CIDER/WINE MAKER Kristop Brown, John Weed

GOLD RUSH APPLE WINE EVENTS:

FOLLOW US:

SEPT

Peach Festival

GETTING HERE

OCT

Octoberfest

FROM I-87: Exit 17 to I-84 East. Continue for two miles to Exit 10. Follow US Route 9W North for six miles into the town of Marlboro. Make a left on Western Avenue, then follow signs to Weed  Orchards & Winery.

OCT

Halloween + Spirits Festival

NOV

Vendor Day

NOV 27–DEC 20

Christmas Tree Sales

/weedorchard @Weed_Winery

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CHRISTOPHER JACOBS WINERY AT PENNINGS VINEYARDS

A BOUT US

Established 2006

THIRD GENERATION FARMER Christopher Pennings and wife Monica planted their first block of grapes in 2006. “It’s been quite the adventure for us. We’ve had our successes and our challenges, but we’ve always maintained our love for family and farm.” Chris enjoys focusing on the vineyard and farm management side of the business. “Agriculture is in my blood,” he says to justify to his wife and sons, Christopher and Jacob, his long hours of physical labor in soil and sun. Monica toils with the wine making craftsmanship. “I am a novice on the vintner’s stage, and I’m smitten by the endless intricacies of winemaking,” she says. “I focus on balancing the practical and passionate aspect of creating a Hudson Valley Region wine, simply for the enjoyment of its flavor, aroma and taste.” What started as a hobby has quickly developed into a growing farm winery business. Following in the footsteps of Chris’s father’s and brother’s agricultural business (Pennings Orchard), seedless table grapes were planted for a U-Pick operation which launched in 2015. A healthy snack, distinct from California grapes, these culinary treats are known for their flavors of pineapple, peach, and Muscat. Late summer into early September is a great time of year for kids to pick and eat grapes, while mom or dad relax with a glass of wine at the winery. Eventually the couple focused on crafting an apple wine. Monica poured herself into all things cider, and crafted an apple wine unique to the family’s namesake. They will release their first apple wine, Appleoosa, this year. The 375ml bottle will sell for $8.00, and will tickle the taste buds of all apple lovers. The outdoor tasting venue at Pennings boasts vineyard, mountain and meadow views. A private country setting, delectable wine, picnic area, live music scheduled once or twice per month, finger foods available for purchase, all nestled in rural Pine Bush. New for 2016: a cozy, barnside enclave for when the weather gets fussy.

…A PRIVATE COUNTRY SETTING, DELECTABLE WINE, PICNIC AREA, LIVE MUSIC, FINGER FOODS…ALL NESTLED IN RURAL PINE BUSH.

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MEET THE OWNERS CHRISTOPHER AND MONICA PENNINGS

Christopher Pennings grew up on and off dairy and apple farms through his childhood. He realized agriculture was in his blood and he had been away from it too long. In 2003, Monica introduced the idea of grape farming. Growing up within a Mediterranean influence, she recognized the growing American trend of wine consumption. A passionate traveler, she knew and visited wine regions around the world, and welcomed the Hudson Valley potential of winemaking. The couple turned to Chris’s brother and father, Jack Jr. and Jack Pennings Sr. for guidance. Together, after the establishment of the grapes, the trio established a small apple block on the Pine Bush farm. The agricultural family heritage was again being passed down. “If it weren’t for my father’s and brother’s expertise in growing apples and its U-Pick operation (www.pennings orchard.com), I don’t think the winery and the Appleoosa apple wine would be in our lives today.”


IN THE SPOTLIGHT APPLEOOSA

This highly anticipated apple wine is made from fruit grown at the Pennings Orchard. A blend of apples that will tickle the taste buds of apple lovers, it pairs perfectly with feathered game and turkey, and is a winning choice for Thanksgiving dinner. It is also a great accompaniment with a variety of cheeses and rustic or English-style cuisine. It was a hit as a tank sampling at their Valentine event, where guests enjoyed it alone as a sipping wine, as well as alongside some sweet treats.

THE ESSENTIALS

DEEP ROOTS

A new red blend from estate grown grapes to be released this season! Dry, medium bodied, deep colored, it’s a blend of Noiret, Cabernet Franc, and Oberlin Noir. Perfect with any traditional hearty meal.

SIGNATURE PRODUCTS

APPLEOOSA BELLA HOLY COW OLÉ DEEP ROOTS

GETTING HERE FROM I-87: Exit 16 (Harriman) for NY-17 W to Exit 119 for Pine Bush/NY-302. Turn right onto NY-302 and continue 10 miles into Thompson Ridge. Turn left onto CR-48 (across from Searsville church). Continue for 2 miles and turn right onto Crawford St. The red barn will be on your left (0.5 miles). For gPS use 326 Crawford Street.

NAME CHRISTOPHER JACOBS WINERY  AT PENNINgS vINEYARDS ADDRESS 320 Crawford St. Pine Bush, NY 12566 PHONE 845-728-8066

TASTING FEE $4.00 TOURS Free FARM ACREAGE 40 acres PRODUCTION 300 cases

EMAIL christopherjacobswinery@gmail.com WEBSITE www.christopherjacobswinery.com OPEN May 25–Oct 31, only  Sat–Sun: 12–5pm

OWNERS Christopher and Monica Pennings MANAGERS Christopher and Monica Pennings WINEMAKERS Christopher and Monica Pennings

CLOSED New Year’s Day, Easter, Thanksgiving Christmas

FOLLOW US:

EVENTS: SEPT

Harvest Picnic

OCT

Hoedown

FEB

Valentine Event

/cjwinery @CJWinery @penningsvineyards

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AppleJa WHISKEY THAT SEIZES A MAN WITH THE GRIP OF A GORILLA HUDSON VALLEY

By Robert Bedford

commonly known as “Applejack,” is once again making a name for itself as a popular American drink. Here in the Hudson Valley, where it boasts a rich and generations-long tradition, this natural and potent by-product of orchard fruit farming was once revered as “cider brandy,” “apple whiskey,” or just plain “apple.” For nearly two centuries it was renowned as the beverage of choice throughout New York State.

While many argue that applejack distillation began in Sussex County, New Jersey, it quickly spread into New York through the Hudson Valley. The “great applejack-producing belt” ran between the Hudson River on the east and the Delaware River on the west. Applejack production centered around Orange County, but its reach extended to Westchester, Rockland, Sullivan, Ulster, Dutchess, Columbia and Greene counties.

Since Adam and Eve, the apple has been closely identified with man’s existence. Its health and medicinal qualities were so highly considered that wherever colonization occurred, the apple was sure to follow. Around the globe, it was often the first tree fruit planted and cultivated in any newly acquired territory.

Well into the 19th century, primitive applejack distilleries could be found on almost every hillside within the apple belt. Local farmers became the principal distillers, turning the end product into an important and desirable commodity in the Hudson Valley. Apple cider and distilled apple brandy were considered common offshoots of orchard farming, and as popular as farm-fresh apple pie, applesauce, apple cobblers, and apple preserves.

During the early Colonial Era in America, apple seeds from Europe were planted extensively, and almost every farm in the New World soon had its own apple orchard. After a harvest, surplus apples were pressed into cider, which was plentiful and cheap. Early settlers quickly came to favor cider and cider brandy, or “applejack,” which was traditionally made by allowing “hard,” or fermented, apple cider to freeze outside during the winter months. The layers of ice were removed and the liquid allowed to re-freeze—sometimes three or four more times—to concentrate the alcohol. The word “applejack” itself is said to have been derived from the term “jacking,” an early term for freeze distillation. The resulting unfrozen liquid, however, was a crude and powerful drink, whose effect, it’s been noted, was like “a crack on the head with a hammer.” In the decades before the American Revolution, colonists brought cider presses and simple stills with them to the New World. By heating fermented cider in a large, air-tight copper kettle, with its accompanying “worm” or distilling coil immersed in cold water, a farmer was able to isolate and vaporize (distill) the alcohol from the fermented fruit back into its liquid form. These simple pot stills varied in capacity ranging from 100 to 3,000 gallons, and were used to produce all sorts of “brandy” – the generic name for distillates made from fermented fruit, rather than from grain (i.e., whiskey).

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In the rural communities they drank little else. Despite its potency, Hudson Valley settlers quaffed it at weddings, funerals, church raisings, and public events. Even children were given watered down, sweetened and spiced hard cider or “apple,” at night. The reputation of this fiery spirit spread to the big cities, where it was regarded as a safe beverage free from adulteration, and considered the only “stimulant” truly fit to drink. It prolonged life, built up the system, and prevented disease. For proof, one only needed to point to the hearty old farmers who professed to have imbibed applejack for 60 or 70 years, and who—at 80—were as vigorous as men half their age. The spirit was so popular, that if a man asked for “apple” or “whiskey” at a Hudson Valley establishment, the proprietor set out applejack. Rye or bourbon had to be requested as such. Every store and nearly every farmhouse sold “apple" and a farmer’s hospitality was measured by how quickly he produced the applejack jug, and the cheerfulness with which he replenished it. Prices for applejack straight from the still (a colorless liquid as clear as water) started at fifty cents a gallon. But it was said that only a bold man with an iron stomach could voluntarily drink the strong spirit


ck

before it was a year old – even aged a year it was still sharp and fiery, and considered a “whiskey that seizes a man with the grip of a gorilla.” Lore has it that a four-ounce glass of applejack, “would climb to the head of a man that isn’t used to it in less than ten seconds. His face gets red and feels as if it was sun burned. When he shuts his eyes he sees a hundred torchlight processions charging at him ten abreast. He may sleep all night and all day, but when he wakes up he will find himself drunker than when he passed out.” Rip Van Winkle, the Catskill Region’s storybook character, fell asleep in the woods for 20 years after sampling spirits from a stranger’s keg. Many believe the beverage was not cider, but a powerful version of Hudson Valley applejack. Generally it was considered that applejack improved and mellowed with time, taking on a fruity flavor and a pale yellow hue, becoming more and more valuable the longer it aged in the barrel. Connoisseurs often claimed that applejack was not fit to drink until it was at least three or four years old. Prices ranged from $1.50 to $2.50 a gallon, and as high as $5 a gallon for well-aged “apple.” Thousands of gallons were reportedly stored in farmers’ cellars that could fetch $10 or $15 a gallon, assuming the farmer could be convinced to part with it. The Federal government took a different position on applejack, as it didn’t consider the spirit to be a farm product, even if made by a farmer furnishing his own apples. By 1875, applejack was not only prohibited from being sold without a license, but federal legislation had imposed a 90¢ per gallon tax on the beverage. The crackdown on illicit distilling came with heavy fines and imprisonment, along with the confiscation of any liquor. Both the distillery and entire farm were subject to seizure. Yet many farmers continued to manufacture applejack in spite of the government’s vigilance, and family farms with their distilleries continued passing from generation to generation.

A Good Year for Orange “Apple” Applejack production in the Hudson Valley reached its peak in the late 1800s. Throughout the applejack belt there were close to 60 registered distilleries devoted to its manufacture, with roughly 25 in Orange County alone. In fact, applejack distillation carried on to a greater extent in Orange County than in any other part of the country, producing about two-thirds of all made in New York State. Among them, the largest producer was J. L. Sayer & Son of Warwick, whose family had been distilling applejack since before the Revolutionary War. Other wellknown distillers of the era included: Richard Wisner, Williams & Son, and Daniel Kelley, all of Warwick; Beverly K. Johnson’s Old Sycamore Distillery in East Coldenham; and Maher W. Decker in Burlingham, Sullivan County.

Courtesy Sylvia Hasenkopf

By all accounts, 1888 was a good year for apples, the even-numbered years being the good “apple-bearing” years. New York State produced 111,257 gallons of applejack that year; 68,000 gallons of it in Orange County. During 1872, the record year for the largest amount of legal applejack ever distilled, 101,617 gallons were produced in Orange County alone. But apple cultivation relies on the graciousness of nature. Apple trees might be loaded with fruit one year, and then almost barren the next. In a bad year, 1873 for example, the total production in Orange County was recorded at only 12,289 gallons.

Shortly after the turn of the new century, demand for applejack began to diminish, both on the local level and in the trade. Although growing consumption of beer had supplanted the taste for strong liquor, many attributed the passing of applejack to the Federal tax charged on fruit spirits, which was the same for rye or corn whiskies that cost farmers about one quarter of what it cost to make applejack from apples. In addition, many of the farmer-distillers in the Hudson Valley had converted to the Temperance movement, abandoning their stills and refusing to sell their apple crops to anyone who intended to use them for distilling. One by one, many of the old cider mills and distilleries fell into decay. CIDER GUIDE • Premier 2016

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The enactment of Prohibition in 1920 dealt a final death blow to the legalized manufacture of the once popular distilled apple. Registered distillers were forced to dismantle or abandon their businesses, with only a handful opting to produce sweet cider and cider vinegar instead. In the more rural areas, however, the farmers who continued to distill illegally found that the demand was such that there was often little time to age it properly, and they took to coloring it with burnt sugar and roasted peach pits to “age” it quickly. For the most part, local authorities seemed to turn a blind eye to the small farmerdistiller during Prohibition, but there were occasional federal raids on illegal stills in all counties that resulted in the arrest of more prominent, and often repeat, offenders. Applejack was the principal illicit beverage in most rural counties in New York, and it was Dutchess County bootleg applejack that became renowned for its superior quality during these dark years. But it was Greene County that received the media attention when Manhattan-based gangster Jack “Legs” Diamond made headlines attempting to muscle his way into the local applejack industry. Although Diamond previously escaped bullets, convictions, and jail time, his luck ran out in 1931, when both the state and federal governments cracked down on his activities in the northern Catskills. Numerous raids on his bootlegging ring were followed up with high-profile trials in the state’s capital in Albany and in Manhattan, bringing the subject of illegal applejack production into the national spotlight. Diamond’s death by gunfire, on the eve of yet another acquittal in December 1931, ended the media’s and the government’s obsession with illegal applejack distilling, and bootleg production returned to “normal.”

Talk of Prohibition’s end was barely on everyone’s lips when many saw an opportunity to cash in on applejack once liquor became legal again. The popularity of the Hudson Valley’s favorite libation before and during Prohibition led many to scramble on the eve of Repeal in 1933 to establish new distilleries, and bring legalized applejack back into local production. Within just a few years, several locally-produced applejacks could be found on the market in the Hudson Valley and throughout New York, among them Old Catskill Brand Apple Brandy (from the Greene County Fruit Distillery, in Catskill, Greene County); Hendrik Hudson Distilleries’ Kinderhook Special Apple Brandy (Kinderhook, Columbia County); Old Orange County Brand Straight Apple Brandy (Middle Hope, Orange County); H. B. Morgan Distilleries’ Half Moon Brand Apple Brandy (Amenia, Dutchess County); and Hildick Applejack Brandy from Distilled Liquors Corporation, partially operating out of Mount Kisco (Westchester County). Expectations of large sales growth, however, were never realized. The fundamental cause was initially attributed to commercial manufacturers’ failure to produce a palatable brandy of good quality. Most superior apple brandy was still made illicitly on the farm, and as such, would never be available on the retail liquor market. Consumer tastes had also changed, and it soon became apparent that applejack had lost much of its old-time hold on the hearts of rural Americans. The new generation of drinkers was mostly unfamiliar with this oncepopular tipple, opting instead for more commonly available grain spirits like gin or whiskey. By the Second World War, nearly all of

DEFINING MOMENTS IN HUDSON VA 1768 Daniel Sayer begins making cider and apple “whiskey” in Warwick, Orange County, NY, and by 1812 acquires a still originally from England that his descendants continue to use right up until Prohibition.

New revenue laws enforce a 1875 90¢ per gallon tax on applejack and fruit brandies. Harsh penalties are imposed on illicit distilling which drives generational farmer-distillers underground.

A peak year for apple crops 1888 in the Hudson Valley region that results in a surplus of apple cider and applejack. In Orange County alone, it was said, enough applejack was produced “to float a ship.”

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1912 The rising Temperance movement, successive years of low-yield apple crops, and the 1unscrupulous doctoring of young applejack helps contribute to the decline of the once-popular tipple.

1920 National Prohibition deals

applejack a death blow, leaving only a few legitimate distillers producing apple juice, sweet cider, and vinegar. The majority of illegal farm producers continue with “business as usual.”

1931 Illegal applejack activity is

thrust into the national spotlight when Jack “Legs” Diamond “muscles in” on the applejack and beer trade in Greene County and the Catskills. Media exposure from high-profile raids returns to normal after Diamond is gunned down in Albany.


the independent Hudson Valley distilleries were gone. The eventual war-time ban on apples, pears, and other fruits and grains for distillation hastened their end. Many of the remaining distilleries were bought up by Laird & Co. in Scobeyville, the largest and well-known of the New Jersey distillers.

ciderhouse

It’s taken nearly half a century, but the Hudson Valley and Capital Region is experiencing a renaissance of distilled apple spirits. Consumer tastes have circled back around to once again embrace these unique and complex spirits, and local craft distilleries have stepped up to face the new demand.

rev i v i n g

l o st

spi r i t s

18 Hicks Road, Granville, NY 12832 | 518.642.1788 www.slyboro.com

The terms applejack and apple brandy are still synonymous (i.e., distilled from 100% apples), but new federal regulations allow for a “blended applejack” with up to 80 percent neutral grain spirits – a relic from the post-war years when consumers lost their taste for fruit brandy, and companies looked for cheaper ways to produce it. Today, distillers are crafting apple brandy in a fashion worthy of being sipped and savored like its French counterpart, Calvados. At its core, applejack has a full-bodied, fruity lushness, and whether distilled in small or larger batches, unaged or aged in American oak, these hand-crafted, classic apple brandies are worthy of attention, sure to please even the most discerning palate. Now is the time to seek out these hand-crafted, small-batch spirits from 100% New York State apples. But hurry, they’re so popular they’re often sold out as quickly as they’re released. continued on page 34

Tours, Tastings & Cocktails Fri 3-8

Sat 12-7

Sun 12-6

1727 Rte 9, Clermont, NY 12526 www.hudsonvalleydistillers.com

LLEY APPLEJACK With repeal of Prohibition 1933 new distilleries quickly emerge to produce applejack and apple brandy legally, including Greene County Fruit Distillery, Old Orange County Apple Brandy Distillery, and Dutchess County Cider Company. Within a decade, changing consumer tastes forces them all to close their doors.

2003

Warwick Valley Winery & Distillery becomes New York’s first fruit micro-distillery with the launch of their unaged Apple Brandy. Soon afterwards, Tuthilltown Spirits Distillery becomes the state’s first whiskey distillery. A resurgence of locally-produced craft spirits ensues. Changes in distilling regulations in 2007 allows Harvest Spirits and other farm distilleries to open in the region and begin crafting small-batch applejack and apple-based spirits.

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continued from page 33

“Apple” by the Bottle Here’s a look at some apple spirits that are making a distinct name for themselves in the Hudson Valley and Capital Region: ALBANY DISTILLING CO. Albany | Albany County THE 10TH PIN BARREL-AGED APPLE BRANDY 40% ABV

A recently launched apple brandy produced in the Capital Region from Hudson Valley apples, fermented at Nine Pin Ciderworks. The light amber brandy is aged in American oak barrels formerly used to age whiskey and cider. The fragrant nose reveals caramel, toffee, and a touch of clove. Soft and silky on the palate, with buttery baked apple and a vanilla creme brulee finish. Well-balanced and smooth. 375ml. ®

BLACK DIRT DISTILLING CO. Warwick | Orange County

Harvest Spirits, continued: SMALL BATCH DISTILLED HUDSON VALLEY APPLE BRANDY 40% ABV

A light amber-colored, five-year-old apple brandy, cold-pressed and double distilled in small batches, with a touch of ice cider added for apple body and a hint of sweetness. Heavy aromas of vanilla and maple with subtle notes of baked apple. The oak is noticeable but not dominant, and the palate is clean and soft with a long toffee and butterscotch finish. 375ml. HUDSON VALLEY DISTILLERS Germantown | Columbia County ADIRONDACK APPLEJACK 40% ABV

Applejack from 100% Hudson Valley apples aged for one year in small American white oak barrels. Pleasant, subtle notes of apple and toffee up front with a smooth, subtle, non-aggressive oaky finish. Complex, yet mellow enough for the classic cocktail. 750ml.

BOTTLED IN BOND APPLE JACK 50% ABV

Distilled from New York-grown Jonagold apples and aged four to six years in new charred American oak barrels. Unapologetically pungent with baked earth notes backed by leather and cedar-box, with an undertone of toasted honey on the nose. Intense and weighty on the palate with heavy oak that dominates. A long and woody finish with caramel and baked apple notes. Currently the only Bottled in Bond applejack in the US, this is not an applejack for the faint-hearted. 750ml. SINGLE BARREL APPLE JACK 50% ABV

A very recent release, this applejack is distilled from Hudson Valleygrown Honey Crisp apples, aged a minimum of 12 months in new charred oak. Light amber in color, it has underlying aromas of apple juice with subtle caramel and cinnamon. Soft notes of sweet barrel and spice on the palate. 375ml. HARVEST SPIRITS Valatie | Columbia County CORNELIUS APPLEJACK 40% ABV

Double distilled in small batches using 100% apples from their Golden Harvest Farm. Aged for three years in 50-gallon ex-bourbon white oak barrels then finished in 15-gallon casks. Fruity aromas of fresh apple, pear and ripe banana, with vanilla and a hint of butterscotch. The palate is crisp, with soft shades of smoked wood, toffee and caramel, and a buttery apple finish. Simple and austere, this is an applejack for traditionalists. Available in 50ml, 375ml, and 750ml.

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CHANCELLOR’S HARDSCRABBLE APPLEJACK 40% ABV

A robust and intense applejack, aged for 12 months in charred tengallon yellow birch barrels. A rich, oaky character with hints of caramel and vanilla on the nose and palate, with a smooth, aged whiskey-like finish. Available in 375ml and 750ml. SPIRITS GROVE FINE SHINE APPLEJACK 40% ABV

From 100% Hudson Valley apples sourced locally in Clermont. A clear and unaged version of “moonshine,” Fine Shine is the base of their aged applejack. Light and clean with faint green apple notes on the nose. Smooth and easy on the palate, with a hint of apple leading to a subtle licorice-anise finish. Ideal as a base for cocktails and frosty shots. Available in 375ml and 750ml. NEVERSINK SPIRITS Port Chester | Westchester County APPLE BRANDY 40% ABV

A limited release hand-crafted apple brandy, unaged and clear, sourced from New York State apples. Well-balanced, with pronounced aromas of apple and pear with a hint of nutmeg and clove. Toffee and butterscotch bursts on the palate with underlying apple notes, finishing with more lingering spice than the color or nose suggests. 375ml.

This article was adapted from the author’s upcoming book on applejack in the Hudson Valley. [2017, Flint Mine Press]


EVENTS

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HARVEST SPIRITS

A BOUT US

Established 2007

LOCATED ON A 200-ACRE APPLE FARM in Columbia County, Harvest Spirits benefits by having fresh ingredients (apples) grown and pressed year-round on location. Their third-generation farm, Golden Harvest Farms, benefits by having a new market for cider apples and increased traffic to their retail farm store. The symbiotic relationship allows them to make fresh spirits from fresh fruit all year long. They also buy extra fruit from local farms which promotes strong ties between local agriculture and craft distilling. The retail farm market and distillery tasting room are open daily. Harvest Spirits offer tastings and bottle sales of locally-made hard cider in addition to their full selection of award-winning spirits. They distill right in the tasting room, so you can learn how they make their spirits while you enjoy a taste. The small distillery is a very modern work of art. Though they distill only 100 gallons at a time, they can create virtually any kind of spirit, from vodka to whiskey, brandy and gin. Their state-of-the art equipment, manufactured in Germany by the world’s oldest distillery fabricator, allows them to consistently produce spirits of the highest quality. Core Vodka (40% ABV) is their original and most popular product—meticulously hand-crafted in small batches using nothing but apples and filtered water. It is distilled three times from hard cider, non-charcoal filtered, and gluten free. With aromas of McIntosh skin and creme brulee and a smooth finish, Core Vodka is distinctive and delicious. Each bottle is made from 50 lbs. of fresh apples. Cornelius Applejack is New York’s first applejack since anyone can remember. Applejack is an apple brandy that historically was made by freezing hard cider. Nowadays, applejack is an aged apple brandy that is distilled, not frozen. Named after the guy who’s made their cider for a generation, Cornelius Applejack is double distilled from hard cider and aged in ex-bourbon barrels, giving it an amber color and whiskey-like flavor. The Peach (30% ABV) and Cherry Applejack (35% ABV) are made by soaking fresh fruit in two-year-old applejack – with no sugar added – and macerated for six months with minimal filtration. Peach Applejack mixes well with champagne and hard cider. Cherry Applejack is excellent in Manhattans or on its own. Their newest product, John Henry Single Malt Whiskey, is named after their eponymous farm manager, John Henry. It is double distilled from 2-row malted barley, aged for two years in new and re-fill applejack barrels. A smooth and balanced whiskey, it boasts flavors of dried fruit and sourdough with a long satisfying finish of chocolate malt and distant campfire. Visit for a tour and taste.

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CIDER GUIDE • Premier 2016

MEET THE DISTILLER DEREK GROUT

Derek Grout is a third-generation apple farmer and the distiller at Harvest Spirits. He is actively in charge of the distillery and all aspects of the distilling process, as well as product development. Derek’s responsibilities range from designing product packaging and website development, to scrubbing tanks and promoting the products. A graduate of Cornell University, Derek began his career as a graphic designer in Boston, MA. After spending too much time in front of his computer, he decided to return to his roots. In 2003, Derek moved back to the family apple farm in the Hudson Valley to help his father and to learn the family business of growing apples. He continues to help on the farm, when he’s not in the distillery.


IN THE SPOTLIGHT 5-YEAR APPLE BRANDY

The Hudson Valley’s answer to Calvados, this rare apple brandy is smooth and silky with a finish of baked apple and butterscotch. A single varietal brandy from Fuji apples, this apple brandy spent five years in charred American oak barrels, giving it plenty of time to develop its delicate, integrated flavors. Enjoy on its own in a brandy snifter. A CSA 2016 Silver Medal winner. So good, it might change the way you think about brandy. BLACK RASPBERRY VODKA

Made by infusing homegrown black raspberries in Core Vodka, this very rare spirit boasts full aroma and flavor of fresh raspberries with a dry, satisfying finish. Distilled four times and colored with a touch of the original black raspberry juice, it’s based on the French “framboise” and the German “Himbeergeist.” It can be enjoyed on its own or mixed with pink lemonade, cranberry juice, or in a Cosmopolitan. Smells sweet, but finishes dry.

SIGNATURE PRODUCTS

CORE VODKA

THE ESSENTIALS NAME HARvEST SPIRITS

TASTING FEE $1.00 each

ADDRESS 3074 Route 9 valatie, NY 12184

TOURS Weekends 12–5pm, free FARM ACREAGE 200 acres

PHONE 518-758-1776 EMAIL info@harvestspirits.com

CORNELIUS APPLEJACK

WEBSITE harvestspirits.com

JOHN HENRY WHISKEY

OPEN Jan–Dec  Daily: 10am–5pm

PEACH APPLEJACK CHERRY APPLEJACK APPLE BRANDY PEAR BRANDY BLACK RASPBERRY VODKA

GETTING HERE FROM I-87 [NYC]: Exit 21A for the Berkshire Extention. Follow to Exit B1. Continue on U.S. Highway 9-S for four miles. Harvest Spirits is on the left. FROM I-90 [AREAS NORTH]: Exit 12 to  U.S. Highway 9-S. Continue for four miles.  Harvest Spirits is on the left.

OWNERS Derek grout and Ashley Hartka MANAGER Peter Upstill DISTILLER Derek grout

CLOSED New Year’s Day, Easter, Thanksgiving, Christmas

EVENTS:

FOLLOW US:

SEPT

Hudson Falley Wine & Food Festival

SEPT–OCT

Pick-your-own apples

/harvest-spirits @harvestspirits @harvestspirits

FARM MARKETS: Troy Waterfront Market, Troy Rhinebeck Farmers Market, Rhinebeck

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TUTHILLTOWN SPIRITS DISTILLERY

AB OUT US

Established 2003

TUTHILLTOWN SPIRITS is located at the site of the 1788 Tuthilltown Gristmill, a National Historic Site. It was the first distillery opened in New York since Prohibition. From the beginning, its founders have been recognized as leaders and innovators in the emerging American craft spirits industry.

MEET THE OWNERS RALPH ERENZO

Tuthilltown now features a tasting room where visitors can sample and purchase its products, and the Tuthill House Restaurant, a full service restaurant on the banks of the Shawangunk Kill (river). This farm distillery uses raw agricultural materials from New York State to produce award-winning Hudson Whiskeys, Indigenous Vodkas, and Half Moon Orchard Gin. The distillery was built from scratch by founders Ralph Erenzo and Brian Lee, and opened in 2003. By 2005 they released the first products, corn whiskey and vodka from local apples. Neither Lee nor Erenzo had any previous distillery or alcohol production experience. Now, they invite visitors to enjoy the wonderful property with their families, and learn about how spirits are made during their comprehensive distillery tours. Offered every weekend, they include a tasting and Tuthilltown whiskey glass. Tuthilltown’s spirits are distributed throughout the US and abroad, and they have been featured in numerous national and international media. The partners were instrumental in the 2007 passage of the Farm Distillery Act, which launched the New York craft distillery movement. From 2005, until the bill was signed into law, Tuthilltown was the sole New York State distillery. Today, there are over 125 craft distilleries operating in the state.

Founder Ralph Erenzo acquired the Tuthilltown Gristmill property in 2001. After 15 years as a professional climber he intended to open a “climbers’ ranch” near the Shawangunks, the home of American rock climbing. But instead, in 2003 he started planning a small craft distillery in Tuthilltown. Erenzo brings 35 years of production management experience to Tuthilltown Spirits. He sits on the Governor’s Committee on Alcohol Beverage Control Law Revision, and is Chair of the American Craft Spirits Association Legislative Committee working on the national level to modernize alcohol law. Ralph is also design director at Tuthilltown and is responsible for many of its award-winning packaging designs. He is married and has one son, Gable, who left Tuthilltown to open his own distillery/ tasting room. BRIAN LEE

Tuthilltown features special events throughout the year, a beautiful riverside walk to the dam and pond, picnic tables and the peaceful Shawangunk Kill, a protected recreational river that’s perfect for dipping toes during the warm months. The Tuthill House Restaurant welcomes a new restaurant manager George Gorsky, and a new menu featuring local products. Many dishes and desserts also feature special spirit products. Visit Tuthilltown weekends and get to know them!

TUTHILLTOWN FEATURES A BEAUTIFUL RIVERSIDE WALK TO THE DAM AND POND, PICNIC TABLES AND THE PEACEFUL SHAWANGUNK KILL, A PROTECTED RECREATIONAL RIVER THAT’S PERFECT FOR DIPPING TOES DURING THE WARM MONTHS.

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Founder Brian Lee is responsible for engineering and all technical aspects at Tuthilltown Spirits. He designed and installed all of the mechanical, electrical, and control systems at the distillery. Prior to his work with Tuthilltown Spirits, Brian was a senior technical designer for a company building high-end broadcast television facilities. Lee is currently upgrading Tuthilltown’s facilities to increase overall efficiency and open new opportunities for innovation. In whatever free time he has, Lee builds Windsor-back chairs. He recently built a wood kayak by hand for his son. Brian is married and has two children.


IN THE SPOTLIGHT A 100+ YEAR OLD COGNAC STILL

Tuthilltown is celebrating the installation of a 100+ year old Charante Cognac still in its new R&D building. Tuthilltown’s crew and distillers are now experimenting with fruit spirits: apples and grapes to brandies and eau de vie (clear unaged spirit of fruit). DISTILLERY TOURS

Distillery tours at Tuthilltown continue to draw visitors curious about how beverage spirits are made, and in particular, how it’s done at Tuthilltown Spirits. The tours offer a backstage look at creating artisan spirits from raw agricultural materials like corn, rye, wheat and barley. You’ll see the rickhouse where thousands of gallons of aging spirits rest. And you’ll hear the history of the development of Tuthilltown since 2001.

THE ESSENTIALS NAME TUTHILLTOWN SPIRITS DISTILLERY

TOURS $15.00

ADDRESS 14 grist Mill La. gardiner, NY 12525

FARM ACREAGE 21 acres

PHONE 845-255-1527 EMAIL distillery@tuthilltown.com WEBSITE www.tuthilltown.com

SIGNATURE PRODUCTS

INDIGENOUS APPLE VODKA HALF MOON ORCHARD GIN

PRODUCTION 22,000 cases OWNERS Ralph Erenzo, Brian Lee DISTILLERS The entire team contributes to the  production of Tuthilltown’s products.

OPEN Mon–Sat: 11am–6pm Sun: 12–6pm CLOSED Easter, Thanksgiving, Christmas TASTING FEE $10.00

GETTING HERE FROM I-87 [NYC]: Exit 17 and follow signs for Route 300 N. Turn left at NY-55 W/US-44 W/Main St. Turn left at Albany Post Rd. Make first right onto Tuthilltown Rd., and second left at the Tuthilltown Spirits sign. FROM I-87 [AREAS NORTH]: Exit 18 for NY-299 toward New Paltz/Poughkeepsie. Turn left  at NY-299 W/Main St. Turn left at NY-32 S. Turn right at NY-55 W/US-44 W/Main St. Turn left at  Albany Post Rd., then follow directions above.

EVENTS: Visit Tuthilltown.com and Tuthillhouse.com for upcoming events and promotions. Join the email newsletter to stay up to date each month.

FOLLOW US:

/TuthilltownSpirits @tuthilltown @tuthilltown

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HUDSON VA L L E Y

J U N E 3 – 12 Enjoy Hudson Valley hard ciders at restaurants, bars, and bottle shops throughout the region during our annual Cider Week festival. See our calendar of events and list of participating locations at ciderweekhv.com.

HARD CIDER : OUR REGION’S SIGNATURE DRINK CIDER MAKERS IN THIS GUIDE 1

Angry Orchard T F 2241 Albany Post Rd, Walden, NY 12586 845-713-5180 AngryOrchard.com see page 8

2

Bad Seed Cider Co. T R 43 Baileys Gap Rd, Highland, NY 12528 845-236-0956 BadSeedHardCider.com see page 10

3

Joe Daddy’s Hard Cider T P F at Brookview Station Winery 1297 Brookview Station Rd Castleton-on-Hudson, NY 12033 518-732-7317 BrookviewStationWinery.com see page 12

4

Kettleborough Cider House P F 277 State Rte 208, New Paltz, NY 12561 845-255-7717 NewPaltzCider.com see page 14

5

6

7

Naked Flock Hard Cider T R P F at Applewood Winery 82 Four Corners Rd, Warwick, NY 10990 845-988-9292 ApplewoodWinery.com see page 16 Nine Pin Ciderworks T F 929 Broadway, Albany, NY 12207 518-449-9999 NinePinCider.com see page 18

15 Fishkill Farm Cidery P F Pennings Farm Cidery T R P F 4 Warwick Turnpike, Warwick, NY 10990 9 Fishkill Farm Rd, Hopewell Jct, NY 12533 845-987-9922 845-897-4377 PenningsCidery.com FishkillFarms.com see page 22 16 Glorie Farm Winery T 40 Mountain Rd, Marlboro, NY 12542 9 Standard Cider T R 845-236-3265 at Brotherhood Winery GlorieWine.com 100 Brotherhood Plaza Dr Washingtonville, NY 10992 845-496-3661 17 Hardscrabble Cider T P F Brotherhood-Winery.com at Harvest Moon Farm & Orchard 130 Hardscrabble Rd, North Salem, NY 10560 see page 24 914-485-1210 10 Weed Orchards & Winery T R P F BrothersCovino.com 43 Mt Zion Rd, Marlboro, NY 12542 18 Helderberg Meadworks and Cider 845-236-7848 Duanesburg, NY 12056 WeedOrchards.com 518-795-8964 see page 26 HelderbergMeadworks.com 11 Christopher Jacobs Winery T 19 Hudson Valley Farmhouse Cider T R P F at Pennings Vineyards 320 Crawford St, Pine Bush, NY 12566 at Stone Ridge Orchard 845-728-8066 3012 Rte 213, Stone Ridge, NY 12584 ChristopherJacobsWinery.com 845-687-2587 HudsonValleyFarmhouseCider.com see page 28 8

20

Slyboro Cider House T P F at Hicks Orchard 18 Hicks Rd, Granville, NY 12832 518-642-1788 Slyboro.com

21

Stone Bridge Cider T F at Stone Bridge Farm 85 Middle Rd, Hudson, NY 12534 518-966-2614 StoneBridgeCider.com

OTHER CIDER MAKERS IN THIS REGION 12

13

Aaron Burr Cidery Wurtsboro, NY 845-468-5867 AaronBurrCider.com

Brooklyn Cider House T R P F 155 N. Ohioville Rd, New Paltz, NY 12561 22 845-633-8657 BrooklynCiderHouse.com

Orchard Hill Cider Mill T P F 14 Doc’s Draft Hard Cider T R P F at Soons Orchards at Warwick Valley Winery and Distillery 29 Soons Circle, New Hampton, NY 10958 114 Little York Rd, Warwick, NY 10990 845-374-2468 845-258-4858 OrchardHillCiderMill.com W V Winery.com see page 20

23

Sundog Cider T 343 Route 295, Chatham NY 12037 518-392-4000 SundogCider.com Sundström Cider Lake Katrine, NY SundstromCider.com


MONTGOMERY SCHENECTADY

18

Esperance

20

Slyboro Cider House

LOCATION FEATURES

6 T R P F

Tasting Room Restaurant Pick Your Own Farm Stand

RENSSELAER

Albany

SCHOHARIE

ALBANY

3

Nassau 28

Valatie

25

26

Wayside Cider T R F 55 Redden Ln, Andes, NY 13731 917-605-0230 WaysideCider.com Westwind Orchard R P F 215 Lower Whitfield Rd Accord, NY 12404 845-626-0659 WestwindOrchard.com

COLUMBIA

GREENE

24 Wayside Cider

Catskill Saugerties

Yankee Folly Cidery P F at Jenkins and Lueken Orchards 69 Yankee Folly Rd New Paltz, NY 12561 845-255-1155 YankeeFollyCidery.com

23

28

29

19

ULSTER

DUTCHESS

25

New Paltz

30

30

Tuthilltown Spirits Distillery T R 14 Grist Mill Ln. Gardiner, NY 12525 845-255-1527 Tuthilltown.com see page 38

4

13 2 16 10

1

Wurtsboro 12

ORANGE

Poughkeepsie

Marlboro

11

Harvest Spirits T 3074 U.S. 9, Valatie, NY 12184 518-253-5917 HarvestSpirits.com see page 36 Hudson Valley Distillers T R 1727 Route 9 Clermont, NY 12526 518-537-6820 HudsonValleyDistillers.com

29

Kingston

26 Black Dirt Distillery 114 Little York Rd. Warwick, NY 10990 845-258-6020 BlackDirtDistillery.com

Hudson

Rhinebeck

APPLE SPIRITS MAKERS IN THE REGION 27

21

Hudson R.

24

Newburgh

Beacon

15

9 PUTNAM

7 Goshen

17 14

5

27

Warwick 8

ROCKLAND

WESTCHESTER

30 MILES SOUTH TO

NEW YORK C ITY

White Plains

22


Ultimate Cider + Apple Spirits Guide  

The go-to guide for all things apple in NY's Hudson Valley and Capital Region. Read profiles of top hard cider and spirits producers, learn...

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