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THE BEAUTY EXPERT EXPER XPERT T

NOV

Inside The Secret, Complicated World Of Muslim Beauty Goddess Hair Fuller, Longer in Minutes Taking Pains How Much Procedures Actually Hurt

The

NEW

Amanda Seyfried Hass

Power Beauty Doing It Like a Boss

Absolutely, Positively No Filter


NOVEMBER

98

POWER POINTS The future of workplace dressing: Graphic knits, a dewy glow.

IN THIS ISSUE BEAUTY REPORTER 37 Look We Love: Ruby Lips 38 Editors’ Favorites 40 Hair Ribbons Straight off the Runway • Test Drive: Charcoal-Based Tooth Whitening • Whiskey-Inspired Scents

42 Beautiful People: Nail Artist Madeline Poole • A Too Faced and Kat Von D Collaboration 44 Cult Object: Tom Ford’s Take-on-Vacation Makeup

48 Is Your Phone Damaging Your Skin? • The Most Innovative Anti-Aging Masks Yet

FASHION 51 Royal Treatment. Miu Miu’s jewel-bedecked brocade heels make a decadent statement.

52 Blue Period. Allure accessories director Nicole Chapoteau on how to rock a denim tuxedo. 56 New Vintage. Rachael Wang, Allure’s fashion director, offers a casual spin on velvet and lace. 58 Clothes Encounters. Writer Molly Young overcomes her fashion fears and conquers the fall trends. 64 Elements of Style. Model 66 Ripple Effect. Softly ruffled boots, bags, and bracelets.

4 ALLURE NOVEMBER 2016

ALIQUE

Jordan Rebello styles a pair of very red, very oversize trousers.


NOVEMBER

NEWS & TRENDS 24 Beauty School. Jewel-tone winged eyeliner, easy (cool!) new tools for fuller lashes, three ways to beat holiday bloat, and more.

30 Hair Inspiration. Extra, Extra. Hairstylists Riawna Capri and Nikki Lee show us how to use extensions to add volume, texture, and color.

68 Anti-Aging Report. The

70 Beauty Passport. Getting Steamy. In Finland, the antidote to the bone-chilling cold is the intense heat—and easy camaraderie—of public saunas. 76 Insider Secrets. The Surprising Habits of Hand Models. Hint: Wearing gloves to the beach is just the beginning.

FEATURES 82 Country Fair. Amanda Seyfried is the rare movie star who is as comfortable at a roadside diner as she is on a red carpet. By David DeNicolo

90 A Private Beauty. In Saudi Arabia, the pursuit of beauty is an often complicated, largely private and intimate experience. But in spite of religious restrictions on the display of female beauty, Saudi women are avid consumers of cosmetics. By Katherine Zoepf

114

THE INGENUE Chloë Grace Moretz is wise beyond her years.

96 Life According to Dick Page. From the best markets in Paris to the only two items you need in your makeup bag, the master face painter shares his secrets.

98 The Power and the Glory. How dewy skin and matte red lips became the new boss uniform. By Liana Schaffner 108 Taking Pains. Ever wondered what it feels like to get fillers, lasers, or fat-melting treatments? We have the answers from patients who’ve tried them. By Katie Becker

114 She’s Not Even 20. Chloë Grace Moretz shares her unusual use for olive oil, the stories behind her tattoos, and the advice she got from Hillary Clinton.

ON THE COVER

Amanda Seyfried’s look can be re-created with the following: Eye Color Quad in 316, Bronzing Powder Duo in 1, and Extra Rich Lipstick in 309 by Clé de Peau Beauté. Velvet blazer by 3.1 Phillip Lim. Silk top by Dries Van Noten. Rings by Jennifer Fisher. Photographed by Scott Trindle. Hair: Rutger. Makeup: Maud Laceppe. Manicure: Gina Edwards. Prop stylist: Nicholas Des Jardins of Mary Howard Studio. Fashion stylist: Tony Irvine. Details, see Shopping Guide. 6 ALLURE NOVEMBER 2016

REGULARS 14 Contributors 16 Cover Look 20 Editor’s Letter 22 Beauty by Numbers 118 Shopping Guide 120 Autobiography. Sarah Jessica Parker fills in the blanks.

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: JOSEPHINE SCHIELE; PAUL MAFFI; SCOTT TRINDLE

Future Perfect. Three nextgeneration treatments that will change the way we smooth lines, eliminate undereye bags, and lighten dark spots.


ALLURE .COM Soft to the Touch

BEAUTY OBSESSED? Follow Allure on Instagram for peeks at the latest products, celebrity office visits, and beauty inspo. CoverGirl lipstick in Seduce Scarlet

Picture Perfect

The capital of the happiest country on earth has some of the best places to photograph. Visit Copenhagen through an Instagrammer’s eyes at allure.com/copenhagen. 8 ALLURE NOVEMBER 2016

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: MIREYA ACIERTO/GETTY IMAGES; JULIE CID; JOSEPHINE SCHIELE

Do you really know how a good moisturizer is supposed to feel when you apply it? Allure gets answers from top dermatologists at allure.com/moisturizers.


EDITOR IN CHIEF

MICHELLE LEE D E S I G N D I R E C TO R

RENEE RUPCICH

E X E C U T I V E E D I TO R

M A N AG I N G E D I TO R

DANIELLE PERGAMENT

AMANDA MEIGHER

E X E C U T I V E B E AU T Y D I R E C TO R

JENNY BAILLY D E P U T Y E D I TO R

PATTY ADAMS MARTINEZ D E P U T Y B E AU T Y D I R E C TO R

ELIZABETH SIEGEL

S E N I O R B E AU T Y E D I TO R

JESSICA CHIA B E AU T Y E D I TO R

CHLOE METZGER FA SH ION D I R E C TO R

RACHAEL WANG AC C E S S O R I E S D I R E C TO R

NICOLE CHAPOTEAU

WHAT’S YOUR BEAUTY HACK?

Frozen ketchup packets on your eyes to get rid of bags.

LEXI NOVAK A S S O C I AT E E D I TO R

A S S O C I AT E FA S H I O N E D I TO R

JENNA WOJCIECHOWSKI P H OTO D I R E C TO R

RHIANNA RULE B O O K I N G S D I R E C TO R

RO PENULIAR E X E C U T I V E P H OTO E D I TO R

BETH GARRABRANT S E N I O R P H OTO E D I TO R S

AMBER VENERABLE, HOLLY WATSON A S S O C I AT E P H OTO E D I TO R

HANNAH CHOI NICOLE ARGENTO A S S I S TA N T A R T D I R E C TO R

MEGAN MAQUERA

JUNIOR DESIGNER

BRIANA MARSHALL COPY CHIEF

CATHERINE GAMBRELL

Smudging mascara on my bottom lashes for a lived-in eyeliner look. I might have learned this from Kylie Jenner.

R E S E A R C H D I R E C TO R

LORI SEGAL

C O P Y E D I TO R

R E S E A R C H E D I TO R

AURA DAVIES

AMBER ANGELLE

When I’m not feeling it, I avoid mirrors—works like a charm!

A S S O C I AT E R E S E A R C H E D I TO R

CRISTINA RIVERA

S E N I O R A R T D I R E C TO R

P R O D U C T I O N D I R E C TO R

HEATHER TUMA NAPOLITANO P R O D U C T I O N M A N AG E R

VALERIE THOMAS P R O D U C T I O N A S S I S TA N T

EMMA LOUISE JOSLYN D I G I TA L D I R E C TO R

SIMONE OLIVER D E P U T Y D I G I TA L E D I TO R

RACHEL JACOBY ZOLDAN S E N I O R D I G I TA L E D I TO R

DEENA CAMPBELL

D I G I TA L D E P U T Y B E AU T Y D I R E C TO R

SOPHIA PANYCH S E N I O R S O C I A L M E D I A E D I TO R

GERILYN MANAGO

D I G I TA L E D I TO R S

ELIZABETH DENTON , SEUNGHEE SUH D I G I TA L P R O D U C T I O N M A N AG E R

MONICA PERRY

VIDEO PRODUCER

MAYA MARGOLINA

A S S O C I AT E D I G I TA L E D I TO R S

DEVON ABELMAN, RENEE JACQUES A S S O C I AT E S O C I A L M E D I A P R O D U C E R

ARIBA ALVI ASSOCIATE DIGITAL RESEARCH AND COPY EDITOR

JANELL HAZELWOOD

ASSOCIATE DIGITAL PRODUCER

LARA ADEKOLA

A S S O C I AT E P R E D I TO R

ANNA STYPKO A S S I S TA N T D I G I TA L E D I TO R

CHANTEL MOREL S E N I O R P RO D U CT M A N AG E R

RANDI EICHENBAUM

A S S O C I AT E D I R E C TO R , AU D I E N C E D E V E LO P M E N T

LINDSAY SANSONE

A N A LY T I C S M A N AG E R

TULIKA SINGH E X E C U T I V E D I R E C TO R , P U B L I C R E L AT I O N S

ERIN KAPLAN S P E C I A L P R OJ E C T S E D I TO R

MEGAN SALERNO A S S I S TA N T B U S I N E S S M A N AG E R

TAYLOR SHEA B E AU T Y A S S I S TA N T

KATHLEEN SUICO A S S I S TA N T TO T H E E D I TO R I N C H I E F

KRISTEN NICHOLS PATRICIA ALFONSO TORTOLANI C O N T R I B U T I N G P R O D U C T I O N D I R E C TO R

GRETCHEN VITAMVAS C O N T R I B U T I N G E D I TO R S

JILLIAN DEMPSEY, DAVID D E NICOLO, MEIRAV DEVASH, JOLENE EDGAR, FRANCIS KURKDJIAN, BROOKE LE POER TRENCH, CHRIS M C MILLAN, JUDITH NEWMAN, LIANA SCHAFFNER F O U N D I N G E D I TO R

LINDA WELLS

ARTISTIC DIRECTOR

ANNA WINTOUR

JOSEPHINE SCHIELE

C O N T R I B U T I N G E D I TO R I A L P R OJ E C T S D I R E C TO R


PUBLISHER, CHIEF REVENUE OFFICER

AGNES BOGDAN CHAPSKI HEAD OF BRAND MARKETING & STRATEGIC PARTNERSHIPS

JILL STEINBACH FRIEDSON

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, FINANCE & OPERATIONS

KEVIN DONOVAN

A DV E R T I S I N G E X EC U T I V E I N T EG R AT E D D I R ECTO RS

MARIA GARCIA, KIM CONWAY HALEY, LAUREN DECKER LERMAN, SANDRA MAURIELLO EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR–FASHION, JEWELRY, AND WATCH

SARAH YORK RICHARDS I N T EG R AT E D D I R E C TO R

CARLY GRESH I N T EG R AT E D M A N AG E R

ALEXANDRIA HAUGHEY EZRA SEAN ALVAREZ 323-965-3564 E X EC U T I V E M I DW E ST D I R ECTO RS

CHRISTINA KROLOPP 312-649-6731 ANGIE PACKARD PRENDERGAST 312-649-3509 I TA LY

WHAT’S YOUR BEAUTY HACK?

ELENA DE GIULI 011-39-02-655-84223

PAC I F I C N O RT H W E ST D I R ECTO R

NATALIE BANKER TAQUINO 415-955-8280 N E W E N G L A N D/ D E T RO I T

KRISTIN HAVENS 585-255-0207 D I R ECT R E S P O N S E

REBECCA VOLK 800-753-5370 ext. 489 U. K . / F R A N C E

SELIM MATARACI 011-33-1-44-78-00-62

Wash your makeup brushes with baby shampoo.

E X EC U T I V E S O U T H W E ST D I R ECTO R

S E N I O R B U S I N E SS D I R ECTO R

SHERRI GINSBERG

DIGITAL H E A D O F D I G I TA L R E V E N U E

NICOLE AMICO SMITH D I G I TA L AC C O U N T E X EC U T I V E S

HARRIET KADAR, ALISON WOOD D I G I TA L SA L E S D E V E LO P M E N T M A N AG E R

SAMANTHA DANA D I G I TA L C A M PA I G N M A N AG E R

ERICA CHEUNG

D I G I TA L SA L E S P L A N N E R

ELIZABETH MILLER

CONTENT MARKETING AND PARTNERSHIPS E X EC U T I V E D I R ECTO R, ST R AT EG I C PA RT N E RS H I P S

DAVID OLESNEVICH

C O N T E N T M A R K E T I N G D I R ECTO R

ALEXIS WALL

B E AU T Y B OX M A N AG E R

INTEGR ATED MARKETING AND CRE ATIVE SERVICES E X EC U T I V E D I R ECTO R

ERIN BRENNAN D E S I G N D I R ECTO R

MARIS BODELL S E N I O R D I R ECTO R

STEFENI BELLOCK

D I R ECTO R

JUSTIN REIS

S E N I O R M A N AG E R

MALLORY MILLER

NICOLE SAFIR

Coconut oil.

MARKETING SERVICES

Lipstick as blush.

E X EC U T I V E D I R ECTO R

GERARD FARRELL S E N I O R D I R ECTO R, M A R K E T I N G I N T E L L I G E N C E

JENNIFER FRIEDMAN PEREZ E X EC U T I V E ASS I STA N T TO T H E P U B L I S H E R

VINCENT KEEGAN S A L E S A S S O C I AT E S

JULIA BROKAW, CAROLINE GRANGER I N T EG R AT E D C O O R D I N ATO R

BECCA LEVENSON I N T E G R AT E D A S S I S TA N T S

ZUIE BILLINGS, ALEXANDRA KELIKIAN, CARA KURICA, STEPHANIE TILLISON P U B L I S H E D BY C O N D É N A S T

SVP–B u s i n e s s O p e ra t i o n s SVP–Corporate Controller SVP–Managing Director, 23 Stories SVP–Network Sales & Partnerships, Condé Nast & C h i e f Reve n u e O f f i c e r, C N É SVP–Financial Planning & Analysis SVP–Strategy, 23 Stories SVP–Ad Products & Monetization SVP–Licensing SVP–Re s e a rc h & A n a l y t i c s SVP–D i g i t a l O p e ra t i o n s SVP–Human Resources General Manager–Digital

S. I. NEWHOUSE, JR. CHARLES H. TOWNSEND ROBERT A. SAUERBERG, JR. DAVID E. GEITHNER EDWARD J. MENICHESCHI JILL BRIGHT JOANN MURRAY FRED SANTARPIA MONICA RAY CAMERON R. BLANCHARD DAVID ORLIN DAVID B. CHEMIDLIN JOSH STINCHCOMB LISA VALENTINO SUZANNE REINHARDT PADRAIG CONNOLLY DAVID ADAMS CATHY HOFFMAN GLOSSER STEPHANIE FRIED LARRY BAACH NICOLE ZUSSMAN MATTHEW STARKER

C O N D É N A S T E N T E R TA I N M E N T President EVP/General Manager, Digital Video EVP & Chief Operating Officer EVP–Motion Pictures EVP–Alternative TV EVP–CNÉ Studios SVP–Marketing & Partner Management

DAWN OSTROFF JOY MARCUS SAHAR ELHABASHI JEREMY STECKLER JOE L ABRACIO AL EDGINGTON TEAL NEWLAND

C O N D É N A S T I N T E R N AT I O N A L

12

Chairman and Chief Executive JONATHAN NEWHOUSE President NICHOLAS COLERIDGE Condé Nast is a global media company producing premium content for more than 263 million consumers in 30 markets. condenast.com condenastinternational.com

JOSEPHINE SCHIELE

Chairman Emeritus Chairman President & Chief Executive Officer Chief Financial Officer Chief Marketing Officer & President–Condé Nast Media Group Chief Administrative Officer Chief Human Resources Officer EVP & Chief Digital Officer EVP–Consumer Marketing EVP–Corporate Communications


CONTRIBUTORS

THEY SAY EVERYONE HAS A SUPERPOWER. Or at least a cool secret trick

ALIQUE

JESSICA CHIA

Photographer, “The Power and the Glory”

Editor, Beauty Reporter, and aromatherapist

...taking the bad out of a bad day:

...not getting sad and tired at 3 P.M.:

“Turn the music up loud and dance like crazy.”

“Breathe in some sweet orange essential oil—it’ll wake you up faster than a matcha latte.”

RIAWNA CAPRI AND NIKKI LEE

INGRID K. WILLIAMS

Los Angeles hairstylists, “Extra, Extra”

Writer, “Getting Steamy,” and Ligurian local

...sitting in traffic for 118 hours:

...ordering pasta like an Italian:

“Call your grandmother.”

“Never mix cheese and seafood.”

14 ALLURE NOVEMBER 2016

JOSEPHINE SCHIELE (MAKEUP); TIJL DHE NIJE (ALIQUE); SOPHIE ELGORT (CHIA)

of some kind. We asked our experts for their advice on...


COVER LOOK

Seyfried handled the sweltering heat like a pro. Dress by Akris. Details, see Shopping Guide.

AMANDA SEYFRIED

Behind the scenes at Allure’s cover shoot.

T

he sun was blazing, the dog was panting, and Amanda Seyfried wanted to get something off her chest: “I cut my own bangs,” she said, almost apologetically, of her long, sideswept layers. “But they look good, right?” We were in Stone Ridge, New York, at a private estate to photograph the actress for her third Allure cover. “They’re good,” said hairstylist Rutger, then added gently, “but I’m going to need to even them out a bit.” While in the makeup chair, Seyfried tossed blueberries into the air to Finn, her Australian shepherd (and Instagram costar). It was lively on set that day, and Seyfried was in the mood to confess things. “I hate it,” she said of her Pure Barre workout. “But it has moved my butt—it’s higher now.” Layers of velvet may not go well with a sunny afternoon in the mid-90s, but Seyfried had no complaints as she posed for photographer Scott Trindle. “I’d rather be hot than wearing swimsuits on the beach in winter,” she said. Still, she seemed happy to slip back into her halter top, denim cutoffs, and Birkenstocks when it was over. —REPORTING BY PATTY ADAMS MARTINEZ

Watch a behind-thescenes video of Seyfried’s photo shoot at allure.com/ amanda-bts.

16 ALLURE NOVEMBER 2016

CLOCKWISE FROM BOTTOM LEFT: TAWNI BANNISTER (2); JOSEPHINE SCHIELE

Coat by Boss. Dress by Alix. Boots by 3.1 Phillip Lim. Hat by Mara Hoffman. Details, see Shopping Guide.


COVER LOOK

Dress by Eckhaus Latta. Details, see Shopping Guide.

BEAUTY LESSON

Hair “I wanted the hair to match Amanda’s personality: very easy, not too overdone,” said Rutger. He created loose waves by wrapping small sections of Seyfried’s hair around a oneinch curling iron, leaving the ends out. Then he misted on dry shampoo to roughen up the texture and combed through it with his fingers. As for those bangs: Rutger blended them in with Seyfried’s waves—and told the actress not to quit her day job.

Seyfried’s look can be re-created with the following (from top): Extra Rich Lipstick in 309, Eye Color Quad in 316, and Bronzing Powder Duo in 1 by Clé de Peau Beauté.

18 ALLURE NOVEMBER 2016

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: TAWNI BANNISTER; JOSEPHINE SCHIELE (3)

Makeup Makeup artist Maud Laceppe dusted bronzer all over Seyfried’s face to give her a “warm, outdoorsy glow.” She also mixed the golden powder with a pearly gloss before dabbing it on the actress’s lips with a small brush. Laceppe then lined and smudged Seyfried’s eyes with brown and black pencils and coated her lashes with mascara.


LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

Portrait of a

POTUS

Like many of you, I’ve spent a lot of time marveling at this monster-truck rally of an election year. The hubbub over Hillary Clinton’s $12,495 Armani jacket got me thinking about how often the conversation has circled back to candidates’ appearance. Let’s replay some highlights (or, er, lowlights?): • Donald Trump talks smack about Carly Fiorina: “Look at that face. Would anyone vote for that?” • He mocks Marco Rubio’s heeled boots. • Rubio swings back at Trump’s “small hands” and spray tan. • Jeb Bush calls out Trump’s expensive wardrobe. • Trump stirs the crowd at a rally: “Do I look like a president? How handsome am I, right? How handsome?... Does Hillary look presidential?” I could go on and on about the negative tone of the election, but all this talk of appearance also raises the question: What does it really mean these days to “look presidential”? Of course, many of us harbor some preconceived notion of what a president should look like. Before the roster of prospects was whittled down, I heard plenty of people say that they couldn’t imagine voting for candidate X or candidate Y because “he just doesn’t look presidential.” For decades, history and Hollywood served up the image of a POTUS who was a salt-andpepper-haired, moderately slim white guy. But I’d like to think that cliché has been shattered in

recent years thanks to Barack Obama and any number of diverse depictions of the commander in chief in entertainment (hey there, Julia Louis-Dreyfus). If we’ve chipped away at the walls of color—black, brown, white, everything in between—and gender, I suppose the larger question is: How much should candidates care about their appearance? Frankly, office seekers have to walk a fine line. Caring too much about—and particularly spending too much on—one’s appearance is generally perceived as vanity, as weakness. A politician would undoubtedly be skewered for getting Botox or an eye lift. John Edwards shelling out $400 on a haircut in 2007? Get your pitchforks, people. I get it: It’s human nature to take looks into consideration. But let’s all remember to look at the bigger picture when we head to the polls. What I really want is a president who looks, sounds, and is sane, intelligent, and trustworthy. Is that so much to ask?

Michelle Lee, Editor in Chief @heymichellelee

JUST FOLLOW THESE EASY STEPS: 1 Download and open the free app on your phone or tablet. 2 Tap the camera icon. 3 Hold your camera over the page. 4 Enjoy the special features! 20 ALLURE NOVEMBER 2016

JOSEPHINE SCHIELE

Allure + Shazam We’ve partnered with Shazam to give you even more from this issue. Look for the Shazam icon (below) on our pages to access behind-the-scenes videos, expert advice, and lots of exciting extras.


BEAUT Y BY NUMBERS

Headbands Basically, they keep hair off the face. But when something has a place at the Oscars, in the NBA, and in a presidential campaign, there’s really nothing basic about it. —REPORTING BY JESA CALAOR

1992

YEAR THE ASSOCIATED PRESS ran the headline “Hillary: ‘I’m Standing Up for Headbands’” after the potential First Lady was blasted for her go-to hair accessory.

17 500

$

.75

PRICE OF A “Vote Hillary Clinton for President” headband on zazzle.com.

8.98

APPROXIMATE NUMBER OF headbands costume designer Eric Daman outfitted Leighton Meester’s character in throughout Gossip Girl’s six-season run.

WEIGHT IN CARATS OF the diamonds on Lupita Nyong’o’s headband at the 2014 Oscars.

26

.5

PERCENTAGE ABOVE league average that LeBron James shot in his first full game of the 2014– 2015 season without his signature—and some say “magical”—headband.

22 ALLURE NOVEMBER 2016

32

2016

YEAR RODARTE DESIGNERS Kate and Laura Mulleavy created headbands of cast-metal orchids woven together with real flowers that models wore across the back of their heads.

LIAM GOODMAN

From top: Jennifer Behr headbands, $895 and $2,800 (jenniferbehr.com).

LENGTH IN INCHES OF THE original bra-strap headband, which debuted on the Moschino runway in 1998.


BY JESA CALAOR

Beauty School

T H E T I P S , T H E S H O R T C U T S , A N D A L L T H E S T E P - B Y- S T E P I N S T R U C T I O N S

EARNING YOUR WINGS Left: Urban Decay Eyeshadow in Shockwave. Above: Hair, Zaiya Latt. Makeup: Cynthia Sobek. Manicure: Holly Falcone. Model: Jenna Earle. Fashion stylist: Nina Sterghiou. PHOTOGRAPHED BY ANDREW STINSON

JOSEPHINE SCHIELE

A shimmery swipe of purple streaked past the outer edges of your eyes takes equal parts skill and moxie.


BEAUT Y SCHOOL Versace Spring 2016

Make Up For Ever Aqua XL Eye Pencil in I-90

HOW TO MAKE PURPLE WINGS 1 The softness of the edges makes this vibrant purple feel sophisticated, so create the shape with a powder shadow, not a liner. Dip a flat, square brush in the powder and press the tip into the base of your upper lashes. When you reach the outer corner, position the brush at a 45-degree angle to create the triangle.

2

3 To give the wing just enough definition (and clean up any mistakes), run a small concealer brush dipped in foundation against the bottom edge. Leave the top edge soft and smudgy.

HIGH TECH VS. LOW TECH

BOLD LASHES Just when we thought we knew our way around every wand, curler, flare, and strip, we’ve found two new ways to get lashier lashes.

LOW TECH On the other end of the cool-lash-gadget spectrum: those bristly flossing wands. Yes, they’re designed to get gunk out of your teeth, but makeup artist Kabuki likes to dip one in black mascara, then run it down the bottom lashes. “It’s the perfect size to get those tiny little hairs,” he says.

HIGH TECH Flirt Flashes Lash Applicator

26 ALLURE NOVEMBER 2016

What is this odd tape dispenser–tweezer hybrid for? Applying false lashes, of course. The device (the real thing is just slightly bigger than what you see here) comes preloaded with 44 bitty strips of lashes (three lashes on each). Simply click to release a strip from the tool’s tip. Dab the base of the lashes with glue, wait a beat, then press the tool to your lash line and click again to release the lashes.

Left: Kabuki works on a model’s lashes. Below: GUM Proxabrush.

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP RIGHT: MARK LEIBOWITZ; CHUCK FIORELLO; JOSEPHINE SCHIELE (4)

Trace over the upper lash line with a purple pencil—but first warm the pencil by running the tip over the back of your hand.


BEAUT TY Y SCH HO OO O LL Cara Delevingne

HOW TO

BODY DETOX If the holidays have you feeling more puffed up than the Snoopy balloon in the Macy’s parade, you’re not alone. Here’s what you need to do.

THE 1-2-3: UPGRADE YOUR PART

Kate Bosworth

A braid may not be the easiest way to section your hair— but it’s easily the coolest. We asked hairstylist Mara Roszak to walk us through how she created the look above on Cara Delevingne.

Scarlett Johansson

28 ALLURE NOVEMBER 2016

1 2 3

Part your hair as you normally would. Take a half-inch section from the back of your head where the part ends and work a dab of styling paste through it, says Roszak, who uses L’Oréal Paris Txt-It Hyper-Fix Putty (she works with L’Oréal).

Pull the ends of that small section all the way forward and braid it tightly alongside the part. When you reach your hairline, curve the braid around to the side and tuck it behind your ear. Tie it off with a tiny clear plastic elastic. To keep the braid from shifting around, you need hair tape (the kind stylists use to hold extensions in place). Cut inch-long strips and slide them underneath the braid. Fear not: The tape is invisible—but you will need an oil-based remover to take it off at the end of the night.

It may sound counterintuitive, but drinking lots of fluids flushes out the accumulated liquid that causes bloating. Dietitian Lauren Slayton encourages clients to sip dandelion-root tea, a natural diuretic.

SNACK ON FRUIT. Fresh fruits and vegetables are a gentler form of digestion-easing fiber than grains or beans. Strawberries and cantaloupe are particularly good choices—they contain potassium, which counteracts bloating sodium, says Slayton.

DO A MASK. A mineral-rich clay mask doesn’t just degunk pores—it also helps draw out excess fluid. Smear it along your jawline and under your eyes to relieve puffiness.

CLOCKWISE FROM BOTTOM LEFT: JIM SPELLMAN/WIREIMAGE; JON KOPALOFF/FILMMAGIC; JOSEPHINE SCHIELE; @BRIDGETBRAGERHAIR

SIP TEA.


H A I R I N S P I R AT I O N Shazam for a guide to every type of extensions— including the perfect ones for you.

Extra

Extra Extensions extend. (Obviously.)

But if you think that’s all they do, fine-haired friends, you’re very much mistaken. “Extensions aren’t just for long, mermaid hair,” says hairstylist Riawna Capri of Nine Zero One salon in Los Angeles. They can add texture, volume, even highlights. To prove the point, Capri and Nine Zero One co-owner Nikki Lee used them to give three models thicker, sexier, wavier (but not necessarily longer) hair.

Reporting by Chloe Metzger

These pages: Hair, Riawna Capri and Nikki Lee; makeup, Tsipporah Liebman. Fashion stylist: Sue Choi. PHOTOGRAPHED BY EMMAN MONTALVAN


H A I R I N S P I R AT I O N

B

ORE F E

AFTER

In Transition “Extensions let you immediately get past the awkward phase of growing out a bob,” says Lee. But they don’t have to be one length or stick straight. In fact, they shouldn’t be. “We added graduated layers so the shortest layer you see is her real hair,” says Capri. Throwing in a few curves completes the illusion, seamlessly blending everything together. Capri twisted sections around a curling iron with a one-inch barrel, leaving the last couple of inches of the hair straight. Above, on Corrie Lejuwaan: Jersey top by Topshop Boutique. Left: Wool top by J. W. Anderson. Vice Lipstick in Hitch Hike by Urban Decay. Details, see Shopping Guide.

AFTER

BEFORE

Body Building To get the most natural volumizing effect from extensions, don’t layer them around the whole head—put them only on the sides. “We also used two different shades of blonde here so there wouldn’t be an obvious disconnect between her own hair and the extensions,” says Capri, who misted the top couple of inches of the extensions with light-brown Rita Hazan Root Concealer to blend them with the model’s grown-out roots. Above, on Taylor Kraemer: Cotton top by Helmut Lang. Right: Wool polyester dress by Nika Tang. Polyester top by Topshop Boutique. Silver earring by Sorelle. Details, see Shopping Guide.

32 ALLURE NOVEMBER 2016


H A I R I N S P I R AT I O N

B E F O RE

There’s permanent hair color, wash-out hair color, and the hair color you take out at the end of the night. (Yes, that’s a thing.) To give our model natural-looking highlights that added lushness to her curls, Lee layered caramel clip-in extensions into her auburn hair. “We pulled the darker pieces through the light ones so the effect was subtle, not chunky,” Lee says. Above left, on Sera Mann: Jacquard jacket by Rodebjer. Cotton linen top by Topshop. Earrings from Ben-Amun by Isaac Manevitz. Makeup colors: Colorful Eyeshadow in Watermelon Falls and Colorful Gloss Balm in Earth Angel by Sephora Collection. Above right: Top, Mann’s own. Details, see Shopping Guide.

34 ALLURE NOVEMBER 2016

Keep It Real

AFTER Color Scheme

Your fake hair should never be fake. Stay with us: Whether you choose clip-in extensions (like the ones Capri and Lee used on these pages) or bonded ones that last for months, they should be made of human hair. (Expect to pay at least $250 for clip-ins and up to $4,500 for bonded extensions.) “Synthetic hair has this sheen that looks so fake,” says Capri. Just as problematic: You can’t apply any heat to it. And without a curling iron, the languid bends and waves you see here aren’t possible.


FROM TOP: FRANCOIS G. DURAND/WIREIMAGE; JOSEPHINE SCHIELE

To create this look, McGrath used her new Lust 004 lip kit—and Scotch tape for cleaning up glitter fallout (and there will be fallout).

LOOK WE LOVE

Hot Lips

Beauty Reporter

T H E B E AU T Y N E W S YO U N E E D T O K N O W N O W

A

s of right now, we’re swearing off: salad dressing, coffee mugs, and possibly speaking with our mouth. This look is that striking— and that worth it. For Atelier Versace’s fall show, makeup artist Pat McGrath painted models’ lips with matte red lipstick and pressed loose red glitter on top. (For a higher-shine finish, stir M.A.C.’s loose red glitter into its Lipmix Gloss, as we did at left.) Either way, it’s a look that’s bold and stunning and maybe says all there is to say.

NOVEMBER 2016 ALLURE 37


BE AUT Y REPORTER

Revlon ColorStay Crème Eye Shadow in Honey, Black Currant, and Cherry Blossom. Flexible polymers create a force field that deflects creasing and fading. Of the 12 delicate, luminous colors, these three are particularly out of this world. $7.99 each.

Tarte Double-Ended Cream Cheek and Lip Brush. Doublesided genius: Precise and tapered lip brush on one end, full and fluffy blush blender on the other. $34.

EDITORS’ FAVORITES THE STUFF WE PLAN TO STEAL FROM THE BEAUTY CLOSET WHEN NO ONE’S WATCHING.

Blistex Bliss Flip in Soft & Silky and Ultra Moisturizing. Spinning open the flip top—and whirling it closed—is as addictive as rolling on the lip-softening balm. $3.99 each.

Zoya Professional Lacquer in Finley, Tara, and Britta. Whether glitter-flecked or high-gloss, these purples are so party-ready that your favorite red might hibernate for the winter. $10 each.

38 ALLURE MONTH 2016

Murad Retinol Youth Renewal Serum. Slowly dissolving lipid shells release powerhouse retinol over time, so skin gets all of the antiaging benefits—and none of the burn. $88.

Yves Saint Laurent Rouge Pur Couture Collector Sparkle Clash Edition lipstick. Bet you didn’t know you had a weakness for star-embossed, creamy lipsticks in shimmery gold cases. Call it self-discovery. $37 each.

JOSEPHINE SCHIELE

Missoni Eau de Toilette. This sweet, zesty blend of blood orange and peony has all the dolce vita appeal of a sunny zigzag print. $94 for 3.4 ounces.


BE AUT Y REPORTER

PRODUCT REVIEW

Curaprox Toothpaste

FLUFF PIECE

What it is: A charcoal-based whitening toothpaste Key ingredients: Activated charcoal (lifts stains); mica, titanium dioxide, and tin oxide (brighten teeth); ethyl menthane carboxamide (freshens breath) How it looks/feels: It’s a photo negative of your everyday toothpaste: jet black with blue flecks. Mid-brushing, the gel could pass for any other paste—nongritty and foamy with a mild minty flavor—until you eye the unnerving tar-covered appearance of your teeth and gums in the mirror. Why we like it: Rather than bleaching (and potentially sensitizing) teeth, charcoal absorbs surface stains to return teeth to the shade they were approximately 5,185 coffee runs ago, says dentist Joseph Banker. It’ll take a week or more before stains start to lift, but a mineral-based blue pigment subtly tints teeth so they look a bit brighter after one brushing. —JESA CALAOR

The fuzzy pastel ribbons that held back models’ wild curls at the Fendi couture show (shown here) looked like unspooled cotton candy. Really, really luxurious cotton candy. They were, in fact, mink fur. If pelts aren’t your dig (we hear you), use craft-store faux-fur trim to tie back any amount of hair. Look for natural colors (which make fakes look more luxe), and leave the ends long and uneven. —JESSICA CHIA

Above: Curaprox toothpaste and toothbrush.

Liquid Gold

H

ooch is having a moment. Bourbon and American whiskey sales rose nearly 8 percent last year. And now fragrance brands are serving up scents with blatantly boozy accords. Phuong Dang Leather Up combines whiskey, rose, and suede for an effect so smooth, it skims the pulse points. Constructed with three primary notes, Elizabeth and James Nirvana Bourbon is spare, modern...dare we say neat? Cypress Fig by Apolis balances vanilla bourbon with splashy citrus, while Replica Jazz Club by Maison Margiela distills the swank and smoky essence of an upscale speakeasy. Shaken or spritzed, each of these scents has an earthy, assertive quality we find straight-up sexy. —LIANA SCHAFFNER 40 ALLURE NOVEMBER 2016

From left: Elizabeth and James Nirvana Bourbon, Apolis Cypress Fig, Maison Margiela Replica Jazz Club, and Phuong Dang Leather Up.

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: COURTESY OF FENDI; JOSEPHINE SCHIELE (2)

TA K I N G N OT E S


BE AUT Y REPORTER

BEAUTIFUL PEOPLE

MADELINE POOLE

B

Clothing and jewelry, Poole’s own. Color Therapy nail polish in Ja-Cozy by Sally Hansen. Manicure: Madeline Poole. Hair: Zaiya Latt. Makeup: Cynthia Sobek. Photographed by Andrew Stinson.

efore nail artist Madeline Poole became a backstage regular at Stella McCartney and DKNY shows, she was an art-school graduate working in a Baltimore posterrestoration shop, repairing vintage Barnum & Bailey circus signs and navy recruitment bulletins. “I spent my days fixing artifacts with teeny, tiny paintbrushes and realized I loved small-scale painting,” Poole says. But it wasn’t until she moved to Hollywood and watched a manicurist at work on the set of a fashion shoot that she scrapped her plans to become a painter and enrolled in beauty school. “It just clicked for me that I’d rather do miniature paintings on a live hand than on a lone, sad canvas,” says Poole, 30. Two nail-art books, a crazy-popular Instagram feed (@mpnails, if you don’t already follow her), and a few thousand manicures later, Poole landed the role of global color ambassador for Sally Hansen. Her latest project for the company is fine-tuning shades for the new Color Therapy line: 38 nude, pink, and jewel-tone polishes infused with argan and eveningprimrose oils that sink into nails to keep them flexible and strong. Also key: The colors look as saturated on your fingertips as they do on salon and store shelves. “It was so frustrating to buy nail polishes that looked bright and opaque in the bottle only to find they were completely sheer or dull when I painted them on,” says Poole. “With these polishes, what you see is what you get.” —CHLOE METZGER

Kiss and Make Up When Rocky and Apollo put competition aside, they crushed Clubber Lang in the third round (it’s not a spoiler if the movie came out in 1982). Beauty-world competitors, however—not so quick to join forces. But two old friends, Too Faced cofounder Jerrod Blandino and Kat Von D, are rewriting the rules. “I called her up and said, ‘Let’s do something that shows the world we’re better together,’ ” says Blandino. On the surface, the pairing isn’t the most likely: “There’s a lot of pink and glitter in the Too Faced world, and there’s a lot of black in Kat Von D beauty,” says Von D. “But we both celebrate femininity in our own ways.” A standout of the union: a magnetized eyeshadow set (right) that includes six new shadow shades from each brand. Friendship for the win. —LEXI NOVAK 42 ALLURE NOVEMBER 2016

The Too Faced x Kat Von D Beauty Better Together Eyeshadow Palette Set will be available in late December.

FOR PHOTOGRAPHERS’ CREDITS, SEE CREDITS PAGE.

From far left: A matte-and-chrome look by Poole, Sally Hansen Color Therapy polish in Indiglow, an evil-eye design by Poole, and Sally Hansen Color Therapy polish in Therapewter.


BE AUT Y REPORTER

C U LT O B J E C T

Stark white, trimmed in gold, glinting in the sun. That’s a description of the yacht anchored off Palawan we’d like to be on right now. But the same words apply to the new Tom Ford Soleil Eye and Cheek Palette, a fantasy of clean lines and tasteful shimmer. The ivory clutch houses a quartet of iridescent shadows in sunset hues, while the highlighter and blush flanking it warm the high points of the face. The powders are soft and weightless enough to sweep on with an idle finger—from a reclining deck chair. —LIANA SCHAFFNER Tom Ford Soleil Eye and Cheek Palette, shown here in Warm (also available in Cool), $155.

44 ALLURE NOVEMBER 2016

JOSEPHINE SCHIELE

The Good Life


BE AUT Y REPORTER

ON TRIAL

Blue Light Is it a villain that’s aging your skin or a hero that eradicates acne and skin cancer?

OUR NEW OBSESSION

DRY Spell

It’s a truth universally acknowledged that sheet masks make you look like a serial killer or a superhero. Or so we thought, until we saw Nannette de Gaspé’s Restorative Techstile Masque for the Eyes. The mask’s scalloped edges and filigreed design seem like something we’d wear to a masquerade ball (if we ever went to a masquerade ball), not a place as downmarket as our bathroom sink. But that’s not even the coolest part: It’s totally dry. Not dry-oil dry. Actually dry-dry. Embedded in the feltlike mask are semisolid plant oils that warm up and imperceptibly melt at body temperature, explains cosmetic chemist Ni’Kita Wilson. Those oils jibe well with the skin barrier and can be more effective at delivering active ingredients, like peptides and antioxidants, than the waterbased masks we’re used to. After 15 minutes, our skin was a lot softer and glowier; if you have oily skin, use it before bed to avoid outright shine. —J. C.

Shazam for more sheet masks.

Left: Nannette de Gaspé’s collection includes masks for the face, eyes, hands, neck, and mouth.

FROM TOP: PHIL OH/TRUNK ARCHIVE; JOSEPHINE SCHIELE (2)

The Prosecution: Blue light, which cell phones and other digital screens emit at low levels, can penetrate skin and let loose skin-aging free radicals. The claim is scary and, so far, relatively unsupported—save by the chief scientists at Junetics, a company that just so happens to make a new cream designed to protect against blue light. Only one small study found that blue light might age skin, and it didn’t separate blue light from violet. The Defense: Blue light is used to treat precancerous spots in an in-office procedure known as photodynamic therapy and can also kill acne-causing bacteria at certain wavelengths, says dermatologist Brian Zelickson. (Your phone’s blue light isn’t acne-fighting.) Skin should be clearer after several weeks of twice-weekly, 20-minute in-office sessions or daily use of the latest at-home options, says dermatologist Anne Chapas. Neutrogena’s Light Therapy Acne Mask (above left) teams blue light with anti-inflammatory red, while Tria’s Positively Clear Acne Clearing Blue Light is almost as powerful as in-office LEDs. The Verdict: The only thing truly endangered by your phone’s blue light is your beauty sleep; blue light depresses melatonin levels, which in turn may elevate collagen-degrading cortisol. Research is on the side of blue light’s safety in at-home and in-office devices and even suggests it could speed skin’s wound-healing process. —JESSICA CHIA


Royal Treatment

JOSEPHINE SCHIELE

Dressed in a crown of blue jewels and the most opulent floral brocade, Miu Miu’s statuesque heels are holding court this fall. —AMBER ANGELLE

Fashion Notes

C U LT O B J E C T

Miu Miu brocade shoes, $1,350, at select Miu Miu stores.

NOVEMBER 2016 ALLURE 51


NOTES: EDITOR’S OBSESSIONS Off-White Fall 2016

MIU MIU DENIM DRESS. “I would layer this over jeans—I love the lace accent.” Details, see Shopping Guide.

AMBUSH SILVER NECKLACE. “This pendant reminds me of a class ring.” $463 (ambushdesign .com).

Allure accessories director Nicole Chapoteau is layering denim on denim—on denim.

ALXVNDRA JEANS. “Two old pairs of jeans sewn together? That’s my kind of recycling.” $375 (alxvndra.com). DIOR DIORSHOW MASCARA IN PRO NAVY. “Blue mascara makes my eyes sparkle.” $28.50 (dior.com).

DEREK LAM LEATHER BOOTS. “The clean silhouette elevates any denim look.” $950, at Derek Lam, N.Y.C. (212-493-4454).

CHANEL BAG. “The ultimate denim accessory.” $3,500, at Chanel stores.

JOSHUA WOODS (OFF-WHITE); JEREMY ALLEN (CHAPOTEAU); STUART TYSON (STILL LIFES)

Blue Period


NOTES: EDITOR’S OBSESSIONS

J. W. ANDERSON COAT. “Like Granny’s, but even better.” $4,600, at Dover Street Market New York, N.Y.C. (646-837-7750). Roberto Cavalli Fall 2016

SAINT LAURENT VELVET BAG. “The beading is to die for. It already looks like an heirloom.” $3,450, at Saint Laurent, N.Y.C. (212-980-2970).

Shazam for Rachael’s style tips.

New Vintage Allure fashion director Rachael Wang is taking the stuffiness out of velvet and gold by pairing them with down-to-earth denim.

DRIES VAN NOTEN VELOUR SHOES. “These are decadent in the best way.” $660, at Bergdorf Goodman, N.Y.C. (800-558-1855). MARA CARRIZO SCALISE GOLD NECKLACE. “It’s reminiscent of an antique watch chain.” $1,045 (maramcs.com).

LEVI’S JEANS. “Rugged, all-American jeans—my wardrobe staple.” $148 (levi.com). ROBERTO CAVALLI SILK TOP. “Loud and unapologetic.” Price available upon request, at Roberto Cavalli stores.

SONNY VANDEVELDE/VOGUERUNWAY.COM (RUNWAY); JEREMY ALLEN (WANG); STUART TYSON (STILL LIFES)

BYREDO MOJAVE GHOST. “My signature scent: Bright, subtle, and mysterious.” $230 (byredo .com).


TREND REPORT

Gucci

Balenciaga

Diane Keaton in Annie Hall

have a problem with white jeans. Not for what they are—which is bleached cotton cut into a pair of tubes and sewn together—but for what they represent. Because white jeans tend to be unforgiving. It takes a woman with healthy self-esteem to pull them off. Historically speaking, I have not been a woman with healthy self-esteem. Therefore, I have not been a woman who wears white jeans. And until recently, I felt a pang of spite every time I passed a woman who wore white jeans and looked great in them. The aversion is like a self-inflicted allergy: irritating, unpredictable in its emergence, and entirely my own fault. It may also be universal. Every woman I know has a similar irrational intolerance for a particular item of clothing. Rompers, for example. Or kitten heels. Or sleeveless turtlenecks. Or peplums. Or empire waists.

CLOTHES

Encounters

What do you do when an entire season’s worth of runway trends don’t exactly speak to you? By Molly Young

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: IMAXTREE; INDIGITAL.TV; JASON LLOYD-EVANS; EVERETT COLLECTION

Dries Van Noten


TREND REPORT

Or combat boots. Or whatever. It’s the item that you tried on once as a teenager, and it looked so miserable that it still makes your skin crawl to think of it. The item that, when you see another woman looking great in it, injects you with petty, unfeminist feelings. None of this is reasonable, but neither is fashion. Which brings me to the runways this season.

t

Thom Browne

Prada

60 ALLURE NOVEMBER 2016

IT’S AS THOUGH ALL THE DESIGNERS CAME UP WITH A MASTER LIST OF THE MOST DIFFICULT-TO-WEAR ITEMS. Anjelica Huston

with argyle tights and drop-shoulder jackets bearing fur sleeves, just in case any of us want our legs and arms to look four times as big as they are. Sheer madness, all of it. And yet if we know anything about designers, it’s that their madness always has a method. While grappling with the fall forecast and its highconcept gear, I found myself turning to the French-born notion of jolie laide. That phrase—which Google helpfully translates as “pretty ugly”—refers to the unconventional glory of the not quite perfect. It’s used to describe people, typically women, who sport an idiosyncratic, non-textbook beauty.

The gorgeous lady with a gap tooth or a crooked nose or a slight asymmetry in her eyes (or all of the above)? She might qualify as jolie laide. Anjelica Huston is a commonly cited example. Jolie laide is the opposite of Barbie dolls and Kate Upton and Joan Smalls; it’s Charlotte Gainsbourg and Daphne Groeneveld and Lady Gaga. Beauty icons are not jolie laide, but style icons often are. And in clothing terms, jolie laide might be exactly what has marched off the runway and into our lives for the brisker seasons ahead. Sound intimidating? I thought so, too, until I realized that a bit of jolie laide fashion might be a relief after all the flesh-baring pageantry of summer. Gone are the sandals and off-theshoulder sundresses of June. Gone are the crop tops and featherweight slip dresses of July. Come fall, nobody is mistaking your outerwear for underwear, unless you habitually fall asleep in a floor-length mustard velvet turtleneck dress. Best of all, you won’t hear the phrase “body-con” for at least six months, guaranteed. See? You’re breathing more deeply already. Plus, the new fall clothes raise imaginative possibilities that crop tops can’t touch. Can you see yourself draped in a tent-loose, pin-striped pantsuit? Or buttoned into a brocade tuxedo jacket with overstated shoulder pads and a matching necktie? Probably not, and that’s the fun of it. Experimenting with new identities

FROM TOP: JASON LLOYD-EVANS; WALTER MCBRIDE/CORBIS VIA GETTY IMAGES; JASON LLOYD-EVANS

he runways were—what’s the best way to say this? It’s as though all the designers held a secret conference where they came up with a master list of the most difficult-to-wear items and then populated their fall runways exclusively with those items. There were oversize, rough-edged trench coats belted perilously high on the waist and tweedy menswear-inspired trousers that would seem to require at least 40 inches of leg to pull off (or on, as it were). There were fuzzy midcalf skirts. There was doublebreasted everything. Miuccia Prada, who is the undisputed queen of challenging fashion, outdid herself


TREND REPORT

recognize the woman in the mirror, but I was starting to respect her style. In fact, a fashion alchemy was occurring before my eyes: I’d worn an outfit so wrong that it started looking right. By lunchtime, I’d ordered a second pair. Now I wear them all the time. My favorite outfit—regardless of the season—consists of white jeans, white brogues, and a white silk shirt. I think it makes me look like a big, sexy glass of milk. If there’s a lesson here, it’s that our sartorial antipathies might be worth exploring for precisely the reasons they make us squirrelly and anxious. And the timing couldn’t be better: This season offers more opportunities than ever to face your fashion allergies head-on. Or feet first. Or, you know, however you get dressed in the morning.

Christopher Kane

Rodarte

A FASHION ALCHEMY WAS OCCURRING BEFORE MY EYES: I’D WORN AN OUTFIT SO WRONG THAT IT STARTED LOOKING RIGHT. is one of the great privileges of getting dressed every day. Each time you open your closet, you’re given a chance to shock your coworkers to pieces, startle your family to bits, and make your boyfriend or girlfriend question your sanity. Surely it’s worth exercising that right every once in a while, if only to see the looks on their faces. Fortune favors the bold, as they say. This doesn’t mean you have to exchange your perennial fall staples (trench coat, cashmere V-neck in a tasteful neutral) for a rack of runway costumes. Baby steps in a quirky direction can be just as satisfying as giant leaps. If you’re not ready to sport a statement pantsuit, you can try houndstooth trousers. If thighlength leather jackets are a step too far, stick with a bomber. If full fur sleeves make you nervous (about your silhouette, about PETA, or about attracting stray wildlife), a coat with

a faux-fur collar will accomplish the job. The only taboo is playing it safe. And once you discover the pleasures of being unpredictable, you might just find yourself strapping into that pantsuit after all.

JASON LLOYD-EVANS (3)

i

n my case, it was the white jeans that got me. After decades of avoidance, I woke up in a perverse mood one morning last year, opened my laptop, and, from bed, ordered a pair of Levi’s 501s in a snowy selvedge. It seemed like the mature thing to do. If I could force myself to wear a pair of white jeans for even one day, I figured, it might have the effect of a vaccine, curing me of my spiteful thoughts and hypersensitivity for good. When the pants arrived, I let them sit in their plastic wrapping for a full weekend. On Monday, I forced myself to wear them to work. At 9:15 A.M., I got a compliment. By noon, I was passing reflective surfaces on purpose in order to clock myself in the pants. I didn’t

Proenza Schouler

NOVEMBER 2016 ALLURE 63


NOTES

ELEMENTS OF

Style

1 PAIR OF PANTS, 3 WAYS

The very red, very oversize pants on this page didn’t faze Jordan Rebello, a model and co-owner of Trouble in Paradise, a vintage-clothing store in Los Angeles. “I bring quirkiness to my outfits,” says the self-described eccentric. “I feel at home in the big pants—they’re flattering if you get the proportions right.” Woolblend pants with belt by Adam Lippes, $1,250 for similar styles, at Hudson’s Bay, Toronto (416-861-9111).

“The burgundy on the wool coat pops, and the striped sweater tones the look down—a bit.” “I love how the pants peek out under this dress. You may question, Is this a good look? I felt great in it.”

“This is my idea of an office look: the pants with a button-down. The lips on the collar add a nice little touch.” Top right: Wool-and-shearling coat by Drome. Wool sweater by Tim Coppens. Earrings, Rebello’s own. Above: Embroidered cotton top from Sonia by Sonia Rykiel. Ring, Rebello’s own. Right: Silk-blend dress by Ellery. Patent-leather-and-suede shoes by Christian Louboutin. Hair: Rachel Lee Brady. Makeup: Stacey Tan. Fashion stylist: Sue Choi. Details, see Shopping Guide.

64 ALLURE NOVEMBER 2016

PHOTOGRAPHED BY FELISHA TOLENTINO


NOTES: EXTRAS Rodarte leather shoes, price available upon request (fwrd.com).

Nina Ricci suede bag, price available upon request, at Nina Ricci stores.

Rodarte Fall 2016

RIPPLE

Undulating boots, frilly bracelets—the best fall accessories make waves.

J. W. Anderson suede boots, $890, at Dover Street Market New York, N.Y.C. (646-837-7750).

66 ALLURE NOVEMBER 2016

Fendi leather bag, $4,300, at Fendi, N.Y.C. (212-897-2244).

INDIGITAL.TV (RUNWAY); STUART TYSON (STILL LIFES)

Ef fe ct

Fendi leather bracelets, $600 each, at Fendi, N.Y.C. (212-897-2244).


ANTI-AGING REPORT

The

Future

PERFECT

Flying cars, shmying cars. We’re way more excited about the new generation of anti-aging products about to take off. By Elizabeth Siegel

Abolishing Bags.

Many dermatologists don’t inject hyaluronic acid fillers in the superficial lines under the eyes because they can create a blue cast (it’s called the Tyndall effect, and it happens when the hyaluronic acid gel shows through skin). But a new injectable collagen called Cellifique can fill those tiny lines in a natural-looking way. “It integrates into the tissue without causing that discoloration,” says Joel L. Cohen, a dermatologist in Colorado, who’s seen data from companysponsored clinical trials on the new filler. So far, it’s also promising for plumping sunken tear troughs and lines around the lips. Results last around nine months. Cellifique is debuting in Europe this spring and could make its way to the U.S. in about four years. So if you’re lucky, you won’t get crow’s-feet until around 2020.

Lightening Spots. Getting rid of sun spots is tricky, and the more you have, the more treatments you’ll need. The best way to eradicate dark spots may be with the same technology that got rid of that dolphin on your ankle. “Tattooremoval lasers are very good at targeting and eliminating pigment, so using them on hyperpigmentation is a natural next step,” says New York City dermatologist Neil Sadick. “We’re running a large study and amassing evidence that three of these lasers—PicoSure, Enlighten, and PicoWay—remove diffuse hyperpigmentation in a very effective, very gentle way in just one session.” That’s huge, since other solutions, such as lasers and chemical peels, can involve numerous visits and side effects like redness and peeling. —ADDITIONAL REPORTING BY BROOKE LE POER TRENCH

68 ALLURE NOVEMBER 2016

Close your eyes and imagine a world where you could deflate eye bags—for good— with a cream.

FLORIAN SOMMET/TRUNK ARCHIVE

Smoothing Lines.

The only way to get rid of fat pads under the eyes has been plastic surgery, so most of us just deal. That’s where a molecule called XAF5 (traditionally used in glaucoma drugs) comes in: When applied as an ointment, XAF5 binds to fat cells under the skin and gets them to slowly release fatty acids. That makes the fat cells deflate like balloons losing air. It takes about three months of nightly use to see those undereye bags shrink. XAF5 could be available soon, and yes (big yes), there could be potential for eliminating fat on other areas of the body, too.


Passport Beauty

NEWS, TREATMENTS, AND OUR LATEST

OBSESSIONS FROM ABROAD

GETTING STEAMY Nordic winters can get pretty harsh—which is why the people who live them have the perfect escape. By Ingrid K. Williams

70 ALLURE NOVEMBER 2016

SARAH LEE/LIVESHARETRAVEL.COM

A sauna with a view at the Lehmonkärki resort in Asikkala


B E AU T Y PAS S P O RT

A Helsinki winter from above Ice swimming (exactly what it sounds like) is a Finnish tradition— and quite a rush.

S

74 ALLURE NOVEMBER 2016

Inside Helsinki’s Löyly sauna

Feeling the Heat Helsinki’s best saunas are steeped in tradition—and steam (so, so much steam). Kulttuurisauna is renowned for its minimalist design and proximity to the Baltic Sea. As I learned, cooling off with a frigid postsauna swim is a Finnish tradition. Löyly (meaning “steam”) is the newest and sceniest sauna on Helsinki’s harbor. Its terrace bars overlook the sea. Kotiharjun is the traditionalist’s choice: a family-run sauna that was built in 1928.

FOR PHOTOGRAPHERS’ CREDITS, SEE CREDITS PAGE.

isu first came into my life when I was at a café with a friend: “It’s the grit and determination that we Finns have,” said Tiina, who is from Turku, a city in the south of Finland. “Our strength in the face of adversity.” I imagined sisu as the force that allows Finns to survive bone-chilling Nordic winters, when the country is cloaked in moonlight (24-hour nights here actually have a name— they’re called kaamos) and there is so much snow that locals can ski through city centers. It never occurred to me that I’d also need sisu to partake in one of Finland’s oldest and most beloved traditions. I was on my way to my first Finnish sauna. It all sounded so benign: Public saunas in Finland, like bars, are places where locals go to escape the cold and hang out with friends over a tuoppi olutta (pint of beer). You can find saunas across the countryside, along Helsinki’s harbor, even inside Parliament. It’s estimated that there are 2 million saunas in Finland. Bear in mind this is a country of just about 5.5 million. Incidentally, many apartment buildings and offices have saunas, too, so going for a steam with your coworkers is to them what happy hour is to us (kinda). It was late afternoon when I arrived at Helsinki’s famous Kulttuurisauna, a sparse concrete box with a picture window looking out over sailboats drifting on the Baltic Sea. The procedure is simple: Take off your clothes, sit on a washcloth, sweat. A lot. (Public saunas are typically heated to around 200 degrees.) Clothes off, nerves high, I pushed open the door to what amounted to a very chic prison cell. Half a dozen naked women of various ages and shapes reclined on three tiers of cedar benches. Before I’d even sat down, I was sweating. You make friends quickly in a sauna. A twentysomething blonde, curiously wearing a wool cap, recounted a recent date to me and her friend. Noticing my face growing red, a grandmotherly type pulled me to a lower bench, saying, “It’s cooler down here.” Then, with a smile, she ladled water onto hot rocks, filling the room with a rush of steam that seared my eyes, clogged my throat, and left me gasping for air. While everyone chatted leisurely, I concentrated on not fainting, until Wool Cap motioned for me to follow her. Finally, an escape! We headed outside to the edge of the Baltic, which was barely above freezing that day. Maybe we’d take in the view and hurry back inside? I was shivering. But Wool Cap jumped in. “Beers after!” she yelled from the icy waters. I summoned some sisu and took the plunge.


INSIDER SECRETS

THE SURPRISING HABITS OF

HAND MODELS They wear gloves to the beach. Their fingers can be insured for six figures. And they’d sooner eat glass than bite a hangnail. This is what it takes to have the loveliest hands in the world.

“Sugar, salt, and caffeine make the veins on the backs of your hands look plump,” says Ellen Sirot, whose hands you may recognize from Dawn ads. (Extreme? Maybe. But also effective, according to dermatologists.) If you’re a fan of smooth skin and ice cream, raise your hand. Seriously. Do it. Lifting your arms over your head for a minute gets your blood flowing away from your hands, so your veins look less obvious in pictures.

They’re spendthrifts. Nail files get used once, and then into the trash they go, says Christina Ambers, the owner of the hands of Sally Hansen–box fame. “Using a fresh emery board prevents cracks in your nails when they start to grow out,” she says. In general, use your file until its color has faded, and skip nail clippers, which Ambers swears are harsher than dull nail files. If a chip happens, hand model Adele Uddo reaches for nail glue and a box of Earl Grey: Turns out you can cut a strip of a tea bag and glue it onto your nail to bind a break. 76 ALLURE NOVEMBER 2016

Their hygiene is meh. Unless they’re washing dishes in a commercial, Sirot’s hands hardly ever touch soapy water. The same goes for hand sanitizers and moisturizers that smell good (or bad for that matter) since anything that has a lot of fragrance can dry out the skin and make nails brittle. A hand model’s moisturizing alternatives: coconut oil, olive oil, Aura Glow Cream, and Weleda Skin Food.

They can’t get engaged. “I haven’t worn a ring, bracelet, or watch in 15 years,” says Ashly Covington, a hand model who works with Sephora. It’s because they can leave indentations on the skin. But one accessory is mandatory. “I own so many gloves that I stopped counting at 500 pairs,” says Sirot. Without gloves, you’re risking sun spots—career suicide—and scratches. To heal the occasional nick, Uddo swears by a botanical oil called helichrysum (available online). —REPORTING BY PATTY ADAMS MARTINEZ

DAVID BELLEMERE/TRUNK ARCHIVE

They’re not ordering chocolate lava cake.


HEART Times

JOSEPHINE SCHIELE

Think you can’t judge someone by her makeup bag? We disagree. This is Amanda Seyfried’s life (OK, maybe not all of it), as told by her beauty stash.

For product details, see Shopping Guide.


Fair

Amanda Seyfried enjoys a rustic escape, loves her animals, and might splash around in a baby pool. Meet Hollywood’s most unlikely beauty icon.

BY DAVID DENICOLO PHOTOGRAPHED BY SCOTT TRINDLE

Opposite page: Cashmere-blend coat by Boss. Velvet dress by Alix. Velvet boots by 3.1 Phillip Lim. Rings by Jennifer Fisher. Hat by Mara Hoffman. Makeup colors: Perfect Lash Mascara in 1, Extra Rich Lipstick in 311, and Powder Blush Duo in 104 by Clé de Peau Beauté. These pages: Hair, Rutger; makeup, Maud Laceppe; manicure, Gina Edwards. Prop stylist: Nicholas Des Jardins of Mary Howard Studio. Fashion stylist: Tony Irvine. Details, see Shopping Guide.


Silk coat by The Row. Wool nylon dress by Eckhaus Latta. Earrings by Erin Considine. Makeup colors: Cream Eye Color Solo in 306, Luminizing Face Enhancer in 16, and Radiant Liquid Rouge lip color in 11 by Clé de Peau Beauté. Details, see Shopping Guide.


TAWNI BANNISTER

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wo hours north of Manhattan and two worlds away, there’s a quiet hamlet in the foothills of the Catskill Mountains called Stone Ridge. The names of the country roads—Sawkill, Cottekill, Shivertown—seem to be lifted right out of a Washington Irving story. In fact, the writer’s most famous character, Rip Van Winkle, set off on his mysterious day trip not far from this spot. When you hear thunder in the distance, it’s hard not to think of it being, as Irving imagined, made by the ghosts of Henry Hudson and his loyal men, those poor lost souls playing ninepins in the mountains. M. Night Shyamalan would be comfortable here; it’s a landscape of supernatural legends. Today, the deep green hills and sleepy hollows are dotted with aboveground pools, tractor-tire flower planters, whirligigs, and wind chimes. And everywhere you look—along the roadsides, in the pastures and abandoned lots—you see acres of the wildflower Queen Anne’s lace, its slender stalks capped with whorls of antique white and a tiny red dot in the middle, where, the story goes, a needle pricked Her Royal Highness at her sewing table. Listed as a “noxious weed” by the United States Department of Agriculture, it is, to many eyes, including my own, an all-American beauty: deceptively hardy, slightly wild, homespun. Lovely, but the opposite of exotic. This is one of the places that the actress Amanda Seyfried calls home. We’re meeting at a no-frills roadside café filled with boisterous local folks enjoying the lunchtime rush. A table on the porch outside is a bit more private and quiet, though the rural peace and birdsong are regularly overwhelmed by the roar of big rigs, tanker trucks, and all manner of farm equipment thundering over Route 209 and down the valley. Seyfried drives up on the dot in a black Toyota SUV. She’s wearing denim shorts, Birkenstocks, and a black T-shirt that says “Wakeman Basketball.” Lovely, but the opposite of exotic. Maybe it’s not where you’d expect to find the star of Mamma Mia!, Les Misérables, Lovelace, and Ted 2, but she’s in her element. It could be because she grew up in the classic Rust Belt city of Allentown, Pennsylvania, in the northern reaches of Appalachia. Perhaps it’s even more surprising to think of her as a brand

ambassador for Clé de Peau Beauté or the face of Givenchy Very Irrésistible fragrances or a model in Miu Miu’s ad campaign, but her heart seems to be right here. “I love this place so much. I love this town!” she says, picking at a black-bean burger and absorbing farm and gardening tips from the (very chatty) waitress. Seyfried, who bought a house here a few years ago, begins to tick off its virtues as if she works for the local chamber of commerce: “There’s a little strip mall. But it’s a cute strip mall.

decided not to go to college, her curiosity seems boundless. Like many actresses, she is that familiar combination of autodidact and blank slate. When she talks, she might sometimes contradict herself, circle back to amend an old statement, or shoot off on a tangent. There is a certain wide-eyed wonder to it all. OK, can we talk about her eyes for a second? She acknowledges that they are “weird” (and most likely inherited: “You should see my dad’s”). When it comes to Seyfried’s eyes, adjectives

Silk top by Dries Van Noten. Details, see Shopping Guide.

When it comes to Seyfried’s eyes, adjectives fail. “Large” is too small a word. There’s a Dunkin’ Donuts, a reflexology place. Even the grocery store is special. It’s the classic small-town grocery. There’s a lot of local things happening. And then I go to the farm stand. Everything you get is absolutely local. But I also have a garden. Kale. Romaine. I just planted blueberries last year. Tomatoes aren’t out yet.” A long conversation about pickling ensues with the waitress, and Seyfried listens intently, studiously, as if there will be a quiz. For a smart woman who

fail. “Large” is too small a word. There’s a running joke in Ted 2 that compares her eyes to those of Gollum, the tortured creature from The Lord of the Rings. A kinder person might say she resembles a Margaret Keane portrait or a Japanese anime character. There’s also a quirkiness there that perhaps emphasizes a quirk or two within, like Seyfried’s penchant for taxidermy or her need to FaceTime with her Australian shepherd, Finn, whenever they’re apart for any length of time.

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thought I had a tumor in my brain. I had an MRI, and the neurologist referred me to a psychiatrist. As I get older, the compulsive thoughts and fears have diminished a lot. Knowing that a lot of my fears are not realitybased really helps.” In case it isn’t obvious, Seyfried doesn’t censor herself. Of course it is fashionable, and downright offensive, to claim you have OCD when you’re just a little high-strung. That is not what she is doing. She is perfectly fine displaying vulnerability, even as a digital recorder is running right next to her lunch plate. But her candor should not be misconstrued as melancholy, much less self-pity. She is cheerful and positive even when talking about difficult subjects. When I point this out later in the interview, she explains the dichotomy between her confidence and insecurity. “It’s funny when insecurity hits you,” she says. “Sometimes I feel I know the

She is perfectly fine displaying vulnerability, even as a digital recorder is running right next to her lunch plate. A: “Yes. About the gas. You could so easily burn down something if you leave the stove on. Or the oven.” Q: Are you medicated? A: “Yeah. I’m on Lexapro, and I’ll never get off of it. I’ve been on it since I was 19, so 11 years. I’m on the lowest dose. I don’t see the point of getting off of it. Whether it’s placebo or not, I don’t want to risk it. And what are you fighting against? Just the stigma of using a tool? A mental illness is a thing that people cast in a different category [from other illnesses], but I don’t think it is. It should be taken as seriously as anything else. You don’t see the mental illness: It’s not a mass; it’s not a cyst. But it’s there. Why do you need to prove it? If you can treat it, you treat it. I had pretty bad health anxiety that came from the OCD and

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world so well, but then…it’s so debilitating. You’re like, What am I doing here? No one wants to see me. Why are you taking my picture? It’s stupid, it’s irrational, and it’s not all about me, but I make it about me because I’m insecure.” Honesty doesn’t make her morose. Quite the contrary. Much of her happiness, at least the happiness she expresses, seems to come from her love of nature and particularly of animals. After a freewheeling exchange about summer pleasures like swimming, I mention that there were humpback whale sightings off the coast of Connecticut, where I live, and show her a picture of one breaching. She nearly jumps out of her chair. “What? No way. That is amazing! You are so lucky. I need to go to Connecticut. I’ve never seen a whale. I grew up swimming in aboveground pools. Maybe I’ll get a baby pool from Target this week. Yes, I think I’ll do that.”

Childhood photo “Oh, God. ‘Chunk-aTooth’: That was my name. It wasn’t just my sister who called me that; it was my father. They didn’t let me drink out of their cups because I would backwash.”

2014 At the While We’re Young premiere in Toronto “I’m lucky to have been a part of this movie. [But] it was a bad day. I was emotional, and my hair made me feel [too] young. I felt inadequate. It’s not rational. It hits you at weird times.”

2014 With Mark Wahlberg on the set of Ted 2 in New York City “Mark is the most chill, hardworking person I’ve ever met. The bear’s usually not there. Sometimes it’s a stick with balls on it.”

FOR PHOTOGRAPHERS’ CREDITS, SEE CREDITS PAGE.

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ow that the pickle lady has (finally) departed, I ask Seyfried a little more about her life up here with Finn and her growing menagerie of animals, both living and stuffed. The following exchange, for reasons that will become abundantly clear, is better left in her own words. Q: Have you done a lot of work on your place? A: “I bought the house in 2013, and then I had it redone…. I just finished renovating one of the barns for guests. I put in a bathroom and a little kitchenette, but no stove; I want people to eat meals in the house. Also, I always worry about people and how they use stoves. Which is just a controlling thing.” Q: Is this related to OCD?

1994


2004

2005

In Mean Girls “That was one of the most famous scenes. ‘I’m a mouse… duh.’ They straightened my hair every day, and the fake nails were redone every week. It was the best experience; I wasn’t jaded at that point. I ate so much, I had to wear a girdle. I’d never seen so much free food in my life.”

At a Project Angel Food benefit in Los Angeles “When you get into the business, you get invited places where they give you free shit, otherwise known as swag. I wasn’t opposed to that at the beginning of my career, because I couldn’t afford to buy stuff. I think the hat is a pot reference. I don’t partake, but it’s funny.”

2005

2008 At the premiere of Mamma Mia! in New York City “That face [on the poster]: That’s pure happiness. I had just met my best friends for life, Ashley [Lilley] and Rachel [McDowall]. I was with a man I loved, Dominic [Cooper]. We were all in the movie; we had our own little world. The bubble wasn’t going to burst for a while. This was a year later, when the movie came out. Things weren’t as such, but that’s the way it goes, right?”

With Rachel McAdams, Lacey Chabert, and Lindsay Lohan at the MTV Movie Awards in Los Angeles “[Pointing to McAdams and Chabert] These are really good people. [Pointing to Lohan] I really don’t have anything to say. I wish her health and happiness.”

2009

FOR PHOTOGRAPHERS’ CREDITS, SEE CREDITS PAGE.

On the cover of Allure “That was one of my first covers. It was in Malibu, and it was freezing. The hair is beautiful. It was straight and just fierce. Those eyelashes are so fake but so great. I love fake eyelashes. They make my eyes… not so weird.”

2013 With Justin Verlander, Kate Upton, and Taylor Swift at a Knicks game in New York City “I didn’t know any of these people before that. I’m not friends with many ‘celebrities.’ [Taylor’s] fucking awesome. She’s a girl’s girl.”

2015 At the Met Gala in New York City “That night was so fun. That was a perfect wedding dress by Riccardo Tisci. By the way, it’s not easy going up those stairs.”


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he segue from whale watching to splashing around in a baby pool is part of the particular charm of talking to Seyfried. She prefers to tell a story rather than mechanically answer a question. “It blows my mind how smart pigs are,” she begins as a reply to a question about her farm plans. Then the words just tumble out. “We have a whole new design for the property. We’re going to get a goat and a pig; they’re going to grow up together, so there shouldn’t be trouble.” She pauses to let the wisdom of her decision settle with the listener. “This past week, we rescued two cats.” Back to the goat: “A lot of goats just need homes.” Poultry now: “We have four chickens and a rooster. Now here’s a fucking weird thing. They stopped laying. They didn’t lay for a good six months.” She seems almost hurt by their disloyalty. “They have a really good home, and they were superfertile, and then they just stopped. Then we got four more chickens, and the other ones started laying again. I think they’re threatened.” Since it’s pie season on the farm and she is known to be a baker, I ask if she’s still honing her craft. “Pies. Yeah. Fuck yeah!” You get the impression that Seyfried never says “yes” when a “fuck yeah” might serve. You almost begin to think that if she were to marry and the officiant asked, “Do you

Shazam for more Amanda.

take this man?” she would respond, “Fuck yeah.” She may soon get the chance to test that theory: Seyfried recently became engaged to actor Thomas Sadoski. The two met in 2015 and started dating earlier this year. Anyway, back to pie. “My favorite thing now is because of this [local place] Lekker. They have this deepdish Dutch apple pie that I saw last year and thought, I’ve got to make that. All you do is do it in a springform pan. I make the basic Epicurious pie shell, and then you dump it doublefull of apples or peaches. Pies are the easiest thing in the world.” But that doesn’t mean she doesn’t feel she still deserves a bit of credit for making the effort. “I once made a pecan pie for a guy I was dating, and we had a nice meal—I think it was paella—with friends, and then that night, when we were alone, he said, ‘Did you really make that pie?’ ” She pauses to let the injustice, the sheer effrontery, of the question settle in. “I mean, who says that?” Who indeed? Lunch is over, and it’s time for Seyfried to get back to her dog, her new cats, her chickens, her garden, and maybe even a new splash pool. She gives me a big hug (she’s so tiny, you could put her in your pocket) and wrinkles her nose. “I hope I wasn’t too boring,” she says. “If I was, you should feel free to make anything up that you want.” She actually means it. But of course there is no need.

BEAUTY CORNER When did you cut your hair to its new shoulder length? “Last summer. Orlando Pita did it for a Clé de Peau campaign. What he did was magic. Since then, Garren has cut it, too.” Did you ever have skin problems? “Fuck yeah. Eczema on my face. It came back a few years ago. I think it was anxiety. My skin is amazing now.” What’s your food indulgence? “Cheese! I like it all. Havarti, cheddar…” Do you eat meat? “I don’t eat beef unless it’s the cows I know in the pastures here. They seem content.” How do you feel about your age? “I love being 30. I do. I mean, my pimples come hormonally every month and you don’t really see them.”

Do you have any perceived body flaws that you worry about? “I try to pose in a way where you don’t see my arm fat. I go to Pure Barre all the time. Not that it helps with my flabby arms.” Are there particular downsides to being a film and TV actress? “I don’t like to promote myself. It’s so tiring. I didn’t feel like waxing my legs today—I’m so sorry.” Any cosmetic procedures? “I had braces, oral surgery, veneers—the whole nine yards. Teeth are definitely a thing. And they’re expensive.”

Velvet dress by Valentino. Earrings by Lucifer Vir Honestus. Makeup colors: Touche Sublime Brilliant Enhancer and Extra Rich Lipstick in 311 by Clé de Peau Beauté. Details, see Shopping Guide.


A PRIVATE


CHRISTOPHER FURLONG/GETTY IMAGES

Eyes—and eye makeup—take on a whole new significance when everything else is covered.

BEAUTY

A Western reporter navigates the surprising, nuanced, and often complicated world of makeup, fashion, and style in one of the most religious parts of the Middle East. BY KATHERINE ZOEPF


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s someone who is constantly resolving to spend less time thinking about clothes and cosmetics, I remember looking forward to my first reporting trip to Saudi Arabia, in 2007, in the way a compulsive Instagram user might anticipate a weekend stay in a place with spotty cellular coverage: as a period of enforced, but not unwelcome, abstinence. I was, at that point in my life—in my late 20s, and working as a reporter in Syria and Lebanon—increasingly pained by my interests in fashion and beauty, which seemed very much at odds with the serious journalism I aspired to. Arab society is highly gendered, and though female Arab culture, which can sometimes take the cultivation of beauty and femininity to extremes, had not yet occurred to me as a subject in its own right, I felt its influence every time I set foot outside. Many women covered themselves, of course. But those who didn’t always looked, well, amazing. Arriving in Beirut after a few weeks away, I’d find myself suppressing the kind of acute anxiety about my appearance that I hadn’t experienced since middle school. I had to do something about my hair and nails, and right away, if possible. I was 26 when a concerned Lebanese friend advised a prophylactic Botox regimen; fair-skinned women like me aged so badly otherwise, she explained. I considered the idea with more seriousness than I’d like to admit. I had to get a grip. If ever a secular, American, female reporter were disposed to embrace the abaya—the floor-length cloak that women in Saudi Arabia are obliged to wear in public at all times—it was this self-conscious beauty junkie. It was the fall, and I was heading to Riyadh for one of my first big magazine assignments. The thousands of pages I’d read about Saudi history and culture all seemed to confirm a picture of the kingdom as a sort of frivolity-free zone. And I couldn’t wait. I would buy a black abaya during my layover in Abu Dhabi, I decided, and that would be that. At first, the abaya and the hijab did simplify matters. From the moment I stumbled out of baggage claim, trying to keep my new abaya’s trailing hem from getting caught in the wheels of my rolling suitcase, it was as if women had disappeared from the public space. They were there, of course, swathed in black. But I would go days without seeing another female face in public, and without other women to admire and emulate, concerns about grooming and adornment began to feel increasingly abstract. The culture of regulating women’s modesty has a history in the West, too, with bikini bans in Europe as late as the 1950s. In the current political climate, the tide has turned dramatically. Certain towns, like Nice, recently banned the “burkini,” a swimsuit that covers a woman’s body like a hooded wet suit and allows Muslim women to enjoy the sea without compromising their beliefs.

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A French court overturned the ban, but the conflict highlighted the discomfort on both sides of the issue. To say that reality in Saudi Arabia was more complicated than I’d imagined is a gross understatement. I should have been less surprised to find that in the gender-segregated kingdom, the female culture I’d observed elsewhere in the region reached its apotheosis. When it comes to devotion to makeup, spa treatments, visits to the salon, and other higherorder forms of self-care, Saudi women are major players. Spending on cosmetics in Saudi Arabia has nearly doubled over the last ten years, from $280 million in 2005 to $535 million in 2015, according to data compiled and analyzed by Euromonitor, a London-based market-research firm. Even in an oilrich country with sky-high disposable incomes, those are significant numbers. But they begin to make sense when you consider the Saudi population’s relative youth (roughly 70 percent are under 30) and the fact that Saudi women are increasingly working outside the home thanks to reforms enacted under the late King Abdullah, who died last year. Rising female employment rates had sparked hope among women’s rights advocates that financially empowered Saudi women, saving their own salaries in their personal bank accounts, would begin to command greater respect within their families and gain a greater degree of control over their lives. But at the moment, it seems that supporters of those changes may have underestimated the seduction of the makeup counter; according to a report in Arab News, the Jeddah-based Englishlanguage daily, the average employed woman in the kingdom spends between 70 and 80 percent of her earnings on beauty products. And now, the great irony: Few, if any, of these products may be used or shown in public. Women pursue beauty for and among themselves, as a means of expression, in strictly private, women-only settings. In Saudi Arabia—more than in any other country, and to a degree that seemed inconceivable to me until I observed it up close—beauty is a private pleasure, an intimate, sometimes even secret, pursuit.


CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: ALEXANDRA GOLOVKOVA; KATE BROOKS/REDUX PICTURES; KHAWLAH AL-BASHAIREH; KATE BROOKS/REDUX PICTURES

A saleswoman at Harvey Nichols in Riyadh

Leaving my own face uncovered felt a bit strange and vulgar.

Model and blogger Alexandra Golovkova

Hijab styling on Instagram

Women shopping at a M.A.C. counter in Riyadh


Two Muslim women in Toronto


Muna AbuSulayman, a well-known Saudi philanthropist and media personality who is often referred to as the Oprah of the Arab world, told me that she believes that young Saudi women “care a great deal about femininity.”

HAARIS GILANI & TALHA TABISH/@GOODKIDCO

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he sheer tonnage of makeup imports to the kingdom may be the result of a longstanding “more is more” attitude. In general, AbuSulayman explained, Arab Gulf women like to wear heavier makeup than their European counterparts. “We say, ‘Wishik yohmoul’—it literally means your face and coloring can take the more polished fullmakeup look,” she said. “When you have light skin and delicate features, you don’t look as good when you use a lot of makeup. It looks wrong. But for a Saudi girl, we say, ‘Wishik yohmoul’ because she can try all sorts of techniques and colors without looking unnatural or unstylish.” I sometimes wondered whether, paradoxically, religious restrictions on the display of beauty only intensified women’s interest in it or heightened the senses somehow. The Saudi women I knew were alert to aspects of beauty and personal expression that I had trouble even perceiving. Like many Western visitors to Saudi Arabia, I found it almost impossible at first to differentiate between any two women who covered their faces. But Saudis, I soon learned, had no such difficulty. A black niqab covering the entire face is often a part of the school uniform for Saudi girls in elementary school, and if you happen to pass a girls’ elementary school at the end of a day’s classes, you’ll likely see fathers and drivers waving and smiling and effortlessly picking out their own daughters and charges from the sea of black-swathed children rushing out into the sunshine. During a 2013 visit to the kingdom, I once stepped into the corridor of a Riyadh shopping mall alongside a saleswoman I’d been speaking to and watched as she called out a greeting to an old friend she’d spotted 50 paces away, standing in a throng of uniformly black-clad women. Until the friend turned and gave the saleswoman a wave in return, I hadn’t been sure, at that distance, which way she was facing. These garments are designed to efface beauty or protect against objectification (depending on your perspective), and there is endless debate over how a woman should wear her head scarf: tied in such a way that the outline of her neck and shoulders is still

To say that reality in Saudi Arabia was more complicated than I’d imagined is a gross understatement. discernible, or worn “over her head” in a looser style that is considered more modest. Among women who wear their face covering with a slit for the eyes, the precise width of the slit is a subject of passionate debate and mutual judgment. In Saudi Arabia, I often felt I was constantly recalibrating, refining my powers of observation, readjusting my sense of what was appropriate. Sometimes, especially if I’d spent a few days in the public space, leaving my own face uncovered felt a bit strange and vulgar. I began to feel awkward— there is no other way to put this—about showing so much skin, walking around with my whole face hanging out. I never did wear the niqab; as an American and a non-Muslim, doing so would have felt absurd. But after several weeks in Riyadh, going down to the lobby of my hotel without it felt like wearing a bikini top to the Met. In July, Condé Nast International announced the launch of a new magazine, Vogue Arabia, and hired Deena Aljuhani Abdulaziz as its editor in chief. I remember the trunk show Aljuhani Abdulaziz invited me to at her boutique D’NA and her obvious pride in the young Saudi designers she promoted and encouraged. There were pieces by Western designers for sale at D’NA, too, and, thinking that those displays looked oddly sparse, I asked Aljuhani Abdulaziz whether it was difficult to import clothing into the kingdom. She explained that no, fashion was so important to Saudi women that she often ordered only one of each piece. Occasions for women to express themselves through fashion were especially precious to those who wore an abaya daily, and a customer buying an important piece liked to know that it was the only one of its kind in the whole kingdom. The thought of taking off your abaya at a women’s party and discovering that another woman was wearing the same dress was a special source of dread for Saudi women, Aljuhani Abdulaziz said. To avoid such disasters, Saudi women took great care to stay current and buy the latest collections, even when they had to stretch their budget in order to do so. If there is a secret to understanding the tastes of women in the kingdom, it could be summed up quite succinctly. Said Aljuhani Abdulaziz, “I think the word that Saudi women like is ‘exclusive.’ ”

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LIFE According to... DICK PAGE

He works with the biggest models in the world, calls Michael Kors a friend, and knows the single best place for uni in Tokyo. Oh, and he’s one of the best makeup artists ever. We talked to Dick Page about his life lessons. You’ll want to hear this. Reporting by Patty Adams Martinez

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ick Page doesn’t believe in words like “age-appropriate,” “trendy,” or “seasonal.” In fact, the British-born makeup artist doesn’t believe in beauty rules period. “Makeup should be fun, not a chore,” he says. That devil-may-care approach—plus a sharp eye for color and detail—has led to a nearly twodecade stint as the artistic director of Shiseido and countless runway collaborations with designers like Narciso Rodriguez and Michael Kors. Page doesn’t just paint lips and sculpt cheeks; he helps the designers home in on the makeup looks that eventually become their signature. But most important, it’s led to a rich and beautiful life. We asked Page for the non-rules he lives by.

TAKE NOTES FROM YOUR FRIENDS— ALL OF THEM. “Michael Kors is about trying new things and not saying no automatically. Maria Cornejo has taught me the importance of having a piece of me show through in all of my work, but also a bit of the woman. And then there’s my dog Raggio, who is literally always stopping to smell the roses.”

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EAT LIKE A JET-SETTER. “If you’re traveling, you need to try new foods. That’s one of my favorite parts of my job. I’ve spent a lot of time in Japan for Shiseido, so I love Japanese stews and soups, which I now know how to make at home. But when I’m working in Paris, I get an Airbnb rather than a hotel so I can prepare my own meals with the amazing ingredients from the fish and cheese shops in the 1st and 7th arrondissements. Cooking is a relaxing creative outlet for me. If I weren’t a makeup artist, I might have liked to be a cook for a living.”

IF YOU OWN ONLY TWO PIECES OF MAKEUP, THEY SHOULD BE: “A black eyeliner and a red lipstick. It’s a graphic makeup look that every woman can pull off, whether she’s a downtown punk or a Fifth Avenue society queen. That’s the wonderful thing about makeup: You infuse your personality into whatever you wear, so no two people will look identical even if they are using the same [thing].”

WORK YOUR ASS OFF. “Know that when you’re first starting out, 95 percent of your ideas might be awful, but the other 5 percent could

be genius. And eventually that ratio will change in your favor. Whatever you do, realize that you are not the center of the universe—you have to be able to work with people as a team. If you can’t, your career will eventually implode.”

DON’T UNDERESTIMATE THE VALUE OF SATURDAYMORNING TV. “I’ve been fortunate—I haven’t had to deal with too many haters in my lifetime, but when I do, I take the Pee-wee Herman approach. Someone says something negative about me, and I think, I know you are, but what am I? It’s as simple as that.”

REMEMBER THAT LESS IS MORE. “You can really go down a rabbit hole of YouTube makeup videos with all the strobing and baking and ombré eyebrows. How can you move your face with all that stuff on it? I’ve always believed that you should wear as little makeup as you can get away with. And it should have an ease to it, like you put it on while riding the bus.”


“I’VE ALWAYS BELIEVED THAT YOU SHOULD WEAR AS LITTLE MAKEUP AS YOU CAN GET AWAY WITH. AND IT SHOULD HAVE AN EASE TO IT, LIKE YOU PUT IT ON WHILE RIDING THE BUS.”

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: PATRICK DEMARCHELIER; COURTESY OF SHISEIDO; FIRSTVIEW.COM; AFFRA GIBBS

Left: Fresh, rosy makeup on Cara Delevingne for Vogue. Below: A face-chart sketch created for the Acne Studios spring 2016 runway.

Below: Page backstage at the Michael Kors fall 2015 show. Left: “This painting of my dog [Raggio, a Spinone Italiano] by my sister-in-law is one of my most prized possessions,” says Page.

97


THE

POWER AND THE

G L O RY

A soft updo. A stroke of razor-sharp eyeliner. Maybe a stamp of crimson lipstick. The rules of female power dressing are simple: There are none. By Liana Schaffner Photographed by Alique

Stephanie Rawlings-Blake, the mayor of Baltimore

C

onsider shoulder pads. In the 1980s, women tried to extend their professional clout by forging a masculine silhouette. Double-breasted suits obscured actual breasts, while pinstripes were like natural camouflage, allowing the wearer to blend seamlessly into the red-blooded environs of the boardroom. Well, not quite seamlessly. That’s because a woman trying to dress the way a man would dress if he were a woman was a confusing (and condescending) proposition on its own. And when hair and makeup came into play, it actually backfired. In the name of “power dressing,” women began piling their hair into scaffold-like updos, practically giving it a head start up the corporate ladder. They may not have gone to a barber, but a stripe of blush revealed cheekbones as sharp as a razor’s edge, and aggressive shades on eyes and lips were the makeup equivalent of an executive decision: unflinching and unapologetic. Clothes may have made the man, but makeup armored the woman inside men’s clothing. 98

Lauren Remington Platt, the founder of Vênsette

Yael Aflalo, the founder of Reformation

Times have changed. As women reach the top of every profession, their desire to be one of the guys is as dead as the three-martini lunch. If a woman wears a tie, it’s only because she doesn’t have to. But the real leap forward in the evolution of power dressing is in the hair and makeup. Think about that. We’ve gotten to a place where it’s possible to display both femininity and authority, where prettiness doesn’t equal weakness, where you can lean into your work as successfully as you can lean into wearing long, wavy hair while you’re doing it. There may be no more famous a poster child—make that a poster woman—of this pivot in our national psyche than the formidable president of J.Crew, Jenna Lyons. Her famously tomatored lips represent the type of creative insight—and, going out on a limb here, business acumen—that generates billions in revenue. More evidence that the women who indulge their preferences, and even dare to have fun with beauty, mean business.

FROM LEFT: WESTON WELLS; SEAN SCHIEDT/THELICENSINGPROJECT.COM; JASON JEAN/BLAUBLUT-EDITION.COM; GARRETT STUDIOS, INC.

Jenna Lyons, the president of J.Crew


THE NEW POWER NEUTR AL — Steely bronze shadow is an edgy alternative to muted beige. On Ondria Hardin: Earrings by Jennifer Fisher. Color Design Shadow and Liner Palette in Kissed by Gold by Lancôme. These pages: Hair, Edward Lampley; makeup, Benjamin Puckey; manicure, Sheril Bailey. Prop stylist: Josephine Shokrian. Fashion stylist: Michelle Cameron. Details, see Shopping Guide.


THE NEW POWER GLOW — “Never let them see you sweat” doesn’t mean smothering your pores in powder. A dewy glow has a fresh, easy, unflappable appeal. On Riley Montana: Leather jacket and knit top by Versace. MoistureSmooth Color Stick in Wine Berry by Neutrogena. Details, see Shopping Guide.


TH E N EW POW ER SUIT — A diving neckline and a daring shade energize the classic three-piece suit. Cotton jacket, alpaca jacket, and alpaca pants by Max Mara. Gen Nude Matte Liquid Lipcolor in Swank by BareMinerals. Details, see Shopping Guide.


TH E N EW POW ER STROK E — This razor-thin line along the upper and lower lashes requires an eye for detail and nerves of steel. Cotton shirt by Céline. Makeup colors: Voluminous Liner Noir in Blackest Black and True Match Lumi Powder Glow Illuminator in Rose by L’Oréal Paris. Details, see Shopping Guide.


THE NEW POW ER BLUE — A hybrid of slate and navy, this shadow adds strength and sexy definition. Wool coat by David Koma. Silver-and-gold earrings by Wasson Fine. Makeup colors: Eye-shadow palette in Breathtaking Blues and Outlast Stay Brilliant Nail Gloss in Nemesis by CoverGirl. Details, see Shopping Guide.


T H E N E W P O W E R PI NST R IPES — Full sleeves and roomy pants look sharp when paired with thick suspenders. Cotton poplin shirt and wool pants by DKNY. Leather shoes by Hermès. Color Sensational lipstick in Coffee Addiction by Maybelline New York. Details, see Shopping Guide.


TH E N EW POW ER UPD O — This offhand updo is swept back and held together with exactly two pins—beautiful and efficient. Faux-fur collar, wool jacket, and wool skirt by Calvin Klein Collection. Lasting Finish by Kate Lipstick in Muse Red by Rimmel London. Details, see Shopping Guide.


THE NEW POWER R ED — This bright matte shade is as powerful, precise, and commanding as the woman who wears it. Rouge Allure Ink Matte Liquid Lip Colour in Libérée by Chanel.


JAMIE NELSON/BLAUBLUT-EDITION.COM

.. . Taking PAINS Discomfort and beauty are always in tension. So we teach ourselves the algorithm of: Is it worth it? We learn the calculations between ouch and better skin (or flatter abs, or a firmer jawline, or...). But you can’t do the math without knowing what kind of pain you’re in for. We went to the people who know best—the patients—to find out exactly what it feels like to be on the receiving end of all those needles, blades, and lasers. BY KATIE BECKER


BOTOX An injectable neurotoxin used to temporarily paralyze facial muscles and smooth wrinkles The Patient Report: “I get it every four to six months to erase the etched lines on my forehead. Most doctors numb the area first with ice. I dislike that more than the needle—it’s like a brain freeze. Each injection is quick; usually I don’t feel a thing. But the area just underneath the eyebrows really hurts. Like a bee sting. The pain goes away immediately, though. Sometimes I get bruises that last a few days, but I can cover them with concealer. After a week or so, my brow feels a little heavy, like when your hand falls asleep. That’s right around the time people start telling me I look really relaxed, as if I was just on vacation.” —Andrea Modlin, 41 The Doctor’s Note: “I put a little pressure on each injection site right afterward to help with the sting and get very anxious people to do Lamaze-style breathing. The muscles start to feel kind of stiff once the Botox kicks in, about five days later. You get used to that after a week or so, and soon you almost forget how to frown. Research even shows that you’ll actually feel happier.” —Ava Shamban, a dermatologist in Beverly Hills

.

The Pain Meter:

RESTYLANE AND JUVÉDERM Hyaluronic acid–based gels injected to restore contours and fullness to the face and lips The Patient Report: “My upper lip is much smaller than my lower one. I’ve gotten it filled with Restylane or Juvéderm twice a year for about six years. My first treatment was at a spa, and it was a horror story—they completely overfilled my lips, and it really hurt. I had to go to a doctor for another injection to undo it. Now I always go to a dermatologist. I don’t use numbing cream, just close my eyes and center myself. The needle feels sort of like a splinter, but the pain doesn’t linger. I think a paper cut is worse. My lips are a little swollen for a few hours, but by the next day, kissing and eating feel completely normal.” —Elaine*, 31 The Doctor’s Note: “The lips are one of the most sensitive areas on the body, so sometimes we start with an injectable anesthetic. Icing first is often enough, though. Plus, the most commonly used fillers, like Juvéderm and Restylane, have numbing lidocaine mixed in. The temporary swelling of the gel might feel a little creepy but should never be painful. The swelling dissipates after about a week. And if a patient doesn’t like the results, there’s an exit strategy: We can inject an enzyme called hyaluronidase that breaks down the hyaluronic acid completely over a couple of days.” —Shamban

..

The Pain Meter:

READING THE PAIN METER It’s over already? I need more Demerol. NOW.

KYBELLA Deoxycholic acid, a fat-dissolving chemical injected to reduce a double chin The Patient Report: “I’m skinny, but the fullness under my chin really bothered me. I went in for four Kybella sessions over six months. With the first two, they injected lidocaine before the acid, and I didn’t feel anything after that. I thought the lidocaine increased my swelling afterward, though, so I skipped it for the last two. Without it, the acid felt like a deep, throbbing pain and burned for about 15 minutes. It wasn’t unbearable, but it made my eyes water. There was swelling for a week—a couple days less when I didn’t do the lidocaine—but not so much that people were staring at me. I just wore a scarf.” —Jenny*, 35 The Doctor’s Note: “I start with a numbing cream, then draw a grid across the area of about 20 spots. I inject lidocaine in each one, followed by the Kybella. Once the lidocaine wears off, the area can be achy for a few hours and will sometimes bruise. One hundred percent of patients have some swelling that can last up to two weeks.” —Anne Chapas, a dermatologist in New York City

...

The Pain Meter:

FRAXEL DUAL RESTORE A fractional CO2 laser that diminishes wrinkles, brown spots, scars, and pores The Patient Report: “I got a bad sunburn on my chest that left huge, dark sun spots. When a dermatologist suggested Fraxel, I went for it. She used a numbing cream first, but the pain was still an eight on a scale of one to ten. The first zaps weren’t incredibly painful, but the pain kept building as she covered the area. It became almost unbearable. The whole thing took roughly 15 minutes, and once the laser was turned off, my chest felt like it was on absolute fire for an hour. After that, there was no pain. My skin was red for two weeks and felt rough as it healed. A month later, though, my chest had completely changed: The dark spots had radically lightened or disappeared.” —Sarah*, 24 The Doctor’s Note: “The laser makes tiny holes in the skin, so it does create a pinprick-y feeling. We always start with lidocaine cream. We also use a Zimmer fan, which blows supercold air, and I give people squeezy stress balls. Afterward, you may feel badly sunburned for a day. By day three, your skin has a sandpapery texture that lasts a week or two.” —Ellen Marmur, a dermatologist in New York City

....

The Pain Meter:

*Names have been changed.


JAMIE NELSON/BLAUBLUT-EDITION.COM

‘‘

The dermatologist used a NUMBING cream first, but the pain was still an eight on a scale of one to ten.... It became almost UNBEARABLE.”


JAMIE NELSON/BLAUBLUT-EDITION.COM


ULTHERAPY An ultrasound-based technology for tightening skin on the face and body The Patient Report: “Over the last several years, I’ve done Ultherapy three times on my face and neck. The first time, I took Percocet beforehand for the pain, but it didn’t help much. The doctor held the handpiece against my skin and delivered zaps from the middle of my neck to just above my jaw. With each one, there was an intense burning feeling that lasted two or three seconds. Pain-wise, it was an eight on a scale of one to ten. The next two times, I took Demerol; the pain was more like a three— I just felt a hot sensation every time there was a pulse. Afterward, my skin was slightly flushed, but I didn’t need more painkillers. My jawline definitely looks tighter now.” —Amanda*, 42 The Doctor’s Note: “I usually give Valium or Demerol, but some of my patients use no painkillers or sedatives at all. The machine delivers heat into the muscles that tighten up coils of collagen; it feels like a sparkler hitting your skin. We ‘stamp’ it across the face. Most of the time the pain is a four or five out of ten, but you get some zingers of nine. Treating the whole face takes a few hundred pulses—that can wear on you. Most patients see results in about a month.” —Paul Jarrod Frank, a cosmetic dermatologist in New York City

.....

The Pain Meter:

COOLSCULPTING A freezing procedure shown to reduce fat on the abdomen, thighs, and upper arms The Patient Report: “I work out and eat well, but I had this ring of fat around my belly, like a life preserver, so I tried CoolSculpting. A vacuum-like contraption—around the size of an iPad mini—sucks in about two inches of your skin, which feels bizarre. The area starts to feel increasingly cold, but not painfully so...then you go numb. I didn’t need an anesthetic or a painkiller. I did three areas—my love handles and the area below my belly button; each one took 45 minutes. The most uncomfortable part was sitting in the same position for three hours. Afterward, my skin was a little red and felt cold for a while, but I went to dinner that night and the gym the next day. About a month later, the life preserver was gone.” —Allison*, 28 The Doctor’s Note: “The best candidates have fat that’s ‘squeezy’—not the hard, beer-belly type. If you make it through the first six minutes of the cold, you’ll be fine. That’s when you go numb. Afterward, we use a massaging device on the area. As the skin comes back to life, it feels sort of good—like your hands warming back up after a snowball fight. You might have some bruising and light soreness, but you can go straight back to work and working out. It takes two to six weeks to start seeing results, and some patients need more than one session.” —Marmur

.

The Pain Meter:

CELLFINA A device with a small blade to sever the fibers under the skin that create cellulite The Patient Report: “You lie on your stomach, and the most painful part is the injection of the lidocaine. Once that kicks in, you can’t feel anything. The blade’s motorized, though, and the sound—like an electric knife—is jarring. I had 21 dimples treated across my butt and thighs; it took 45 minutes. The dimples were gone immediately. For 48 hours I had soreness, like after a workout, but it didn’t hurt enough to even take Tylenol. The bruises lasted about ten days.” —Mickey Williams, 42 The Doctor’s Note: “The ideal candidate is under 50, so her skin has enough elasticity to spring back. The device—it looks like a petri dish—hovers over the area being treated and delivers a shot of lidocaine. Then a suction cup grabs the skin and inserts a tiny knife below the skin to cut the fiber that creates the dimple. The sound of the blade is a little disturbing; we offer noise-canceling headphones so you can listen to music. Most patients have tenderness and bruising afterward; improvements are visible in a few days.” —Melanie Palm, a dermatologist in Solana Beach, California

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The Pain Meter:

MONALISA TOUCH A fractional CO2 laser used to treat signs of aging and atrophy on the vaginal walls The Patient Report: “I wasn’t experiencing the vaginal dryness that can come with menopause but did this preventively—three treatments, each two months apart. Your feet are in stirrups, like at a pelvic exam, and they insert a probe that’s like a big metal tampon. You feel a slight vibration that’s somewhat pleasant—imagine a very low-intensity vibrator. It was done in ten minutes. I haven’t noticed major differences, but there’s a bit more moisture, and I’ll go in for the recommended yearly touch-up appointment.” —Michele Cloud, 49 The Doctor’s Note: “Decreased estrogen levels can lead to vaginal dryness and discomfort. This laser triggers cellular regeneration that leads to new blood vessels and more collagen and elastin. Some women feel a little pain around the vaginal opening during the treatment, so we might apply a numbing cream. But others say it feels good; a patient or two has even come close to orgasming. A few weeks after, a lot of women say things feel more ‘juicy,’ and for many, it’s totally life-changing.” —Maria Sophocles, a gynecologist in Princeton, New Jersey The Pain Meter:


Silk top by Jill Stuart. Earring, Moretz’s own. Pop Glaze Lip Colour + Primer in Bubblegum Pop by Clinique. These pages: Hair, Gregory Russell; makeup, Mai Quynh; manicure, Tracey Sutter. Prop stylist: Evan Jourden. Fashion editor: Rachael Wang. Details, see Shopping Guide.


JOSEPHINE SCHIELE (STILL LIFES)

She jams to Missy Elliott, isn’t into push-up bras, and straight-up hates Facetune. Chloë Grace Moretz just might be the coolest—and smartest—teenager alive. REPORTING BY PATTY ADAMS MARTINEZ PHOTOGRAPHED BY PAUL MAFFI


On her biggest beauty challenge: “I dealt with really bad cystic acne growing up. I tried changing my diet and my beauty products before going on Accutane. [Having acne problems] was a long, hard, emotional process.” On an unorthodox skin-cleansing regimen: “I wash my face with olive oil. I swear my skin is so much clearer because of it.”

“I like that it’s not too opaque,” says Moretz of her go-to blush, Chanel Powder Blush in Malice.

On sweating herself Zen: ”SoulCycle, Pilates, and high-intensity interval training are my form of relaxation. Working out is my chance to be by myself and do my own thing and get my energy out, and it keeps my mind pretty clear.”

On the feature she’d never change: “Over the years, makeup artists have wanted to pluck my eyebrows, but I wouldn’t let them touch them, because I’ve learned from others’ mistakes.” On her secret to beachy waves: “I’ll curl my hair, then sleep on it. I also don’t wash my hair very much. You want your natural oils to come through.” On her unexpected vice: “I’ve seen The Little Mermaid, I’m not kidding, over a hundred times. I’ve watched Pocahontas a hundred times, Mulan a hundred times. I watch Disney-princess movies like nobody’s business.” On storytelling: “My latest tattoo is the number 4,419 on my hip. It’s the 4,419 miles that I drove cross-country when I turned 18. It represents coming of age. I have my grandmother’s signature on my back, along with a rose and a cross; my family’s initials on my thigh; the letters CK on my ankle [she and best friend Kathryn both have it]; a color spectrum on my hip for LGBTQ pride [two of Moretz’s four brothers are gay]; and the print of my sister’s feet—who passed away when she was, like, two days old—on my ankle.” On the thing she most regrets: “I like staying up late, and then I regret it every morning. I have to set three or four alarms to make sure if I have an appointment. I’d sleep till the middle of the afternoon every day if I could.” On what Hillary Clinton said to her: “She’s told me she’s proud of how feisty I am and to not be afraid to speak my mind or to cause a bit of a wake.”

Silk dress by Etro. Studded Kiss Lipstick in Mötorhead by Kat Von D. Details, see Shopping Guide.

On life-changing advice from her mother: “I’m five foot five and broad-shouldered and have a short waist. I’ve had movie [producers] tell me I need to wear push-up bras or that I don’t have a pronounced enough jaw. When I was younger, I really took it to heart. But one day my mom said, ‘Chloë, you’ve gotta stop picking your body apart because that’s what makes you beautiful, that’s what makes you my daughter.’ I realized she was right. I don’t want to be a clone of everyone else. I like being me.”

“I DON’T WANT TO BE A CLONE OF EVERYONE ELSE. I LIKE BEING ME.” 116

THIS PAGE AND OPPOSITE PAGE: JOSEPHINE SCHIELE (STILL LIFES)

O

n the one hand, Chloë Grace Moretz is like many girls her age: She stresses over acne, works out to Missy and Britney, and occasionally sleeps until noon. On the other, she couldn’t be more different: She’s had a makeup artist since she started acting at age six, she gets advice from Hillary Clinton, and she has 55 movies under her belt. The 19-year-old actress and face of Coach the Fragrance shares the lessons she’s learned growing up in the spotlight.

On the downside of perfection: “Everyone needs to figure out their own angles, lighting, and the perfect reach for a good selfie. The problem with Facetune and all of these other apps is that it’s just another way to cover up who you really are. It allows you to fulfill the dark, twisted sides of yourself where you don’t feel adequate enough. You go on these apps and make yourself almost perfect, but it’s fake and leads to unrealistic expectations.”


Acrylic-blend sweater by Philosophy di Lorenzo Serafini. Rouge Rouge lipstick in Hushed Tones by Shiseido. Right: Nail polish in Sarah Smile, Dirty Little Secret, and Shape of My Heart by Deborah Lippmann. Details, see Shopping Guide.

Shazam for more Chloë.

Coach the Fragrance is “a happy, fun scent, but it also has undertones of musk. It makes me feel sexy,” says Moretz. One of Moretz’s other favorite products: Lancôme Le Stylo Waterproof Long Lasting Eyeliner. “I can smudge it and make a good smoky eye,” she says.


SHOPPING GUIDE Cover: 3.1 Phillip Lim velvet blazer, $1,050. 31philliplim.com. Dries Van Noten silk top, $690. Bergdorf Goodman, N.Y.C. 212-753-7300. Jennifer Fisher rings, $245 to $275. Jennifer fisherjewelry.com. Cover Look, page 16: Akris velvet dress, $3,990. Akris stores. Boss cashmere-blend coat, $2,395. Hugoboss.com. Alix velvet dress, $375. Alixnyc.com. 3.1 Phillip Lim velvet boots, price available upon request for similar styles. 31phillip lim.com. Mara Hoffman hat, price available upon request. Marahoffman .com. Page 18: Eckhaus Latta wool nylon dress, $475. Shop.eckhauslatta .com. Extra, Extra, page 32: Topshop Boutique jersey top, $40. Topshop.com. J. W. Anderson wool top, $650. Barneys New York stores. Helmut Lang cotton top, $295. Helmutlang.com. Nika Tang wool polyester dress, $680. Nikatang .com. Topshop Boutique polyester top, $66. Topshop.com. Sorelle silver earring, $480. Quiet Storms, Brooklyn. 718-782-1547. Page 34: Rodebjer Jacquard jacket, $525. Rodebjer.com. Topshop cotton linen top, $60. Topshop.com. Ben-Amun by Isaac Manevitz earrings, $170. Ben-amun.com. Blue Period, page 52: Miu Miu denim dress, $2,965, and belt, price available upon request. Select Miu Miu stores. Elements of Style, page 64: Drome wooland-shearling coat, price available upon request. Drome.it. Tim Coppens wool sweater, $295. Barneys.com. Sonia by Sonia Rykiel embroidered cotton top, $220. Bloomingdales.com. Ellery silk-blend dress, $2,660. Elleryland.com.

118 ALLURE NOVEMBER 2016

Christian Louboutin patent-leather-and-suede shoes, $845 for similar styles. Christian louboutin.com. Heart Times, page 81: Clé de Peau Beauté La Crème, C.O. Bigelow Lavender Essential Oil, Lulu Organics Hair Powder, Clé de Peau Beauté Luminizing Face Enhancer, R + Co Bel Air Smoothing Conditioner, Clé de Peau Beauté Perfect Lash Mascara, and Givenchy Very Irrésistible Eau de Toilette. Country Fair, page 82: Boss cashmereblend coat, $2,395. Hugoboss.com. Alix velvet dress, $375. Alixnyc.com. 3.1 Phillip Lim velvet boots, price available upon request for similar styles. 31philliplim.com. Jennifer Fisher rings, $245 to $275. Jenniferfisherjewelry.com. Mara Hoffman hat, price available upon request. Marahoffman.com. Page 84: The Row silk coat, $3,690. The Row, N.Y.C. 212-755-2017. Eckhaus Latta wool nylon dress, $475. Shop.eckhauslatta .com. Erin Considine earrings, $163. Bonadrag .com. Page 85: Dries Van Noten silk top, $690. Bergdorf Goodman, N.Y.C. 212-753-7300. Page 88: Valentino velvet dress, $7,900. Valentino stores. Lucifer Vir Honestus earrings, $1,630. Lucifer Vir Honestus, Miami. 786-577-0858. The Power and the Glory, page 99: Jennifer Fisher earrings, $195. Jenniferfisher jewelry.com. Page 100: Versace leather jacket, $4,995, and knit top, $750. Select Versace stores. Page 101: Max Mara cotton jacket, $1,690; alpaca jacket, $1,490; and alpaca pants, $795. Max Mara, N.Y.C. 212-879-6100. Page 102: Céline cotton shirt, $1,100. Céline, N.Y.C.

212-535-3703. Page 104: David Koma wool coat, $2,270. Davidkoma.co.uk. Wasson Fine silver-andgold earrings, $1,120. Wassonfine.com. Page 105: DKNY cotton poplin shirt, $258, and wool pants, $698. Select DKNY stores. Hermès leather shoes, $970. Hermès stores. Page 106: Calvin Klein Collection faux-fur collar, $695; wool jacket, $2,895; and wool skirt, $1,295. Calvin Klein Collection, N.Y.C. 212292-9000. She’s Not Even 20, page 114: Jill Stuart silk top, $448. Jill Stuart, N.Y.C. 212-3432300. Page 116: Etro silk dress, $3,260. Etro, N.Y.C. 212-317-9096. Page 117: Philosophy di Lorenzo Serafini acrylic-blend sweater, $540. Barneys New York, N.Y.C. 888-2227639. Autobiography, page 120: Sarah Jessica Parker Fragrances Stash SJP eau de parfum, Dior Dior Addict Lip Maximizer in Pink, Serge Normant Must Haves Meta Morphosis Hair Repair

Treatment, and Laura Mercier Caviar Stick Eye Colour in Jungle.

PHOTOGRAPHERS’ CREDITS Beauty Reporter, page 42, from left: Nails by Madeline Poole at Bridge for Sally Hansen; Liam Goodman; Nails by Madeline Poole at Bridge for Sally Hansen; Liam Goodman; Josephine Schiele (2). Getting Steamy, page 74, clockwise from top left: Getty Images; Aku Pöllänen; kuvio.com; Mariza Georgalou. Country Fair, page 86, from top: Courtesy of subject; George Pimentel/ Getty Images; GWR/Star Max/GC Images/Getty Images. Page 87, clockwise from top left: Paramount/Everett Collection; Jesse Grant/ WireImage; Jim Spellman/ WireImage; Jamie McCarthy/FilmMagic; James Devaney/GC Images/Getty Images; Norman Jean Roy; John Shearer/WireImage.

ALLURE IS A REGISTERED TRADEMARK OF ADVANCE MAGAZINE PUBLISHERS INC. COPYRIGHT © 2016 CONDÉ NAST. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. PRINTED IN THE U.S.A. VOLUME 26, NO. 11. NOVEMBER 2016 ISSUE. ALLURE (ISSN 1054-7771) is published monthly by Condé Nast, which is a division of Advance Magazine Publishers Inc. PRINCIPAL OFFICE: Condé Nast, One World Trade Center, New York, NY 10007. S. I. Newhouse, Jr., Chairman Emeritus; Charles H. Townsend, Chairman; Robert A. Sauerberg, Jr., President & Chief Executive Officer; David E. Geithner, Chief Financial Officer; Jill Bright, Chief Administrative Officer. Periodicals postage paid at New York, NY, and at additional mailing offices. Canada Post Publications Mail Agreement No. 40644503. Canadian Goods and Services Tax Registration No. 123242885-RT0001. Canada Post: Return undeliverable Canadian addresses to P.O. Box 874, Station Main, Markham, ON L3P 8L4. POSTMASTER: Send all UAA to CFS (SEE DMM 507.1.5.2); NON-POSTAL AND MILITARY FACILITIES: Send address corrections to ALLURE, P.O. Box 37656, Boone, IA 50037-0656. FOR SUBSCRIPTIONS, ADDRESS CHANGES, ADJUSTMENTS, OR BACK ISSUE INQUIRIES: Please write to ALLURE, P.O. Box 37656, Boone, IA 50037–0656, call 800-678-1825, or email subscriptions@allure.com. Please give both new and old addresses as printed on most recent label. Subscribers: If the Post Office alerts us that your magazine is undeliverable, we have no further obligation unless we receive a corrected address within one year. If during your subscription term or up to one year after the magazine becomes undeliverable, you are ever dissatisfied with your subscription, let us know. You will receive a full refund on all unmailed issues. First copy of new subscription will be mailed within four weeks after receipt of order. Address all editorial, business, and production correspondence to ALLURE Magazine, One World Trade Center, New York, NY 10007. For reprints, please email reprints@condenast.com or call 717-505-9701, ext 101. For reuse permissions, please email permissions@condenast.com or call 800-897-8666. Visit us online at www.allure.com. To subscribe to other Condé Nast magazines on the World Wide Web, visit www.condenastdigital.com. Occasionally, we make our subscriber list available to carefully screened companies that offer products and services that we believe would interest our readers. If you do not want to receive these offers and/or information, please advise us at P.O. Box 37656, Boone, IA 50037– 0656 or call 800-678-1825. ALLURE IS NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR THE RETURN OR LOSS OF, OR FOR DAMAGE OR ANY OTHER INJURY TO, UNSOLICITED MANUSCRIPTS, UNSOLICITED ARTWORK (INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, DRAWINGS, PHOTOGRAPHS, AND TRANSPARENCIES), OR ANY OTHER UNSOLICITED MATERIALS. THOSE SUBMITTING MANUSCRIPTS, PHOTOGRAPHS, ARTWORK, OR OTHER MATERIALS FOR CONSIDERATION SHOULD NOT SEND ORIGINALS, UNLESS SPECIFICALLY REQUESTED TO DO SO BY ALLURE IN WRITING. MANUSCRIPTS, PHOTOGRAPHS, AND OTHER MATERIALS SUBMITTED MUST BE ACCOMPANIED BY A SELF-ADDRESSED STAMPED ENVELOPE.


AUTOBIOGRAPHY

JOSEPHINE SCHIELE (STILL LIFE); BRUCE GLIKAS/FILMMAGIC (PARKER)

Sarah Jessica Parker FILLS IN THE BLANKS.

For details on a few of Parker’s favorite products (shown here), see Shopping Guide.


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