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School of Social Sciences

Survival Guide

BA Economic and Social Studies Step-by-step guide to Welcome Week DON’T FORGET TO BRING IT WITH YOU! 1


You’ll have lots to do this week so if you need help just ask! These are the people who will be your first line of support:

BA(Econ) Programme Director: Adam Ozanne 3.070 Arthur Lewis Building Tel: +44 (0)161 275 4814 Email: adam.ozanne@manchester.ac.uk

Undergraduate Administrative Support:

Shau Chan and Bernadette Julien Undergraduate Support Office, Arthur Lewis Building Tel: 0161 275 2500/ 275 4822 Email: shau.y.chan@manchester.ac.uk or bernadette.julien@manchester.ac.uk

Academic Advisors You’ll meet your Academic Advisor in Welcome Week. Your Advisor will assist you on a range of issues throughout your time at University so it’s a good idea to make a note of their contact details and the date of your first meeting.

Academic Advisor: Meeting:

Peer Mentors You’ll also meet your Peer Mentor this week. The Mentors are second or third years so they’ve been through everything you’re going through now. They’re a great source of support and they’ll be there to help you survive your first year in Manchester.

Peer Mentor:

You’ll see a lot of people around campus wearing “AskMe” badges this week. They want to help so don’t be afraid to ask them questions.

askme

There will also be “Ask Me” desks and signs around campus so if you get lost just head for the nearest help point.

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Welcome to Manchester Welcome to the BA(Econ) degree. I hope you enjoy your time in Manchester: this is a great city, the university is one of the best in the UK, and the BA(Econ) offers an unrivalled choice of courses combined with the depth and rigour of any single-discipline degree. University may seem daunting, but we will help: you will soon meet your Academic Advisor; the undergraduate office is open every day; your lecturers and tutors will all hold weekly office hours; and a BA(Econ) Programme Tutor is on duty every weekday. Moreover, this Survival Guide provides much vital information: please read it carefully. Enjoy yourself: join clubs, go to (night) clubs, make friends and have fun. But also work hard, pay attention and, above all, take responsibility for your own studies and progress over the next three years. You are embarking on an adventure. Make the most of it!

Dr Adam Ozanne

BA(Econ) Programme Director

Where to find us The Undergraduate Support Office is based on the ground floor of the Arthur Lewis Building (No. 36 on Campus Map). The Social Sciences UG team of administrators and support staff are based in this office and they will be your first point of contact for any queries. The UG Support Office is open Monday to Friday between 9am and 5pm during term time and 10am and 4pm during holidays. All academic staff are based in the Arthur Lewis and Humanities Bridgeford Street (No. 35 on Campus Map) buildings. In the Arthur Lewis Building: Social Anthropology are based on the second floor, Economics and Sociology on the third floor and Philosophy and Politics are located on the 4th Floor. In Humanities Bridgeford Street: Social Statistics staff are based on the ground and first floors. For students taking BMAN courses, the MBS Undergraduate team are based in Manchester Business School East (No. 26 on Campus Map). If you are taking Law course units, the Law Teaching Support Office is in room 3.05 in the Williamson Building (No. 52 on Campus Map).

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Welcome Week 2013 Have you completed Registration? If not go to the Crucial Guide and do this first! http://bit.ly/ crucialwelcome

Your 5 steps through Welcome Week 1. Go along to Introductory Meetings, Unismart, Library tutorials and Social Events This week you’ll have lots of opportunities to meet staff and students from your degree programme and you’ll be given vital information to get you through your time at University. At the introductory meetings you’ll meet your Academic Advisors and Peer Mentors and get an idea of what’s ahead of you in the next 3 years on your degree programme. Unismart will tell you what it’s like to be a student. The Library tutorials will set you up for success in your studies and the social events are a great chance to make friends. Your Welcome Week Schedule is on page 5.

2. Complete Course Unit Selection You’ll need to select your course units this week. There are lots of course units on offer so don’t miss the Options talks and the Course Unit Registration drop in sessions. For full details on choosing and enroling on your course units see pages 13 to 18.

3. Financial Registration If you have had any problems with online financial registration go along to Whitworth Hall between 9am and 5pm any day this week and the Student Services Team will be on hand to help you out.

4. Pick up your student card Your student card is your Student ID and your library card so make sure you collect it as soon as possible. You can pick up your student card from any of the locations listed in the Crucial Guide. International Student Check In – Whitworth Corridor (9am to 5pm all week) Tier 4 students - don’t forget that as part of our checks for UKBA we are required to see original copies of your academic documents on your arrival at Manchester. Please remember to bring the original copies of the qualifications listed on your CAS as well as your English Language qualification. You’ll need to Check In before you collect your student card.

5. Health and Safety Induction Course We want to make sure that you stay safe during your 3 years in Manchester so we ask you to complete a Health and Safety Induction Course (SOCS11230) and obtain a “pass”. The course is online and you will be able to access it via Blackboard (through My Manchester) as soon as you have registered.

Societies University isn’t all work, work, work! Joining a society is a great way to make friends and can help you to make the most of your three years in Manchester. For more information go along to the Student’s Union Societies and Sports Fair on Tuesday and Wednesday at Manchester Academy (No. 68 on Campus Map) or check out the website at http:// manchesterstudentsunion.com/groups.

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Welcome Week 2013 Monday 16 September 10am

Peer Mentor Welcome

Arthur Lewis Common Room

1pm

Peer Mentor Welcome

Arthur Lewis Common Room

Tuesday 17 September 9.30-11am UniSmartTM

Lecture Theatre B University Place (Campus Map 37)

1.30pm Programme Welcome and Plagiarism Talk

University Place, Lecture Theatre B

Wednesday 18 September First Year Options meetings in Lecture Theatre B, University Place. 9.00am

Politics

12.45pm

Maths and Stats

9.45am

Criminology

1.30pm

Social Statistics

10.00am

Social Anthropology

2.00pm

Development Studies

10.30am

Sociology

2.30pm

Library Tutorial

11.00am Philosophy

3.00pm

Economics

11:30am

Library Tutorial

4.00pm

Accounting and Finance

12.15pm

Lunch Break

If a venue is not given for a particular event please go to www.socialsciences.manchester.ac.uk/ undergraduate/prearrival/ for further information.

Thursday 19 September Course unit selection – all the meetings below are held in the Common Room, Ground floor (next to the coffee bar), Arthur Lewis Building (no 36 in Campus Map) at the following times: All students specialising in Business Studies (please see list of course codes below) Time Surname

Time Surname

9.00am A-M

9.30pm N-Z

N100

Business Studies

NL11

Business Studies & Economics

NL12

Business Studies & Politics

NL13

Business Studies & Sociology

All students specialising in areas other than Accounting/Finance or Business Studies (please see list of course codes below) Time Surname

Time Surname

10.00am A-M

10.45pm N-Z

L100

Economics

LL12

Economics & Politics

LL13

Economics & Sociology

L244

Politics

L900

Development Studies

LL91

Development Studies & Economics

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LL92

Development Studies & Politics

LL93

Development Studies & Sociology

LM19

Economics & Criminology

LV15

Economics & Philosophy

All students specialising in Accounting/Finance (please see list of course codes below) Time Surname

Time Surname

1.30m

A-M

2.30pm N-Z

N300

Finance

NN43

LN13

Economics & Finance

9-5pm

Accounting & Finance

Course Unit Selection Drop-in PC Clusters, Arthur Lewis

Friday 20 September 9-11am Peer Mentor Session Venue tbc (see link below) 1-3pm

Meet your Academic Advisor You will be emailed with details of your advisor and the time and place of your meeting.

3pm

Welcome Party

Arthur Lewis Common Room

If a venue is not given for a particular event please go to www.socialsciences.manchester.ac.uk/ undergraduate/prearrival/ for further information.

City Bus tours See the sights of Manchester on a City Bus Tour. The tours will run each day during Welcome Week from 10am to 12pm and 2pm to 4pm. For booking and tour information go to www.welcome.manchester.ac.uk

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The BA (Economic and Social Studies) Programme The first year of the BA(Econ) degree gives you a broad introduction to the social sciences, enabling you to make an informed choice of areas to specialise in for your second and third years.

Your Programme Structure

In each year there are a number of course units which you are required to take and you also have a range of additional optional course units to choose from.

Level One Programme Structure 2013-14

The following course units are offered subject to availability, timetabling constraints and, in certain cases, limits on the number of students accepted. Course units available in the first semester are designated by the suffix digit ‘1’, those in the second semester by the digit ‘2’ and those covering both semesters by the digit ‘0’. Any pre–requisite is indicated by the letter ‘P’ and any co-requisite by the letter ‘C’. Honours candidates are required to complete course units totalling 120 units, including at least 50 units, and not more than 70 units in any one semester.

A. Students intending to take pathways in Economics and/or Social Sciences

B. Students intending to take pathways in Accounting and/or Finance

C. Students intending to take pathways in Business Studies

A. Students intending to take pathways in Economics and/or Social Sciences: Course Code

Course Unit Title

Units

Pre/Co-requisites, Notes

Economics

Students must take 20 units from the following:

ECON10061

Introductory Mathematics

10

P: GCSE Mathematics

&

ECON10062

Introductory Statistics

10

C: ECON10061

or

ECON10001

Further Mathematics

10

P: AS Level Mathematics

&

ECON10132

Statistics for Economists

10

C: ECON10001

or

ECON10071

Advanced Mathematics

10

P: A Level Mathematics

&

ECON10072

Advanced Statistics

10

C: ECON10071

Students must take 20 units from the following:

ECON10041

Microeconomic Principles

10

&

ECON10042

Macroeconomic Principles

10

C: ECON10041

or

ECON10081

The UK Economy – Microeconomics

10

P: A Level Economics

&

ECON10082

The UK Economy – Macroeconomics

10

C: ECON10081

The following course units may also be selected:

ECON10002

An Introduction to Development

10

SOST10142 Applied Statistics for Economists 10 P: A Level Mathematics or Statistics

7


Politics Students must take at least 20 units from the following (Politics pathway must take either (POLI10201 or POLI10202 or POLI10601). In addition, POLI10702 must be taken as a compulsory unit in either the first or second year):

POLI10201 Introduction to Comparative Politics 20

Cannot be taken in conjunction with POLI10202

POLI10202 Introduction to Comparative Politics 20

Cannot be taken in conjunction with POLI10201

POLI10601

Introduction to International Politics

20

POLI10702

Introduction to Political Theory

20

The following course units may also be selected:

POLI10402

Britain in the Global Context

20

Students must take at least 20 units from any of the following four subject areas:

Criminology (Criminology pathway must take LAWS10421 as a core unit) LAWS10001

Crime & Society

20

LAWS10421

Foundations of Criminal Justice

20

LAWS10432

Psychology, Crime & Criminal Justice

20

PHILOSOPHY (Philosophy pathway must take at least 20 units) PHIL10021

Values We Live By

20

PHIL10041

Critical Thinking

20

PHIL10622

Discovering Reality

20

PHIL10631

Mind & World

20

PHIL10642

Philosophy & Social Sciences

20

Social Anthropology SOAN10301

Power and Culture: Inequalities in Everyday Life 10

SOAN10312

Cultural Diversity in Global Perspective

SOAN10320

Introduction to Social Anthropology (Parts 1 and 2)

SOAN10361

Introduction to Business Anthropology

20

SOAN10382

Introduction to Digital Film Making

20

10 20

Sociology (Sociology pathway must take one of SOCY10421 or SOCY10432 as a core unit) SOCY10402

British Society in a Globalising World

20

SOCY10421

From Modernity to Postmodernity I

20

SOCY10432

From Modernity to Postmodernity II

20

SOCY10441

Media, Culture & Society

20

SOCY10451

Media, Self & Imagined Community

20

SOCY10472

Sociology of Personal Life

20

SOCY10912

Work, Organisations & Society

20

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The following course units may also be selected:

Course Code

Course Unit Title

Units

BMAN10552

Fundamentals of Finance

10

BMAN10621A

Fundamentals of Financial Reporting

10

BMAN10632

Fundamentals of Management Accounting 10

ECON10151

Computing for Social Scientists

HIST10062

Origins Of British Industrialisation: Economic & Social History 1660-1850

British 20

HIST10511

Globalisation in Historical Perspective

20

Pre/Co-requisites, Notes

P: BMAN10621A

10

SOCS10902 Study Skills 10

Cannot be taken in conjunction with SOCS10911

SOCS10911 Study Skills 10

Cannot be taken in conjunction with SOCS10902

SOST10012

Understanding Social Media

20

SOST10021

Unequal Societies Health, Well-Being & Happiness

20

B. Students intending to take pathways in Accounting and/or Finance: Course Code

Course Unit Title

Units

Pre/Co-requisites, Notes

Accounting And Finance Students must take the following 30 compulsory units:

BMAN10501

Financial Reporting

10

BMAN10512

Introductory Management Accounting

10

BMAN10522

Financial Decision Making

10

Economics Students must take 20 units from the following:

ECON10061

Introductory Mathematics

10

P: GCSE Mathematics

&

ECON10062

Introductory Statistics

10

C: ECON10061

or

ECON10001

Further Mathematics

10

P: AS Level Mathematics

&

ECON10132

Statistics for Economists

10

C: ECON10001

or

ECON10071

Advanced Mathematics

10

P: A Level Mathematics

&

ECON10072

Advanced Statistics

10

C: ECON10071

Students must take 20 units from the following:

ECON10041

Microeconomic Principles

10

&

ECON10042

Macroeconomic Principles

10

C: ECON10041

or

ECON10081

The UK Economy – Microeconomics

10

P: A Level Economics

&

ECON10082

The UK Economy – Macroeconomics

10

C: ECON10081

9


The following course units may also be selected:

ECON10002

An Introduction to Development

10

SOST10142 Applied Statistics for Economists 10 P: A Level Mathematics or Statistics Students must take at least 20 units from any of the following four subject areas:

POLITICS

POLI10201

Introduction to Comparative Politics

20

POLI10402

Britain in the Global Context

20

POLI10601

Introduction to International Politics

20

POLI10702

Introduction to Political Theory

20

PHILOSOPHY

PHIL10021

Values We Live By

20

PHIL10041

Critical Thinking

20

PHIL10631

Mind & World

20

SOCIAL ANTHROPOLOGY

SOAN10301

Power and Culture: Inequalities in Everyday Life 10

SOAN10312

Cultural Diversity in Global Perspective

10

SOAN10320 Introduction to Social Anthropology (Parts 1 and 2) 20

SOAN10361

Introduction to Business Anthropology

20

SOAN10382

Introduction to Digital Film Making

20

SOCIOLOGY

SOCY10402

British Society in a Globalising World

20

SOCY10421

From Modernity to Postmodernity I

20

SOCY10432

From Modernity to Postmodernity II

20

SOCY10451

Media, Self & Imagined Community

20

SOCY10472

Sociology of Personal Life

20

SOCY10912

Work, Organisations & Society

20

The following course units may also be selected:

Computing for Social Scientists

10

HIST10062

ECON10151

Origins Of British Industrialisation: British Economic & Social History 1660-1850

20

Globalisation in Historical Perspective

20

HIST10511

SOCS10902 Study Skills 10

Cannot be taken in conjunction with SOCS10911

SOCS10911 Study Skills 10

Cannot be taken in conjunction with SOCS10902

SOST10012

Understanding Social Media

SOST10021

Unequal Societies – Health, Well-Being & Happiness

10

20 20


C: Students intending to take pathways in Business Studies:

Course Code

Course Unit Title

Units

Pre/Co-requisites , Notes

ACCOUNTING AND FINANCE Students must take the following 10 compulsory units

BMAN10621A

Fundamentals of Financial Reporting

10

The following course units may also be selected:

BMAN10522

Financial Decision Making

10

BMAN10632

Fundamentals of Management Accounting 10

P: BMAN10621A

ECONOMICS Students must take 20 core units from the following:

ECON10061

Introductory Mathematics

10

P: GCSE Mathematics

&

ECON10062

Introductory Statistics

10

C: ECON10061

or

ECON10001

Further Mathematics

10

P: AS Level Mathematics

&

ECON10132

Statistics for Economists

10

C: ECON10001

or

ECON10071

Advanced Mathematics

10

P: A Level Mathematics

&

ECON10072

Advanced Statistics

10

C: ECON10071

Students must take 20 units from the following:

ECON10041

Microeconomic Principles

10

&

ECON10042

Macroeconomic Principles

10

C: ECON10041

or

ECON10081

The UK Economy – Microeconomics

10

P: A Level Economics

&

ECON10082

The UK Economy – Macroeconomics

10

C: ECON10081

The following course units may also be selected:

ECON10002

An Introduction to Development

10

SOST10142 Applied Statistics for Economists 10 P: A Level Mathematics or Statistics

POLITICS Students must take at least 20 units from the following (Politics pathway must take either (POLI10201 or POLI10202 or POLI10601). In addition, POLI10702 must be taken as a compulsory unit in either the first or second year):

POLI10201 Introduction to Comparative Politics 20

Cannot be taken in conjunction with POLI10202

POLI10202 Introduction to Comparative Politics 20

Cannot be taken in conjunction with POLI10201

POLI10601

Introduction to International Politics

20

POLI10702

Introduction to Political Theory

20

11


The following course units may also be selected:

POLI10402

Britain in the Global Context

20

Students must take at least 20 units from any of the following three subject areas (strongly advised to take both SOAN10361 & SOCY10912):

PHILOSOPHY

PHIL10021

Values We Live By

20

PHIL10041

Critical Thinking

20

PHIL10622

Discovering Reality

20

PHIL10631

Mind & World

20

PHIL10642

Philosophy & Social Sciences

20

SOCIAL ANTHROPOLOGY

SOAN10301

Power and Culture: Inequalities in Everyday Life 10

SOAN10312

Cultural Diversity in Global Perspective

SOAN10320

Introduction to Social Anthropology (Parts 1 and 2)

SOAN10361

Introduction to Business Anthropology

20

SOAN10382

Introduction to Digital Film Making

20

10 20

SOCIOLOGY (Sociology pathway must take one of SOCY10421 or SOCY10432 as a core unit)

SOCY10402

British Society in a Globalising World

20

SOCY10421

From Modernity to Postmodernity I

20

SOCY10432

From Modernity to Postmodernity II

20

SOCY10441

Media, Culture & Society

20

SOCY10451

Media, Self & Imagined Community

20

SOCY10472

Sociology of Personal Life

20

SOCY10912

Work, Organisations & Society

20

The following course units may also be selected:

ECON10151

Computing for Social Scientists

10

HIST10062

Origins Of British Industrialisation: British Economic & Social History 1660-1850 20

Globalisation in Historical Perspective

HIST10511

20

SOCS10902 Study Skills 10

Cannot be taken in conjunction with SOCS10911

SOCS10911 Study Skills 10

Cannot be taken in conjunction with SOCS10902

SOST10012

Understanding Social Media

SOST10021

Unequal Societies – Health, Well-Being & Happiness

12

20 20


Course Unit Selection: Research Your Course Units

!

When you’re trying to decide on a Free Choice Option remember you should be looking for a first year course which is open to all students.

Interpreting Course Unit Codes Each course unit has a code containing four items of information:

E C O N 1 0 0 7 1

The First Four Letters: The Discipline area providing the course E.g.: ECON = Economics POLI = Politics BMAN = Finance SOCY = Sociology MATH = Maths LAWS = Law PHIL = Philosophy HIST = History SOST=Social Statistics CARS = Careers

The First Number: The level (or year) in which the course is taught.

The Second Third And Fourth Numbers: The actual course number

The Last Number: Indicates the semester in which the course is taught E.g.: 1 for semester one 2 for semester two 0 for a course unit taught all year (in both semesters)

Course units in the School of Social Sciences School Options Session At the Options meetings on the Wednesday of Welcome Week, members of academic staff from each subject area will give you an overview of the course units available to you in your first year. An informed choice of first year units is very important so make sure you attend the meetings for any subjects in which you may be interested. First Year Options meetings are listed on page 5.

Academic Staff If you need additional information on a course you can contact the course convenor directly. Contact details for all academic members of staff are listed on the School’s intranet site at http://staffprofiles.humanities.manchester.ac.uk/StaffList.aspx?ou=I3041

Peer Mentors There are lots of optional course units to choose from so speak to the people who did them last year. Your Mentor will be able to give you all the facts on everything from Macroeconomics to Media, Culture and Society.

Online The Course Unit Database provides info on all for all SoSS course units. www.socialsciences. manchester.ac.uk/undergraduate/courses/modules

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Things to remember when choosing course units Check Your Programme Structure When choosing your course units please pay careful attention to your Programme Structure and make sure that you have selected course units in all the appropriate sections.

Balancing your workload

Before you enrol on your course units think about the amount of units you’ll have in each semester. In each year you will be taking courses worth a total of 120 credits. These may be single semester modules (worth either 10 or 20 credits, depending on there intensity) or year long courses (worth 20 credits). You’ll normally have an even split of credits across the two semesters i.e. 60 credits in each semester. You are allowed to have a slight imbalance between semesters, so that you are taking 50/70 or 70/50 across semesters one and two.

!

If your course unit selection doesn’t meet the degree requirements, for content or balance of units, you’ll have to change your course units. If you don’t select the correct course units first time around you may struggle to get on courses later so if you are unsure ask!

Choose your course units early Some courses fill up very quickly so sign up for your course units as soon as possible during Welcome Week. It’s not always possible to get your first choice but the earlier you complete course unit selection; the more likely you are to be successful.

Waiting Lists All Discipline Areas within the School of Social Sciences operate waiting lists for popular course units. If you can’t get onto a course unit because it’s full email your Programme Administrator and they will add you to the waiting list. Lists are checked daily and where possible extra tutorials will be offered to meet demand for places. However, being added to a waiting list is not a guarantee of enrolment on the course. You should always choose another course unit in case a place does not become available.

Permission Do you have permission to choose free choice units? If you do your course units may need to be approved by either your Academic Advisor or your Programme Director. Check your Programme Structure for more information.

Timetables You can’t select two course units that have lectures at the same time so make sure you check your timetable. Timetables for SoSS can be found at: www.socialsciences.manchester.ac.uk/intranet/ug/useful/ Use the blank timetables in this guide to work out when your lectures are and what spaces on your timetable are free for optional course units.

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Course Unit Selection: Enrolment Once you’ve chosen your course units you need to enrol on them and choose tutorial groups through the on-line student system. You need to complete course unit selection by 22nd September 2013 . You can log into the Student System through My Manchester at http://my.manchester.ac.uk (You will need your username and password to log in.) Course Unit Selection is easier if you think about it in two stages.

Stage One You will already be enrolled on lectures for some of your course units so for these courses you only have to select a tutorial group. For these course units you are currently enrolled in tutorial zero (TU0) or seminar zero (SEM0). This is just a holding group so you need to select a live tutorial group i.e. one that has a day and date attached to it. When you access your student system, you use the Edit tab to change your tutorial.

Stage Two You will need to select both a lecture and a tutorial for any additional course units you wish to take. When you access your student system, you use the Add tab to enrol on a lecture and tutorial. We’ve included a Quick Guide to Course Unit Selection on the next page of this booklet. You can find full instructions on how to select course units at http://www.socialsciences.manchester.ac.uk/ intranet/ug/registration/  (Full Guide to Course Unit Selection)

Confused? Don’t worry. We’ll be holding a drop-in session on Thursday afternoon so come along if you need help selecting your course units. Course Unit Drop-In: 19th September 2013 9am - 5pm UG Computer Clusters (Arthur Lewis Building)

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Course Unit Selection: a guide to adding your courses on Self Service http://www.studentnet.manchester.ac.uk/crucial-guide/academic-life/registration/cus/ Log into the Student System (aka Campus Solutions), through your My Manchester http://my.manchester.ac.uk/ Enter your Central User Name and Password and click LOG IN. Once you are logged in, click on the MY SERVICES tab and click on the STUDENT SYSTEM link Click on STUDENT CENTER Select ENROLL. Ensure you are in the ADD tab Select the 2013-14 Academic Year Ensure that the CLASS SEARCH radio button is selected, and click SEARCH Select a Course Subject e.g. Economics, Politics, Social Anthropology etc. from the drop-down menu The course number is the 5 digit number that appears in the course code e.g. ECON10441 or SOAN30601. Then click SEARCH You will need to select the LECTURE component (unless otherwise advised) – normally defined as ‘LEC’ in the Section – by clicking on Select Class You will be prompted to add a tutorial/workshop/seminar etc. There may be more classes to choose from than initially appear on screen – if there are you should click VIEW ALL SECTIONS. Click the radio button to the left of the option you wish to add. Then click NEXT The next screen will show what you have chosen. You are not enrolled yet, click NEXT The next screen will confirm your selection, now you can add more classes, or to finish, click PROCEED TO STEP 2 OF 3 To end the enrolling process click FINISH ENROLLING (you can come back later and add more if you wish). YOU ARE NOT ENROLLED until you click this button. You will now be notified if the enrolment was a success. If you receive an error message, it could be for a number of reasons; A class requires special consent from the discipline area who owns the course. You must contact the relevant School office to get consent. A class (lecture or tutorial) is already full. If this is the case you will have seen a blue square symbol when selecting the class, and also get an error message when you try to finish enrolling. There is a time conflict.

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17

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

5.00 – 6.00

4.00 – 5.00

3.00 – 4.00

2.00 – 3.00

1.00 – 2.00

12.00 – 1.00

11.00 – 12.00

10.00 – 11.00

9.00 – 10.00

Semester 1

Thursday

Friday


18

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

5.00 – 6.00

4.00 – 5.00

3.00 – 4.00

2.00 – 3.00

1.00 – 2.00

12.00 – 1.00

11.00 – 12.00

10.00 – 11.00

9.00 – 10.00

Semester 2

Thursday

Friday


Online Resources BA(Econ) Hub

The Hub is a multi programme Blackboard space open to students studying BA(Econ). Regular announcements will keep you up to date with everything that is happening. This should be your first stop for everything you need to know about BA(Econ) including: Course Unit Selection Info Contact Info Programme Handbooks You can access the Hub from your Blackboard homepage under the ‘My communities’ tab. You log into Blackboard through My Manchester http://my.manchester.ac.uk

School of Social Sciences Intranet

Everything you need to know about registration, assessment, exams, timetables and other useful information can be found on the SoSS intranet site at http://www.socialsciences.manchester.ac.uk/ intranet/ug/ Your username: facstud Password: tennis

My Manchester

My Manchester gives you access to key information, tools and services to support you over the next three years. This includes email, University news, course unit selection and Blackboard. You need your username and password to log into My Manchester. http://my.manchester.ac.uk

iManchester

Stay connected wherever you are by downloading iManchester to your Smartphone for free. It helps you find your way around campus, search for your nearest café, locate your nearest PC Cluster and much more! See more at: http://www.studentnet.manchester.ac.uk/it-services/gettingstarted/imanchester/

The Crucial Guide You can access the Crucial Guide through My Manchester (through the ‘My Campus Life’ tab) and it is an excellent source of essential advice, information and guidance.

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BA(ECON) Course Units There will be meetings on Wednesday 18 September at which further information and advice will be available about optional course units as well as the course unit selection sessions on Thursday 19 September. Please see your welcome week timetable in this booklet for more information. Below is some information about the first year course units provided by the School of Social Sciences and Manchester Business School, for more information about these course units and other course units please visit the undergraduate course modules website at: http://www.socialsciences.manchester.ac.uk/undergraduate/courses/2012/modules/

Accounting and Finance course units These six course units provide a broad introduction to the principles and practice of financial decision making, financial reporting and management accounting. They also provide a foundation for the second year accounting and finance courses offered in Manchester Business School. The main topics are:

BMAN10501 Financial Reporting (for Accounting/Finance specialists only)

This unit is concerned with the way in which organisations “account” for their activities to external users of financial reports. As well as offering an understanding of the general role, context and principles of financial reporting, it covers the basic recording of transactions, through to the preparation of income statements, balance sheets and cash flow statements along with some of the associated measurement and disclosure problems. Bookkeeping techniques are taught within the course as a means to understand how the figures in financial reports are derived and thereby to assist with the interpretation of financial reports. The course unit assumes no background knowledge in accounting.

BMAN10621A Fundamentals of Financial Reporting (for non-Accounting/Finance Specialists)

This unit introduces non-specialist accounting and finance students to the fundamental concepts and techniques of accounting. Its conceptual approach emphasises general principles which students should be able to apply to specific problems and issues in accounting and the wider business/social environment. Topics include: introduction to financial reporting concepts, the balance sheet, the income statement, the cash flow statement, ratio analysis, and corporate governance. The course unit assumes no background knowledge in accounting.

BMAN10632 Fundamentals of Management Accounting (for non-Accounting/Finance specialists) This unit introduces non-specialist accounting and finance students to the fundamental concepts and techniques of management accounting. Its conceptual approach emphasises general principles which students should be able to apply to specific problems and issues in accounting and the wider business/social environment. Topics include: introduction to management accounting, relevant costs, cost-volume-profit analysis and marginal costing, full costing, budgeting, capital investment decisions, strategic management accounting. The course unit assumes no background knowledge in accounting.

BMAN10512 Introductory Management Accounting (for Accounting/Finance specialists only)

This unit is concerned with the ways in which accounting information can assist “internal” users (i.e. management) to make decisions and to plan and control organisational activities. Such “management accounting” is relevant to all kinds of organisations. Although concentrated on accounting information, an important emphasis in the approach adopted in the course is the need to see the use of accounting in its organisational context and the effect it can have on human behaviour. Various management accounting concepts will be introduced and illustrated through practical examples of various numerical techniques. Alternative cost concepts will be explored for both recording the costs of existing operations and for taking decisions about new opportunities. Special attention will be given to cost-volumeprofit analysis, product pricing, special decisions, and allocation decisions when resources are limited. In addition, the construction of budgets for planning and the use of standard costing and variance analysis for control will be examined. The course also introduces the concept and design performance measurement systems in decentralised organisations. The course unit assumes no background knowledge in accounting.

BMAN10522 Financial Decision Making (for Accounting/Finance/Business specialists only)

This unit is concerned with principles that influence decisions when approached from a financial perspective. Topics include: introduction to finance, the time value of money, capital raising and evaluation of securities, the firm’s capital budgeting decision, share price behaviour and informational efficiency, security risk and return. The course unit assumes no background knowledge in finance.

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BMAN10552 Fundamentals of Finance (for non-Accounting/Finance/Business Specialists)

This unit introduces non-accounting and finance specialists to the fundamental concepts and techniques of finance. Its approach emphasises general principles which students should be able to apply to specific problems and issues in finance and the wider business environment. The course unit introduces the basic concepts of financial statement analysis, time value of money, capital budgeting, bond valuation, stock valuation, stock returns and market efficiency, portfolio diversification, capital asset pricing model, cost of capital, corporate governance, and behavioural finance. In addition, it also introduces empirical research evidences that synthesise the aforementioned topics.

Criminology course units LAWS10001 Crime & Society

This course aims to introduce students to concepts of crime and criminality as understood in the social sciences. Topics covered include: The social construction of crime, The sociology of crime, The psychology of crime, Media representations of crime, Crime statistics and the fear of crime, The geography of crime, Crime, race and ethnicity, Crime and gender, Crimes of the powerful, Offenders and victims By the end of the course students will have an understanding of the social construction of crime, differentiate between approaches to crime and criminality in the social sciences, articulate the benefits of inter-disciplinary study of crime and criminality, show an appreciation of the ethical dilemmas connected with crime and criminality in a diverse society

LAWS10421 Foundations of Criminal Justice (Compulsory for Criminology specialists)

This course will assist students to familiarise themselves with the history, structure and agencies of the criminal justice system, to consider the values which inform the criminal justice system, to enable students to critically consider research in the field. Topics include - studying the criminal justice system, orientation to the CJS - competing perspectives, policing: history of the modern police and recent developments, criminal prosecutions: private, police and public prosecutions,the criminal courts; their origins and practice, sentencing: rationales for punishment, victims: what should their role be?, punishment and imprisonment, Probation: theory and practice, youth justice

LAW10432 Psychology, Crime & Criminal Justice

This course aims to introduce the discipline of psychology as it applies to the study of crime and criminal justice, to explore the contribution of psychology to the explanation, investigation and reduction of crime and anti-social behaviour, to evaluate strengths and limitations of the featured approaches and literature. Topics include introducing psychology, introducing criminological psychology, crime and development: the ‘facts’, crime and development: persistent offending, crime and development: adolescent offending, forensic psychology: police investigation, forensic psychology: eyewitness testimony, addressing offending: post-hoc interventions, predicting risk and dangerousness, perspectives on crime prevention

Economic and Social History course units HIST10062 Origins of British Industrialisation: British Economic & Social History 1660-1850 This course covers the economic and social history of Britain from the beginning of the eighteenth century through to the outbreak of the First World War. The first section, covering the period 1700 to 1850, deals with the history of the ‘Industrial Revolution’. The industrialisation of Britain was not a single transition, but a number of parallel transformations: an economic revolution, a demographic revolution, a social revolution, and a revolution in economic and social thought. The second section, covering the period from 1851 to 1914, explores the further transformation of the British economy. By 1851, Britain was the ‘workshop of the world’, and the foundations of her economic leadership lay in her unprecedented industrial capacity. But the decades from the mid-nineteenth century through to the outbreak of the First World War brought ominous signs of uncertainty and change.

HIST10511 Globalisation in Historical Perspective

The course examines histories of globalisation in a long-term historical perspective covering the period from 1800 to the present. The course aims to foster an understanding of globalisation as a dynamic process of world-wide connections through detailed case-studies drawn from Africa, Asia, the Americas and Europe. Drawing on economic, social, cultural and political history, the course explores the movements of peoples, goods and ideas around the world. Focusing on key debates in global history, topics explored include the transformation of migration, transportation and communication networks, global trade and commodity chains, empire and international organizations, global epidemics and economic crises.

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Economics course units ECON10041 Microeconomic Principles (For Students without A-level Economics) The aims of this course are:

to provide a self-contained introduction to microeconomics for general social scientists to cover the preparatory material for more specialist courses in economics in the second and third years At the end of this course students should be able to: demonstrate their understanding of how markets clear through the interaction of supply and demand show graphically and algebraically how firms respond to changing demand and costs use indifference Curve analysis to derive a price consumption curve and income consumption curve show graphically and algebraically the consequences of government intervention in the form of price controls and indirect taxes demonstrate their understanding of the welfare properties of perfectly competitive markets demonstrate their understanding of the consequences of monopoly for price, output and welfare

ECON10042 Macroeconomic Principles (For Students without A-level Economics) The aims of this course are:

to provide a self contained introduction to macroeconomics for general social scientists to cover the preparatory material for more specialist courses in the economics in the second and third years On completion of this unit successful students will be able to Demonstrate their knowledge of the major national accounts Manipulate the income- expenditure model algebraically and diagrammatically Demonstrate their critical awareness of the exchange rate regime for macroeconomic policy

ECON10081 the UK Economy – Microeconomics (For Students with A-level Economics or equivalent) The aims of this course are:

to develop a knowledge of firms and industries within the UK economy to develop a knowledge of UK microeconomic policy to develop a theoretical understanding of firm and industry behaviour and an appreciation of the interaction between theory and practice On completion of this unit successful students will be able to: demonstrate knowledge of the recent behaviour of UK firms and industries relate theory to recent UK experience demonstrate knowledge of UK microeconomic policies critically evaluate recent UK policy

ECON10082 The UK Economy – Macroeconomics (For Students with A-level Economics or equivalent) The aims of the course are:

to develop a deeper knowledge of the principles of macroeconomic analysis, and use these principles to understand the macroeconomic dimensions of recent UK economic history. On successful completion of the course, students should be able to: (i) demonstrate knowledge of recent UK macroeconomic performance (ii) be able to demonstrate a theoretical understanding of this performance in terms of economic analysis (iii) critically evaluate aspects of recent UK macroeconomic policy.

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ECON10151 Computing for Social Scientists

The course unit is optional for all first year students on the BA(Econ). This unit develops the skills of the novice user as well as those more experienced in applied computing. The unit is ‘web lecture’ and lab session based. It introduces students to the University system (Windows XP, network drives, University email system, network printing, using the Rylands Library catalogue and databases via the web). It also covers MS Office applications (Word, Excel, & PowerPoint) and Nvu web authoring software. The training is geared for the use of these applications by social scientists. For example, creating Styles and Tables of Contents for essays/reports in Word are covered. The use of Excel to undertake Project Appraisal and use of Solver to solve Linear Programming problems is explained. The skills developed are transferable skills which are useful not only during your course of study (for the production of reports and preparation of presentations etc) but are also valuable outside the University. Whilst we acknowledge that many students will already be familiar with some of the material covered, we expect that many students will be able to refine their skills during this unit. In subsequent course units and years we will expect that you possess the skills taught in this course unit. Only if you are a very confident user of PCs (especially in EXCEL, Word and Power Point) should you opt to not select this course unit.

ECON10002 An Introduction to Development

This course aims to provide a self-contained introduction to development issues for general social scientists and to cover the preparatory material for more advanced development courses in the second and third years. On completion of this unit successful students will be able to demonstrate their knowledge of the meaning and measurement of development. Additionally a critical understanding of at least one, but more desirably all, of: Sen’s (1999) Development as Freedom and Stiglitz’s (2002) Globalization and its Discontents and Chang’s (2007) The Bad Samaritans and Dasgupta’s (2007) Economics: A Very Short Introduction, can be expected.

Mathematics and Statistics Course Units There are three core Mathematics course units in Semester 1: ECON10061 Introductory Mathematics ECON10001 Further Mathematics ECON10071 Advanced Mathematics with three follow-on core Statistics units in Semester 2: ECON10062 Introductory Statistics ECON10132 Statistics for Economists ECON10072 Advanced Statistics Depending on the student’s background, there is (normally*) one of THREE routes available through the first year of Mathematics and Statistics as follows: Background

Semester 1

Semester 2

Up to GSCE Maths ONLY(or equivalent)

ECON10061

ECON10062

Up to AS level Maths ONLY(or equivalent)

ECON10001

ECON10132

A level Maths (or equivalent)

ECON10071

ECON10072

Note that in ALL cases, the Mathematics unit taken in Semester 1 dictates the Statistics unit taken in Semester 2. *ECON10071/10072: Students who have studied Maths only to AS Level, achieving a grade B or higher in the Pure Mathematics component (or equivalent qualification) should seek advice about following ECON10071/10072 rather than ECON10011/10132. *ECON10001/10132 Students who have studied Maths only to AS Level achieving a grade C or lower in the Pure Mathematics component will take ECON10001/10132. Students should also be aware of the optional Statistics unit in Semester 2: SOST10142 Applied Statistics for Economists Which is available to those students with A-level Mathematics or equivalent

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ECON10061 Introductory Mathematics

The aim of this unit is to introduce students who have not taken mathematics at AS/A-level to the main mathematical tools used in economics and the social sciences. At the end of the course students should be able to (i)

differentiate simple mathematical functions of one variable

(ii)

use differential calculus to solve simple, one-variable unconstrained optimisation problems

(iii)

use matrices to solve 2x2 simultaneous equation systems and input-output models.

ECON10062 Introductory Statistics The aims of this unit are

to provide an introduction to basic statistical concepts; (ii) to develop an understanding of methods to explore relationships in data to develop skills to build causal models to introduce concepts of probability and its uses to develop skills to interpret results. At the end of this course students should be able to (i) use appropriate graphs and tables to explore data (ii) use contingency tables to explore relationships with categorical data (iii) use techniques to measure relationships and build simple linear regression models with continuous data (iv) build a casual model with categorical data (v) apply probability to such issues as independence (vi) interpret the results of statistical analyses.

ECON10001 Further Mathematics

The aim of this unit is to provide those students with an intermediary knowledge of mathematics (usually up to AS level Maths) with the opportunity to gain fundamental mathematical knowledge required to pursue second and third year studies in economics, finance and management science. At the end of this course students should understand (i) the use of the Lagrange to solve constrained optimization problems (ii) the basics of integration, and (iii) the fundamentals of solving linear equations.

ECON10132 Statistics for Economists

The aim of this unit is to provide those students with an intermediary knowledge of mathematics (usually up to AS level Maths) with an introduction to the fundamental methods (including theory) of classical statistics such as might be employed by the modern social scientist. By the end of this course students should be able to: (i) understand and construct descriptive statistics (including sample means, variances, correlation and simple regression) (ii) understand and explain statistical properties (including expectation, variance, covariance and correlation) (iii) obtain and manipulate probabilities from statistical models (such as the Binomial, Poisson, Normal and Exponential models) (iv) understand and explain properties of estimators and in simple cases derive these properties

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(v) carry out and interpret simple hypothesis tests of relevance in the social sciences (vi) construct and interpret confidence intervals for means and proportions

ECON10071 Advanced Mathematics

The aim of this course is to introduce mathematical techniques useful in the economic and social sciences to those students who have the appropriate advanced mathematical background. On completion of this course successful students will be able to: (i) Solve simple linear equations, find roots of a quadratic and understand the solution to non-linear equations. (ii) Understand functions, continuity and basic differentiation. (iii) Solve one and two variable unconstrained and constrained optimisation problems using the Lagrangian method. (iv) Demonstrate an understanding of linear univariate difference equations. (v) Understand matrices and vectors and their basic manipulations. (vi) Demonstrate an understanding of Nash equilibrium and perfect equilibrium solutions of simple non cooperative games. (vii) Apply methods (i) to (vi) in a range of approriate economic models.

ECON10072 Advanced Statistics

The course provides an introduction to fundamental methods of statistics, which are the basis of techniques widely used in the analysis of economic and social data. The course is designed for students who have Maths A-Level or equivalent. At the end of the semester, successful students should have sufficient knowledge to: (i) construct and understand essential descriptive statistics for sample data (means, variances, correlations, regression coefficients); (ii) obtain and manipulate probabilities from important statistical distributions (including the Binomial, Normal and Student-t); (iii) understand and use key statistical concepts (including population, expectation, estimation); (iv) construct and interpret confidence intervals for population means and proportions; (v) carry out and interpret simple hypothesis tests of relevance in the social sciences..

Politics course units POLI10201/2 Introduction to Comparative Politics

This course focuses on the state and power. In particular, it considers the evolving nature of power within the analytical context of the modern state in the twenty-first century. It introduces students to comparative politics and government through key concepts such as ‘power’, ‘democracy’, and ‘the nation-state’; by examining leading models of political science; by analysing the changing nature of the state in modern liberal democracies ; and by studying economic and political reform in contemporary China. The course is highly varied, comprising three related areas of politics. Part One introduces key concepts for analysing the state through the comparative method, with the emphasis on power. It focuses on democracies, considering different approaches to understanding how power operates between individuals, in governance, and in relations between state and society. Part Two applies these concepts to explore, understand and analyse how modern liberal democratic states have changed over time and adapted to challenges including internationalisation, globalisation and neo-liberal reforms. Part Three explores the notion of change overtime from the perspective of authoritarian regimes. Here, the course looks at political reform in China as an example of an authoritarian state attempting to modernise economically while minimizing democratic reforms. The course enables students to understand the features of different political systems by exploring the questions of who governs, how they govern, and what government does.

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POLI10601 Introduction to International Politics

This course provides an introduction to international politics in the context of the ending of the Cold War and the intensification of economic exchange between market economies on a global scale (‘globalisation’). It introduces students to leading theoretical approaches to International Relations and examines international history since 1945, providing a coherent framework within which to examine some of the main issues in contemporary world politics: security issues since the end of the Cold War, the role of international organisations such as NATO and the UN, and the links between politics and economics at a global level as a means of understanding ‘globalisation’.

POLI10702 Introduction to Political Theory

The course is designed to introduce and study a range of concepts and questions that are central to politics: Why do some persons have the right to rule over others? Why should citizens obey the law? How far is government compatible with the liberty of the individual? What makes for a just law? What rights do individuals have against the state? In the language of political theory these are questions about power, authority, legitimacy, rights, duties, liberty, justice, freedom and equality. We will study these questions and will also view the implications for our understanding of democracy and the law. The course will draw on both classic and contemporary authors, and so will introduce the ideas of major political thinkers such as Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Hume, Mill and Marx. The course will allow students to gain an understanding of the key principles and ideas of political thought, enabling them to subject political thinking to critical analysis and providing an understanding of both its historical context and relevance to contemporary politics.

POLI10402 Britain in the World - The British Political Tradition

This course explores the changing nature of political power in British politics overtime from both an internal and an external dimension. Traditional accounts of the nature of British politics have tended to view such debates through the perspective of the Westminster model, and in so doing offer a flawed account depicting Parliament as sovereign and power as being hermetically sealed within it. This course offers a more critical account by introducing students to a number of important contemporary conceptual frameworks - the British Political Tradition, macro-theories of the state, and multi-level governance. This provides the tool-kit to then explore the changing nature of power both overtime – focusing on the politics of the postwar consensus, Thatcherism, New Labour and the current Coalition, but also thematically through a nuanced understanding of globalisation, Europeanization, devolution, a democratic crisis, regulation, security etc. On completion of this course, successful students will be able to demonstrate: 1) a clear understanding of key conceptual approaches to understanding political power; 2) an ability to apply these approaches to key themes within British politics; 3) the capacity to develop critical arguments, drawing on appropriate academic literatures about key case studies relating to British politics [internal and external] and how they have changed over time.

Philosophy Course Units PHIL10021 Values We Live By

This course unit will examine some hard moral questions: Is it ever right to abort a foetus? Are we ever morally responsible for anything we do? Is it ever right to torture the innocent? Is morality relative to culture? By examining moral conundrums raised in applied ethics, normative ethics and metaethics, this course unit will provide an introduction to some central themes in moral philosophy. PHIL10041 Critical Thinking The course focuses on the nature, purpose, and evaluation of arguments. You will learn what arguments are and what they are for; also how to identify an argument in conversation or text, to identify and understand its structure, and to evaluate it. You will learn to distinguish between good and bad arguments, and to articulate what features of an argument make it good or bad, better or worse. You will also be introduced to some basic concepts that form the backbone of any academic discipline, such as: truth and falsity, rational and irrational beliefs, theory, method, proof and evidence.

PHIL10622 Discovering Reality

This course concerns key topics in the theory of knowledge (or epistemology, as it is known) and in metaphysics (the study of reality at its most general). The topics in epistemology concern such questions as: What is knowledge? What is it to perceive something? Can we know anything through the use of reason alone? What is it for our beliefs to be justified? What is the scope of our knowledge? The topics in metaphysics concern such questions as: What is it for one event to cause another? What is it to be a person? What makes you now the same person as you were ten years ago? What is time? Does it flow? Do we have free will? What is it for something to be possible?

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PHIL10622 Mind & World

A major shift in perspective on the place of the mind in nature accompanied the rise of modern science in the 17th century. The revolutionary writings of Hobbes, Descartes, Galileo and other scientists and philosophers of the time sought to mechanize and mathematicize nature and thereby supplant the earlier Aristotelian hylomorphic view of the world dominant in the ancient and medieval periods of thought. What are the implications for the mind of this powerful scientific materialism? Are mental processes just further material processes in nature, susceptible to mechanical explanation — or are they immaterial processes of an altogether different kind of substance separate from the body?

PHIL10642 Philosophy & Social Science The course investigates three main areas:

1. What is science? What distinguishes sciences, such as physics and chemistry, from non-sciences, such as history and philosophy, and from pseudo-sciences such as astrology and homeopathy? Is there a distinctive scientific method, and if so, what is it? 2. Probabilistic and Statistical reasoning: Much science – in particular social science – relies on statistical evidence and probabilistic reasoning. But such reasoning is strewn with pitfalls. How can we avoid drawing the wrong conclusions from statistical evidence? 3. Issues in the philosophy of social science: The course discusses various philosophical problems that arise from the study of social phenomena, such as: what is the difference between behaviour and action? Is there a universal standard of rationality, or is rationality relative to a particular culture or conceptual framework? Can facts be distinguished from values and is a value-neutral social science possible?

Social Anthropology Course Units SOAN10301 Power and Culture: Inequalities in Everyday Life

Power and Culture provides an exploration of some contributions made to the social sciences by social and cultural anthropology. The overall aim is to tickle the students’ anthropological imagination with some key insights that the discipline has developed, highlighting the specific perspectives that are offered by anthropologists on a range of themes. While dealing with a broad range of topics, the module is built around the implications of the straightforward anthropological notion of the ‘social construction’ of human realities, including many that are commonly experienced as ‘natural’. Given the existing diversity in such social arrangements in the world, anthropological studies have drawn attention to cultural relativity—i.e. the belief that there exists a variety of ways of experiencing the world and that these should be understood within their own cultural context. Importantly, it is impossible to grasp this variety in terms of hierarchy and/or evolution—as if different worldviews reflected various stages on a civilisational ladder. The extent to which this awareness of cultural relativity should then frame our moral and political judgements is a matter of debate; i.e. a debate as to the merits of cultural relativism. Starting from case studies on topics related to culture and power, we relate those to theoretical developments, central concepts and schools of thought in anthropology and their implications.

SOAN10361 Introduction to Business Anthropology

Anthropology is the study of human culture and social organization. Business anthropology as a field of practice looking at how culture impacts on consumer behaviour and on organizations is increasingly used by companies across the world in processes such as product development. This course introduces students to how businesses use anthropology, how culture shapes consumption choices and how culture affects businesses as organizations in various parts of the world. Topics studied include: the importance of branding, homemaking and identity, how cultural insights shape product design, cultural difference at work and the business implications of organizational cultures. The course explores these issues using a mix of research articles, websites and case studies of companies like Intel, Muji, Ford and the New York Stock Exchange to provide real world examples of the ways in which culture shapes business practices globally. This course will appeal to students with interests in society, culture, business and marketing. Assessment is by exam and a short practical exercise.

SOAN10312: Cultural Diversity in Global Perspective

This course examines three, often interrelated, aspects of cultural diversity in global perspective: examples of diverse ways in which people in different parts of the world may perceive, experience and act within it.

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the assumption that the spread of communication technologies, such as the internet, of long-distance forms of transport and of mass-produced consumer goods will inevitably lead to a loss of cultural diversity around the world (in a process sometimes called ‘global homogenization’, ‘cultural imperialism’ or ‘Coca-colonisation’). the notion of ‘cultural diversity’ itself, examining how it may be produced, marketed, consumed and put to political use. As a course in social anthropology, it puts particular emphasis on in-depth empirical studies from different parts of the world.

SOAN10320: Introducing Social Anthropology (Parts 1 and 2)

The main aim of this course is to explore ways in which concepts of ‘‘culture’’ and ‘‘society’’ have been theorised within anthropology. We will consider particular theoretical positions, including functionalist, structuralist, Marxist, feminist and post-structuralist, in the context of specific ethnographic examples and of particular historical moments. This will give students a framework for understanding the different ways in which anthropologists have attempted to make sense of human social behaviour and cultural diversity, and how and why those understandings have changed over time, as the world itself changes.

SOAN10382: Introduction to Digital Film Making

The course offers an introduction to the principal theoretical, practical and technical elements of Digital Film-Making. The course will combine theory and practice in order to teach students—from a range of disciplines across the arts, humanities, social sciences and business—to plan, make and edit short film for use in their study area using freely available digital technology. Students will be expected to use their own phones, digital cameras or camcorders. However, for those without access to these, a small number of portable video cameras will be available for student use. The practical component will cover a range of techniques and methods, such as story-boarding, directing, different camera-techniques, sound recording, different editing techniques and styles, so as to offer students a hands-on introduction to the basic film-making techniques involved in the production of different kinds of film. The short films made by students will cover a range of subject matter and styles, including process, event, research, archival and testimonial based film-making. The theoretical component will introduce the core intellectual and epistemological issues, including visual and sensory perception, visual methods, film as a research tool, narrative construction and semiotic theory, audience and communication, and the legal and ethical implications of the use of imagery.

Sociology Course Units SOCY10402 British Society in a Globalising World:

The aim of the course is to introduce students to sociology by way of an understanding of contemporary British society and culture and the main changes and continuities from the past. The lecture series will focus on four topics of investigation: globalisation, race and `racialised’ national identities, class cultures and educational practices and gender, sexuality and families. Students will be introduced to key theoretical concepts of the discipline and encouraged to critically evaluate these ideas. They will also be introduced to the most up-to-date empirical research and encouraged to critically assess the methods and substantive findings. In seeking to develop these skills, students will develop an appreciation of how individual identities and practices are inherently social and the need to locate them in an historical, economic, social and political context. Students will also see that how we interpret British society cannot be separated from the sociological concepts and techniques we employ to make sense of the social world.

SOCY10421 From Modernity to Postmodernity I

This course will provide a basic but comprehensive introduction to some of the intellectual traditions within Sociology with a focus on the origins of the discipline. The course will provide the student with the necessary conceptual tools to understand the distinctive origin and nature of sociology as an academic discipline and as a wider cultural presence within modernity. In all cases, emphasis will be placed upon the specific historical context of particular writers and theories. It will be argued that the emergence of sociology and the social sciences in general represents an intellectual response to the cultural and material problems of capitalist industrial societies in the 19th and early 20th centuries. The course will equip students with the concepts and information necessary to grasp the main themes of the classical sociological tradition. The objectives of the course are to provide students with some basic conceptual resources for tackling substantive and theoretical material in their 2nd and 3rd years.

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SOCY10432 From Modernity to Postmodernity II

This course seeks to introduce students to a range of some of the most important modern social theorists, and to encourage them to explore some of the key debates and issues which the work of these theorists has raised. It prepares them for some of the theoretical frameworks they will encounter later on in their degree and, at the same time, affords them an opportunity to see how the theories discussed in From Modernity to Postmodernity I have been extended and developed. Students who have completed the course should be able to write competently about a number of the key theorists/issues of modern social theory, and should have a solid grasp of some of the key debates that structure contemporary social thought. They should be adequately prepared for engaging with the substantive theoretical content of whatever sociology courses they pursue later in their degree.

SOCY10441 Media Culture and Society

The course examines a series of concepts that are key to understanding modern society: The ideas of culture; ideology and hegemony; discourse; media aesthetics, and digital convergence are all examined in depth. Class discussions investigate the history of communications techniques; the implication of media in the workings of power in modern societies; the politics of media aesthetics; the role of audiences in shaping media, and the impact of digital technologies. Specific examples are introduced to clarify the main ideas, including: the printing press; nineteenth century visual entertainments; early and avant garde films; fan-fiction, and computer games.

SOCY10451 Media, Self and Imagined Community

This course is an opportunity to study popular entertainment media in social and historical context. We will look at how technologies facilitate different kinds of social connection between people and at how they alter what we mean when we refer to ‘society’. These questions will be explored through a range of case studies, starting with print and the rise of the popular novel then looking at fairground scopes, ‘slot machines’ and panoramas, which entertained people in the nineteenth century. We also study the early history of cinema to see how it became a storytelling medium, before turning to analyse digital media, especially computer games and social media like Facebook and Twitter. Looking at these examples enables us to explore the relationship between popular entertainment practices and questions of social power. We also ask why some cultural practices seem to be more esteemed than others – is looking at paintings ‘better’ than playing video games, for example, and, if so, why?

SOCY10912 Work, Organisations & Society:

This course introduces students to the sociology of work, considers the emergence of modern work, and assesses the nature of contemporary work and work-place organisation. The course covers themes from rationalisation, discipline, and the work-place organisation of time, to emotional labour, unemployment, domestic labour, and low-waged work in the global economy. The course aims to consider both global trends and specific features of contemporary work, and place work in the context of the movement from Fordist models of production to post-Fordist and globalised production. The lectures include a film component to illustrate each week’s theme.

SOCY10472 Sociology of Personal Life

The course will start with an introduction to what is meant by ‘personal life’ with the help of practical examples. This will provide a basis for the lectures that follow. These will address demographic shifts that have occurred in the area of personal life over the last century or so, as well as how these wider social changes have been visible on the level of individual lives. We will unpack different areas of ‘personal life’ and examine how these have changed in relation to wider social phenomena. One important area is that of different personal relationships such as family, kinship and friendships. Other aspects of personal life that we will address include the meaning of home, sexualities, the impact of new reproductive technologies and the link between the personal and the political. The course will end with a lecture that provides a summary and overview of what personal life means in sociology.

Social Statistics SOST10021 Unequal Societies - Health, Well-being & Happiness

Why do certain people live longer than others? Why are some people happier than others? What data skills do we need to research these issues? This lecture and practical training based unit aims to: (i) To develop students knowledge of the evidence for understanding inequality in relation to health, well-being and happiness; (ii) To introduce students to the key analytical skills required and provide basic training in the use of software for analysing quantitative data; (iii) To develop students understanding of sampling, sample bias and statistical inference in social research. Students will develop an understanding of good practices in evaluating evidence and data and assessing scientific

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robustness. The course will involve the development of critical skills in evaluating data and methods through: lectures, lab classes, group work and independent reading. Students will be encouraged to develop skills in using social statistics and practical experience of data analysis including using software (Excel/SPSS) and use of on-line tools such as NESSTAR. Social statistics and data analysis skills are in high demand in the labour market. The group work will also aid the students in development of their communication and team working skills.

SOST10012 Understanding Social Media

It’s the so called age of big data - where people are creating archives of their lives as they use different services and communication tools such as blogs and Twitter and on-line purchasing. But how we can use this data for research? How does it help our understanding of challenging social problems? What issues are raised in terms of privacy? This lecture and practical training based unit aims to: (i) To develop students understanding of social research methods using social media data such as Facebook, Twitter and Blogs; (ii) To inform students about research design and ethical issues concerning the use of social media data in research; (iii) To introduce students to the analytical skills used in collecting and analysing social media data; (iv) To provide students with a basic training in the use of software for the handling and the analysis of social media data; (v) To develop students understanding and critical skills in such areas as sampling. Students will develop an understanding of social statistics and practical experience of data analysis including using software for social research and will also develop skills in evaluating evidence and scientific claims. Social statistics and data analysis skills are in high demand in the labour market. The group work will also aid the students in developing their communication and team working skills.

SOST10012 Understanding Social Media

It’s the so called age of big data - where people are creating archives of their lives as they use different services and communication tools such as blogs and Twitter and on-line purchasing. But how we can use this data for research? How does it help our understanding of challenging social problems? What issues are raised in terms of privacy? This lecture and practical training based unit aims to: (i) To develop students understanding of social research methods using social media data such as Facebook, Twitter and Blogs; (ii) To inform students about research design and ethical issues concerning the use of social media data in research; (iii) To introduce students to the analytical skills used in collecting and analysing social media data; (iv) To provide students with a basic training in the use of software for the handling and the analysis of social media data; (v) To develop students understanding and critical skills in such areas as sampling. Students will develop an understanding of social statistics and practical experience of data analysis including using software for social research and will also develop skills in evaluating evidence and scientific claims. Social statistics and data analysis skills are in high demand in the labour market. The group work will also aid the students in developing their communication and team working skills.

SOST10142 Applied Statistics for Economists

How do we understand society? How do we understand and analyse data? The aims of this course are for each student to achieve: (i) an introductory understanding of the concepts of sample surveys; (ii) an understanding of the appropriate statistical methodology necessary for doing social science; (iii) the skills necessary to interpret statistical analyses; (iv) an awareness of the uses and limitations of statistical software (SPSS).At the end of this course students should be able to: (i) demonstrate an understanding of the basic concepts and issues of sample surveys and questionnaire design; (ii) use the correct statistical methodology appropriate to the circumstances, for a range of types of set tasks; (iii) apply the concept of hypothesis tests and carry out a variety of bivariate tests; (iv) apply the concepts of a model to build and refine multiple regression models; (v) use commercial statistical software and be aware of some of the potential problems in its use; (vi) interpret the findings of statistical analysis.

Study Skills Course Unit SOCS10911/10902: Study Skills

This course is concerned to help students develop the skills necessary for successful study in the social sciences at undergraduate level. Effective learning is developed through group work which builds on the experiences of students, the expertise of staff, and notions of the transition to higher education. Different ideas about successful study methods are shared and discussed. Small group tasks and individual take-away exercises focus on the study and presentational skills which add to an awareness and understanding of the purpose and methods of learning, while the classes are based on student participation and the sharing of ideas. Comprehensive material is provided on Blackboard for activities outside the classes. Study Skills can be taken in either semester (but not both semesters).

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Campus Map 63 Alan Gilbert Learning Commons 46 Alan Turing Building 76 AQA 36 Arthur Lewis Building 75 AV Hill Building 73 Avila House RC Chaplaincy 09 Barnes Wallis Building 49 Beyer Building 27 Bowden Court 56 Burlington Rooms 88 Carys Bannister Building 05 Chandos Hall 89 Chemical Engineering and Analytical Sciences 61 Chemistry Building 58 Christie Building 86 Core Technology Facility 43 Coupland Building 1 47 Coupland Building 3 31 Crawford House 33 Crawford House Lecture Theatres 87 Denmark Building 41 Dental School and Hospital 30 Devonshire House 70 Dover Street Building 62 Dryden Street Nursery 06 Echoes Day Nursery 77 Ellen Wilkinson Building 64 Environmental Services Unit  03 Fairfield Hall 20 Ferranti Building 17 George Begg Building 93 George Kenyon Building and Hall of Residence 24 Grosvenor Halls of Residences 83 Grove House 29 Harold Hankins Building 74 Holy Name Church 80 Horniman House 35 Humanities Bridgeford Street 40 Information Technology Building 89 James Chadwick Building 92 Jean McFarlane Building 16 John Garside Building 48 John Owens Building 39 Kilburn Building 02 Lambert Hall 63 Learning Commons 55 Main Library 26 Manchester Business School East 29 Manchester Business School West 16 Manchester Institute of Biotechnology 

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Manchester Museum Mansfield Cooper Building Martin Harris Centre for Music and Drama Materials Science Centre McDougall Centre Michael Smith Building Moffat Building Morton Laboratory Oddfellows Hall Opal Hall Paper Science Building Pariser Building Precinct Shopping Centre Prospect House Renold Building Ronson Hall Roscoe Building Rutherford Building Sackville Street Building Samuel Alexander Building Schunck Building Schuster Building Simon Building St Peter’s House/Chaplaincy Staff House Sackville Street Stephen Joseph Studio Stopford Building Student Services Centre Students’ Union (North) Students’ Union Oxford Road Sugden Sports Centre The Academy The Manchester Conference Centre The Manchester Incubator Building The Mill University Place  Waterloo Place Weston Hall Whitworth Art Gallery Whitworth Building Whitworth Hall Whitworth Park Halls of Residence  William Kay House Williamson Building Wright Robinson Hall  Zochonis Building

Sat nav North Campus Sackville Street M1 3BB South Campus Oxford Road M13 9PL

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