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Nicole Butscher “Meet the Kook”


To: My Smush Thank you for always trying to push me to be the best I can be.


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Glossier Ad

Interview with Nicole Butscher

Art On Paper Takes Over NYC Article

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Pretty Girl; An Editorial

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Decoding the Finsta Article 22

Skater Girl Editorial 30

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Unif Ad

Biography

Coco Chanel; Icon


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Interview with Nicole Butscher

Tell me a little bit about yourself. Where did you grow up?

I’m a sound design major at Academy of Art University. That basically entails putting sound effects and sometimes dialogue into visual mediums. It’s a bit obscure and overlooked, but that’s how most of my favorite things are. I grew up mainly in Southern California but I’m not done growing yet and Ive moved around a bit so it’s hard to pin point any one spot.

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What colors are you drawn to/ do you feel represent you, and why?

My favorite colors honestly depend on my mood. Each day the colors im drawn to is a little different. Lately i’ve been liking orange, teal, and yellow. I also try to associate different colors with different people.

What are you most passionate about? I would say im most passionate about the “whys” of everything. I want to know why the earth spins, why we exist, why we like what we like and do what we do. The word “Why” alone inspires so much of what I do. A lot of people say that im just overthinking everything, But I think that more people should ask why.

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If you could create the perfect day, what would you want to happen? If I could create the perfect day I would have to be by the beach. I dont think I would even go to the beach I just really like the breeze that costal climates bring. It would have to be like 70 and partially cloudy, but mainly sunny. I would want it to be spent with my closest friends (Summer being one of them). I like going with the flow too so is it bad that my perfect day is one that I dont have to make any decisions? I would just want to wake up and have everything fall naturally into place. Like naturally eat all the ice cream I can and then pass out in the sun.

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Art on Paper Takes Over NYC by MaShawn Jones, MA Fashion Journalism Nearby, a booth contained a statue of a trailer made out of unopened credit card applications. With a quick glance, this could be seen as an innocent statue, but did the artist mean more? Was the artist trying to say that too much credit card debt equals to being in a trailer? These exhibits inspire discussions that continue long after the viewers have left. Beyond intentional or unintentional meanings, this event exposed the audience to various forms and techniques that one might not expect could be performed with paper. From large matchboxes to teabags with fashion drawings and one of the largest installations of a fully furnished “basement,” visuals constantly stimulated the viewers. While this could seem a bit overwhelming, the exhibitors were extremely knowledgeable of their artists’ work, if viewers had any questions. A remarkable number of exhibitors either brought one of the artists or armed themselves with a gallery handbook that contained all the information that one might ask, from techniques to a bit of background on the artist and the piece.

X Cut by Peter Monaghan

Though the Art of Paper is over in NYC, Art Market Production, which produces the event, also produces Art Market San Francisco April 26 through 29 at Fort Mason Festival Pavilion, where viewers will behold 80 top international exhibitions of modern and contemporary art. Grab a friend, buy a ticket, and when the time comes, let art take you to another world.

Whether it was folding, watercolors or creating masterpieces with ballpoint pens, New York City’s Pier 36 Warehouse recently hosted a wide variety of talent that all had one element in common — paper. Returning for the fourth time, Art on Paper featured 85 individual exhibits that represented several of the world’s top artists earlier this month. As the largest exhibition in the city to date, the 70,000-square-foot facility courted a magnitude of people — hip, conservative, young and old — who transcended to a world where art represented many ideas. A few pieces alluded to political meanings that either required decoding or were quite noticeable in their stance. One that garnered much reaction was a pointillism painting that depicted the unfinished tombstone of President Donald Trump. While the tombstone consisted of a birth year, there wasn’t an end year, and the caption underneath read, “Made America hate again.” As patrons walked by shaking their head in either agreement or disagreement, many stopped to take a picture that undoubtedly made it to Instagram or Snapchat. If the artist was going for reactions that weren’t lukewarm, then consider this mission accomplished.

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Pretty Girl

Styled by Summer Hutchen Photographed by Mackenzie Smith

flame shirt owned by nicole butscher

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thrifted vegan highwaisted leather pants silver and gold belt- mission thirft

pink sweater owned by alex iverson

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thrifted and repurposed baby doll jacket by nicole butscher

flame shirt owned by nicole butscher

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thrifted fur coat-goodwill

thrifted long Denim coat and denim dress

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Decoding the Finsta How ‘Fake Instagrams’ Are Helping a Generation Communicate. Madeleine Crenshaw

For many of us, checking social media has become the first and last thing we do in our day-to-day routine. On Instagram, Snapchat, and Twitter we scroll endlessly to see what the rest of the world is up to. We check our accounts to see who’s liked our posts, who’s followed or unfollowed us, all while we were supposed to be living our actual lives we’re supposedly documenting. Social media has become a form of self-validation and entertainment all in one. And through this fascination, a new concept has emerged: the Finsta or “fake Instagram” account. Although the Finsta account has been an online presence for a couple of years now, it remains a mysterious platform. For those who are not familiar, a Finsta is a second Instagram account that targets a smaller, more private audience. Almost like a diary of images in a sense — or rather one filled with unapologetic selfies, trashy memes, and tell-all posts. The first time I heard of a Finsta I thought my friend was joking. “Why would you post about something embarrassing, like a screenshot of a conversation you’re having on Tinder or a confession that you’d hooked up with an ex ?” I vowed I would never get one. But I did not object to following the Finstas of my friends. Their accounts opened a world of intimacy and entertainment. They posted memes and selfies with long-winded paragraphs about their most personal moments. No longer did I have to wait for a weekly dinner to get the tea on their sex life, I could just open up Instagram and scroll. Then, everything changed.

In the early days of summer, I ran into a guy I had my eye on all semester from school. We were at a rooftop party held by a mutual friend. We both bonded over a mutual love for rolled joints, and mutual distaste in the party’s playlist. We hung out together the whole night. Needless to say, we hit it off. The next morning a wave of anxiety hit me. I hadn’t liked someone in a while. Dating in a generation whose eyes and attention are fixated on their phones is hard enough, but add living in New York City to the mix and it’s nearly impossible to find someone who fits perfectly within your ridiculously busy schedule. I felt weird, like I had a bad case of romantic FOMO. I didn’t want to mess this up. I felt like I needed to disclose my emotions, but was scared I might come off too strong. I needed an outlet. So I logged onto Instagram, started to scroll, and realized maybe it was time to invest in a Finsta. It would be the perfect arena to disclose, confide, and release the intense emotions I had for someone I barely knew. And so my “fake Instagram” account was born. I started following my friends and posting memes that coincided with my emotions. When I asked for advice, my Finsta following gave it. When I needed support, my following sent positive comments and emojis. And then it hit me: social media apps have become so integral that they’re now a normal outlet for disclosing our emotions. In 2018 it seems almost natural that we would resort to creating Finstas to document the most intimate parts of our lives.

For me, creating a Finsta account helped channel the anxiety I had about liking someone. That release of dopamine I got from posting and having a support system of faithful followers made me feel at ease with my feelings. Soon my feed became littered with astrology memes and embarrassing anecdotes of my day, and of course, an occasional post about the anxiety I got from a romantic pursuit. The romance between the guy from the rooftop quickly fizzled, but through our interaction, I realized our generation’s fascination with Finsta accounts. There is something about Finstas that reveal a more real, unfiltered reality we often don’t see when we unlock our phones. I teeter back and forth on what to make of Finstas, honestly. On the one hand, it is a platform that has opened up a realm of privacy between friends never experienced before. While it can be used to check up on a friend’s mental health, a crowd-source for sexual advice, an arena of support for the tense times we live in today, at the end of the day we must remember, like a regular Instagram account, it is just another illusion — made out of signals and thousands of tiny pixels we can receive and send. Nothing more.

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Skater Girl

Styled by Tyler Lynch Photographed by Carla Macar

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styled by Tyler Lynch

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styled by Tyler Lynch

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styled by Tyler Lynch

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Dream Girl

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Biography Room 161, Ms.Walker That’s where my love for Fashion Design began. Pens and pencils, designing and sketching, fabric existed with the stroke of a hand. The clothes on screen, the trends, the fabrics. It became so easy on the eye, so visually satisfying, though I still craved a sense of my own originality. As time passed more opportunities became available to me, enrolled in a sewing class where I made my first skirt. There came weeks of learning to sew fabrics and patterns, and the constant frustration and string of curse words when I realized I had once again pricked myself. I learned the different stitches, when to use them, and how to properly thread the sewing machine. This brings us to present day. I am currently enrolled in The Academy of Art University in San Francisco where I am completing my first year as a freshman. Although my dream was to become a designer, I’ve realized styling and how many fields lay within it, is truly what I’m interested in. I hope to use the next ¾ years to grow as a person, as well as a stylist, and work in the industry I believe I truly belong in.

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Coco

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by Summer Hutchen

Chanel

Fashion is not something that exists in dresses only. Fashion is in the sky, in the street, fashion has to do with ideas, the way we live, what is happening. -Coco Chanel Words to live by. Coco Chanel, was one bad ass woman. At the age of 20 she opened her first clothing shop. It’s hard enough these days for women to get recognition or equal recognition as men in almost any field, so imagine how hard it was for her then.

In the 1920s, she released her own perfume line stating that perfume “is the unseen, unforgettable, ultimate accessory of fashion. . . . that heralds your arrival and prolongs your departure,” which came to be Chanel N°5.

She basically invented skater girl look! Just kidding. But she did tend to “borrow” elements in men’s fashion and overall make women’s clothing just more damn comfortable. GoodBYE restricting corsets, HELLo little black dress. As she always said,“luxury must be comfortable, otherwise it is not luxury.”

This woman is truly what I would believe to be a fashion ICON. Not only did she start business in the middle of World War 1, but she changed history for women forever with her technique and eye for fashion. She had an eye for class and her style and designs remain timeless because of it. Now even though my style may be completely different from Coco’s, I still appreciate and hold so deeply in my heart, vintage Chanel pieces. One being a gorgeous Chanel Metallic-Trimmed Tweed Jacket in dark blue from her 2010 Cruise Collection. The tweed jacket with a pointed collar, structured shoulders, metallic gold-tone trim, and a “gunmetal” chain-link accent at interior hem is to die for. That with vintage leather baggy pants and some kickass vintage boots, Bellisima!

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Summer Hutchen 04534362 FSH 168 SS 2018

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