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Edition Six – 2020

BIOSECURITY IS THE CORNERSTONE

– On-Water Tracking – Huon Salmon: Focus On Welfare – By-Product Innovation Gets Tails Wagging


– “We are proud of our Dr Steve Percival who has recently been appointed to the Tasmanian Biosecurity Advisory Committee, which provides advice to government across all primary industries. Steve’s selection reinforces the significant work undertaken by many across this company to constantly safeguard the health of our stock while also protecting the future of the industry.” –

Introduction Phew, has 2020 finished yet? I reckon this has been a thought of many people over the past few months, and unfortunately the answer is somewhat unclear! What isn’t unclear is that the pandemic has, for better or worse, placed most of us in a situation of constant change while also highlighting the importance of transparent, clear communication. At Huon we’ve not been immune to these challenges and this edition of The Huon Story focusses on the important topics such as farm hygiene, our feed ingredients and the company’s efforts to improve our carbon footprint.   One of the ways Huon is striving to be ahead of the pack is through our focus on biosecurity; the importance of biosecurity is basically the foundation of all the pandemic public health advice –

the same principles that apply to washing your hands apply to cleaning farm equipment while social distancing is the same as having a low stocking density and wearing PPE, well….we do that already in spades!   We can be very proud of our safety record in general, and not just employee or food safety, but also ensuring safe farming practices are in place, that our HR policies underpin a culture that encourages a good work-life balance, that the company recognises the skills and qualifications of our clever staff and that we also value, support and respect the many communities where we farm.   We don’t always get it right but this edition demonstrates that we will continue to test, trial, learn and then implement the best process, system or policy possible!  Anyone who doesn’t

improve by trial and error probably isn’t serious about learning or improving. If the salmon industry founders (including the resilient, tenacious Peter and Frances Bender) hadn’t been committed to trial and error, this fabulous $1 billion industry which employs directly and indirectly tens of thousands of Tasmanians wouldn’t exist…so here’s to constantly challenging ourselves in good times and in tough times. Happy reading, — Please note that some of the images in this edition were taken prior to physical distancing requirements. The Huon Story is proudly written, designed and printed in Tasmania.


THE HUON STORY

Edition Six

– Springfield Hatchery Image by Katherine O’Connor

Sustainably and efficiently produce product

The King of the Fish

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4

By-Product Innovation Gets Tails Wagging

New Safety App Doubles Reports

Be a workforce that seeks excellence and innovation

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Fleeting Fleet Update

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Innovation Program’s Early Successes

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FIFO and FCR; What’s in A Name?

Support for New Parents

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Provide the best quality of service possible

More Than Meets the Eye

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What’s in the Feed?

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Smoke On the Salmon

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Science Week Feature

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Continuously Improving Food Safety

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Engaging with Education Providers

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Salmon vs Trout

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Engaging with Our Community 28

Farm Hygiene is a Priority

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Around the Farm

Biosecurity is the Cornerstone

Striving to be leaders in our industry On-Water Tracking Huon Salmon: Focus On Welfare

COVER IMAGE: Huon Ocean Trout, Huon Salmon and Huon Kingfish

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CONTACT: E: communications@huonaqua.com.au P: 03 6295 8111 Level 13/188 Collins St Hobart TAS 7000

huonaqua.com.au

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Sustainably and efficiently produce product

– Steve Percival with his daughter Tori Percival at Hideaway Bay –

Biosecurity is the Cornerstone One positive outcome of the current COVID-19 global pandemic is that most people now have a deeper understanding of the importance of biosecurity in controlling the transmission and impacts of disease. The same underlying principles that apply to washing your hands, social distancing and restricting the movement of people are equally important to biosecurity measures for the salmon industry. In this story, we take a look at how Huon manages biosecurity and the important role it plays in safeguarding the health of our stock and the future of our industry. Firstly, let’s introduce you to Dr Steve Percival, Huon’s General Manager of Fish Health who has been extensively involved in biosecurity matters for the Australian aquaculture industry at both a local and national level.

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Steve holds a Bachelor of Veterinary Science and Diploma of Education, both from the University of Queensland. He has over 30 years’ experience in fish farming operations having joined Huon in 1990 as a Farm Manager.

– Steve currently manages all aspects of fish health across the company and was responsible for preparing a Veterinary Health and Biosecurity Plan which assisted in Huon being recognised as Australian Biosecurity Farmer of the Year in 2013. – In addition to his role at Huon, Steve, by Ministerial Appointment, sits on Tasmania’s

Biosecurity Advisory Committee which provides advice on biosecurity across all primary industries. Steve is also on the National Steering Committee for the Fisheries Research and Development Corporation (FRDC) Subprogram—aquatic animal health and biosecurity, and is currently involved in the development of the national AQUAPLAN— Australia’s National Strategic Plan for Aquatic Animal Health. The Plan outlines objectives and priorities to enhance Australia’s management of aquatic animal health.

What is biosecurity? Biosecurity in its broadest definition is the prevention of disease-causing organisms entering or leaving any site where they pose a risk to farmed stock, other animals, humans or the safety and quality of food. Biosecurity in an aquatic environment poses many challenges, as often potential pathogens can be carried in wild fish and never totally eliminated from aquatic systems.

THE HUON STORY | Huon Aquaculture | Edition Six


Sustainably and efficiently produce product

Specific pathways by which exotic or new diseases not currently occurring in Tasmanian-farmed salmonids could be introduced, or by which existing diseases could be spread between sites include:

– Sniffer dog - Picture courtesy Biosecurity Tasmania –

• Live fish movements, including the water in which they are transported. Live fish includes: eggs, fry, smolt and brood stock. • Infected fish products including harvest fish, fish products, waste products and mortalities. • Contaminated equipment including farm equipment, transport trucks and boats. • Staff, contractors and visitors including vehicles, equipment and protective clothing. • Wild aquatic organisms e.g. fish, crustaceans, zooplankton, algae. These species may also be carrying potential pathogens not yet introduced into farmed stock. • Recreational anglers and wild fishers including contaminated tackle, vehicles and bait. • Intake water. This includes town, river and bore water sources at hatcheries. • Wildlife including birds and rodents. Once viable disease organisms have entered and established infection at a farm site, it can be very difficult to prevent spread of that organism within the site and limit the impact of disease. Therefore, it is critical that all reasonable measures are taken to minimise the risk of introduction of disease organisms to all sites.

– Overseas salmon farming countries have learnt from bitter experience the devastating cost of poor biosecurity and its impact, not just on company finances, but their staff and the communities in which they operate. –

THE HUON STORY | Huon Aquaculture | Edition Six

It is critical for the Tasmanian industry that we learn from overseas experience to avoid the same devastating consequences here. We still have the opportunity to get things right without being forced by disease events and the Tasmanian Government and industry is working hard to achieve this goal.

Tasmanian Biosecurity Act The core tenet of the recently approved Tasmanian Biosecurity Act is that biosecurity is the responsibility of everybody in the Tasmanian community. As with COVID-19, we cannot do it alone. Industry must play its part by developing and adhering to good biosecurity practices as detailed in the state-wide and company specific Veterinary Health and Biosecurity Plans. For example: •C  leaning and disinfection of equipment (same as washing hands and wiping surfaces for COVID-19). •K  eeping adequate distance between leases and year classes (same as social distancing for COVID-19). •N  ot overstocking pens or leases (same as managing crowd numbers for COVID-19). •A  void moving stock between different leases or zones, particularly where there is different disease status (same as staying home and closing borders for COVID-19).

How you can help In reality it doesn’t matter whether a disease is in humans, livestock, pets, horticulture or salmon, the underlying biological principles that form the basis of good biosecurity are essentially the same. The community can play its part in a number of ways. For example: •A  dhering to Tasmania’s strict border security measures which mean that a range of fresh food products, including salmon products, should not be brought into Tasmania. If there is any doubt, the products should be declared to border security officers. •S  almon heads, frames and offcuts should not be used for commercial or recreational fishing bait e.g. craypots. People should not discard any uneaten salmon products or fresh salmon offcuts into the aquatic environment. It is also worth noting that just as with COVID-19, industry has invested along with Government and Fisheries Research and Development Corporation, millions of dollars into the Centre for Aquatic Animal Health and Vaccines in Launceston which is totally focused on the early identification of disease threats and the development of vaccines. This is a world-class facility with highly skilled staff that Tasmanians should be rightly proud of. Together we can all play our part in maintaining the excellent disease free status of our community and industries in Tasmania.

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Sustainably and efficiently produce product

“Sustainability is increasingly front and centre in the consumer’s mind. People are not just caring about what they are consuming, but also about how it was produced, the food miles, and the use of by-products,” Luke said.

– Salmon skin pet treat –

“The fingerlings, smolt and skin were specifically chosen for the trial due to their abundance and their potential to bring a unique sustainable product to retailers.” “All feedback from discussions has been immensely positive – they love the idea of sustainable, nutritious and natural pet treats and see an extensive opportunity in a growing market.” In addition to increasing sustainability, there is a strong business opportunity as the pet treat market has a projected global value of US$174.3 billion by 2024.

By-Product Innovation Gets Tails Wagging ‘Pet treats’ and ‘sustainability’ isn’t something that you are likely to hear strung together in a sentence, but at Huon, we are always looking for ways to be innovative and sustainable. Using products that would otherwise go to landfill, Huon has developed a healthy pet treat product line using freeze-dried fingerlings, smolt and salmon skins.

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Managed by Huon’s Tasmanian Business Manager – Luke Cavanagh, the new products use fingerlings and smolt that have been graded off at Forest Home, and skins from Huon’s Parramatta Creek processing facility.

– The pet treats are challenging the perception of what was previously seen as ‘waste’ at Huon. –

– “We know that pet owners want to give their animals healthy food and central to this is being able to understand the ingredient list. This is why we’ve kept our treats as simple as possible with just one ingredient: salmon!” Luke said. – “Salmon is known to be beneficial for pets due to its healthy fats and Omega-3. It is also good for fussy pets and those who have allergies to overly processed foods.” The treats are freeze-dried, which is the process of removing the water from perishable items and foodstuffs. Freezedrying makes food shelf-stable, leaving out the need for refrigeration or preservatives. The treats have been taste-tested by the pets of Huon employees, including Luke’s dog, Buddy. “The biggest challenge has been ensuring that the product is the most relevant for the market and loved by pets. Thankfully all reports so far suggest pets, both cats and dogs, absolutely love them!” Luke said. A trial run of the pet treat product range is in the final stages of production and is due to hit Tasmanian shelves in the coming month. The range will also be available for purchase at Huon’s farm-gate shops – stay tuned!

THE HUON STORY | Huon Aquaculture | Edition Six


Sustainably and efficiently produce product

FIFO and FCR; What’s in A Name? FIFO (Fish In:Fish Out) and FCR (Feed Conversion Rate) are useful yardsticks for evaluating the sustainability of salmon farming, but what do they actually mean?

FIFO FIFO is the ratio that describes the amount of wild sourced fishmeal or fish oil taken to produce an equivalent unit of farmed fish. To put it simply, how many kilos of wildsourced ingredients would it take to grow a kilo of salmon? An ideal FIFO (fish-in/fish-out) ratio should be less than 1.0 (meaning more fish protein is produced than consumed). Huon's forage fish FIFO ratio is 0.88 (for 2019 Year Class), which is lower in comparison to other salmon farmers around the globe (global industry average in 2019 was 1.22. This is because our feed includes alternative proteins and starch (such as vegetable and land-animal by-products) which increases the sustainability of our operations. Of the total diet provided to our fish, 18 per cent is from forage fish and 7 per cent is from marine trimmings.

– Our salmon need to eat a certain amount of fish meal and fish oil to obtain the appropriate level of Omega-3. Most fish meal and oil is extracted from fast-growing bony pelagic fish which are classified as forage fish. Forage fish, also called prey or bait fish, are eaten by larger predators including other fish, seabirds and marine mammals. – THE HUON STORY | Huon Aquaculture | Edition Six

A significant amount of research has and continues to go into reducing the amount of marine-sourced ingredients in the feed. This research has resulted in some feeds being completely free from wild-sourced marine ingredients to others that include alternative land-sourced ingredients to reduce the marine ingredients. Huon has had queries around why can’t the offcuts from our processing be used in the feed? —the answer is simple: biosecurity. Livestock should not eat their own species as it has the potential to spread disease.

FCR Food Conversion Rate is the rate of measuring the efficiency which a farmed animal converts a kilogram of feed into a kilogram of body weight. The lower the FCR, the more efficient the animal is at converting feed into protein.

– Salmon, out of chicken, pork and cattle has the best FCR. This is thanks to salmon being neutrally buoyant, which allows them to have small lightweight skeletons and being cold-blooded, which reduces energy lost to staying warm. – This basically means that salmon grows into a food source for us while consuming less food than other proteins. This, combined with their sleek streamlined shape, also means that they have the highest edible yield out of chicken, pork and beef.

– Source: GSI –

Source: GSI

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Sustainably and efficiently produce product

– Fish feed for adult salmon –

What’s in the Feed? We get a lot of questions asked here at head office and ‘what is in the feed?’ is at the top of the list.

– To put it simply, our feeds are formulated to meet a specification that changes with each stage of the salmon’s growth, and our suppliers, Skretting, BioMar and Ridley, manufacture to this specification. – Because the ingredients and their exact ratios are tightly kept secrets for commercial reasons, when posed this question we speak in generalised terms: • Vegetable ingredients such as wheat, soya derivatives, corn gluten, and vegetable oils. Huon has been steadily increasing the percentage of vegetable

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ingredients. In 2015, the percentage was 31 per cent; compared with our 2019 year class of salmon which were fed a diet comprised of 64 per cent vegetables. • Vitamins and minerals and Astaxanthin (Astaxanthin is a powerful antioxidant that salmon need for healthy muscle growth and egg production and which also provides the salmon the signature orange hue to the flesh). Astaxanthin is highly sought after and available at health food shops as a high-potency human antioxidant. • Meat and chicken meal, blood meal and poultry oil. By using land-animal by-products in our feed, we are helping to utilise ‘waste’ from other farming, which improves the sustainability of both landbased and sea-based aquaculture farming production. Our use of land animal byproducts has significantly reduced; in 2015, our fish were fed a diet which comprised 45 per cent land animal by-products; in 2019 that had reduced to just 11 per cent. The use of land-animal by-products sourced outside of Australia is strictly controlled by national biosecurity laws.

• Fish meal and fish oil, which is sourced from certified wild fisheries (typically small, bony pelagic fish that aren’t used for human consumption) and the off-cuts from other fish species. Salmon farmers worldwide have been working on a fish oil and fish meal substitute for many years and during this time Huon has reduced our use by around 20 percentage points down to the current range of between 15-18 per cent. Algae oil is also now becoming commercially available and Huon is examining the merits of that form of oil. • The percentage of some components (like fish meal) can vary depending on the season and fish catches etc. Prior to its use for salmon farm feed, fish meal was primarily used for pig and poultry production. As the level of fishmeal in salmon feed is reduced, primary industry feed manufacturers will continue to use sustainably created fish meal as a key ingredient. In Australia, these feed companies are legally required to disclose ingredient details which is why Tasmanian farmed salmon is a safe, nutritious, locally-made, healthy, and sustainable food.

THE HUON STORY | Huon Aquaculture | Edition Six


Striving to be leaders within our industry

On-Water Tracking Salmon farming in the 21st century means taking advantage of technologies including Global Positional System (GPS) to track certain on-water equipment—this is the kind of cuttingedge farming that many stakeholders have come to expect from Huon. Huon currently tracks a range of equipment from corner markers to grid cans, as well as certain vessels all with the aim of improving practices, transparency and accountability.

– The GPS units have been progressively rolled out and at the time of writing, over 100 grid cans are tracked, 33 corner markers, 8 mambas and 12 vessels. The vessels are tracked with a combination of AIS and GPS. –

Huon’s IT Manager, Angus Sprott, said on-water tracking has some challenges but these are outweighed by the benefits. “We’ve experimented with a range of different units; for example, one had its own solar panel to charge the device but because of the position on the equipment these were easily knocked off by moored vessels. We’ve also had the batteries in some units compromised because they experienced water ingress.” “Learning what works and what doesn’t is all part of the process and now the Projects team seals units with batteries inside equipment such as grid cans. The only time that these need to be opened up is to replace the batteries, which will be in 5 to 6 years’ time,” said Angus. Leigh Savage, Assistant Manager of Farm Operations said mounting the devices inside the buoys involves some fabrication work for the Projects team. “Mounting the devices inside the hollow buoys involves fabricating a housing that encases the unit and then plastic welding that into the side of the buoy. This then protects the units from anything damaging it while also keeping it away from the water,” said Leigh.

Each new device is added to Huon’s system before it is installed and the management of that device is then down to an external contractor. Huon currently uses units tracked by a range of suppliers from Star2M (Telstra 4G) to TasmaNet (Telstra CatM1 Network), TracerTrack (Satellite) and Marine Traffic (AIS).

– “The benefit of these systems is that each one has their own online dashboard that enables Huon’s Admins to be alerted if anything has strayed outside its geo-fence (virtual perimeter) and to see the real-time position of the equipment,” said Angus. – “Right now we are in a deep testing phase with the units that we have deployed and we are changing our settings to optimise the results,” said Angus.

– A grid can with a tracking device –

THE HUON STORY | Huon Aquaculture | Edition Six

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Striving to be leaders within our industry

– A tracker alongside the plastic housing –

– “We are currently working on getting these onto all the mooring buoys out at Storm Bay and have them on 100 per cent of the grid buoys at East of Yellow Bluff. We will also work on the Huon and Channel when more become available and time permits,” said Leigh. –

For Leigh, the benefits of tracking means meeting a community expectation around equipment accountability in a public waterway. “I think we have an obligation to the community to know where our gear is at any given time. If large buoys or grid components break free during a weather event, they have the potential to cause accidents to fisherman or recreational boaters, as well as washing up on beaches and rocks. With these trackers, we now have the capabilities to locate these much faster than we have been able to,” said Leigh. Due to the online system, the frequency with which a device ‘pings’ can also be customised or automated. For example, if a tracked piece of equipment has been taken back to shore to be serviced, the pings can be slowed to once or twice a day then reinstated to a higher frequency once the equipment returns to its designated location. “This automation of pings is especially useful when units return a false-positive due to satellite drift,” said Angus Drift occurs when there aren’t enough satellites available at any given time to accurately triangulate a GPS’s location. “In the event a device slips outside a geofence, the device will automatically increase the number of satellites required for a fix providing a more accurate position,” said Angus “If drift has occurred, the next reading provided will be more accurate and in

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– The housing in a grid can – most cases the equipment is exactly where it should be. If a device continues to return a location that is outside of its geo-fence, then we know that it has strayed or is adrift which is when a team is deployed to retrieve it,” finished Angus. When time, budget and staffing permits, the units will be rolled out in the Huon and Channel.

“As the technology gets better and unit cost and size come down, we would like to add accelerometers and other instruments into the units. This would give us even more data on the way the grids and pens react and move on the water, particularly in bad weather,” finished Leigh. This data will better inform current and future farming operations.

There’s also plans to install them on Huon’s vessel fleet as well as on the pens themselves.

THE HUON STORY | Huon Aquaculture | Edition Six


Striving to be leaders within our industry

– Huon Salmon have room to move –

Huon Salmon: Focus On Welfare Huon believes it’s important to produce salmon with a focus on welfare. Scientific research shows that fish are capable of feeling. This means we have a responsibility to farm them in an environment that meets their needs, and avoid practices that might cause them pain, suffering or distress.

• F reedom from discomfort – As far as possible by maintaining the water at an appropriate temperature and chemical composition and providing well designed enclosures or tanks, with shading if necessary

The Approved Farming Scheme is part of the RSPCA’s efforts to improve the lives of Australia’s most intensively farmed animals. Since the scheme was launched in 1996, the lives of over 2.09 billion farm animals have benefitted from better conditions, and this includes millions of farmed Atlantic salmon.

• F reedom from fear and distress – by minimising stressful situations such as handling or predator attack as far as possible, water quality, and by humane slaughter

Key elements of Huon’s Veterinary Health Plan, include: • Freedom from hunger and thirst – by providing an appropriate high-quality diet and an environment in which fluid and electrolyte balance can be maintained

THE HUON STORY | Huon Aquaculture | Edition Six

• F reedom from pain, injury or disease – by avoiding situations which are likely to cause pain, injury or disease, by rapid diagnosis and treatment of disease and humane slaughter • F reedom to express normal behaviour – by providing the appropriate space and environment for the species

When it comes to fish welfare, Huon practises caring planning and management, skilled, knowledgeable and conscientious husbandry, appropriate environmental design, considerate handling and transport, and humane slaughter. The RSPCA Approved Farming Scheme standards require that all persons managing fish are trained and competent in their

– Huon is Australia’s only RSPCA Approved salmon producer and recently celebrated two years of being with the scheme. – required tasks; that handling of fish is carried out in a manner that is low stress; and that all husbandry and management practices limit negative impacts on the fish. The standards aim to ensure that fish be held in water of good quality and that farming practices aim to provide all fish with sufficient oxygen and feed; freedom from injury, stress, deformation or disease; the ability to exhibit normal swimming and schooling behaviour and to escape aggressive encounters. To find out more about how Huon’s RSPCA Approved salmon is farmed, take a look at the publicly-available farmed Atlantic salmon standard that can be found on the RSPCA Approved website rspcaapproved.org.au.

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Striving to be leaders within our industry

The King of the Fish In June 2020, the West Australian Government announced that they are fasttracking plans for a Geraldtonbased finfish nursery. This exciting announcement places Huon in a better position for the future establishment of a Kingfish farming operation in the region.

Huon’s history with Yellowtail Kingfish dates back to 2016, when a joint trial with the NSW Department of Primary Industries (DPI) was established to research the viability of farming the species off the coast of Port Stephens, and to determine the best technology and methods to do so.

– In addition to these goals, the joint trial also undertook to evaluate the success of Kingfish feed—a cornerstone of future operations. –

The NSW trial proved that it was possible to farm an exceptional quality Kingfish, however, the location had some drawbacks including the lack of a shorebase close to the water, continuity of fingerling supply (the DPI research hatchery was not setup to produce commercial quantities), and a suitable site for harvest pens. In early 2019, the trail was finished a year ahead of schedule and Huon began to look at alternative sites in both New South Wales and Western Australia. This search ultimately led to Huon securing a marine farming lease off the Houtman Abrolhos Islands in Western Australia. The Houtman

– Yellowtail Kingfish from the NSW joint trial –

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THE HUON STORY | Huon Aquaculture | Edition Six


Striving to be leaders within our industry

Abrolhos is a chain of 122 islands and reefs in the Indian Ocean, approximately 80 kilometres west of Geraldton. The new farming zone is a greenfield site, meaning that no previous aquaculture has taken place in the area, giving Huon an excellent opportunity to establish future operations with the strongest biosecurity measures in place. In addition to biosecurity benefits, the water temperature range of between 20.8˚C – 23.5˚C is ideal for farming warm-water Kingfish. As Kingfish are cool blooded, like all fish, they are sluggish in cooler waters and more active in warmer. Temperature also affects metabolism and metabolic processes which speed up in warmer waters.

– In November 2019, two of our employees who are on the Industry Reference Group were in Geraldton to discuss the tender process and to inspect possible building sites of the nursery. –

– The Houtman Abrolhos Islands –

They also did a fly-over of the Abrolhos Islands and met with stakeholders to discuss possible camp locations on Coronation Island, requested to join the Southern Group Body Corporate, and are in ongoing discussion with the Mid West Ports Authority around suitable locations for a shorebase. With the project being in a state in which Huon has never operated, it is even more important to get the foundations right and to ensure that the appropriate infrastructure is in place before having boots on the ground. While farming Kingfish is still a little way off, we know that there is demand for a farmed white-fleshed fish and Huon endeavours to rise to the challenge.

THE HUON STORY | Huon Aquaculture | Edition Six

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Striving to be leaders within our industry

New Safety App Doubles Reports Huon’s new safety hazard and incident reporting web app has doubled the number of incidents and hazards reported during the first month of its soft-launch. Stuart Lovell, Huon’s Work Health and Safety Manager said the app developed inhouse is already exceeding his expectations. “To see the number of reports double in the first month is astounding. Safety is everyone’s responsibility and making a report is the first step in the process of addressing the underlying issue,” said Stuart.

– “We know that near-misses happen in just about every workplace and sometimes people can be hesitant to make a report because they are worried about punitive action. We have the attitude that safety is about education and collaboration which is why the app was developed.” –

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– Stuart Lovell with the new app –

The app was designed by Huon’s IT team and supersedes the old reporting system which involved filling out a lengthy form. Angus Sprott, Huon’s Information Technology Manager said simple is best when it comes to web apps. “We wanted to get an app out there that is workable, usable and would be taken up by employees,” said Angus. The app is being rolled out across Huon starting with areas identified as having historically higher hazard reporting. “We’ve looked at the data of previouslyreported incidents and are targeting these key areas for the first wave of roll-outs,” said Stuart

– “The difference between the old paper-based form and new online system really is night and day,” finished Angus. –

“This app will be whole-of-Huon but our immediate focus is on marine operations and so far we’ve seen almost immediate adoption of the new platform,” finished Stuart.

THE HUON STORY | Huon Aquaculture | Edition Six


Striving to be leaders within our industry

Fleeting Fleet Update – The locally-built Atreus –

– Ronja Storm by Luke Taylor –

– Hope at Port Huon –

Atreus At only 18 metres long, Huon’s new works boat, Atreus, packs a punch. Built by Crips Bros. and Haywards at Margate, Atreus completed its sea trials in late July and has been deployed to Storm Bay where it is assisting with gill and weight checks. Atreus also has the ability to carry a Tassie Tracker net cleaner which will help with cleaning biofouling on the Fortress Pens in Storm Bay. Atreus is heavy-set with plenty of deck room and a crane which makes it versatile to be adapted for a wide range of on-water tasks.

Hope Barge Having been deployed five years ago, the Hope feed barge was due for a touch up before being redeployed at East of Yellow Bluff in Storm Bay. In July and early August this year, Hope was at Port Huon for the installation of new gensets in preparation for smolt transfers later this year. While at Port Huon, Hope also had some automation works carried out including installing fuel isolation lines, fire Louvers and additional fire alarms—all of which will put the barge in good stead for many more years.

THE HUON STORY | Huon Aquaculture | Edition Six

Southern Condor

Ronja Storm

The Southern Condor is officially back in operation after the competition of engine repairs.

Since its arrival in Tasmania, the Ronja Storm continues to make and break its own records.

Rather than returning to its old assignment of feed transport, the Southern Condor has been used to transfer feed bins to Strahan and to bring moorings and six hamster wheels (the round structure in the middle of a Fortress Pen that supports the bird net) back to the South East.

In July, the Ronja Storm set a record of tonnage on board for a transfer and just under a fortnight later, it broke this record with even higher tonnage on board for a bath.

The return tow took two days and the hamster wheels were GPS tracked to safeguard the equipment during the voyage.

As the Ronja Storm is able to hold such high tonnage, it eliminates the need to bathe half-pens which increase the overall efficiency of bathing and transfer operations.

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Provide the best quality of service possible

– Blackened Spice Huon Salmon –

Smoke On the Salmon Master Smoker isn’t a job title that you’ll hear very often. In fact, most people don’t even know what a Master Smoker does let alone that this longstanding profession is alive and well in Tasmania. For Andrew Gower, who started working for Huon when he was just 17, this niche profession is one that he thoroughly enjoys.

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– “My Team’s role is to provide the best product that we can to the public including our signature hot and cold smoked products,” said Andrew. –

Andrew is the Master Smoker at Huon’s Parramatta Creek processing facility. “Smoking fish as a method of preservation dates back thousands of years and I’m proud to be able to continue on this tradition,” said Andrew. While Huon’s smoking technology is hightech, it still requires a personal touch to monitor and finesse the finished product.

THE HUON STORY | Huon Aquaculture | Edition Six


Provide the best quality of service possible

– Each order, big or small, is harvested and processed specifically for the customer ensuring that they receive the freshest salmon possible. –

Andrew and his team are also responsible for ensuring that customer orders are consistently filled to a high-standard. “My day consists of making sure our Hot Smoke team fulfil all customer orders at a high quality while also maintaining all food safety requirements.”

– Chips for the smoker –

The Hot Smoked products are dry salted and left to cure before being smoked with Australian red-gum logs—a recipe that is closely guarded by the Master Smoker. “Over in the smokehouse I monitor our product from start to finish ensuring all steps are met to requirements from salting, curing to smoking.” “Cold Smoked salmon is produced at a low temperature over a long period to ensure that the smoke penetrates the flesh of the salmon but the protein remains rawer in texture. The Hot Smoked is cooked for a shorter time and at a higher temperature with smoke in the chamber.” Once smoked, the fish is blast chilled to reduce the temperature stopping the cooking process. Both products are ready to be eaten straight from the pack—something that Andrew enjoys doing. “My favourite way to eat salmon would have to be cold smoked straight from the pack!” finished Andrew. For recipes and tips and tricks on how to cook Huon Salmon, head to www. huonaqua.com.au/enjoy/salmon-recipes

THE HUON STORY | Huon Aquaculture | Edition Six

– Andrew inside the smokehouse –

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Provide the best quality of service possible

– Huon Salmon Caviar –

Continuously Improving Food Safety To continue to grow responsibly and remain at the forefront of our industry we must constantly improve and the safety and security of food is a vital component of this effort. All of the fish Huon produces is primarily processed at a single facility, at Parramatta Creek (PMC), near Sassafras in beautiful North West Tasmania, which makes food safety variables easier to control. From here, whole fish, fillets or valued added products are dispatched for sale or are sent to our Ingleburn factory in Sydney for further value-adding and dispatch to local customers along the eastern seaboard of Australia. PMC was designed, built and is managed with a strong focus on food safety which is why we hold British Retail Consortium AA rating (and have done since 2016). We are the only seafood processing facility in Australia to achieve this rating which is a testament to our focus on food safety and continuous improvement.

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– We also have an on-site Quality Assurance team who work tirelessly to audit and conduct daily onsite testing to continually improve our processes and as a result, we have not had a single product recall since processing operations commenced in Tasmania in 2015. – Our thorough testing regime in place at PMC involves testing everything from the processing water right through to each product line. The frequency of our tests range from daily, monthly, six-monthly and annually. In the event that a test result picks up a result, immediate corrective action is taken by our Quality Assurance team. Other food-safety related certifications held

by Huon include Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points (HACCP) and Global G.A.P. (Good Agricultural Practice). We apply HACCP techniques to our production process – in practice, this means that this internationally recognised method of identifying and managing food safety related risk is addressed through the analysis and control of biological, chemical, and physical hazards from raw material production, procurement and handling, to manufacturing, distribution and consumption of the finished product – that is, at all steps of our processing operations! Global G.A.P. is an internationally recognised standard for farm production. Unlike some other ‘accreditations’ or ‘standards’, Global G.A.P isn’t a marketing partnership, rather it presents an opportunity for the facilitation of ongoing, continuous improvement. In 2012, Huon became the first Australian salmon producer to achieve this internationally recognised accreditation; a pre-farm gate standard that covers the whole production process of the certified product from the hatchery until the point of harvest and packing.

THE HUON STORY | Huon Aquaculture | Edition Six


Provide the best quality of service possible

Salmon Vs Trout People often ask us: ‘what’s the difference between Huon Salmon and Huon Ocean Trout?’ Many of us who work at Huon (especially those who see our salmon and trout day in and out) will know there’s quite a big difference between the two species. How you ask? Well you only need to look at this comparison image to see the two species differ quite significantly in appearance.

THE HUON STORY | Huon Aquaculture | Edition Six

However, the differences aren’t just ‘skin deep’ – here are the four main differences: 1. H  uon Ocean Trout has a pinker flesh than Huon Salmon (similar to the pink streak on their skin). 2. H  uon Ocean Trout is renowned for having a richer texture and more adaptable flavour profile than salmon, making it a favourite among chefs and foodies. 3. S  imilar to the lifecycle of Atlantic Salmon, Ocean Trout start their life in freshwater. However, at this stage of their life they are referred to as Rainbow

Trout, and once they are exposed to saltwater, they become Ocean Trout. Although Rainbow Trout and Ocean Trout are the same species, Rainbow Trout need to spend their entire life in freshwater to keep their name. 4. A  s previously mentioned, the physiology of the two species are quite different – Atlantic Salmon have a pointed head and slender, streamlined body, whereas Ocean Trout have a roundish head, thickset body and signature pink streak across the length of its belly.

– Huon Ocean Trout and Huon Salmon –

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Provide the best quality of service possible

– A footbath at Hideaway Bay –

Farm Hygiene is a Priority Farm equipment, vehicles and staff boots, among many other things, can all carry and transfer pathogens between sites, leases and fish populations. In fact, they are among the most important risk pathways for Huon when it comes to managing farm biosecurity. Avoiding the transfer of used equipment between sites is the best way to manage the risk, however in some cases it is necessary to move gear to other locations. In these cases, Huon has strict decontamination and disinfectant protocols in place to minimise the opportunity for disease transmission.

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When it comes to staff movements between sites, footwear can pose a risk. This is why each of our hatchery sites provide dedicated staff and visitor boots, specifically for use at that site. Each hatchery and marine shore base also has disinfectant footbaths positioned at the site entry points. These footbaths contain Huon’s disinfectant of choice - Virkon Aquatic. This is considered to be the gold-standard disinfectant when it comes to efficacy against aquatic pathogens, and is proven to work on over 500 strains of viruses, bacteria and fungi. At the same time, it has very low toxicity to other non-target aquatic organisms as well as domestic animals and humans. Instead of being a single chemical, Virkon Aquatic is a mixture of six different biocides,

all designed to work together to give the product a broad range of anti-microbial activity. Key to its success is manually cleaning equipment before application— Virkon Aquatic won’t work on dirty equipment such as muddy shoes or nets with biofouling. Also important is the correct concentration and application rate, and for the appropriate contact time. So next time you visit a site that has a footbath, be sure to do your part for good farm hygiene. Make sure your boots are physically clean first, then pause for a moment as you go through the footbath to cover as much of the boot surface with disinfectant as you can. We all play an important role in Farm Biosecurity and each small step helps to protect our fish from the threat of disease.

THE HUON STORY | Huon Aquaculture | Edition Six


Be a workforce that seeks excellence and innovation

Innovation Program’s Early Successes Less than a year from its launch and the Innovation Program is celebrating some outstanding early successes including the inhouse design, fabrication and implementation of Operations Projects' Ed Rivett’s feed pipe cradle.

Employees have submitted their ideas to the Program to improve the way Huon operates and to continue to drive the company forwards in an innovative way.

– “Huon has always been an innovative company and the Program offers a channel through which to formalise and harness the creative energy of our people.” –

Tony Baker, Huon’s General Manager of People, Safety and Sustainability said that the Innovation Program has had great success with engagement from employees right across the business.

An example of this is Ed’s idea of a better way to store and transport used feed pipe.

“To date, the Innovation Program has had 31 submissions from a wide range of departments including Marine Operations, Processing, Subsea, Environmental and Sustainability, Corporate, and Sales and Marketing,” said Tony.

“The pipe cradle is a method in which disused feed pipes can be easily collected, bundled and transported off-site by a truck to a recycling facility. This will ultimately free up space at shore bases and improve the operational efficiency,” said Tony.

– The pipe cradle in concept and use –

The cradle was designed and fabricated in-house by Huon employees. “Whether it is finding better ways to rig our Fortress Pens right through to improving efficiency in processing, every idea submitted to the Program is considered on merit and most importantly, the person who submitted the idea is engaged in the process.” Ongoing employee engagement is the key to the success of the Innovation Program. “I would like to thank everyone who has already submitted their ideas to the Program and remind people that no idea is too big or too small to be considered.” In the coming months, the first CEO’s challenge will be announced.

– “The CEO’s challenge is a selection of problems from across the business that Peter will invite all employees to consider.” – “I don’t want to say too much but we’re hoping that people will think outside the box with the challenge and come up with some innovative and exciting solutions,” finished Tony. Ideas submitted in response to the challenge will be assessed by the Innovation Team before being presented to the Executive and CEO.

THE HUON STORY | Huon Aquaculture | Edition Six

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Be a workforce that seeks excellence and innovation

– Huon’s Matt Lamont and baby Evie –

Support for New Parents Huon’s new Parental Leave Policy provides a top-up to the Government Paid Parental leave and Dad or Partner Pay enabling employees to get on with the important job of parenting. Where an employee is entitled to pay under the government scheme, Huon will pay, for each week that the employee receives the government payment, the difference between the payment and the employee’s base salary. Huon Aquaculture’s General Manager of People, Safety and Sustainability Tony Baker said the top-up will help parentsduring a very important time of their lives.

The top-up pay is capped to a base salary of $150,000 per annum.

Huon employs over 700 people, many of whom have chosen to juggle raising a family and employment.

“We know that not that many workplaces offer a top-up and we hope that current and prospective employees take this as a sign of good faith that Huon is supportive of employees living balanced lives,” finished Tony.

“As an Employer of Choice, we want to find ways to better support our workforce so that we can retain good people. The top-up is a small way that we can achieve this.”

In addition to the new Policy, Huon considers flexible return to work arrangements for parents on a case-bycase basis.

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– “Welcoming a child is an exciting and challenging experience and we’re pleased to be able to provide eligible employees with the additional salary so they can focus on parenting, not their finances,” said Tony. –

THE HUON STORY | Huon Aquaculture | Edition Six


Be a workforce that seeks excellence and innovation

– Mark at Zuidpool South –

More Than Meets the Eye People are so much more than their jobs and many of our employees come with some incredible and inspiring backstories. Take Mark Eaton for example, Mark came to Huon through a role on the Bath Team and now works as the Assistant Fish Performance Manager for Channel Zone, but what you mightn’t know is that he spent most of his teenage years living on a yacht and spent five years in the Navy. “I’m originally from Queensland where my family and I lived on a yacht for six years. We sailed up and down the Sunshine Coast and had big dreams of sailing the Pacific,” said Mark.

“My family had an engineering business that became so busy that we never did end up sailing away.” Mark did an apprenticeship in Marine Engineering before joining the Navy. “Growing up on the water and working around boats is what made me want to join. I was a Leading Seaman in Maritime Logistics – Supply Chain.” “Essentially stores and procurement, the role had your time spread across both onshore and at sea in varying capacities. So it may be two years working in or running a warehouse at a shore establishment supporting their associated fleet, or managing the procurement and supply for an entire ship wherever in the world you may be. That was a bit more challenging but I preferred being at sea.” Mark worked some deployments in conjunction with Border Patrol as well working on some maintenance tasks in Singapore. “We spent a fair amount of time in the Pacific, the most recent deployment was Operation Render Safe, which sought to

THE HUON STORY | Huon Aquaculture | Edition Six

find and dispose of unexploded remnants of war from areas around the Pacific, particularly Solomon Islands but saw us transiting through Vanuatu, Fiji, and Noumea.” “My parents had retired to Dover whilst I was away, so I came for a visit on leave one year and fell in love with the place.” “Dover is beautiful. The lifestyle is great, everyone is laid-back and the affordability of housing was also a big drawcard. I could buy land, build a house and have a fantastic view for a fraction of the price elsewhere. So I applied to leave the Navy permanently.” It just so happened that Huon were advertising for staff as it was leading into summer. Mark landed a job on the Bath team and has recently moved into Fish Performance. “I enjoy working at Huon. There’s always something happening to keep you on your toes and the level of innovation is remarkable—we’re working on new technology and always trying new things,” finished Mark.

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Be a workforce that seeks excellence and innovation

Science Week Feature Andrea Shotton Huon’s Quality Assurance Coordinator, Andrea Shotton’s love for science started in her childhood when she was helping her Dad, an agronomist (agricultural scientist), set up farm trials. “I also found science ‘easy’ to learn and loved how ‘instantly’ you could see results with chemistry,” said Andrea. This passion inspired Andrea to pursue a degree in Forensic Science. “Through studying Forensic Science at university and working in a laboratory analysing water, I gained experience in quality assurance and learning about the importance of accountability. I was then employed as a chemist for the Defence Science and Technology (Food and Nutrition) where I gained knowledge of shelf life trials, sensory and packaging requirements for different food products.” This helped Andrea transition into the quality assurance team at Huon Aquaculture.    “A typical day at work revolves around the quality assurance aspects of new product development which includes, but not limited

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– “I find most areas of science interesting with chemistry being where I have spent majority of my work experience and study. Recently however I have been more interested in food and agricultural science and aiming towards a more sustainable lifestyle.” – to, testing water phase salt in both hot and cold smoked products, putting products though shelf life trials and reviewing new product labels to make sure they are correct.” “It’s amazing how much you can learn in such a short period of time when working in a fast-paced workplace like Huon.” Andrea encourages anyone who is interested in science to go for it, “try and get some work experience first if you are unsure about study.”

THE HUON STORY | Huon Aquaculture | Edition Six


Be a workforce that seeks excellence and innovation

Emmaline Kelly Emmaline Kelly not only works as a Technical Officer, but she has just started an Associate Degree in Applied Science Aquaculture at UTAS to consolidate all the knowledge she has learned about salmon in the last six years working for Huon and volunteering at the Huon Valley Trade Training Centre (HVTTC). “I’ve always been interested in science— both my parents have scientific backgrounds and several of my relatives were heavily involved in scientific industries,” said Emmaline.

– “Working at Huon I’ve learned that aquaculture is in constant development. As our equipment changes, such as our wellboats, we use science to ensure our fish have the best treatments and quality of life possible.” –

Emmaline finds it hard to choose what area of science is her favourite but finds both forensic science and virology fascinating. “There’s so many sciences to choose from it’s hard to select a favourite but Australia does some fantastic work in research science for so many things.” “For someone who wanted to get into science I’d say try out several before you choose a specialisation. Every day, scientists are discovering amazing things and working towards so many things. Science is constantly moving and things that were only a far-off fictional idea have become reality.”

“My past scientific studies (Bachelor of Science) were more based in biology, chemistry and human relevant sciences with some biotechnology thrown in for fun.” Emmaline’s role involves conducting water tests, weight counts or osmolality testing. “I also help at our three southern sites doing routines, fertilising, monitoring fish health, analysing eggs, setting up feeders or vaccinating.” “The lifecycle of salmon is also pretty cool; I really enjoy being involved in the whole process from fertilisation to when we send the fish out to sea. I’m constantly learning something and get to see science in action.”

Evan Leonard For Huon’s Fish Health Assistant, Evan Leonard, an interest in marine and aquatic environments started at a young age. “I loved fishing and diving so studying marine science was a way to get closer to these unique environments and better understand how the different marine organisms interact,” said Evan. Evan is responsible for assessing the progression of Amoebic Gill Disease (AGD) in Atlantic Salmon. AGD is a naturally occurring amoeba that lives on the gill tissue of salmon and large numbers of these parasites can lead to the death of these fish if not treated. “Since my past studies were not directly aquaculture related, it was a bit of a learning curve upon entering this sector. However, knowledge of fish behaviour,

THE HUON STORY | Huon Aquaculture | Edition Six

anatomy and osmoregulation, which I picked up through my undergraduate degree, were important for understanding how different diseases or stress events affect fish health.” Evan said anything to do with fish is his passion, and after spending all day with fish at work, he goes home to look after his own fish. For those who are thinking about study or career in science, Evan says that it can open so many pathways that you might not know even existed. “So many people I have studied with thought they knew what they wanted to do, but then ended up doing something in a different science field they loved even more. Don’t limit yourself to one science, challenge yourself and experience as much as you can.”

– “I believe managing fish stocks is crucial for the future of food availability while generally being more sustainable than land-based agriculture practices,” said Evan. –

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Be a workforce that seeks excellence and innovation

Engaging with Education Providers Guiding Students Over Troubled Water

– Ali Stebbing leading the wildlife survey –

For the students of the Huon Valley Trade Training Centre (TTC), 2020 has been a challenging time to complete their studies. In addition to mandatory remote learning, the COVID-19 restrictions placed on industries such as aquaculture have prevented site visits and student placements, leaving students behind on their practical assessments. With easing restrictions, Huon Aquaculture was thrilled to have the opportunity to host 12 students studying their Certificate II in Aquaculture. Huon’s Education Relations Adviser, Ali Stebbing, said studying remotely has restricted students to theory-based learning for a large part of the school year.

– “The site visit offered students valuable industry exposure, as well as the opportunity to complete their practical assessment for the unit Pests and Predators,” Ali said. – “Following a presentation, students went to our harvest pod to conduct a wildlife survey for their practical assessment. During the survey, students identified wildlife occurrences common to aquaculture farms, such as seabirds and seals. “We employ dedicated Wildlife Officers so it was a great opportunity for students to gain practical experience into another career pathway in aquaculture.” Beacon Foundation CEO, Scott Harris, said youth always fare poorly during an economic downturn, however, this cohort has been particularly hard-hit as they

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are overrepresented in industries heavily affected by COVID-19 such as hospitality, tourism and retail. “20 per cent of unemployed youth (aged 15-24 years) said a lack of work experience prevented them from securing a job, compared to only six per cent for the group aged 25 years and over. This is telling as to what we need to do to support young people,” Mr Harris said. Mr Harris said a key element of the recovery journey is better connecting the education system with the workforce. “We need our young people to engage in an educational/vocational pathway that is linked to real workforce opportunities and which fosters entrepreneurship and an adaptable mindset,” Mr Harris said.

“Partnerships with organisations such as Huon Aquaculture are vital as they help to bring real-life work experience to students. We know that real-life experience is of great value and impact to young people and we congratulate Huon Aquaculture for playing a role in this”.

– Latest statistics realised from the ABS Labour Force survey place youth aged 15-24 as disproportionally affected and forced into unemployment due to COVID-19. – THE HUON STORY | Huon Aquaculture | Edition Six


Be a workforce that seeks excellence and innovation

– Huon’s Ali and Beacon’s Halley –

Showcasing the Diversity in Aquaculture The not-for-profit Beacon Foundation, founded in Tasmania in 1988, operates across Australia and builds connections between industry, education and the community to create real world education in schools that is relevant and engaging for young people in the 21st century. In August 2020, Beacon’s Halley Durrant visited some of Huon’s sites to film interviews with several employees about their roles to use as part of a University of Tasmania and University of Wollongong study ‘Influence the Influencers’. Beacon interviewed: • Brad Munnings – WHS Advisor • John Nordstrom – Wildlife Officer • Katherine O’Connor – Compliance Officer • Paul Anderson – Fleet Manager • Darryl Boothey – Technical Officer • Tim Jackson – Control Systems Manager.

THE HUON STORY | Huon Aquaculture | Edition Six

The University of Tasmania said, “in rural, regional and remote communities, the key influencers of these critical factors are found both inside and outside the school environment. “ The research is funded by the National Centre for Student Equity in Higher Education to look at how to best support these key influencers. The Huon Valley region is being used as a case study for this research and the employee interviews will showcase the diversity of roles available in aquaculture. Given that many of Beacon’s programs including their Growth Industries Preparation Program (GrIPP) are running remotely due to COVID-19, this footage will also be a useful asset for students.

– “It is hoped the work will help foster increased pathways for school students and adults towards university, or future employment opportunities and careers.” –

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Be a workforce that seeks excellence and innovation

Engaging with our Community

– Nix Hair and Beauty Studio owner, Kristen Thurley, with Huon’s Emily Dunn –

Helping Hand Encourages Kindness and Collaboration The positive effects of Huon’s Helping Hand 2019 community grants are still being felt across the community, thanks to organisers behind the Huon Domestic Violence Service (HDVS) ‘Be Kind to Yourself’ project. Huon was proud to support this innovative project that provided vouchers for massages, haircuts and beauty treatments to clients of HDVS, while supporting local businesses.

– A spokesperson from HDVS said they were thrilled to report all the local Huon Valley businesses contacted were more than happy to get behind the project. – 28

“The support and commitment from local business has been instrumental to the success of this project, as well as realising one of the project’s primary intentions; to increase community awareness and understanding of Domestic and Family Violence,” they said. “Participating clients have commented on how amazing and wonderful it was to receive a voucher, one particular client saying how nice it was to ‘go to an actual hairdresser’ instead of buying a cheap box dye and trying to make a good job of it when their children were asleep.” “Further feedback HDVS received around the project include comments such as; “it’s the little things that make life so much more bearable and give me the strength to believe in myself again; to feel like a human being that is worthy of luxury and feeling good about myself,” the spokesperson added. “Over the progression of the project it has become evident how imperative it is to bolster and nurture people’s innate sense of self during times of adversity and trauma,” they said.

Huon’s Helping Hand community grants program has supported 180 community-led projects, initiatives and group activities since its inception in 2013.

– The Huon Domestic Violence Service has been supporting people impacted by violence in the Huon Valley for over 20 years. In support of the Service’s holistic framework around early intervention/ prevention, Huon Aquaculture funded the Be Kind to Yourself project as part of their Helping Hand Community Grants program. – Businesses that have participated in the Be Kind to Yourself project include Port Hair and Beauty in Cygnet, Ametrine Holistic Medicine and Healing in Huonville, Ruffles Hair Salon in Huonville and Nix Hair and Beauty Studio in Huonville.

THE HUON STORY | Huon Aquaculture | Edition Six


Be a workforce that seeks excellence and innovation

Tassie destination profile: Geeveston We are very lucky in Tassie to have eased restrictions reintroduced, meaning we can get out and about again. For those of you thinking about a trip down south (or maybe you’re already there!) why not pop down to Geeveston?

– Geeveston is the perfect springboard for your next adventure and only a stone’s throw away from some of the Huon’s most loved attractions such as Tahune Adventures Tasmania, Hastings Caves and the Hartz Mountain National Park. –

Surrounded by rolling hills and the nearby mountains, Geeveston is in its own right a beautiful town to visit. The eclectic township has a range of shops, eateries and a main street full of hand-carved timber sculptures of famous locals to draw your attention. Most importantly, at the heart of Geeveston is the much-loved Geeveston Visitors Centre. After closing its doors during the COVID-19 lockdown, this volunteer-run facility is again open for business and includes our own dedicated display. Stocked full of beautiful locally made arts and crafts, artisan food and beverage products, and useful information about all the local attractions, there’s something for everyone Population: 616 (2016 census) Historical background: First arriving in Tasmania (then a peninsula of Australia) around 60,000 years ago, the lylequonny (loo-lah-kwon-nee) people are the original custodians of the land that is known today as Geeveston. The lylequonny people are part of the South-East nation – one of nine nations of lutruwita (Tasmania). Following the British colonisation of Tasmanian, the land was given by Lady Jane Franklin to an English settler named

– With the state’s borders forecast to remain closed until at least December, our tourism industry is needing local engagement now more than ever, so get out and about this weekend and see some of our beautiful island home! – William Geeves. At the time, the area was known to settlers as Lightwood Bottom (after a type of timber prevalent in the area). In 1861, the Geeves settlement was renamed to Geeves Town, and 15 years later (in 1876), the Geeves Town post office was built. In 1888, the town was officially renamed to Geeveston. For the next 80 years the township was known as a rural farming and timber province, rich with apple and stone fruit orchards. Between 1962-82, Geeveston became a bustling work hub with the opening of a pulp mill. Since 2016, Geeveston has also been the filming location of the popular ABC comedy series, Rosehaven.

– Geeveston Visitor Centre –

THE HUON STORY | Huon Aquaculture | Edition Six

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Be a workforce that seeks excellence and innovation

Around Our Farms

by Katherine O’Connor -Huon’s Compliance Officer

Above: Sunrise at Strahan Left: Millybrook Hatchery

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a.com.a

huonaqu

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To have your image included in the next edition’s Around The Farm email: communications@huonaqua.com.au

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THE HUON STORY | Huon Aquaculture | Edition Six


Be a workforce that seeks excellence and innovation

Above: Hideaway Bay

THE HUON STORY | Huon Aquaculture | Edition Six

Below: Gunpowder Jetty overlooking North West Bay

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huonaqua.com.au

Profile for Huon Aquaculture

The Huon Story - Edition Six  

Huon Aquaculture's quarterly magazine The Huon Story, showcases what is happening across the company.

The Huon Story - Edition Six  

Huon Aquaculture's quarterly magazine The Huon Story, showcases what is happening across the company.

Profile for huonaqua
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