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2017 CANCER REPORT 2016 DATA


COMMITTEE MEMBERS CANCER COMMITTEE CHAIR Brian Mathews, MD Hematology/Oncology

CANCER REGISTRY QUALITY COORDINATOR Cindy Johnson, CTR Cancer Registry

CANCER LIAISON PHYSICIAN Rachel Kruspe, MD Hematology/Oncology

CANCER CONFERENCE COORDINATOR Judy Crawford Cancer Registry

CANCER LIAISON PHYSICIAN Harry James McCarty, MD Radiation Oncology

CLINICAL RESEARCH COORDINATOR Emily Pauli, BMSm PharmD, Rph

CANCER PROGRAM MANAGER COMMUNITY OUTREACH COORDINATOR Karen Adams, RN, BSN

PSYCHOSOCIAL SERVICES COORDINATOR Patty Stutts, LCSW Social Services/Psychosocial Services

American Cancer Society Anna Lisa Weigel

Hospice Family Care Kristina Johnson, RN, CHPN, CHPCA Lee Shaw, CHPCA

Breast Center Sandra Cross, RN Cancer Registry Katherine Wolfson, CTR Carol Spahn Susan Elam RN, BSN Karen Hixson

Oncology Inpatient Lennox Marr, RN, BSN, MSN Ruth Smith, MSN, RN, AOCNS Oncology Pharmacy Jonathan Bunn, PharmD Amanda Ouzts, PharmD

Cardiothoracic Surgery Gregory Thomas, MD

Outpatient Chemotherapy Infusion Unit Michele Engelhardt, RN

Chaplaincy Rod Crutcher

Palliative Care Jennifer Vann, DNP, CRNO Akashai Janak, MD

Clinical Nutrition Vilmali Demerin, RD, CSO, LD Corporate Wellness Heather Whorton, RN Critical Care/Trauma/General Surgeon Jeff Walker, MD Diagnostic Radiology Christian Scales, MD Libby Shadinger, MD General Surgery Richard Richardson, MD Gynecology Oncology Tyler Kirby, MD Hematology/Oncology Marshall Schreeder, MD Mohamad Younes, MD

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QUALITY IMPROVEMENT COORDINATOR Janet Elledge-Nauman, RN

Pathology Frank Honkanen, MD Aimee League, MD Radiation Oncology Elizabeth Falkenberg, MD John Gleason, MD Social Services/Psychosocial Services Suzanne Marks RN Therapy and Rehab Services James Kelly, OT Todd Ziegler, MS Karen Hislop, OT TVGO Stacey Hill, CRNP Urology Michael Brown, MD Joseph Pettus, MD


CANCER CONFERENCE Huntsville Hospital offers a weekly multidisciplinary cancer conference to provide consultative services for patients' treatment planning and to provide education to physicians and other allied health professionals. Physician representatives from surgery, medical oncology, radiation oncology, diagnostic radiology, pathology and a variety of other medical specialties may attend and participate in cancer conferences. Monitoring of the following criteria is required for compliance with the American College of Surgeons Commission on Cancer standards: – Cancer conference frequency – Multidisciplinary attendance – Total number of case presentations – Percentage of prospective cases – Discussion of stage, prognostic indicators and treatment planning using evidence-based treatment guidelines – Options and eligibility for clinical trial enrollment – Adherence to cancer conference policies Additional Huntsville Hospital conferences include chest conference and hemoncology conference. A weekly multidisciplinary breast cancer conference was started in 2016.

2016 CANCER CONFERENCE CASES Urinary System

5

Hematopoietic

28

Bone 2

Liver 7

Breast 163

Lung 72

Brain/CNS

5

Lymphoma

Colon/Rectal

19

Prostate 15

Connective Tissue

5

Skin/Melanoma 17

16

Gastric 5

Thymus 2

GYN 25

Thyroid 6

Head & Neck

Other 16

32

TOTAL 440 The number of annual cases presented is to be proportional to the annual analytic caseload and should represent the case mix. All major cancer sites are discussed each year. The American College of Surgeons Commission on Cancer requires that 15% of the annual analytic caseload be presented at cancer conference. In 2016, 440 cases were presented.

CANCER REGISTRY ACTIVITIES The Huntsville Hospital Cancer Registry is an information data base system for the collection, management and analysis of cancer patient data. The cancer registry participates in a nationwide effort to compile data on the diagnosis and treatment of all types of cancers. The American College of Surgeons Commission on Cancer requires a minimum 80% follow-up rate to be maintained for all analytic cases from the cancer registry reference date of l987, and a minimum 90% followup rate for all analytic cases diagnosed within the last five years. At present, the cancer registry operates with a 93.09% and 93.56% follow-up rate, respectively. The cancer registry has collected more than 41,000 cases since its reference date. There were 2,248 new analytic cases abstracted and entered in the registry in 2016. 2016 Prevention Program In 2016, Huntsville Hospital’s Cancer Program in conjunction with the Center for Lung Heath offered 4 free smoking cessation clinics in the month of November. Additionally, the Center for Lung Health offers the American Lung Association’s Freedom from Smoking Program® year round. Quitting smoking lowers the risk of lung cancer as well as other smoking related illnesses such as heart disease, stroke, pulmonary diseases and peripheral vascular disease.

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2016 Screening Program Lung cancer remains the leading cause of cancer deaths, more than breast, prostate and colon cancers combined. The key to improving the death rate related to lung cancer is earlier diagnosis. The goal of screenings is to diagnose high risk individuals sooner and at an earlier, more curable stage. In 2016, Huntsville Hospital and the Heart Center performed 239 low-dose screening CT to screen for lung cancer. Nine lung cancers were diagnosed, seven of which were at an earlier stage. Findings from the National Cancer Institute's National Lung Screening Trials showed that many lives in high-risk groups can be saved by annual screening with low-dose CT. Screenings are performed in accordance with lung cancer screening guidelines and are tracked in the American College of Radiology Lung Cancer Screening Registry.

LDCT Screening Volume 2016

Smoking Status 2016

40

80

35

70

30

60

25

50

20

40

15

30

10

20

5

10

0

Male

Female

0 Jan

Feb Mar April May June July Aug Sept Oct Nov Dec

Diagnosed Cancers 2016 10

Current Smoker

Former Smoker

Non Smoker

Lung Cancer by Stages 2016 6

9

5

8

4

7

3

6

2

5

1

4

0 Lung Other

IA IB IIA IIB IIIA IIIB IV

2016 CAP Laboratory Accreditation Program The College of American Pathologists (CAP's) Laboratory Accreditation Program accredits the entire spectrum of laboratory test disciplines with the most scientifically rigorous customized checklist requirements. The CAP's peer-based inspector model provides a unique balance of regulatory and educational coaching supported by the most respected worldwide pathology organization. The Laboratory Accreditation Program inspects a variety of laboratory settings from complex university medical centers to physician office laboratories, and covers a complete array of disciplines and testing procedures. The inspections are every two years and on the alternate year a self inspection is performed to assure that all areas of the lab are in compliance with any new checklist requirements. The inspections are performed by practicing laboratory professionals who are qualified through a mandatory CAP training program. On-site unannounced inspections occur every two years using CAP accreditation checklists to assess compliance with program requirements. CAP Lab Accreditation helps laboratories meet CLIA requirements as well as maintain accuracy of test results and ensure accurate patient diagnosis, leading to greater value to the hospital, referring doctors and patients. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) granted the CAP Laboratory Accreditation Program deeming authority, which allows CAP inspection in lieu of a CMS inspection. It is also recognized by The Joint Commission, and can be used to meet many state certification requirements. The results for the 2016 CAP were 99.9% for Huntsville Hospital and 100% for Madison Hospital. 4


AFTER BREAST CANCER, FINDING A NEW NORMAL Sandy Cross, RN, a breast health navigator at Huntsville Hospital’s Breast Center, has seen it happen many, many times. A woman will show remarkable strength, grace and resilience through her breast cancer diagnosis and treatment. But once the treatment ends, fear and doubt start to creep in. What if it comes back? “When you’re going through treatment, fighting cancer becomes a full-time job,” said Cross. “Then all of a sudden the doctor says, ‘You’re done, you can get back to normal now.’ But you don’t know what ‘normal’ is anymore.” The Breast Center’s Surviving & Thriving program aims to help women live life to the fullest after breast cancer. The free eight-week program is taught by Cross and Lydia Cole, RN, a professional development coach, fitness instructor and wellness expert at the hospital’s Corporate University.

“We created this program to be a bridge to help women discover and embrace their new normal including health, wholeness and beauty,” said Cole. “Every aspect is positive and designed to help these ladies be their best.” Every Surviving & Thriving class starts with 30 minutes of yoga, Pilates or Nia, a user-friendly exercise taught by Cole that benefits body, brain and emotion. Cross said studies have shown regular physical activity can greatly reduce the risk of breast cancer recurrence.

Wellness expert Lydia Cole, RN, foreground, leads the exercise portion of a Surviving & Thriving class for women recovering from breast cancer.

The program is funded by Huntsville Hospital Foundation’s Liz Hurley Breast Cancer Fund. Because women with breast cancer spend so much time in medical offices, organizers chose a non-clinical setting for Surviving & Thriving. Classes are held at Corporate University across from Huntsville Hospital. About a hundred women have graduated from Surviving & Thriving since the program launched in 2014. Sessions are held four times a year.

“The exercises we teach are fun and beneficial,” she said. “You can do them at home or at the gym.” In addition to exercise, Surviving & Thriving offers skill-building activities designed to help women be their best. Topics include nutrition, cooking with healthy foods, dealing with negative thoughts, managing stress and sexuality following cancer treatment.

For more information, call Sandy Cross at (256) 265-2293 or Lydia Cole at (256) 265-8147.

Breast Centers get perfect scores Congratulations to our Breast Centers for perfect scores on their Mammography Quality Standards Act inspections by the FDA. The Huntsville Hospital for Women & Children location has earned a perfect score for 17 consecutive years, while the new Madison Hospital location has earned a perfect score for four years straight. More than 30,000 women visit our Breast Centers annually for breast health services including traditional and 3D mammograms. 5


2017 Cancer Report 101 Sivley Road, Huntsville, AL 35801 (256) 265-1000 | huntsvillehospital.org

Annual Cancer Program Report 2017  
Annual Cancer Program Report 2017