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REPORT TO OUR COMMUNITIES | 2018


Established in 1895, Huntsville Hospital is the second largest hospital in Alabama with 971 licensed beds. Huntsville Hospital is a community-owned, not-for-profit hospital and is governed by the Health Care Authority of the City of Huntsville. In recent years, the hospital has expanded its service in the region with the development of Huntsville Hospital Health System, which today includes hospitals in Huntsville, Madison, Athens, Decatur, Boaz, Guntersville, Moulton, Red Bay, Sheffield and Fayetteville, Tenn. Our Mission Provide high quality care and services that will improve the health of those we serve. Our Vision To be one of the best health systems in America and consistently strive to provide clinical and service excellence. Our Values Integrity, Excellence, Innovation, Accountability, Compassion and Safety.


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hat a year 2018 was for Huntsville Hospital Health System. We cared for nearly one million patients in our facilities across the Tennessee Valley. Whether you were treated in one of our hospitals, Emergency Departments, or in an outpatient facility, our goal is to provide you with safe, quality care from compassionate, highly trained team members.

David S. Spillers Chief Executive Officer

Looking back at the past year, we hope we delivered on that goal to you and your family. While we were focused on caring for you, we were also preparing for your future and our future. North Alabama and southern Tennessee are experiencing dynamic growth that is challenging all of us. Huntsville Hospital Health System is responding to these challenges with some of the most significant efforts in our history: replacing our computer system; modernizing our facilities in communities across the region; taking steps to build a new bed tower on our main Huntsville campus; and working diligently to deliver the level of care that you and your family deserve. Thanks to the support of thousands of generous donors, our System’s foundations have funded lifesaving equipment and programs for our not-for-profit hospitals. Philanthropy and community support are critically important, and greatly appreciated.

Philip W. Bentley, Jr. Chairman Health Care Authority

This annual report details some of the steps we took in 2018 to ensure that we fulfilled our mission in Huntsville and Madison County, as well as in communities we serve from Mississippi to Tennessee and to Georgia. With the addition of Marshall Medical Centers and Lincoln Health System, we now have 12 hospitals affiliated with our Health System. Our team now exceeds 15,000 employees who work with nearly 1,400 physicians on our respective hospital medical staffs. On behalf of our governing board — the Health Care Authority of the City of Huntsville — and all of us associated with Huntsville Hospital Health System, thank you for allowing us to serve you and your family. We remain dedicated to improving your lives through quality health care services in your community and region.

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Huntsville Hospital Health System Athens-Limestone Hospital

Lincoln Health System Madison Hospital

Helen Keller Hospital GILES

LAWRENCE LAUDERDALE LAUDERD DALE

FRANKLIN Huntsville Hospital

LINCOLN

LIMESTONE

Huntsville Hospital for Women & Children JACKSON

Red Bay Hospital MADISON

COLBERT LAWRENCE

Lawrence Medical Center

FRANKLIN

DeKALB MORGAN

LAWRENCE L LAWRE ENCE E NCE MARION

WINSTON ON

Marshall Medical Center North

MARSHALL MARSHALL M MARSHA A ALL

CULLMAN C CU ULL LLMA LLMA MAN N

Decatur Morgan Hospital

ETOWAH ET

West Campus

BLOUNT Decatur Morgan Hospital

Decatur Campus

CHEROKEE

Marshall Medical Center South

Decatur Morgan Hospital Parkway Campus

Map includes hospitals owned, managed or affiliated facilities. Entities and Relationships Obligated Entities Athens-Limestone Hospital Decatur Morgan Hospital Decatur Morgan Hospital Parkway Campus Decatur Morgan Hospital West Campus Digestive Disease Center Huntsville Hospital Huntsville Hospital for Women & Children Huntsville Hospital Accountable Care Organization Madison Hospital Marshall Medical Centers Heart Center Physicians Network Hospice Family Care Helen Keller Hospital Red Bay Hospital Spine & Neuro Center Huntsville Hospital Foundation

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Other Ownership Relationships The Surgery Center of Huntsville North Alabama Managed Care Inc. (NAMCI) CompOne First Community Health Group of Alabama (HGA) Occupational Health Group Best Start LHC Home Care (joint venture) Med South Medical Equipment (joint venture) Management Agreement Lawrence Medical Center

Oct. 2018

Affiliate Relationships Lincoln Health System Joint Ventures Continuum RX (Home Infusion) Tennessee Valley Pain Consultants Alabama Community Care Alliance Cancer Care Contractual Agreement Encompass Health


The Health Care Authority of the City of Huntsville

Smith Goodman Arora

Bentley

Phillips

Fehrenbach Richardson

Kakani

Caprio

Philip W. Bentley, Jr., Chairman

Amit Arora, MD

Macon Phillips, MD

Mike Goodman, Vice-Chairman

Kerry Fehrenbach

Beth Richardson

Frank Caprio, Secretary-Treasurer

Bhavani Kakani

David Smith

Leadership

David Spillers Chief Executive Officer

Jeff Samz Chief Operating Officer

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Huntsville Hospital

My reason Joy Tornquist Cardiac Patient — Huntsville Hospital

Even though I had been an operating room nurse for years, all that knowledge and experience didn’t help me believe the warning signs. Thankfully, during a routine pre-surgery appointment for a shoulder injury, my doctor noticed a prescription for a cardiac medicine on my medical record and recommended a full cardiac workup. That’s how I found out I needed open heart surgery. Tests showed I had significant blockage in the major arteries of my heart. Dr. Shaf Holden and his amazing team had to do a triple heart bypass surgery to save my life. And believe me, I did my homework to be sure I was picking the right team. Dr. Holden’s success rate with open heart surgery is excellent. Before surgery, I hadn’t noticed how my heart condition was slowing me down and making it harder to enjoy what I love — riding and taking care of my horse Cirrus. Now, life is not just good, it’s great! I feel stronger and can do all the things I love doing.

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Huntsville Hospital

Highlights

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untsville Hospital maintained its certification as a Primary Stroke Center and achieved a Gold Plus Achievement Award for the ninth consecutive year from the American Heart & Stroke Association. This earned international recognition for achieving the Gold Plus Target Stroke Honor Roll. The hospital’s Stroke program was also listed as a Center of Excellence by U.S. News & World Report. Robotic technology continued to revolutionize surgery at Huntsville Hospital with the addition of the da Vinci Xi robot and the Mazor robot for spine surgery. More advanced cardiac procedures were performed at the hospital, including record numbers of electrophysiology cases, Watchman procedures and TAVRs (trans-catheter aortic valve replacement).

Tracy Doughty Senior Vice President of Operations

Huntsville Hospital was included in America’s Top 50 Hospitals for Cardiac Surgery and Top 100 Hospitals for Spine Surgery by Healthgrades. The national consumer organization also rated Huntsville Hospital’s Knee Replacement program as Five Star, its highest recognition. The physicians and staff at Spine & Neuro Center and the Digestive Disease Center became employed by our Health System last year, while the Heart Center recruited five new physicians to its team of more than 45 cardiovascular specialists.

Admissions 59,210**

Main ER Visits 79,491

Outpatients 334,734

Employees 8,590*

Surgeries 37,111

*includes Huntsville Hospital, Women & Children and Heart Center **includes inpatients and observations

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Huntsville Hospital

MAJOR DEVELOPMENTS

Nursing Simulation Lab at Calhoun Community College

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n a region that’s experiencing unprecedented growth, Huntsville Hospital Health System set the pace in 2018, taking major steps to better serve our patients of today and tomorrow. The design and build of a new electronic health record (EHR) ushers in a new era of information technology that impacts the clinical quality, safety and service to our patients for years to come. The 1Chart system, built by Cerner, was a massive undertaking by our team in the past year. Providing quality care also means offering advanced facilities. Plans were approved and ground has been broken on the largest construction project in the hospital’s history — a new bed tower on the main campus. When completed in 2021, the Orthopedic & Spine Tower will be home to our nationally-acclaimed surgical programs for orthopedic and spine patients. The new facility will include 24 operating suites for inpatient and outpatient procedures; and it will have 72 additional private patient rooms, eliminating nearly all of the semi-private accommodations in the main facility.

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A major priority in any busy medical campus is parking, and Huntsville Hospital is no different. A new 480-space parking garage is under construction behind Huntsville Hospital for Women & Children. We look forward to its opening in the fall of 2019. There’s no question that the heart of a hospital is the care of its nurses. In today’s environment, keeping the pipeline open with trained nurses is crucial to our hospital and our patients. In 2018, Huntsville Hospital partnered with Calhoun Community College, and a grant from Governor Kay Ivey, to build a Nursing Simulation Lab at the school’s Huntsville location. The lab will enable Calhoun to graduate an additional 48 nurses each year. Efforts like this help your community hospital to continue to deliver the care that you need and to prepare for the care your family needs in the future.


THE FOUNDATION

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untsville Hospital Foundation works to inspire philanthropic partners to invest in medical technology and programs at Huntsville Hospital, Huntsville Hospital for Women & Children and Madison Hospital.

Huntsville Hospital

Huntsville Hospital Main and Hospice Family Care equipment and programs funded by Foundation donors in 2018: $2,554,753

In 2018, generous donors made contributions to the Foundation totaling more than $5.4 million. From providing “high-touch” programs like Music Therapy to a new pediatric and neonatal transport ambulance with high-tech lifesaving equipment, philanthropy helps ensure that our hospitals continue meeting the health care needs of our growing community. Examples of other key investments included an endoscopic video system for ER/Trauma, a vein illuminator for Outpatient Chemotherapy and two dialysis machines for the Dialysis Unit.

$1.2 million in funding was provided for Hospice Family Care’s inpatient and outpatient programs, and The Caring House.

$119,468 for a Telemetry system in Cardiac Rehab: This new technology allows the staff to monitor a patient’s heart rhythm during exercise. In fact, they can monitor all of their patients at the same time. The telemetry system improves patient outcomes and reduces readmissions to the hospital. Almost 350 patients benefit from this new system every week.

“Hospitals cannot afford to provide all of the equipment that is necessary without support from the community and from donations … I think it’s extremely important for the community to realize that and to understand that they are a part of what is happening here. Through their donations, they become part of this hospital and a part of what happens to patients like me. It’s those donations that make these kinds of things available. And, especially to have it right here in Huntsville is wonderful.”

— Patricia Latham, grateful Huntsville Hospital Cardiac TAVR patient

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Huntsville Hospital for Women & Children

My reason Taralyn Rowell Patient and Mother of Neonatal Intensive Care Twins — Huntsville Hospital for Women & Children

Something was wrong with one of my twins before he was even born. The first time they weighed, “Baby B” was only six ounces while his brother, “Baby A,” weighed more than twice as much. As a first-time mom, it made me even more nervous than I already was. A condition called Intrauterine Growth Restriction was to blame. I was admitted to Huntsville Hospital for Women & Children and stayed in the Antepartum unit for nine weeks until the Cesarean delivery. The wonderful staff did everything for me and brought me whatever I needed, particularly when I was on bed rest at the end. I got to know so many of the nurses and staff because I received care during my pregnancy and delivery, and then my sons received care in the Neonatal ICU. Everything I needed, and everything they needed, was all right there. Baby B is now called Tyson. He is catching up to his big brother Titus now, and their personalities are already showing. I am so grateful for the care I received. I went back to the Neonatal ICU to share pictures but will be glad when I can show off my sweet boys in person.

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Huntsville Hospital for Women & Children

Highlights

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team of more than 40 physicians, nurses and other staff safely delivered the hospital’s first set of sextuplets in December 2017. Planning and performing mock-deliveries for months in advance, along with a healthy mom, contributed to the safe arrival of three baby boys and three baby girls. Construction on a new parking deck behind the hospital will offer 600 more spaces for visitors and employees later this year. Whitney Dunham, MD, assumed oversight of the Huntsville Hospital Physicians Network’s first OB-GYN clinic, as well as the OB-GYN Emergency Department and OB Hospitalist Program. A leader in his field, Tyler Kirby, MD, of Huntsville Hospital’s Tennessee Valley Gynecologic Oncology, is chairing a new state task force on gynecologic cancer established by Alabama Governor Kay Ivey.

Kyle Buchanan Vice President of Operations

The Breast Center navigated 380 breast cancer patients in 2018, which is approximately 100 more patients than 2017. The Pediatric ICU welcomed HAL, a lifelike 5-year-old boy patient simulator for nurse and physician training. HAL was provided by the Huntsville Hospital Auxiliary through Huntsville Hospital Foundation. The Child Life Department was the first accredited program of its type in Alabama and one of only 54 accredited Child Life internship programs for college students worldwide. It also hosted an inaugural conference for the Southeastern Association of Child Life Professionals. The Maternity program added nitrous oxide as a pain management option for laboring women.

Pediatric ER Visits 34,871

Well Baby Nursery Days 8,207

Births 4,331

Neonate Nursery Days 21,637

OB ER Visits 9,103

July 1, 2017 – June 30, 2018

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HH for Women & Children

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omen & Children’s new Infant Nutrition Lab is the first and only facility of its type in North Alabama. The lab is an aseptic environment where refrigerated and frozen breast milk is safely stored, and certified technicians precisely mix feedings for babies in the Level III Regional Neonatal ICU. It starts with a team of neonatologists and registered dietitians creating customized nutrition plans to give infants the exact nutrients they need to grow and thrive. Depending on each baby’s needs, those feedings could include their mother’s breast milk and supplements, or fortifiers, if the patient needs extra nutrition. While preparing feedings according to the prescribed nutrition plan, technicians wear gowns, gloves and hair nets. To ensure accuracy, they measure portions on gram scales and use bar code scanners to label and identify milk. The benefits of breast milk — especially for premature babies — are significant. When the mother’s breast milk is not available, feedings can also include donor

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MAJOR DEVELOPMENTS

breast milk with the parents’ permission. The hospital receives donor milk through Prolacta Bioscience, which is regulated by the FDA. The Infant Nutrition Lab is made possible by the Melissa George Neonatal Memorial Fund and generous Huntsville Hospital Foundation donors.


THE FOUNDATION

F

oundation donors generously supported programs including Child Life, Music Therapy, Arts in Medicine, Sew Healing, Surviving & Thriving for breast cancer survivors, and the Dr. Frank Crim Compassion Fund for Children with Cancer which supports St. Jude Affiliate Clinic patients.

HH for Women & Children

Huntsville Hospital for Women & Children equipment and programs funded by Foundation donors in 2018: $1,508,073

Donors also invested in critically needed equipment for the Level III Regional Neonatal ICU, the Breast Center, Mother/Baby, Pediatrics, Pediatric Therapy and Audiology, Women’s Surgery and the Pediatric Emergency Department. Examples of key investments also included an endoscopic video system for ER/ Trauma, a vein illuminator for Outpatient Chemotherapy and two dialysis machines for the Dialysis Unit. $100,000 for four ventilators for the Level III Regional Neonatal ICU: The Foundation purchased four new ventilators for the NICU thanks to generous funding from the Jane K. Lowe Charitable Foundation. This equipment provides lifesaving support to the tiniest patients.

$340,000 for a 3D mammography system for the Huntsville Hospital Breast Center, made possible by the Liz Hurley Ribbon Run: This diagnostic technology makes breast cancer easier to detect, particularly in dense breast tissue. The equipment makes the Huntsville Hospital Breast Center fully 3D-capable – all thanks to generous donors.

“I was born in Huntsville Hospital; my children were born in Huntsville Hospital; every time we’ve had an emergency we’ve gone to Huntsville Hospital. It’s pretty easy to give back when you realize you or your family could be the ones who are the recipients of [donor] funding.” — Aaron Caradonna Huntsville Hospital Foundation Development Council Chairman

The 2018 Huntsville Classic raised a record $431,000 to provide a second Kids Care pediatric transport ambulance, and the lifesaving equipment on board.

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Madison Hospital

My reason Jeffrey Collins Son of Emergency Department patient — Madison Hospital

Madison Hospital has always provided outstanding care for my family. So, when my 89-year-old dad, Karl Collins, experienced complications from what should have been a routine stent procedure in his urinary tract, I took him directly to the Madison Hospital Emergency Department. Dad was in a great deal of pain, my mom, Barbara, was very upset, and I was fearful that his condition was life-threatening. Realizing the urgency of the situation, the ED staff took my dad back immediately, and the team quickly began treatment with a level of professionalism and confidence that I’ve never before experienced. Everyone on the team knew their job and performed it with just the right balance of urgency and calmness. I credit Emergency Nurse Derek Sheedy with performing “super magic.” He knew exactly how to treat my dad’s pain and summarized everything for us in an extremely attentive way. After a stay in the hospital, dad is doing well. The memory of his exceptional care will make us choose Madison Hospital for all of our future needs.

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Madison Hospital

Highlights

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or the first time since opening the hospital in 2012, more than 1,000 babies were delivered in a single year — 1,085 to be exact.

To meet growing patient demand, Madison Hospital grew to an eight-bed ICU by adding four more beds and opened nine more inpatient rooms. The Emergency Department opened a Fast Track area to expedite care for patients with lower acuity illnesses. This was the fourth expansion since 2012. Expanded services in the Imaging Department included a new MRI and Nuclear Medicine equipment which doubled the capacity in both areas.

Mary Lynne Wright President

A new pediatric service was developed to offer outpatient EEG procedures, in addition to adult EEGs. The Madison Hospital Vein Center received accreditation by the Intersocietal Accreditation Commission. Team members implemented a new program called “Forget Me Not” which trained staff to identify and address care techniques for patients diagnosed with dementia or Alzheimer’s. Madison Hospital became the only hospital in North Alabama certified as an Alzheimer’s Friendly Business. Madison Hospital employees won Huntsville Hospital Foundation’s Lifesaver Club competition by having the most new employee donors and by increasing the percentage of employee giving. The Maternity program added nitrous oxide as a pain management option for laboring women.

Admissions 4,644

ER Visits 53,856

Surgeries 3,621

Births 1,085

Outpatients 28,003

Employees 660

Hospital Advisory Board Members Mike Goodman Chairman Beth Richardson Ashley Burchfield, MD Bobby DeNeefe Gerald Dupree Paul Finley Matthew Hunt, MD Carole Jones Krishna Srikakolapu Taron Thorpe Clarence Tidwell Carmeleita Winburn

July 1, 2017 – June 30, 2018

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Madison Hospital

MAJOR DEVELOPMENTS

M

adison Hospital continues to add and expand services while retaining the hometown-hospital feel that patients expect.

The facility doubles the space available for endoscopies, meaning more Madison-area residents can have their procedure done close to home.

Digestive Disease Center gastroenterologist Suresh Karne, MD, performed the first procedure in the new Outpatient Endoscopy Center.

Moving outpatient endoscopy to another location also allows the hospital to convert the two existing endoscopy suites into regular operating rooms. More operating room space gives surgeons more options to schedule procedures sooner.

Located on the second floor of the Madison Medical I office building near the hospital’s Balch Road entrance, the Endoscopy Center offers a full range of endoscopic procedures including colonoscopy and EGD, or upper endoscopy. The new 10,000-square-foot facility includes four modern endoscopy suites, nine pre-operative bays where patients are prepped for their procedures, and eight recovery bays.

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“The Madison Hospital services continue to expand to meet the demand we’re experiencing from the tremendous economic growth in our region. This success is a testament to our exceptional staff and our physician partners.” — Mary Lynne Wright Madison Hospital President


THE FOUNDATION

Madison Hospital

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untsville Hospital Foundation has played an integral role in Madison Hospital’s growth since the hospital opened in 2012. As the hospital continues to grow, so does its need for equipment and programs. Donor gifts benefited every area of the hospital, from Surgery and Obstetrics, to a new Alzheimer’s education and awareness program. Key donor investments included a glidescope intubation system for the Emergency Department, patient monitors for Cardiology and Obstetrics, centrifuge systems for the Lab, and a Giraffe incubator for the Level II special care Nursery. Madison Hospital equipment and programs funded by Foundation donors in 2018: $271,214

“Foundation donors ensure our nurses have the supplies and equipment needed to provide the best patient care, and that our families have the essential items needed to make their stay as comfortable as possible. Madison Hospital’s Obstetrics Department is thankful for the generous Foundation gifts provided to us.” — Renee Colquitt, CRNP, NNP-BC Director of Perinatal Services

Forget Me Not program launched: Huntsville Hospital Foundation is fully funding Madison Hospital’s Alzheimer’s education and awareness pilot program, thanks to the generosity of the James Cecil and Margaret G. Ashburn Foundation. Forget Me Not provides training for every member of the hospital staff— from nurses and techs, to Environmental and Food Service employees. The hospital also hosted a conference for the community.

$87,402 for a joint replacement operating table for Madison Hospital’s Surgery Department, made possible by Party in the Park: Madison Hospital had a 20 percent increase in orthopedic cases over the past four years. This new equipment is used to perform total hip and knee procedures, and enables the hospital to keep up with growing patient volumes.

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Athens-Limestone Hospital

My reason Bryan Johnstone Father of Pediatric Cardiac Patient — Athens-Limestone Hospital

A call about my healthy 10-year-old needing immediate medical attention made my heart skip a few beats. Connor was at school in Athens when his chest began to pound as his heart raced to an alarming 124 beats per minute for an extended period of time. My wife, Jenny, checked with Connor’s pediatrician who advised her to go directly to Athens-Limestone Hospital’s Emergency Department. My office is a few blocks from the hospital, so I was waiting on my family when they arrived. Connor was triaged immediately, and the staff performed an EKG within minutes. In what seemed like no time, ED Physician Dr. Douglas Moore delivered test results after consulting with Huntsville Hospital Health System Pediatric Cardiologist Dr. Paul Israel. Connor was diagnosed with Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome, a rare condition characterized by a rapid and irregular heartbeat. Follow-up specialty care with Dr. Israel confirmed that Connor may require surgery later in life, but he has no restrictions. When your loved one experiences a medical scare, you want immediate answers. My hospital went above and beyond for us.

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Athens-Limestone Hospital

Highlights

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o reduce readmissions and provide continuity of care for patients, Athens-Limestone Hospital’s clinical team implemented Transition of Care and Chronic Care Management. Every discharged Medicare patient receives a follow-up call from a care coordinator and, if necessary, is connected with community resources to help meet their health needs. A patient who has two or more chronic illnesses and reaches 30 days without readmission to the hospital is transitioned to the Chronic Care Management program for continued wellness follow-ups. Also, clinical team members provided a number of educational seminars and preventative screenings to area companies and community groups that included topics such as nutrition, diabetes and exercise. The hospital’s Advanced Wound Care Center (AWCC) recently received the “Center of Excellence” award by Healogics, the nation’s largest provider of advanced wound healing services. AWCC was awarded the “Center of Distinction” in 2016 which qualified the program for “Center of Excellence” in 2017 and 2018. In addition to the “Center of Excellence,” AWCC also achieved the “President’s Circle” award for the second year in a row. Out of more than 700 centers across the country, only 42 centers achieved this prestigious award. AthensLimestone Hospital’s program was one of seven to achieve this award for two consecutive years.

Admissions 3,960

ER Visits 33,589

Surgeries 5,171

Births 461

Outpatients 103,782

Employees 816

David Pryor President

Hospital Advisory Board Members Camilla Gaston Chairman Max Boone, MD Patrick Boyett, DO Kyle Bridgeforth John Curtis Pat King Ben Ladner, MD Russ Mitchell Rick Mould Ray Neese Tom Norton Nauman Qureshi, MD Shelia Smith

July 1, 2017 – June 30, 2018

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Athens-Limestone Hospital

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he new Athens-Limestone Tower brings 75,000 square feet of surgical, imaging, pharmacy, medical offices and fitness space under one roof. It’s the newest facility on the campus of the Limestone Medical Village. The building has four large, state-of-the-art operating rooms as well as pre-operative and post-operative recovery areas. Surgeons from Athens-Limestone Hospital’s medical staff are performing a variety of outpatient procedures there including knee and shoulder arthroscopy, carpal tunnel repair, tonsillectomy and adenoid removal, colonoscopy and other endoscopic procedures.

MAJOR DEVELOPMENTS

pharmacy. The Orthopaedic Center (TOC) occupies the entire second floor. The third floor includes Valley Internal Medicine and a 24-hour gym, 360 Fitness. The new tower allows for easier surgery scheduling at both facilities, including more complicated surgeries like total joint replacement, in the hospital. The building’s operating rooms have a number of special touches, including cool-burning LED lights that help keep surgeons more comfortable while they work and the state’s only Olympus EasySuite Patient Greeting System to create a calming environment for patients as they are wheeled in for surgery.

The surgical team has averaged 60 procedures a week since the facility opened in October 2018. In addition to outpatient surgery, the tower’s ground floor includes medical imaging with MRI and X-ray machines, and an Athens-Limestone Hospital retail

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“The outpatient surgery program has really taken off with a boom.”

— Jamie Page, RN Surgical Services Clinical Manager


THE FOUNDATION

Athens-Limestone Hospital

T

he outpouring of support from generous donors and major sponsors has given Athens-Limestone Hospital Foundation the ability to substantially fund the purchase of necessary medical equipment and technology to care for patients at Athens-Limestone Hospital. The employees at Athens-Limestone Hospital gave more than $35,000 resulting in more than $20,000 in Helping Hands Grants being awarded to support patient care needs.

Equipment and programs supported by Foundation in 2018: $90,900

The 2018 Athens-Limestone Hospital Foundation Gala raised $62,808 to provide sleeper chairs in patient rooms. More than 310 guests attended this event at the Jackson Center in Huntsville.

A new 3D mammogram unit was the cause for the Pink Elephant Luncheon which raised $22,740. The luncheon was held at the Limestone County Event Center where more than 270 guests also heard breast cancer survivor Jan Lenz share her journey. The Foundation gave $12,459 to provide 10 Staxi Wheelchairs to be used throughout the hospital.

The hospital’s Respiratory Department was the beneficiary of the 2018 Crystal Cup Golf Tournament which raised $20,709 to fund two bi-pap machines. There were 136 golfers who teed off at the tournament which was held at Canebrake Golf Club in Athens.

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Decatur Morgan Hospital

My reason Mary Gail Olinger Surgery Patient — Decatur Morgan Hospital

I consider myself fortunate and blessed to have the type of care and level of skill provided at Decatur Morgan Hospital in my own backyard. A few days after returning from New York City for the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade, I had an emergency appendectomy. The day after my unexpected procedure, I felt compelled to tell as many people as possible about my amazing experience. Rather than telling a neighbor or calling a relative, I shared the news on Facebook with more than 1,000 friends. What started out as a scary experience actually went very smoothly. Following an abdominal CT to confirm my diagnosis, an IV was started with absolutely no discomfort. My pre- and post-op nurses were professional, kind and extremely competent. Dr. Matthew Figh and his surgical team did such an incredible job that I was able to attend my granddaughter’s birthday party a few days after surgery. I was in great hands from start to finish … in the community where I’ve lived my entire life.

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Decatur Morgan Hospital

Highlights

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he Emergency Department, 2-South, 1-Southwest, Dialysis, and a new MRI Suite are part of the multi-year facility renovation project nearing completion. Decatur Morgan’s “Another Chance” addiction treatment program at the Parkway Campus has doubled its patient volume. It is a three to four day medically supervised program to help individuals suffering with active addiction withdrawals. This inpatient stabilization then provides a referral to long-term recovery and/or plans for aftercare. The Vizient Southeast Bright Ideas for Workplace Improvement was awarded to Decatur Morgan Hospital for its nursing model. The new care team model pairs every nurse with a nursing assistant and utilizes LPNs to pull scheduled medications from the Pyxis for the nurses. This change increased the nurse’s time spent at the patient’s bedside from 26 percent to 66 percent.

Nat Richardson President

Employee engagement and physician satisfaction scores continue to show improvement over the past several years. Decatur Morgan received more than $600,000 from the Decatur Morgan Foundation, which was one of its largest gifts, in the past 10 years.

Admissions 10,469

ER Visits 61,478

Surgeries 5,481

Births 719

Outpatients 164,671

Employees 1,446

Hospital Advisory Board Members Nicholas Roth Chairman Reginald Gladish, MD President of Medical Staff Judge David Breland David Burleson Melissa C. Craig Mike Goodman Rodney Harney, MD Ken Schuppert Scott Sharp, MD C. Wallace Terry Bill Wyker

July 1, 2017 – June 30, 2018

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Decatur Morgan Hospital

MAJOR DEVELOPMENTS

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Later, construction teams will get busy refurbishing parts of the third floor of the Decatur campus.

The massive project includes 50 remodeled patient rooms, a larger Emergency Department, a new Labor & Delivery unit, and much more.

The Parkway and West campuses have also seen significant upgrades thanks to the multi-year renovation project, including refurbished patient rooms, new furniture, improved cafeterias and spruced-up public areas.

ecatur Morgan Hospital’s Decatur campus is going to look and feel like a new hospital following a $20 million renovation that is nearing completion.

The upgraded Emergency Department will have 35 treatment rooms – up from 22 – with five of those reserved for emergency psychiatric care. There will also be a private area for assessing new patients arriving in the ED, and a larger Fast Track area for treatment of less severe problems. Soon the hospital will welcome Labor & Delivery back to the Decatur campus. Part of the fifth floor is being remodeled into a comfortable, modern maternity unit. The program has been operating from the hospital’s smaller Parkway campus during construction.

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“When the projects are done, pretty much every area of the hospital will have been renovated,” said Decatur Morgan Hospital President Nat Richardson. “I’m really excited to have facilities that match the high level of care that our team has always provided.”

“We’re proud to have Huntsville Hospital as a partner in these renovations. They’re making sure we have the modern facilities we need to care for the community well into the future.” — Nat Richardson Decatur Morgan Hospital President


THE FOUNDATION

Decatur Morgan Hospital

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ecatur Morgan Hospital Foundation had another terrific year with great support from generous donors. Over 10,000 members of the community participated in fundraising activities. The Foundation is incredibly grateful for the gifts and support from hospital team members and from individuals, businesses and community organizations who give and volunteer to build a healthier community and improve the quality of life for all. Equipment and programs supported by Foundation in 2018: $400,000

More than $250,000 has been raised to fund a Mobile Medical Unit (MMU), which is a health clinic on wheels to provide much-needed health screenings and education to under-served areas in our community.

The Foundation continues to fund scholarships to help Decatur Morgan team members further their educations. Decatur Morgan encourages team members to pursue excellence in all things and highly values continued learning.

Each year, the Decatur Morgan Hospital Foundation supports Camp Bluebird, North Alabama’s only adult cancer camp. This 2½-day camp for survivors and caregivers provides a much-needed respite and a wonderful opportunity for fellowship, support, fun and wellness.

“The Foundation is vitally important to Decatur Morgan Hospital. The Foundation’s fundraising events bring together members of the community while raising money to fulfill its mission. These contributions benefit much needed services and state-of-the-art technology all while serving patients regardless of their ability to pay. I am proud to be a part of this organization.” — Melissa Craig DMH Advisory Board, Foundation Guild and Gala 34 Honoree

The Foundation completed funding of a 3D Mammography machine, provided free and discounted mammograms to uninsured or underinsured women, and completed the renovations to Breast Health Centers at the Decatur and Parkway campuses. The Power of Pink is mighty.

Paddlers competing in the Decatur Morgan Hospital Foundation Dragon Boat Race & Festival are asked to raise donations in support of the hospital. This money helped treat patients who need services, regardless of their ability to pay.

25


Helen Keller & Red Bay Hospitals

My reason Ronnie Wicks Knee Surgery Patient — Helen Keller Hospital

I twisted my knee as soon as I came down from the attic with the Christmas decorations. Resting and ice didn’t help. The orthopedic doctor diagnosed a torn meniscus and recommended surgery. About 10 years ago I had rotator cuff surgery at Helen Keller, and about three years ago they repaired the other knee. I have had great experiences. Everyone is well qualified and good at what they do. So, I knew I would have this knee surgery at Helen Keller Hospital and I decided to have my physical therapy there, too. After just two weeks in therapy, the therapist said I had made enough progress to continue my exercises at home. For more than 35 years I worked as a teacher, coach and principal. I learned something new at my age from my experience at Keller. If I need any more surgery – and I hope I don’t – that’s where I’ll go. I like to think I’m good for another 100,000 miles!

26


Helen Keller & Red Bay Hospitals

Highlights

T

he Emergency Room expansion and renovation is almost finished and was the first phase of an $18 million capital investment. Included in the expansion are five new emergency treatment rooms, improved patient reception and triage flow, and a new ER entrance. Currently more than 42,000 people are treated in the ER each year. This project will accommodate an expected patient increase of 25 percent. Helen Keller partnered with Clearview Cancer Institute and Alliance Cancer Care on a new comprehensive cancer treatment center in Florence. The new facility is expected to open in late 2019 and will enable patients to receive treatments closer to home. Also, these three partners were the Premier sponsors of the American Cancer Society’s Singing River Social.

Paul Storey President

Paul Storey, Helen Keller Hospital President, has been appointed to the American Cancer Society’s State Board of Directors. The new campus Wound Care Center is nearing completion of renovations and will open in 2019. Two new specialists, Dr. Bassam Choudhry, Pulmonology/Critical Care, and Dr. Eric Jenkie, Neurology, joined the medical staff.

Hospital Advisory Board Members

Red Bay Hospital launched a new Hospitalist service to provide coordinated hospital care with a patient’s primary care physician.

Steve Hargrove Chairman Alford Boyd, Jr. Belinda Carmichael Larry Collum Ryan Conner, MD Michael Gosney, MD Larry Holcomb, MD Aaron Karr, MD Andy Mann Mark McIlwain, MD David Ruggles Keller Thompson Josh Vacik, MD

A new outpatient center is under construction in Muscle Shoals. It will house Helen Keller Imaging, Physical Therapy, Lab and Ambulance Services and Avalon Medical Group. Red Bay and Helen Keller recently completed their second year as the exclusive provider of emergency services to Franklin County.

Admissions 10,098

ER Visits 46,532

Surgeries 6,403

Births 791

Outpatients 57,052

Employees 1,133

July 1, 2017 – June 30, 2018

27


Helen Keller & Red Bay Hospitals

E

mergency care is one of the most visible services for any hospital, and Helen Keller Hospital’s updated ER is sure to make a great first impression.

The ER expansion and renovation is almost finished and was the first phase of an $18 million capital investment. Included in the expansion are five new emergency treatment rooms, improved patient reception and triage flow, and an ER entrance. Currently more than 42,000 people are treated in the ER each year. This project will accommodate an expected patient increase of 25 percent. Work has also begun on a freestanding, comprehensive wound care center through a joint venture with Healogics, the nation’s largest provider of advanced wound healing services.

28

MAJOR DEVELOPMENTS

Upon completion of these two projects, the next phase will be a major upgrade of the busy first floor including the front entrance, admitting, registration, cafeteria, kitchen, physician dining area and retail space. The kitchen updates will give patients the ability to have room service-style dining. Renovations to the surgical area as well as a new Muscle Shoals location for imaging and other outpatient services are the future projects in this capital investment.

“In 2021, we’ll celebrate 100 years of service to the Shoals community. The construction projects happening now will allow us to continue providing excellent care and customer service for the next 100 years.” — Paul Storey Helen Keller Hospital President


THE FOUNDATION

T

he Pediatric Department at Helen Keller Hospital will undergo renovations with $90,000 in proceeds from the Foundation’s annual events. These included the Ed Borden and Steve Nesbitt Golf Tournament, the Heather Land Comedy Tour, the Annual Spring Dinner and Auction, and the Mardi Gras Luncheon and Fashion Show.

Helen Keller & Red Bay Hospitals

Equipment and programs supported by Foundation in 2018: $204,881

The Ed Borden and Steve Nesbitt Golf Tournament supports the Foundation’s mission to help fund equipment and programs.

The Foundation’s Bright Little Stars reading program provides each baby born at Helen Keller Hospital a new book so families can begin to foster the love of reading at an early age. The Mardi Gras Luncheon and Fashion Show helped provide funding for the Pediatric Department renovations.

“Helen Keller Hospital is one of the most important organizations in Colbert County. As a not-forprofit, it is vital for everyone to be involved in supporting the needs of our local community hospital — helping provide quality services for all. Through contributions, the hospital is able to purchase new equipment, help with renovations, expansions and special projects. I always say, ‘You are not living unless you are giving!’” — Steve Hargrove General Manager, Sheffield Utilities

The Heather Land Comedy Tour brought plenty of laughs while raising funds for the Pediatric Department renovations.

Being admitted into the hospital is difficult for anyone, but it can be especially scary for pediatric patients. The Foundation purchases material that various schools, clubs and organizations use to make the no-sew Keller Comfort Blankets. These blankets are provided for the Pediatric Department at Helen Keller Hospital. 29


Marshall Medical Centers

My reason Johnny Wales Stroke Patient — Marshall Medical Centers

I think I’m having a stroke. The words raced through my mind but wouldn’t make the short distance to my mouth. And why were my eyes burning? Had I rubbed something in them? I stumbled as I tried to get to my wife. The only way to communicate was to wave my hand and hope she understood. She was frantic. A neighbor called the ambulance. At Marshall Medical Center North in Guntersville, four or five people were waiting to take care of me. The doctor consulted with a neurologist. They gave me a shot to bust the clot then put me on an IV drip. Today, I walk at least two miles several times a week. I dusted off the Bowflex machine. I expect to go back to work. I realize I may always walk with a limp, but I can speak clearly about how grateful I am and what good care I received. I was also rushed to Marshall Medical several years ago during a heart attack. This makes twice that they probably saved my life.

30


Marshall Medical Centers

Highlights

A

history-making announcement came with the official integration agreement with Huntsville Hospital Health System to co-manage Marshall Medical Centers’ operations and facilities. Technology improvements included the implementation of 4K monitors in the surgery suites making Marshall Medical Centers the first in the country to implement 4K technology. The Diagnostic Imaging Department installed 3D mammography in both hospitals. Gastroenterology capabilities were expanded to include endoscopic ultrasound.

Gary Gore Chief Executive Officer

Marshall Medical Centers were added to the list of award-winning hospitals for stroke care (Silver +) published in a 2018 U.S. News & World Report “Best Hospitals” issue. Using LEAN processes, a renovation of the lab at Marshall Medical Centers is now completed. The new and larger space increased overall capacity, improved workflow and enabled new technology to be installed. Patient rooms and bathrooms on the third floor at Marshall Medical Center South were renovated and the work now continues on the second floor. A number of energy-conservation measures are underway throughout the system. The fifth anniversary of the Marshall Cancer Care Center was celebrated in July.

Admissions 9,617

ER Visits 72,415

Surgeries 7,433

Births 1,150

Outpatients 149,245

Employees 1,514

Hospital Advisory Board Members Mike Alred Chairman Joe Abercrombie Pat Allen Liles Burke Stan Chaffin Wayne Crews Roy Rollings Donald Slappey, MD Nancy Stewart David Walker Winter Wilson, DO

July 1, 2017 – June 30, 2018

31


Marshall Medical Centers

D

r. Benjamin Shepard is one of those new physicians making a difference because he has a rare combination of specialty training in gastroenterology and cancer care. Dr. Shepard detects and treats a variety of gastrointestinal cancers, including colon, liver and pancreatic cancer. Marshall Medical is assisting those efforts by investing in the latest endoscopic ultrasound technology, which produces detailed images of gastrointestinal tumors to help doctors decide how best to treat them. Using the scope, physicians can also perform a relatively non-invasive tissue biopsy in areas of the body that are otherwise hard to reach. Also new to Marshall Medical is endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP), a procedure for diagnosing and treating problems involving the gall bladder, bile system, pancreas and liver. The procedure is done through a scope in the small intestine.

32

MAJOR DEVELOPMENTS

Dr. Shepard, who practices gastroenterology at Medical Specialists of North Alabama in Boaz, recently used the new endoscopic ultrasound technology to solve a medical mystery. Raymond Cox had been losing weight and developed severe jaundice. A hospital CT scan showed a large mass on his pancreas consistent with pancreatic cancer. But when a biopsy came back negative for cancer, Dr. Shepard brought Cox back in for further testing. He and pathologist Dr. James Lee worked together on the case and eventually discovered that Cox has autoimmune pancreatitis, a rare lupus-like condition with symptoms similar to pancreatic cancer. But instead of chemotherapy, Cox can be treated with steroids. Dr. Shepard “was excited to give us good news instead of bad,” said Cox’s wife, Judy.


THE FOUNDATION

Marshall Medical Centers

T

he Foundation has supported the work of Marshall Medical Centers by building relationships in the community that inspire the commitment and generosity of its citizens. Over the past decade, the Foundation has been responsible for putting millions of philanthropic dollars to work through Marshall Medical Centers.

“Factory Connection is very pleased to support the Foundation for Marshall Medical Centers and to help out as much as we possibly can while carrying on the legacy of our founder, Terry Scott, who was instrumental in bringing the Marshall Cancer Care Center to Marshall County.” — Steve Williams, CEO Factory Connection

Equipment and programs supported by Foundation in 2018: $857,883

$403,829 was donated to the Marshall Cancer Care Center for the Closer to Home capital campaign.

$368,000 earmarked for the Marshall Cancer Care Center Patient Navigator Program Endowment. A legacy gift from the late Martha Jane Finlay was earmarked for the Patient Navigator Program endowment at the Marshall Cancer Care Center. The program offers oncology patients education, counseling and advocacy through their treatment and into survivorship. $40,000 for new Stryker Patient Transport Chairs system-wide to replace outdated wheelchairs.

$11,000 for Nitrous Oxide Systems in Labor and Delivery for Marshall North and South. Nitrous oxide (more commonly known as laughing gas) gives laboring moms another option for pain management.

33


Lawrence Medical Center

My reason Sonia Terry Daughter of Patient —Lawrence Medical Center

My dad, Rubert Sheats, always attributed his good health to his primary care physician Dr. Nick Gillespie and the services he received from Lawrence Medical Center. He preferred to go to no other place for services unless necessary. He had several health issues but was able to maintain them with little inpatient stays. He was only hospitalized three times between the age of 80 and almost 93, with two of them being in the last six months of his life. This would not have happened if his healthcare had not been maintained well by Dr. Gillespie and the staff of Lawrence Medical Center.

34


Lawrence Medical Center

Highlights

C

EO Dean Griffin was named president of the Alabama Hospital Association’s North Alabama Regional Hospital Council.

Lawrence Medical Center also made history last year by appointing Dr. Faye Wilson as chief of the medical staff. Dr. Wilson, a family physician, is the first female and first African-American to hold that honor. The hospital achieved a four-star rating in Overall Quality from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services; earned a Press Ganey Guardian of Excellence Award for Quality; and completed a successful Joint Commission survey of its Laboratory Services. The hospital successfully completed a full joint Commission survey and a subsequent validation survey by the Alabama Department of Public Health.

Dean Griffin Chief Executive Officer

The swing beds continue to be successful for either acute care or transitional care, depending on patient need. This transitional care is for patients who are on the road to recovery but need a little more physical, occupational or respiratory therapy before they can be sent home safely. Lawrence Medical Center is also improving access to medical treatment by adding weekend hours at its Urgent Care Clinic. Last year, more than 7,000 patients visited the Moulton clinic for treatment of minor illnesses and injuries. The hospital operates five Provider Based Rural Health Clinics, including the only Pediatric clinic in Lawrence County, that saw a total of 27,815 patients during the year.

Admissions 631

ER Visits 9,628

Outpatients 40,093

Employees 196

Surgeries 32

Lawrence County Health Care Authority Board Members Gary Terry Chairman Hillman Locklayer Vice Chairman Bobby Dover Secretary/Treasurer Greg Dutton Patrick Mason Sam Spruell Benny Williams Faye Wilson, MD

July 1, 2017 – June 30, 2018

35


Lincoln Health System

My reason Joe Rutledge Orthopedic Patient — Lincoln Medical Center

I barely had both feet out on the rink when I found out that roller skating isn’t like riding a bicycle – you can forget how even if you used to be able to skate backwards. Both feet went out from under me at my greatgranddaughter’s birthday party. I was lying there in severe pain, about to pass out, wondering what was broken. My leg? An ankle? It was my hip, they said at the hospital, and after surgery I found out I’d be spending three weeks in rehab at Donalson Care Center. I’m hard-headed, my wife would tell you, and I was determined to do the squats, bicycle riding, leg lifts and step exercises. The work was hard, and my physical therapists were firm. I can be a bit of a cutup, but I didn’t argue with them and they treated me like a millionaire. The therapy worked great. I mowed the yard the day I got home and worked all summer at a local farm. Maybe I’ll try sky-diving next … if my wife will let me.

36


Lincoln Health System

Highlights

L

incoln Health System is expanding tele-neurology to provide immediate care from a neurologist while a patient is being evaluated and treated in the Emergency Department. The expanded service will also allow for routine, non-emergency consultations in our ICU and medical/surgical departments, giving patients access to neurologic specialty care during their stay.

The Foundation

T

he county’s first rubber turtle race fundraiser, hosted by Lincoln Health System Foundation, was held in August 2018. Community members ‘adopted’ labeled rubber turtles which were released and raced in the waterways of the local park. The First Annual Lincoln County Mini Turbo Turtle Race was the Foundation’s highest grossing fundraiser of the year. Additionally, the Foundation launched an apparel shop in 2018 to provide employees easy access to Health System apparel and uniforms as well as provide an additional revenue source for the Foundation.

Admissions 2,544

ER Visits 15,056

Surgeries 802

Births 287

Outpatients 44,856

Employees 300

Candie Starr Chief Executive Officer

Hospital Advisory Board Members Anthony Taylor Chairman John Thorpe Vice Chairman Donny Ogle Secretary Richard Cline, MD Chief of Staff Jack Atchley David Sanders Theresa Morrison, MD William Edwards, MD

July 1, 2017 – June 30, 2018

37


Lincoln Health System

L

incoln Health System launched an off-campus Short Stay Rehabilitation Center for patients needing more medical supervision while recuperating from major surgery, injury or illness. The center is housed at the hospital’s Donalson Care Center skilled nursing and assisted living facility. It operates as a distinct unit with a separate entrance and dining area. The Donalson Care Center’s therapy team is available seven days a week to perform physical, occupational and speech therapy. Most patients at the center are active adults recovering from orthopedic surgery, knee injuries or hip injuries. “Our focus is to provide the highest quality care and get patients back to their previous level of function — or better,” said Donalson Care Center Administrator Vicky Groce. The center has seven private patient rooms with modern conveniences including WiFi, in-room refrigerators and a computer lounge/business center. Many patients are able to go home in two weeks or less.

38

MAJOR DEVELOPMENTS


QUALITY MEASURES

H

untsville Hospital Health System is committed to becoming a High Reliability Organization—one where errors are detected and mitigated prior to harm reaching the patient or staff. In support of this commitment, and our continuing efforts to provide excellent care to our patients built around a culture of safety and reliability, we are embarking on a High Reliability Journey as a collaborative engagement with Press Ganey/Healthcare Performance Improvement, Inc. We will be developing tactics that will support our approach to patient and employee safety. Each system hospital will have leadership, staff and physicians training on the chosen tools and tactics to provide care safely.

Patient Safety Indicators (PSIs) are a set of measures that provide information on potential hospital complications and adverse events following procedures. The measure shown to the right include the following PSIs: decubitus ulcer, iatrogenic pneumothorax, postoperative hip fracture, perioperative hemorrhage or hematoma, postoperative acute kidney injury, postoperative respiratory failure rate, perioperative pulmonary embolism or deep vein thrombosis, postoperative sepsis, postoperative wound dehiscence and accidental puncture or laceration. This index value is a ratio of observed to expected events. The goal is remain below a score of 1.0.

Patient Safety Composite Index October 2015 – June 2017 1.14

0.93

0.93

0.92

0.93

HH

DMH

ALH

HKH

MMC

National Average 1.0

Data source: Hospital Compare www.medicare.gov/ hospitalcompare

CHART KEY HH - Huntsville Hospital DMH - Decatur Morgan Hospital ALH - Athens-Limestone Hospital

HKH - Helen Keller Hospital MMC - Marshall Medical Centers

*Huntsville Hospital data includes Huntsville Hospital Main, Huntsville Hospital for Women & Children and Madison Hospital. Decatur Morgan data includes Decatur and Parkway campuses. Helen Keller data does not include Red Bay Hospital.

39


QUALITY MEASURES Inpatient Likelihood to Recommend April 2017 – March 2018

HCAHPS (Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems) is a national survey instrument and data collection methodology for measuring patients’ perceptions of their hospital experience. The survey is conducted on behalf of CMS, which oversees Medicare and Medicaid. The “Likelihood to Recommend” question measures the percentage of patients who answered “always.”

78%

60%

66%

74%

72%

HH

DMH

ALH

HKH

MMC

Data source: Hospital Compare www.medicare.gov/ hospitalcompare

National Average 72%

30-day mortality rates are the percent of patients who expire after 30 days of being hospitalized. Mortality rates are considered an “outcome of care” measure and show what happened after patients with certain conditions receive care. The rates are “risk-adjusted,” meaning that the calculations take into consideration the patients’ severity of illness upon admission. Data source: Hospital Compare www.medicare.gov/ hospitalcompare

30-day Mortality Rates (30 days from admission) Inpatient Medicare only | July 2014 – June 2017 18.5 13.9 12.5

20.8 17.7

18.3

13.3 10.8

16.2 14.113.9

15.5 15.3

9.6

N/A

HH

DMH

ALH

HKH

MMC

Acute Myocardial Infarction (Heart Attack) National Average 13.2% Heart Failure National Average 11.7% Pneumonia National Average 15.7%

40


QUALITY MEASURES

HH

ALH

15.9

15.5

14.4

DMH

30-day readmission rates are the percent of hospitalized patients who return to the hospital within 30 days of discharge. While some readmissions are appropriate, the measure is intended to highlight readmissions to the hospital that were potentially avoidable. The rates are “risk-adjusted,” meaning that the calculations take into consideration the patients’ severity of illness upon admission.

22.2

22.9

21.8 14.9

15.8

19.9

21.0

30-day Readmission Rates (to any acute facility) Inpatient Medicare only July 2014 – June 2017 (Heart Failure) July 2016 – June 2017 (Hospital-wide)

HKH

Data source: Hospital Compare www.medicare.gov/ hospitalcompare

MMC

Heart Failure National Average 21.7% Hospital Wide National Average 15.3%

HH

1.5

0.7

0.0

0.3

ALH

0.5

0.8

DMH

N/A

0.0

0.5

0.6

0.5

0.9

1.0 0.5

0.8

0.8

1.4

1.9

2.6

3.0

Health Care-Associated Infections Ratio April 2017 – March 2018

HKH

MMC

Health care-associated infections (HAIs) are infections people get while they are receiving health care for another condition. HAIs can happen in any health care facility, including hospitals, ambulatory surgical centers, end-stage renal disease facilities, and long-term care facilities. HAIs can be caused by bacteria, fungi, viruses, or other, less common pathogens. Data source: Hospital Compare www.medicare.gov/ hospitalcompare

CLABSI (Central Line-Associated Bloodstream Infection) National Average 0.78 CAUTI (Catheter-Associated Urinary Tract Infection) National Average 0.74 MRSA (Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus) National Average 1.01 C. Diff (Clostridium difficile) National Average 0.63 Ratio of the actual observed rate to the predicted rate.

41


2018 HEALTH SYSTEM STATISTICS

Twelve employees from each of our Health System hospitals stood by their hospital’s red pin on an outline of North Alabama created for a TV commercial about the Huntsville Hospital Health System.

101,143**

9,895* Cardiac

299,630

58,621

admissions

ER VISITS

Catheterizations SURGERIES

7,674 14,842 1,384

babies born

EMPLOYEES

*Huntsville Hospital and Marshall Medical Centers **All admissions include observations.

42

physicians


COMMUNITY BENEFIT

T

he community benefit of a hospital can be measured by the number of people served and by the services that are provided for free or below actual cost. These numbers reflect only the operations in Madison County.

$15,561,213

Charity care Non-reimbursed cost to hospital

$58,858,947

Uncollected accounts Cost to hospital

$4,299,090

Medical education Non-reimbursed cost of educating medical residents and interns

$10,722,602

Medicaid Non-reimbursed cost of care for Medicaid patients

$1,250,000

Support of schools

$250,000

Community classes, screenings and support for health events

TOTAL COMMUNITY BENEFIT IN 2018

$89,886,066

$500,000

Community Health Initiative grants

231 Events 6,157 people screened Mobile Medical Unit

$282,384 155,000 hours

Volunteer Contributions

The Mobile Medical Unit was purchased by the Huntsville Hospital Foundation thanks to proceeds from the 2011 Huntsville Classic event.

43


NEW MEDICAL STAFF MEMBERS IN 2018 More than 230 physicians joined the medical staffs in the Huntsville Hospital Health System. Physicians’ medical staff privileges may vary by facility — such as patient admissions, patient consults, and/or interpretation of diagnostic studies.

HH/MH Josh D. Valtos, MD ALH/MMC MMC Enrique M. Velasquez, MMC

HH/MH

Deanna F. Minisee-Ryce, MD

MD

DMH

Aslam Mohammed, MD

Thomas W. Wright, Jr., MD

MMC

Jacob R. Morris, MD

MMC

Su Q. Nguyen, MD

MMC

John E. Obert, MD

HH/MH

Raymond Rambo Oldham, MD

HH/MH

Scott H. Pfitzer, MD

DMH

Christopher Phillips, MD

Colon Rectal Surgery HH/MH

Blake A. Spindler, MD

Dentistry Anesthesiology

7-1-2017 THROUGH 11-30-2018

HH/MH

Jordan H. Taylor, DMD

DMH

Daniel F. Pirvan, MD

HH/MH

Sarah Michelle Withrow, DMD

HH/MH

Michael Proctor, MD

LHS

Robert Richter, MD

MMC

Daniel L. Rivas, DO

HH/MH

Devin Mark Rogers, MD

DMH

Amanda Ryden, MD

DMH MMC MMC

Robert W. Smith, MD

B. Mark Tafazoli, MD

MMC

Colby R. Duckett, MD

HH/MH

Tony R. Graham, MD

MMC

Robin T. Hall, MD

Dermatology

MMC

Amy B. Halliburton, MD

HH/MH

HH/MH

Jessica Reidy Ivey, MD

ALH

Kevin M. Kennedy, MD

Emergency Medicine

MMC

Gary Keith Morton, MD

LHS

Derron Allen, MD

MMC

Michael H. Mullins, DO

ALH

Jeffrey D. Anderson, MD

HH/MH

Casey Clark Smith, MD

HKH

Kenneth Collins, MD

DMH MMC DMH

DMH

Pavan R. Telang, MD

ALH

Josiah Daily, MD

HH/MH

Joshua Heath Williams, MD

DMH

Willis T. Williams, MD

MMC

Joel G. Evans, DO

MMC

M. Chad Williamson, MD

ALH

Maria C. Falcon, MD

HH/MH

William Lee Young, DO

HH/MH

David J. Garvey, MD

Cardiology

Kathleen Shergy Hesterman, MD

Rodney D. Soto, MD

Julia Vu, MD

MMC

Michael M. Butler, MD

ALH

Milton George, II, DO

Endocrinology

MMC

Gordon H. Cash, MD

LHS

Carol A. Grace, MD

HH/MH

ALH MMC MMC

Shi-Chi Cheng, MD

DMH

Brad Green, MD

Carl J. Gessler, Jr., MD

HH/MH

Rachel Michelle Giyanani, MD

ENT

MMC

Sean P. Groark, MD

DMH

Kofi Gyebi, MD

HKH

ALH MMC MMC

W. Herbert Haught, MD

DMH

Sarmed Al-Haddad, MD

V. Ross Hunter, Jr., MD

HH/MH

Wesley Wayne Harris, MD

Family Medicine

HH/MH

Michael Ryan Kaufmann, MD

HKH

Muhammad Husainy, DO

HH/MH

Raynon A. Andrews, MD

MMC

Muhammad A. Khan, MD

MMC

Frederic M. Jones, MD

HKH

Courtney Bowen, MD

ALH MMC ALH MMC ALH MMC HH/MH

Navdeep K. Mann, MD

DMH

Nadia Lovettz-Tereshchenko, MD

HH/MH

Delmy Yamileth Caton, MD

James P. McGraw, MD

DMH

Chunyen Liu, MD

HKH

Amy Clark, MD

James D. Murphy, MD

DMH

Donald Marshall, MD

HH/MH

Eric Jason Hatfield, DO

Pochana Gautam Reddy, MD

HKH

Eric McDonald, MD

HH/MH

Stephen B. Henderson, MD

HH/MH

Mary McPherson O'Hear, MD

MMC

Morgan C. Jackson, MD

HH/MH Christopher ALH/MMC

44

P. Roth, MD

Malapuram Vasudha Reddy, MD

Pamela McGarrah, MD


NEW MEDICAL STAFF MEMBERS IN 2018

7-1-2017 THROUGH 11-30-2018

HH/MH

Rakhshanda Abidi Khan, MD

Onyinyechi Joy Okike, MD

ALH

Sharon Bush - Coaxum, MD

Katherine Russell Moody, MD

HH/MH DMH DMH

HH/MH

Clement U. Okinedo, MD

HH/MH

Perry Lance Justice, DO

HKH

Dorene Morris, DO

HH/MH

Hemil S. Parikh, MD

HH/MH

Anesha A. Maxwell, MD

Annsely Noterman, MD

DMH

Siddharth H. Patel, MD

DMH

George V. Pegram III, MD

Sheela K. Parrish, MD

ALH

Daniel Pirvan, MD

HH/MH

Christy Lynn Pettes, MD

Justin Price Pruitt, DO

HH/MH

Julian Kent Powers, MD

HH/MH

Jerry Russell Robinson, DO

HH/MH

Natdanai Punnanithinont, MD

Mishanta Reyes, DO

HH/MH

Elizabeth Rosell-Cespedes, MD

Emerald V. Screws, MD

Thomas M. Savage, MD

HH/MH

HH/MH

MMC MMC

Jessica D. Sparks, MD

LHS

Misty Slater, MD

HH/MH

Amanda H. Wolf, MD

HH/MH

Archana Vashisht, MD

HH/MH

Srilatha Venepally, MD

HH/MH

David Wayne Cole, MD

DMH

Kafi Wilson, MD

HH/MH

Frank Francone, MD

HH HH/MH HH/MH

Gastroenterology MMC

Benjamin A. Shepard, DO

Infectious Disease Hematology/Oncology HKH

Occupational Medicine

Diego Bedoya, MD

HH/MH/ DMH HKH

Jorge A. Diaz-Castro, MD

DMH HKH MMC

Thomas Johnson, MD

DMH

Alex Minter, MD

HH/MH

John R. Nicholson, MD

HH/MH DMH

Daniel Schreeder, MD

Surrinder Dang, MD

Robert H. Jones, MD

Hospitalist

Ophthalmology

HH/MH HKH HH/MH

Ali Hassoun, MD

MMC

Michael C. Eddins, MD

Kelsey Ivey, MD

HH/MH

Jonathan K. Ramsey, MD

HH/MH

Ka Yeon Lee, MD

HH/MH ALH

Morgan Christine Scully, MD

Internal Medicine HH/MH

Gregory C. Batson, MD

HH/MH

Omar Iqbal, DO

HH/MH

Pragya Katoch, MD

Neonatology HH/MH

Katie Anne Fritz, MD

DMH

Raleigh Adams, MD

HH/MH

Limitha Adimala, MD

LHS

Shadi Ayyoub, MD

HH/MH

Kasha Elizabeth Benton, MD

HH/MH

Swetha Bheemanathni, MD

HKH

Eric Jenkie, DO

ALH

Scott Buckner, MD

LHS

Greg Sengstock, MD

HH/MH

Jorge Luis Chavez, MD

HH/MH

Sasya Dronavalli, MD

Neurosurgery

HH/MH

Ahmed B.B. Elawad, MD

HH/MH

HH/MH

Vishnu Ilineni, MD

HKH

Adam Isbell. MD

Obstetrics - Gynecology

HH/MH

Bhavini Jitsesh Kar, MD

LHS

Neurology

Stephen Edward Sandwell, MD

John M. Burney, MD

Orthopedic Surgery HH/MH

John Blake Boyett, DO

HH/MH

Joseph Patrick Boyett, DO

HH/MH

John A. Rodriguez-Feo, MD

HH/MH

William David Lawrence, DO

HH/MH

Jefferson Bradley Sabatini, MD

HH/MH

Murray D. Spruiell, MD

HH/MH

James Eric Stanford, DO

Otolaryngology DMH ALH

Jason Lockette, MD

Pain Medicine DMH

Ann Still, MD

DMH HKH

Pavan Telang, MD

Palliative Medicine HH/MH

Robert L. Hash, II, MD

HH - Huntsville Hospital MH - Madison Hospital ALH - Athens-Limestone Hospital DMH - Decatur Morgan Hospital HKH - Helen Keller Hospital LHS - Lincoln Health System MMC - Marshall Medical Center

45


NEW MEDICAL STAFF MEMBERS IN 2018 Pathology HH/MH

William E. Gibson, MD

HH/MH ALH

John R. Ross, MD

HH/MH

Caroline Beitel, DMD

HH/MH

Christopher Todd Parker, DDS Matthew Paul Ticola, DMD

Pediatric Hospitalist HH/MH

Kym Do, MD

Pediatric Intensive Care HH/MH

DMH

Cyril F. Halbert, MD

Podiatry

Pediatric Dentistry

HH/MH MMC

Plastic Surgery

Umesh Narsinghani, MD

LHS

Eric Bouldin, DPM

Psychiatry DMH

Lalleh Adhami, MD

HH/MH

Quratulain "Annie" Agha, MD

HKH

Timothy Carpenter, DO

HKH

Sanjay Malhotra, MD

HKH

Timothy Whalen, MD

Pulmonology HKH

Bassam Choudhry, MD

HH/MH

Prithvi Kukkadapu, MD

Pediatric Surgery HH/MH

Zaria Caryl Murrell, MD

Pediatric Emergency Medicine HH/MH

Nafeh Fananapazir, MD

HH/MH

Timothy Todd Fleenor, MD

HH/MH

Mudasser Mohammed Ibrahim, MD

HH/MH

J. Langston Lee, MD

HH/MH

Kathleen R. Richard, MD

Pediatrics

Radiology HH/MH ALH HH/MH ALH HKH

Nnenna Aguocha, MD

HKH

Abbas Chamsuddin, MD

HKH

Hoyt Childs, MD

HKH

Timothy Conner, MD

LHS

Patrick Couture, MD

HKH

Noel Estopinal, MD

HKH

Phillip Dale Bates, Jr., MD Kathryn Cambron, MD

7-1-2017 THROUGH 11-30-2018

LHS

Meaghan Magarik, MD

HKH

Harry McCarty, MD

HH/MH ALH

John Thomas McCarty, DO

HKH

Steven McCormack, MD

HKH

Traci McCormick, MD

MMC

Yvonne C. Moreno, MD

HH/MH ALH

Ryan J. Redelman, MD

HH/MH ALH

John Landon Reichle, MD

HKH

Alexander Serra, MD

LHS

Marvin Smith, MD

HKH

Stanley Smith, MD

HH/MH ALH

Freddie Rodriguez Swain, MD

HH/MH ALH

Devin V. Waldrop, MD

HH/MH ALH

Kevin Lance Waldrop, MD

HH/MH ALH

Jubal Robert Watts, Jr. MD

ALH

George Butler Wilson, MD

Sleep Medicine DMH

Darren Gannuch, MD

LHS

Thomas Phelps, MD

DMH

Jerrod Taylor, MD

Surgery LHS

David Crump, MD

MMC

Nathan S. Lanham, MD

Elizabeth Falkenberg, MD

HKH

Randall Mansell, DO

HH/MH ALH HH/MH ALH HKH

Amir Fallahian, MD

HH/MH

Veeraiah Siripurapu, MD

John Gleason, MD

Urology

Christopher J. Green, MD

HH/MH

Ryan Daniel Black, MD

David Henley, MD

DMH

Patrick Guthrie, MD

DMH

Kimberley Akridge, MD

HH/MH

Robert A. L. Blake, MD

HH/MH

Claudia Gaviria-Agudelo, MD

DMH

Sugantha Krishnan, MD

HH/MH ALH HKH

DMH

Jennifer Menon, MD

MMC

Mary Catherine Laney, MD

MMC

Michael D. Myers, MD

HH/MH

Christen Thigpen Roth, MD

HH/MH ALH

Joel Lightner, Jr. MD

HH/MH

Michael Tyler Wood, MD

Austin Faulkner, MD

HH - Huntsville Hospital MH - Madison Hospital ALH - Athens-Limestone Hospital DMH - Decatur Morgan Hospital HKH - Helen Keller Hospital LHS - Lincoln Health System MMC - Marshall Medical Centers

46


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Report to Our Communities 2018  

Huntsville Hospital Health System annual report for 2018