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PRESENTED BY THE PHOTOGRAPHER’S COLLECTIVE OF HUNTER COLLEGE

FALL 2016

THE ISSUE

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THE ISSUE FALL 2016


THE ISSUE

FALL 2016

EDITORS IN CHIEF Ilana Krugolets Sarah Leber ASSOCIATE EDITOR Emilia Pesantes ART DIRECTOR Sarah Leber DESIGNER Ilana Krugolets ART CONSULTANT Emilia Pesantes CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER Keka Marzagao INTERVIEWER Claudia Mallea 3


Table of Contents

THE ISSUE FALL 2016

ABOUT THE COLLECTIVE

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LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

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PROFESSORS IN THE ARTS

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PROFESSORS IN THE ARTS : BRIAN WOOD

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PROFESSORS IN THE ARTS : KATIE MURRAY

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PROFESSORS IN THE ARTS : CHRISTINA FREEMAN

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THE PHOTOGRAPHERS COLLECTIVE, I EXIST I RESIST

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SHAWN TISH

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NOAH BENUS

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IDAN BITTON, WHITE BALANCE

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DANNY POLONSKY

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SARAH LEBER, THE FEMININUM .. IN PHOTOGRAPHY TODAY

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ETTIE RACHLEFF, LADIES BE AWARE AND MEN BEWARE

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DARREN RANGEL, SEE AS I SEE

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RAIMONDO GRAZIANO

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KEKA MARZAGAO, AFTER KEÏTA

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PATRICIA ABREGO, INTERVIEW WITH THE ARTIST

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EMILIA PESANTES, SILHOUETTES

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TORI MUMTAZ, INTERVIEW WITH THE ARTIST

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FATMA ELGOHARY

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MONICA MEI

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ANDY LIPTON, TWICE UPON A TIME IN NEW YORK CITY

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CHUNGHEE YUN, MY NEIGHBORHOOD - ROOSEVELT ISLAND

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BRANDON LEE

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SUMMER MERRITT, MEMOIRS OF A MILLENNIAL NOBODY

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MARCELLA PRIETO, ARGONAUT I

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HAYIM HERON

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CARLOS KHALIL GUZMAN, EAST MEETS WEST

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BERNHARD HETZENAUR, SELF PORTRAITS

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ILANA KRUGOLETS, HAVE YOU EVER SEEN THE RAIN?

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ADAM GOLFER, A HOUSE WITHOUT A ROOF

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FIONA ALEXIA

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JULIE LEMBERGER

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THE PHOTOGRAPHERS COLLECTIVE, SUBWAY THERAPY

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HOW TO SUBMIT

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106

97

83

30

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35 74

115

27

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About The Collective

The Photographers Collective, founded in 2014, seeks to encourage the growth of emerging

PRESIDENT Ilana Krugolets

photographers, artists, and thinkers at Hunter College. We aim to supplement Hunter College’s

VICE PRESIDENT

photography curriculum through technical

Bailey Abercrombie

workshops, artist talks, a biannual publication, group shows, and critical conversation about photography. Simultaneously, we offer a platform from which to cultivate community, learning, and creativity among students. We encourage our members to

TREASURER Roza Shamailova SECRETARY Keka Marzagao

collaborate and exchange ideas, offer feedback about each other’s work, and focus their ability to

TO FIND OUT MORE VISIT

use the camera to engage with their surroundings.

HunterPhotographersCollective.wixsite.com/home

With the permission of the Art Department, the Photographers Collective has been fortunate enough to utilize the wall space along the 11th floor of Hunter North to showcase the photography of the students of Hunter College.

JOIN OUR FACEBOOK GROUP facebook.com/groups/HunterPhotographersCollective FOLLOW US ON INSTAGRAM @HunterPhotographersCollective

The Photographers Collective is an organization funded by Hunter College but run entirely by students. THE ISSUE FALL 2016

JOIN OUR MAILING LIST PhotographersCollective.hc@gmail.com


Letter From The Editor

I

am very excited and proud to present our

photo projects authored and created by the

third bi-annual publication of The Issue.

Photographers Collective club. The I Exist I Resist

This publication is a showcase of the amazing

series is an initiative of Keka Marzagao, as a direct

creativity of the Hunter College community.

reaction to the current political climate. The series,

The amount of talent and passion for

Subway Therapy, documents the healing process

photography at this school never ceases to amaze

and the diverse ways New Yorkers are moving

me. It was a joy to work with the photographers,

forward.

designers and curators who contributed to this issue. As we were putting this issue together, a question The last publication, also an effort by my Co-editor

came to mind: how does the artist see the world

in chief, Sarah Leber, and myself, set a precedent,

in changing and uncertain times and how do you

in terms of the design, specs and standards that we

express what you feel through the lens of a camera?

aim to follow through from now on when designing

As you look through the images in the magazine,

new issues. The goal of our design has always been

you can recognize the thoughts and feelings of these

to showcase photography in the most effective

artists in their unique, creative visual voice. As part

way, using minimalism and a contemporary, clean

of the art community in NYC and here at Hunter

design aesthetic. Working with us on this issue, is our

College, we noticed that this semester’s photo

new Associate Editor and Art Consultant, Emilia

submissions were often a direct response to the post

Pesantes, who is brining in her vision and artistic

election psyche of New York City. The reaction

sense that works seamlessly with our team.

of the art community is important to consider at times like these because artists have the ability to

In this issue, we are proud to showcase, for the first

visually represent messages of resistance, change

time, professional photographers who are faculty at

and healing.

Hunter College, who serve as our creative mentors in our individual journeys in the visual arts. We are

Looking forward to seeing new submissions. Keep

very proud of this collaboration and going forward,

on taking great photos and enjoy the The Issue!

we would love to continue this collaboration between professional creative artists and aspiring student artists. For the first time, we are presenting two collaborative

Ilana Krugolets 7


PROFESSORS IN THE ARTS of Hunter College

Brian Wood - Professor of Photography Katie Murray - Professor of Photography Antonella Pelizzari - Professor of Art History Christina Freeman - Professor of Art

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Brian Wood

Swarm Ink and Photograph on Mylar 18 x 12 inches

Museum of Modern Art, New York

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Professors In The Arts

Katie Murray An exerpt from All The Queens Men by Katie Murray, 2013

“H

ow does photography embrace fiction to reveal the deep substance of emotion? Katie Murray answers this provocative question by creating a small community saga in Queens, New York, looking at men as they transition from boyhood into manhood. This is a world she knows and experiences in her daily life—an intimate setting

inhabited by men, scarred, bruised, covered with “tats,” but also surprisingly vulnerable, showing melancholia and uncertainty. This world, partly real and partly fictional, reveals conflict and tension, and Murray uncovers all these feelings in a documentary style that resembles storytelling.... ...Murray stages portraits emblematic of a human condition. Her images address universal ideas about masculine relationships, rites of passage, ritual, and mythology; in this regard, the work responds not only to Latin American magical realism but also to Joseph Campbell’s exploration of the human consciousness through the study of myths. Bound to a specific time

and place, All the Queens Men becomes timeless.

- Antonella Pelizzari

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Katie Murray

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Professors In The Arts

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Katie Murray

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Professors In The Arts

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Katie Murray

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Professors In The Arts

Christina Freeman

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Christina Freeman

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I EXIST I RESIST THE ISSUE FALL 2016


The Photographers Collective responds to the recent election and its implications for the future of our safety and civil rights. We refuse to normalize the hatred and discrimination that has risen to the surface of our culture with the recent political climate. Therefore, the members of the Hunter College community and beyond have been invited to exercise their advocacy by writing their own text and choosing how they want to be photographed for this project. As artists we have the responsibility to use our work to challenge the social order and to deeply engage in solidarity at times like this.

Directed by Keka Marzagao

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I EXIST I RESIST

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The Photographers Collective

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I EXIST I RESIST

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The Photographers Collective

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I EXIST I RESIST

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The Photographers Collective

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Shawn Tish

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Shawn Tish

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Noah Benus

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Noah Benus

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White Balance Idan Bitton

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My perception constructs my reality. My point of view, opinions and ideas are limited to my experiences and knowledge. Some overlap yours, but many do not. My vision is limited, I can see you only through my eyes. The same eyes that have seen all they've seen till this point. What you think is white, seems yellow to me. I won't point it out since I don't want to expose you're wrong, or because I am not entirely sure that I'm not.

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White Balance

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Idan Bitton

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White Balance

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Idan Bitton

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УПУЩЕНИЕ Danny Polonsky

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I started doing photography two years ago and I view it as a creative art process that allows me to record time and space as well as manipulating my ideas with moments that I capture. Упущение, Russian for “omission”, is an on-going series of collages is a part of my exploration of understanding the role of masculinity in contemporary society. I was interested in the relationship between two images and the contrast that they create in terms of the compositional aspect, but also using imagery that is relevant in decomposing the way men and masculinity are viewed in society. There is a presence of nurture with the way the images interact which was possible because of my process of finding balance between the images. The images are of young men that I have photographed or have taken from the internet, the secondary images are the photographs that are a part of my everyday exploration with photography. I see the male body as a fragile and intense being. In contemporary politics men are viewed in negative light. The use of the male body to project a positive image is my goal with this series. Упущение is a self exploration of my search of the way I perceive masculinity in myself as well as in other men.

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The Femininum

in

Photography ................. ...Today...

A photo series directed by Sarah Leber in collabortion with Katherine Ottaviani THE ISSUE FALL 2016


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Sarah Leber

...It only takes 1, 347 tries!

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The Femininum

... an

Excluisive behind the scenes Sneak

peak!

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Ladies Be Aware and Men Beware Ettie Rachleff

We just went through months of listening to male sexists of all ages including politicians, high powered businessmen and others as young as Harvard soccer team members demeaning women. I believe that the images that the tree projects, are sending us messages and, at the same time, empowering those who are open and ready to see above and beyond. Men and women alike will see in the tree images what is within their ability to perceive. Personally, among other things, I see a beautiful naked woman and a lion protecting her physically and giving women strength and power. As a mythical creature, the lion is a symbol of velour, energy and wisdom and also symbolizes strength, goodness and the spirit of change. 51


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See As I See Darren Rangel

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See As I See

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Darren Rangel

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Raimondo Graziano

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After Keïta Keka Marzagao These portraits of Ed, anthropologist and educator, were inspired by the work of Seydou Keïta, a Malian photographer whose work I’ve long admired. Keïta is well known for his black & white studio portraits of everyday people posed in front of traditional African fabrics.

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PATRICIA ABREGO Interview with the Artist CLAUDIA MALLEA: HOW WOULD YOU DESCRIBE YOUR PHOTOGRAPHY? PATRICIA ABREGO: I guess a bit documentary. I do try to be personal, I take them of people that are important to me and in places that are important to me, at least I tried to do that this last time and it seemed to come out more documentary than personal. CM: HOW DID YOU START TAKING PICTURES? PA: I started taking photos in high school, filmed in black and white. I was being sort of safe with them, and I was just taking pictures of friends. In college, I decided I would get more serious with it. My camera was the first thing I thought of packing when I went on my trip this year. CM: TELL ME A BIT ABOUT YOUR PHOTOS OF EL SALVADOR. WHAT EVENT WAS TAKING PLACE? WHAT DID YOU FIND BEAUTIFUL ABOUT THE SCENE? PA: The first week I was there, they were celebrating their culture. I don’t know specifically what the festival was but, I just remember there were parades every day. I go to El Salvador every year but, I never got the chance to see those parades and festivals. This time, I said I should just bring my camera and take pictures of everything, things you don’t usually expect to see. I was a bit afraid, because I’m usually warned not to bring my camera out. I never took photos like this before, I never get in people’s faces, or snuck my camera between two people. CM: CAN YOU DESCRIBE THE EXPERIENCE OF TAKING THESE PHOTOS? PA: It was just really about having a lot of confidence. Taking out a camera and pointing it at someone and snapping it and really not thinking twice about it. Less overthinking what I was trying to do.

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Silhouettes Emilia Pesantes

The interesting thing about a silhouette is that it is often categorized by its absence of detail. A silhouette is an outline, a mere form loosely defined by its attributes. It is a stamp and a shape that is missing specific features. It is the residue of something that once was. But just because it’s a transformation from what the eye is accustomed to doesn’t mean it isn’t valuable. By losing sight of one thing you gain sight of another. Would you ever pay attention to the wireframe otherwise? A silhouette is “missing” many qualities in service of emphasizing others. It illuminates the layout you often take for granted and offers a simpler narrative to the ever-so complicated world. A silhouette is easy on the eyes. Sometimes beauty needs to be seen in the lack of detail.

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Saffron Tori Mumtaz

Amena & Ayesha THE ISSUE FALL 2016


TORI MUMTAZ Interview with the Artist CLAUDIA MALLEA: TELL ME A LITTLE BIT ABOUT YOUR PROCESS AS A PHOTOGRAPHER. HOW DO YOU GET YOUR IDEAS? TORI MUMTAZ: It varies. Usually I do have a vision before I start, sometimes I don’t. My friend [Amina], who’s one of the two sisters I photographed, she’s basically my creative partner. When I’m doing photography that’s for myself, rather than for like a client, usually what we do is we moodboard. Often I’m inspired by things I see, so we send them to each other and kind of riff off of the vision that we have. Usually for projects that we do together we sort of help make each other’s vision come to life, so if I want a certain photo a certain way she’ll help me bring that to life, and vice versa. Almost all of my photos involve other people. So it’s either me discussing with my model or with my partner if I want her to take photos with me because a lot of my work is self portraiture, I’ll direct a shot and she’ll take it or vice versa. CM: HOW DID YOU START TAKING PICTURES? TM: I would say that I had several starts. When I was a little kid, someone bought me a Barbie film camera. That was the first camera that I ever owned and I took a lot of shitty pictures of a family trip that we Saffron took to the mountains in Pakistan. I think I was like seven. And I have all those prints still. Then I would say in high school, somebody sent me this link to a person who took a photo of himself every single day. Every day he would take a photo of himself or have somebody else take it. I kind of was inspired by that, but I didn’t do a photo every day. I just thought okay, every once in a while I’ll do a self portrait. In high school I did a lot of self portraits. Improvised tripods, things like that. I stole the family camera and colonized it as mine. I went away to school for two years and was sort of by myself. When I moved back to new York a year ago was when I really started. iPhone photography, that’s where that began, because the family camera broke. I would say that that’s when I started getting to where I am now. I can’t stress enough how much my partner was a big part of this, she and I started doing photography together. We started going and going and it grew to where it is now.

CM: YOUR IMAGES ALL MAKE USE OF HAIR, WHETHER IT’S YOUR OWN HAIR LACED THROUGH THE BRANCHES OF A TREE, OR THE SISTERS WITH THEIR HAIR BRAIDED TOGETHER. WHAT ITS SIGNIFICANCE IN YOUR PHOTOGRAPHY? TM: I shot those two series about a week apart. One was a Monday, the other was a Saturday. So the fall feeling was really what inspired me on both of them. Fall for me is really nostalgic, it’s full of melancholy. It’s the season you remember the most as a kid, when school’s starting, the holiday season, there’s a lot of nostalgia this time of year. In both of the images the heads tilted back was a motif I wanted to have, eyes closed, heads tilted back, really a reflective stance, also a dreamy stance. I wanted it to be about the nostalgia and the melancholy that comes with the season. And the hair- you hear about it a lot these days, hair is very political, it’s also very feminine. I say that with hesitation because I don’t want to be gender normative, but at the same time, as a woman, hair is something that’s very much a part of the way you present yourself, often. The hair twined together was very much about the sisterhood aspect, and the hair in the bush was about feeling in touch with this season. It’s about connectednesshair in the bush, hair tied together. And it’s all women, all women of color. CM: WHAT DO YOU WANT YOUR PHOTOGRAPHS TO EVOKE? TM: With these photos specifically, I very strongly want them to evoke the emotions I was feeling at the time. So with Saffron, that’s a very introspective piece of self portraits. At the time I was feeling very melancholic, I was feeling lonely, and I was feeling nostalgic, sort of remembering happier times past. Not that I was sad, but that melancholic feeling you get when you’re not sad about something but you’re still kind of just of like dreamy and wistful, that’s what I was feeling. With Amena & Ayesha I wanted them to be very dreamy, melancholic. Also, they’re both full of love. The love of the sisters, the love that I was feeling in my photos towards other people, towards other times... 69


Fatma Elgohary

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Monica Mei

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Usain Bolt, Twice Upon a Time in New York City by Andy Lipton

U

sain Bolt - the fastest man on earth. Fast as lightening. The world record holder for the fastest time ever run in the 100-meter dash. 9.58 seconds. Holder of the world record in the 200-meter dash as well, at 19.19. The 30-year-old Jamaican Bolt has won gold medals in the 100, the 200, and the 4x100 meter relay in three consecutive Olympic Games, the latest being the recent Games in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. This warm and embracing charismatic track and field superstar has raised the popularity of the sport of track and field since 2008, when he won his first three gold medals in the 2008 Olympics in Beijing. Bolt’s trademark lightening bolt pose, his smile, his friendly nature, his talking to the cameras before and after his events, his warm greeting of fans and constantly posing for selfies with his fans, combined with his speed on the track, have made him an international icon. The sport of track and field is truly international – not just in the Olympic years - as athletes from a myriad of countries compete all over the world against each other. Bolt’s international fame and ability has put him in the company of two other superstar athletes known world-wide, the soccer player Pele from Brazil, and the boxer Muhammad Ali, from the United States. You’ve heard the song “New York, New York”. And you’ve heard Sinatra sing this famous line many times, “If I can make it here, I’m gonna make it anywhere.”Well, Bolt is one guy that has made it everywhere. And although he did not have to prove he could make it in New York City, he did make it there. He was A number 1, top of the list, and king of the hill. In a 2008 Adidas Grand Prix Track and Field meet at Icahn Stadium on Randall’s Island in New York City, Bolt broke the then world record for the 100 in a time of 10.72, the first time he set a world record in the 100. Bolt has indicated he will retire from track and field after the World Championships in London in August 2017.It’s unlikely that New York City will get to see Bolt race in person again. The IAAF Diamond League’s annual series of international track meets is not scheduled to hold a meet in New York in 2017. The day before the meet, I watched and heard Bolt address the media. Later that day I was fortunate to watch Bolt practice on the track at Icahn Stadium. The following are some pictures I took of Bolt that day.

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My Neighborhood - Roosevelt Island

Chunghee Yun

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Brandon Lee

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Brandon Lee

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Memoirs of a Millenial Nobody Summer Merritt

Argonaut I Marcella Prieto

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y

Hayim Heron

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East Meets West Carlos Khalil Guzman There is something about bodies of water that always draws me to them, perhaps it is the fact that we are all born in water. A short collection of images taken on both coasts, the Pacific Ocean on the West and the Atlantic Ocean on the East.

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Bernhard Hetzenauer

Self Portraits


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Self Portraits

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Bernhard Hetzenauer

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Self Portraits

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Bernhard Hetzenauer

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Have You Ever Seen The Rain? Ilana Krugolets

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Ilana Krugolets

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A House Without A Roof Adam Golfer

A House Without a Roof (AHWAR) scrutinizes the histories of violence and displacement connecting Europe, Israel, and Palestine. With photographs, appropriated imagery, and texts, fictions of Golfer’s family history are woven together with representations from Israel’s founding and ongoing military occupation of the West Bank. Ethnic and national identities rupture as the project wrestles with contradictory histories and points of view. The narratives in the book are framed via relationships between three generations of men in Golfer’s family: his grandfather – a survivor of Dachau, his dad – who lived on a kibbutz in the early 1970s, and Golfer himself. Memory and time fold into one another as the mythologies of Golfer’s family become entangled with the ongoing narratives of violence and trauma in Israel and Palestine.

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Dachau (Red Tape)

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A House Without A Roof

David Ben Gurion’s Library (Tel Aviv)

Castle Steps (Pelci) THE ISSUE FALL 2016


Adam Golfer

Palestinian village of Nabi Saleh (Occupied West Bank). Site of weekly demonstrations protesting the seizure of a water spring by the Jewish settlement Halamish, directly across the road.

New Soldiers (Old City) 101


A House Without A Roof

Air-o-gram (Dad writes home)

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Adam Golfer

My dad in 1970. He moved to Haifa after high school to live on a kibbutz.

In Hebrew, the caption reads, “Haganah youth in Jerusalem on their way to protect Jewish property during the Arab Riots (1947)�

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A House Without A Roof

People You Might Know Anne Frank was always young. What? She was always young. She never got old. That’s sort of fucked up to say.

What do you mean? Well, she didn’t friend me, exactly. But she popped up in my

It’s true. What does that really mean, though? Well, she was killed. She died in Bergen-Belsen when she was 16. But is she still young?

And it was her?

diary, anyway.

So, that actually doesn’t make sense. If you die before you get old, you will always be young. __ If she was alive now do you think she’d use Facebook? From the attic? Probably. I would. I mean we all do now. Why wouldn’t she? She was cooped up in that room forever. She’d want a connection with the outside world. But she was hiding, that would’ve been suicide. That’s assuming that the Nazis were also using social media. Of course they would’ve used social media. Talk about control. Can you imagine people hashtagging Nazi shit? #HeilHitler

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feed. People You Might Know.

The profile picture was from the cover of her book. Well, her

No, she’s dead.

Again. Very fucked up.

I’m sure some skinhead psychos somewhere are using that now. But that’s not what I’m talking about. I’m talking about Nazis. Just saying, it would’ve been a quicker way to spread the word. You are a freak. Wanna know something weird? On Thursday, she friended me.

The one where she is smiling? Yeah, but that was before— Wait, so what did you do? I couldn’t believe it. I was standing outside the diner on 18th Street waiting for Daniel, playing with my phone. I was just killing time. And then it popped up. People You Might Know. Daniel walks up and I’m like, “You won’t believe what just happened.” He says, “What’s wrong?” and when I show him my phone he slaps his forehead.“Only you. This would only happen to you.” Then, he snatches the phone out of my hands and sends her a friend request. Wait. So now you’re friends with Anne Frank? That’s the crazy thing. It’s been 3 days and she still hasn’t showed up as a friend. And when I search for her profile, there is no entry.


Adam Golfer

People You Might Know

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A House Without A Roof

Mamilla Cemetery, a Muslim burial site dating to the 7th Century Rashidun Caliphate is being dug up for construction of the Simon Wiesenthal Center’s “Center for Human Dignity — Museum of Tolerance.” Construction of the museum faced fierce political opposition from both Palestinian and Israeli groups, but after numerous legal delays between 2011–2014, the project continues as planned.

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Adam Golfer

Boy feeding horse in abandoned house in Wadi Salib (Haifa)

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Fiona Alexia

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Fiona Alexia

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Julie Lemberger

J

ody

Sperling

is

the

founder

and

and white, misstating that it is a photo of

choreographer of Time Lapse Dance.

Fuller herself, and the photo taken by Fredrick

Her dances are highly influenced by

Glasier in 1902! What happened was someone

images, writings and films of Loie Fuller,

had swiped the image, that was available in

a dance innovator who performed in the

high resolution via Sperling’s website, they

early vaudeville scene in the 1900’s. Fuller

then changed it to look old, black & white, and

innovated the use of effects of lighting and

then put it on a site on Etsy and sold the image

large swaths of fabric that move through

as if it was a vintage picture, now digitized for

space and to create amorphous shapes that

consumption and use. At some point I found

bring to mind waves, flowers, butterflies,

out about it, by googling “Loie Fuller”, and I

etc. This picture was created, May 7, 2003 in

followed it to a site in the Ukraine. I demanded

Williamsburg, Brooklyn at WAX, a space for

a cease and desist, and they complied. The

new and aspiring performing artists. This

photo was taken off their web site, however

was a dress rehearsal or a dance for the

now, more than 3 years later, it still shows up

camera that is not to say she posed and did

as the “real” Loie Fuller. By now, the image

things to suit my vision, rather, my lens was

is having a second life, as a black & white. I

there in service of the dance. My job was to

can see and enjoy the form of the flower. It

capture the dance as I see it, and this is how

takes away from the expression of the dancer,

I saw it. However, originally, I photographed

and now what is left is just the form. So if

this in color film, with reds, and yellows

you see this image on the internet, you will

intermingling, but I show it here in black

know that it is a Julie Lemberger photograph,

and white. This photo had a life in color, it

and though it is 13 years old now, it is not yet

appeared in The New York Times and many

considered vintage, but maybe it will be in its

other journals and web sites. Now, when I

own right someday.

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T

he

Erick

Company

Hawkins in

a

Dance

collaborative

work by Hawkins, from notes

found after his death and composer, Lucia

Plugoszewski

in

“Radical

Ardent” a part of the 92Y Harkness Dance Festival at Playhouse 91 in New York City. I photographed the dress rehearsal, March 23, 1999, the day before the opening night, that day Ms. Plugoszewski passed away suddenly, therefore she never saw opening night performance, but she was there in spirit. A note about Erick Hawkins and his choreographic aesthetic, Mr. Hawkins previous to forming his own company was a principal dancer and one-time husband to Martha Graham, he originated many roles in Graham’s repertory. It is clear that his work was an outgrowth of her work.

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Julie Lemberger

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Subway Therapy Presented by The Photographers Collective

Contributing Photographers: Emilia Pesantes, Ilana Krugolets, Sarah Leber On November 7th 2016, Donald Trump became the presidentelect of the Untied States of America. Trump’s negative and hateful language during his campaign created an outpouring of concern from New Yorkers as well as people all over the world. Subway Therapy was a project created by Matthew Chavez where people could voice their anxiety, fear, and frustrations, which ultimately manifested in nearly 50,000 post it notes being put on the subway walls displaying messages of hope, love, courage, inclusion and unity. The post it's are not only memorialzied through photographic doucmentation, they are also being perserved at the New York Historical Society and will be recognized as public art as well as histroical artifcats.

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How To Submit

SUBMISSIONS ARE ACCEPTED AT ALL TIMES THROUGHOUT THE YEAR We encourage everyone to submit for consideration to be published Email: PhotographersCollective.HC@gmail.com Subject: Submission + your name Format of photos: TIFF or JPEG files Include captions and any written work associated with the content (if any) If you’d like help scanning photos or making the files TIFF format, don’t hesitate to email to meet with us!

THE ISSUE FALL 2016


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THE ISSUE FALL 2016

Profile for Hunter College Photographers Collective

The Issue Fall 2016  

Hunter College Photography Magazine

The Issue Fall 2016  

Hunter College Photography Magazine

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