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THE ISSUE SPRING 2016


THE ISSUE SPRING 2016

EDITORS IN CHIEF Ilana Krugolets Sarah Leber ART DIRECTOR Sarah Leber DESIGNER Ilana Krugolets ART CONSULTANTS Keka Marzagao Mozna Mussa 3


Table of Contents

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ABOUT THE COLLECTIVE

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LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

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FEATURED EVENTS

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ETTIE RACHLEFF, PROJECT TREE SPIRITS

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VICTORIA HIGUERA

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INDIANA KUFFER

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SHAWN TISH, TRAVELING EXHIBITIONS OF LIGHT

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CARLOS KHALIL GUZMAN, AMERICAN MUSLIMS

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GABRIELLA VOLL

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SOPHRONIA MA

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HECTOR RENE, COMBAT CAM

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ANITA BARTSCH, RECENT INVESTIGATIONS

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DONAVON SMALLWOOD, INTERVIEW WITH THE ARTIST

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YUNYUN ZOU, CHINATOWN CITY SYMPHONY

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KEKA MARZAGAO, MY NEIGHBORHOOD

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MARINE GABRIELLE BRUN-FRANZETTI, RECIPES OF CULINARY TRAGEDIES

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DARREN RANGEL

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SARAH LEBER, A NEW LANDSCAPE

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NÉSTOR PÉREZ MOLLIÉRE, DOORWAY SERIES

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JULIE LEMBERGER

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MOZNA MUSSA

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ILANA KRUGOLETS, SNOW IN CONEY

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CLAIRE LAWTON, BURN AND DODGE

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YUN JI MOON

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PEPE MOLINA

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BAILEY ABERCROMBIE, SEARCHING FOR YOKO

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FIONA ALEXIA, CANVAS TO CAMERA

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NOAH BENUS

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MAURICIO VALLEJO

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HOW TO SUBMIT

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About The Collective

The Photographers Collective, founded in 2014, seeks to encourage the growth of emerging

PRESIDENT Ilana Krugolets

photographers, artists, and thinkers at Hunter College. We aim to supplement Hunter College’s photography curriculum through technical workshops, artist talks, a biannual publication, group shows, and critical conversation about photography.

VICE PRESIDENT Mozna Mussa TREASURER Roza Shamailova

Simultaneously, we offer a platform from which to cultivate community, learning, and creativity

SECRETARY

among students. We encourage our members to

Chelsea Vazquez

collaborate and exchange ideas, offer feedback about each other’s work, and focus their ability to use the camera to engage with their surroundings. With the permission of the Art Department, the Photographers Collective has been fortunate enough to utilize the wall space along the 11th floor of

TO FIND OUT MORE VISIT PhotographersCollectiveofHunterCollege.com JOIN OUR FACEBOOK GROUP facebook.com/groups/PhotographersCollective.hc

Hunter North to showcase the photography of the

FOLLOW US ON INSTAGRAM

students of Hunter College.

@HunterPhotographersCollective

The Photographers Collective is an organization funded by Hunter College but run entirely by students. THE ISSUE SPRING 2016

JOIN OUR MAILING LIST PhotographersCollective.hc@gmail.com


Letter From The Editor

I

am very excited and proud to present our

we both have our spikes of creativity. We would

second bi-annual publication of The Issue.

deliberate and work selflessly and tirelessly to make

This publication is a showcase of the amazing

this publication our best yet. I think that great

creativity of the Hunter College community.

communication and trust in each other’s vision was

Since the last publication, our magazine has

the key ingredient of this issue, as well as Sarah’s

tripled in page count and submissions. I love

background in art and my background in design.

having this network of photographers who share the same passion. Getting their work showcased and recognized at Hunter is such an important part of growing as photographers on campus.

Along with being a creative endeavor, this was a wonderful professional experience because of the many technical decisions that went into it. We increased the dimensions of the publication after

For this publication, I wanted to show the diversity

much discussion with the purpose of showcasing

of visions and points of view of our photographers.

both, landscape and portrait oriented photos,

The publication is artist driven. I wanted to immerse

more effectively. My goal was to develop a creative

the viewer into the world of each individual artist,

platform in which the design would be a seamless

their ideas, their outlook. When you flip through the

and unifying element without interfering with the

pages, you will be exposed to many different styles

individual creative content of the photographers.

and approaches to the art of photography.

We are excited about the next publication and hope

It’s been such a pleasure designing this magazine

we can get more people eager to send in their work

and really getting to know the work of our talented

for consideration to be featured in The Issue.

photographers. My favorite part was analyzing the photos and trying to figure out the best way to showcase the images. This issue, like the last, was a collaborative effort

We look forward to new submissions. Keep on taking great photos! Enjoy the The Issue!

between myself and my co-editor in chief, Sarah Leber, who is as passionate about this project as I am. She’s always reliable, always there to troubleshoot at a moment’s notice, even at 3 in the morning, when

Ilana Krugolets 7


Featured Events A Talk With Michael Donavon The Photographers Collective hosts an open discussion with Michael Donovan

The Photographers Collective hosted a talk with Michael Donovan on Friday, December 4th of 2015 at Hunter College. Michael Donovan is a visual artist who works in photography, video, and digital art, shooting for Cosmopolitan, Elle, Glamour, Vogue and Givenchy, just to name a few. He spoke on the subject of being a professional photographer and artist of today, and how social media plays an integral role. Donovan stated that being part of your art community, networking, visiting galleries and making friends will ultimately enhance your career as a Photo by Michael Donovan THE ISSUE SPRING 2016

photographer.


Sally Stein “Pretty in Pink”or “Pretty Poison”? Modern Color Photography’s Market Sources and environmental consequences

Right: Montage by Sally Stein of GAP advertisement and view of a river in China

The Photographers Collective was honored to host a lecture conducted by Sally Stein on Wednesday, April 13th of 2016 at Hunter College. Sally Stein is a renowned photography historian who spoke about the historic rise of color photography. In the lecture she explained how the technology of color photography was closely linked to commercial demands. This new technology also allowed artists to find new expressions for their photography. The sudden ubiquitous use of color dyes ultimately proved to be toxic for the environment. Photo by Keka Marzagao 9


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PROJECT TREE SPIRITS A photo series by Ettie Rachleff This project is about Crepe Myrtle trees that live on an ordinary street in New Orleans, Louisiana. In hot humid weather, bacteria and fungi may cause excessive cell division which manifests itself in a multitude of shapes, forms, colors and textures. As a visually challenged photographer, I have always been attracted to irregularities. Upon printing and enlarging the tree trunk irregularities morph into “tree spirits”. Societies, both past and present, hold trees to be sacred beginning with the trees of Knowledge and Life in the Garden of Eden. Artists, poets, writers and philosophers agree that spiritual connections exist among all living things. The challenge is to open our minds to all possibilities. Despite its old age and “disease”, the Myrtle tree continues to produce magnificent blooms every summer. Like all living things, we humans also, in spite of bacteria, virus, physical or emotional hardships, strive to renew ourselves daily. Do trees intentionally express themselves in this manner to subtly attract our attention? Just what is the story of these trees? What you will see is limited only by your imagination. ___________________ “Don’t believe what your eyes are telling you. All they show is limitation. Look with your understanding, find out what you already know, and you’ll see the way to fly.” -Richard Bach (b. 1936)

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Project Tree Spirits

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Ettie Rachleff

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Victoria Higuera

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Victoria Higuera

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Indiana Kuffer

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Indiana Kuffer

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Traveling Exhibitions of Light A photo series by Shawn Tish

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Frequencies on First / The Anomaly 23


Traveling Exhibitions of Light

Torches in Tunnels I

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Shawn Tish

Torches in Tunnels II

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American Muslims A photo series by Carlos Khalil Guzman

“The aim of this series is to document the diversity of the Muslim community in the United States and to bring to light the beauty and truthfulness of Islam while countering the spread of Islamophobia and racism/ discrimination against Muslims in the states.�

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Muslims In America

RONYA – PRE MED STUDENT – CHICAGO “And strive for Allah with the striving due to Him” -Qur’an Chapter 22 / Verse 78 When the term Jihad is mentioned in conversation or in any other situation, people especially in the west automatically misunderstand it as fighting in a war or going to war (which is another topic of discussion and which term needs its own clarification.) But Islamically, there is so much more to the meaning of Jihad. Jihad means to strive; strive in every way possible to become a better person. This ayah from the Qur’an personally speaks to me because it helps me understand that Islam is a way of life. Islam is not only completing my mandatory prayers and fasts, but it is striving to perfect my character, control my anger, donate and help the needy without worrying as to whether or not my own sustenance will decrease, respect my parents, finish my education regardless of how difficult the content might be, etc. This is the bigger picture of Jihad. This is the meaning of Jihad. - Ronya

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SAYARA – GRAPHIC DESIGNER – NEW YORK “And make yourself submissively gentle to them with compassion, and say: O my lord! Have compassion on them, as they brought me up (when I was) little” -Qur’an Chapter 17 / Verse 24 We never really realize the struggles our parents went through to raise us, not until we have taken on the same responsibilities. On the days we get angry with them or annoyed by them, we must always remember to be thankful for having them and with that, smile, forget the petty arguments and love them. If there is anything in the world I could ask for, it would be that my parents find the happiness they have made sure I have grown up with, that Allah (Subhanahu Wa Ta’ala) forgive them for anything they could have done wrong and keep them in Allah’s presence. My parents’ happiness is my world. - Sayara


Carlos Khalil Guzman

ABER – COMMUNITY ORGANIZER – NEW YORK “There lies within the body a piece of flesh. If it is sound, the whole body is sound; and if it is corrupted, the whole body is corrupted. Verily this piece is the heart” -Prophet Muhammad (Peace be upon him) This is my favorite hadith because whenever I am feeling down, confused, or out of balance I remember the first thing that I have to do is check into my heart. I love that in Islam the heart and the soul are part of our essence and have an integral role in helping us to navigate our lives. This is a concept of spirituality that I feel is missing in

SHIFAT – SOFTWARE ENGINEER – NEW YORK “Surely (as for) those who love that scandal should circulate respecting those who believe, they shall have a grievous chastisement in his world and the hereafter; and Allah knows, while you do not know” Qur’an Chapter 24 / Verse 19 Allah (Subhanahu Wa Ta’ala) teaches us to never be okay with spreading rumors or slander anyone under any circumstances. The reputation and character of the believers is so important to Allah (Subhanahu Wa Ta’ala) that creating a positive and supportive community is a must within Islam. - Shifat

a society where we are not taught to be introspective and people are constantly busy distracting and numbing themselves with external things because we are not taught to find peace within our internal selves. I believe that when we learn to look inside that will help us manage a healthy mental, physical, and spiritual self. - Aber

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Muslims in America

VALERIA – PRODUCT MARKETER – NEW YORK “Do not disregard the words of Allah, and do not seek guidance from other than Him, for then (surely) you will go astray” - Imam Ali ibn Musa al-Ridha Whenever I am going through a difficult time in my life or I have something to thank Allah (Subhanahu Wa Ta’ala) for. I pray to Allah (Subhanahu Wa Ta’ala) and ask for guidance and it is from Allah (Subhanahu Wa Ta’ala) that I get the most rewarding answer. Allah (Subhanahu Wa Ta’ala) might not speak to me with words per se but I understand and see the signs of Allah’s wisdom all around me. Never has Allah (Subhanahu Wa Ta’ala) let me alone. - Valeria

ANWAR – SPECIAL ED SCIENCE TEACHER – CHICAGO “Do not regard any good deed as insignificant, even meeting your brother with a cheerful face” - Prophet Muhammad (Peace be upon him) This beautiful hadith shows the importance and significance of every individual and every action. Whether we think we have made an impact or not; and whether we are leaders in our communities or students going to college and doing our duties. This hadith shows that every person is important and every little thing that we do and say is significant. Something as simple as smiling towards others and picking up trash, or as big as donating money to sponsor orphans or building wells, nothing goes unnoticed to Allah (Subhanahu Wa Ta’ala) the All-Knowing. The Prophet Muhammad (Peace be upon him) said that we do not need to only aspire for big things and think “oh well, I can’t do much so I am not going to do anything at all” Instead he taught us that even the smallest actions can have the highest values. - Anwar

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Carlos Khalil Guzman

ABDULLAH – YOUTH DIRECTOR – CHICAGO

IMANIE – PSYCHOLOGY STUDENT – CHICAGO

“Let him who believes in Allah and the Last Day speak good, or keep silent; and let him who believes in Allah and the Last Day be generous to his neighbor; and let him who believes in Allah and the Last Day be generous to his guest” -Prophet Muhammad (Peace be upon him)

“Allah the Almighty said: I am as my servant thinks of Me. I am with him when he mentions Me. If he mentions Me to himself, I mention him to Myself; and if he mentions Me in an assembly, I mention him in an assembly greater than it. If he draws near to Me a hand’s length, I draw near to him an arm’s length. If he comes to Me walking. I come to him running” -Prophet Muhammad (Peace be upon him)

This hadith teaches us that if we believe in Allah (Subhanahu Wa Ta’ala) and the Day of Judgment, then we must learn to control our speech and be generous and kind to our neighbors. Through this hadith, the Prophet Muhammad (Peace be upon him) is telling us that to be a true believer, we must not only speak the truth and refrain from speaking bad or ill about others but also be kind to our neighbors and guests. It is important to take this as a foundation of our belief; and it is just as important for us to allow our beliefs to manifest in our actions. Imagine all Muslims adhere to this, and speak truth and good about others and are kind to all of their neighbors despite the behavior they might receive from them. This will help negate any bad impressions people might have about Muslims based on what they hear and read in mainstream media. This hadith provides the tools we need to bring about social change and improve people’s characters in Muslims and non-Muslims alike; creating

Life is tough; indeed that is the nature of dunya (life on earth). I welcome problems left and right because I know Allah (Subhanahu Wa Ta’ala) is near, because that is how near I allow Allah to be; how close I need God to be. I stop, close my eyes and make God’s presence felt in my heart, mind and soul. It is the only way to get through this life, knowing that the One who brought us to this trial has already found a way out for us. Knowing the creator of our hearts has created for it its cure as well. When I make Allah (Subhanahu Wa Ta’ala) the closest thing to me, Allah’s mercy, pleasure, protection, blessings and help are also near. Alone we can never do it but with Allah (Subhanahu Wa Ta’ala) we can get through it all. I promise. Wait! scratch that, I am flawed remember? Allah (Subhanahu Wa Ta’ala) promises. - Imanie

a society where every American including American Muslims not only coexist but work together as a community. - Abdullah 31


Gabriela Voll

3 Lives

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Surprise

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Comfort

Sophronia Ma

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Combat Cam A photo series by Hector Rene

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Combat Cam

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Hector Rene

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Combat Cam

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Hector Rene

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Recent Investigations A photo series by Anita Bartsch

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Recent Investigations

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Anita Bartsch

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DONAVON SMALLWOOD

Interview with the Artist ILANA KRUGOLETS: WHAT FIRST DREW YOU INTO PHOTOGRAPHY? DONAVON SMALLWOOD: I became interested in photography super young, maybe when I was around 8 years old, because of Nat Geo magazines. I was previously obsessed with anthropology and archeology and then that slowly turned into an interest of the documentation aspect of these fields. I didn’t start actually taking pictures until I was gifted a little film camera when I was 13. IK: WAS THERE A DEFINING MOMENT THAT MADE YOU REALIZE YOU WANTED TO PURSUE THIS PROFESSIONALLY?

DS: I wouldn’t say there was an actual defining moment, it was just something I had fun doing and when it came time to decide what I wanted to actually pursue I couldn’t think of anything I’d rather do for a living. I knew it would be extremely tough but I have to go for it. IK: WHAT DO YOU WANT YOUR VIEWERS TO TAKE AWAY FROM YOUR WORK? DS: I’m still figuring that out; It’s hard to say, I don’t know what people get from my photos or anything I make. I just like trying to create a capital “G” great image at a given time, or capture a moment (selfishly most of the time). If someone has a positive response to that then I think I must be doing something right! haha.

model is established through clothes and I’ve enjoyed trying to create images and at the same time creating an identity. I wouldn’t call myself a fashion photographer though, it’s just a genre I’m exploring right now. IK: WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE ASPECT OF PHOTOGRAPHY? DS: My favorite aspect of photography is being able to capture a moment in time, for a very long time. The fact that I can see an image of my great grandmother as a baby is still mind blowing to me. There’s so much you can take from a photo it’s just amazing and very easy to romanticize forever.

IK: WHY FASHION PHOTOGRAPHY?

IK: ARE YOU INSPIRED BY ANY PHOTOGRAPHERS?

DS: Fashion and how people present or identify themselves, whether it be within a subculture out outside of one, is interesting to me so combining that with photography felt obvious. Fashion photography is interesting in that, for the most part, the identity of the

DS: I’m definitely inspired by other photographers! Most of my inspiration comes from either photographers, filmmakers, or women. There are way too many I could name so I’ll just list one for each category: Glen Luchford, Chantal Akerman, and Erykah Badu. 47


IK: DOES YOUR PHOTOGRAPHY HAVE A THEME? DS: I don’t think my photography has a theme at this point. I’ve had a few people tell me my images bring to mind a sort of abstract yearning but I could never really pinpoint that. Maybe I’ll figure it out eventually. IK: HOW IMPORTANT IS IT FOR YOU TO “CONNECT” WITH YOUR SUBJECTS TO BRING OUT THEIR TRUE SELF? DS: For portrait photography I think it’s super important to try to establish some sort of commonality and connection between the self and subject or else the photos will suffer and it won’t be fun to shoot. It’s weird to not have people comfortable or being reasonably open during a shoot so it’s best to establish that before hand however you can. IK: DO YOU HAVE A FUNNY STORY ABOUT A SHOOT YOU WERE ON? DS: A few years ago when I was first trying to get into fashion photography, I booked a model from an agency. When I went to the shoot location to meet her, it was a totally different model! She didn’t speak English. I think she was Russian. It was actually hilarious and fun even though we both didn’t know what we were saying, body language and hand gestures had to lead the whole thing. IK: WHICH CAMERA DO YOU REACH FOR FIRST? DS: Depends on what I’m shooting, but most of the time I go for my little 35mm point and shoot camera, an Olympus Stylus Epic. IK: WHAT ADVICE WOULD YOU GIVE SOMEONE STARTING OUT IN PHOTOGRAPHY? DS: I would say go to art book stores, look online, find photographers, filmmakers, artists, and whoever else you love, watch their interviews and talks. Figure out what’s a great, iconic photograph or style to you and try to re-create or copy that. You’ll find your own style through that; set the bar really high and specific. When you develop your taste and style, you’ll know what’s great and more importantly you’ll know when you create something great… though it may take a while. I believe in that whole 10,000 hours to mastery theory and I don’t think I’m there yet, but soon. THE ISSUE SPRING 2016


Donavon Smallwood

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Chinatown City Symphony Yunyun Zou

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My Neighborhood A photo series by Keka Marzagao

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My Neighborhood

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Keka Marzagao

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Recipes of Culinary Tragedies A photo series by Marine Gabrielle Brun-Franzetti

“Recipes of Culinary Tragedies reflects environmental concerns portrayed in the following collection of photographs. Each image represents the tragedy of climate changes and environmental decline while simultaneously playing with metaphor and humor. The artist approaches a difficult subject with a light heart, using the plate as her canvas.�

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ingredients for plastic soup recipe 2 117 931 cigarettes and cigarettes filters · 1 140 222 food wrappers and containers · 1 065 171 beverages plastic bottles · 1 019 902 plastic bags · 958 893 caps · 692 767 cups, plates, forks, knives and spoons · 611 048 straws and stirrers · 521 730 beverages glass bottles

ingredients for flatulences’ cows recipe 3 L of water · 10 cows with 8 colons part · 10 hectares of land · 350 gr of antibiotics · 20 gr of salmonella · 59 gr of salt · 12 cans of hormones · 62 gr of flatulence

recipe for hole ozone broil slowly cholorofluorocarbons gases spoon in industries whisk environmental precautions blacken machines carcasses flambé gases rates roast skins on the beaches shake consumers habits shallow fry political interests

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Recipes of Culinary Tragedies

recipe for deforestation choose a fertile terrain divide up locals and CEOs cut the root’s growth chop up trunks and leaves carve some animals let everything brown for several months gut C02 out of the atmosphere ladle up companies’ fireplaces THE ISSUE SPRING 2016


Marine Brun Franzetti

ingredients for oil slick 23 tons of plutonium · 7.3 tons of uranium · 5.4 tons of xenon · 120 000 teaspoons of lanthanum · 35 000 000 onces of ziconium · 3.7 tons of neodynium · 3.3 tons of molybdenum · 2.7 tons of cerium · 25 000 pinces of ruthenium · 14 000 tablespoons of barium · 12 000 000 teaspoons of lanthanum · 23 tons of plutonium · 160 000 pinches of dead fishes 59


Recipes of Culinary Tragedies

ingredients for GMO recipe 1 vegetable cell 1 gene from DNA 1 plasmid ¡ 1 E. Coli bacteria 1 antibiotic ¡ 1 corn plant 1 A. tumefaciens bacteria 1 big corn which stays intact one month in the fridge THE ISSUE SPRING 2016


Marine Brun Franzetti

recipe for ices melting create capitalism mix in selfish policies cook earth on low heat melt glaciers simmer white bears and sea animals sponge scientist’s foreheads dish out consequences serve with vanilla ice cream 61


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Darren Rangel

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Darren Rangel

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A New Landscape A photo series by Sarah Leber

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Doorway Series Néstor Daniel Pérez-Molière

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Julie Lemberger


Mozna Mussa

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Mozna Mussa

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Snow in Coney A photo series by Ilana Krugolets

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Snow In Coney

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Ilana Krugolets

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Snow In Coney

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Ilana Krugolets

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n

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Dodge

A FIELD GUIDE TO PHOTO MANIPULATION Claire Lawton

I

n May of 1920, hundreds of soldiers gathered in Sverdlov Square in Moscow. They’d been called by the new leaders of the Soviet Union -- members of the Bolshevik party that had overthrown the Tsar and seized power to create the first communist country in the world. The soldiers were on their way to the front lines of war in Poland. But before shipping off, they assembled for a rally given by Vladimir Lenin and his comrade, Leon Trotsky. As Lenin addressed the crowd from a makeshift podium, an iconic photograph was made, and as the shutter opened and closed, photo paper was exposed to forever encapsulate what would become a historic moment. Only today, Trotsky is missing in the frame.  As power changed hands in modern-day Russia, history was reshaped through documentation -- namely photography. And anyone who fell out of favor with the heads of state suffered a unique punishment that dates back to the age of the Roman Empire: Damnatio memoriae, or elimination from history.  Trotsky’s story isn’t rare, nor is the practice of photo manipulation. For over a century, photographs have been altered to tell versions of history and to create or destroy moments in time, but the practice has also given rise to its own angle in a longstanding artform. What’s now accepted as simply “Photoshopping” an image has become mainstream -- and while controversial in mass media and in the art world, the practice has been around for much longer than the computer program’s verb form.

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...

To edit a photo during Trotsky’s time, an artist used a combination of charcoal sticks, kneaded erasers, gouache paint and an airbrush to eliminate or alter the foreground or background. The same tools were used to erase estranged allies of Adolf Hitler, to place General Ulysses S. Grant in a better position on the Civil War battleground, and to make a stronger image for a campaign poster for Canadian Prime Minister William Lyon MacKensie King (who had King George VI painted out so the photograph only featured himself and the mother of Queen Elizabeth II).

Early Photoshop Tools

Decades later, as photography has become an increasingly digital, and more accessible artform, the practice of altering images has become easier and more ubiquitous with the help of computer programs, including Microsoft Paint, Photoshop and countless web applications.

...

Today, any professional or amateur photographer – and really, anyone with a smart phone – can change the lighting, filter, perspective, and much more of a photograph with a few simple taps. This has created a widespread conversation about ethics in the news media and documentary world, where anyone can capture newsworthy images, and a photograph is often assumed to tell the truth. But countless images published in mainstream media outlets tell a different story. In February of 1982, the cover of National Geographic featured Egypt’s great pyramids, which were moved closer together with the help of a scalpel and a sharp eye to better fit the magazine’s horizontal format. The Associated Press has fired and condemned photojournalists for editing photos to create more compelling imagery. Within the past few years, countless celebrities have fired back at publications including Vogue, GQ and ESPN Magazine (to name a few) for modifying their appearances to suit modern-day beauty standards. Some news organizations have since created standards and codes, while others argue that photo manipulation is part of the process and that the burden of ethics falls instead on the audience, who should have a realistic


“anyone who fell

out of favor with the heads of state suffered a unique punishment that dates back to the age of the Roman Empire: Damnatio memoriae, or elimination from history.

TOP: Vladimir Lenin giving a speech to the troops on May 5, 1920 with Leon Trotsky in foreground. BOTTOM: Edited photograph with Trotsky removed.

expectation when applying what they see in print or on a screen to everyday life.

...

Photo manipulation may carry a journalistic stigma, but it enjoys a more celebrated view in the art world. For as many years as people have made photographs, they’ve also had the tools of the darkroom. In 2012, the Metropolitan Museum of Art housed an exhibition titled Faking It: Manipulated Photography Before Photoshop. The collection was a visual timeline – composite photographs enhanced with oil paints during 1840s and 50s, soft-focus photographs of the Pictorialism movement during the 1880s, trick photographs developed in the early 20th century, and the surreal photographs of the 1920s. Throughout history, artists have pushed the boundaries of what photography means and what the artist can do after the shutter goes off. Gustave Le Gray, Fritz Henle, Jerry Uelsmann, Henri Cartier-Bresson, Robert Frank and Ansel Adams, to name a few, have used

the analog darkroom in innovative ways to create and share their own visions of the world. But as artistic limits have been tested in photography, others have been determined to draw stronger definitions around the artform, arguing instead for the importance of unedited photography and a stronger connection to photography’s roots as a means of straight documentary. Nothing has tested the purist argument more than the than the digital darkroom. Microsoft Paint (yes, really), xRes, Live Picture, Quark XPosur and the dominant Photoshop have both made it easier for those with access to a camera to create their own images, but also edit, and re-edit those images to enhance their own visions of the world. These tools have also made it more difficult to tell whether a photo has been edited and have created a larger discussion of the definition, role and identity of photography in contemporary culture For more than 100 years, the push and pull has continued and it will likely carry on, whether images are created in the dark or on a screen.

...

Photoshop was released to the public nearly 70 years after Leon Trotsky stood on the makeshift podium with Vladimir Lenin. Since, the program has found its way onto millions of computers and its trademark has worked its way into the modern lexicon. Photo manipulation is no longer just for the fine artist with access to a darkroom – it’s for everyone with access to a computer. Created by Michigan brothers John and Thomas Knoll, Photoshop was the result of a vision to create an easier way to process images. It’s the digital darkroom behind a glass screen that, while creating a larger conversation about documentation, ethics and art, has also revolutionized modern photography. It’s been over a hundred years since the first photographs were taken, and it’s been nearly 30 since the Knolls developed their software. The pair sold their idea to Adobe Systems in 1989, and the rest is history. That is, of course, if you trust what you read.

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Yun Ji Moon

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Pepe Molina Pepe Molina is a photographer, creative director, graphic designer, and musician from Yucatan state, currently based in Mexico City. His work is driven by his own anthropological curiosity and is influenced by a variety of collaborations with multidisciplinary artists. Molina’s career has included personal and commercial projects in design, motion production and advertising. But for the past decade, he has focused his efforts on his photography – a medium that has produced a body of work reflective of his passions, technical skills, and a mission to capture the essence of life in ethnic communities around the world.

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Pepe Molina

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Pepe Molina

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Pepe Molina

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Pepe Molina

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Searching For Yoko a photo series by Bailey Abercrombie

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Camera to Canvas a series by Fiona Alexia

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Noah Benus

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THE ISSUE SPRING 2016


Noah Benus

111


Mauricio Vallejo

THE ISSUE SPRING 2016


113


THE ISSUE SPRING 2016

Views II - Great place to take a girl on a date.

Views I - Happiness is expensive.


“Hell’s Gate” - Good friends go through hell with you.

“59th” - Getting down’s the hard part.

Mauricio Vallejo

115


THE ISSUE SPRING 2016

“Modern Slaves”

Mauricio Vallejo


117


How To Submit

SUBMISSIONS ARE ACCEPTED AT ALL TIMES THROUGHOUT THE YEAR We encourage everyone to submit for consideration to be published Email: PhotographersCollective.HC@gmail.com Subject: Submission + your name Format of photos: TIFF files Include captions and any written work associated with the content (if any) If you’d like help scanning photos or making the files TIFF format, don’t hesitate to email to meet with us!

THE ISSUE SPRING 2016


Profile for Hunter College Photographers Collective

The Issue Spring 2016  

The Issue Spring 2016  

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