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Spring Home

&Garden Volume 9 No. 32

RECIPES INSIDE!

Friday, May 18, 2018

Leisureland rewarded for perseverance By Becky Zimmer Journal editor

The Saskatchewan Regional Parks Board saw something in the LeRoy Leisureland Regional Park. That is why they have been awarded the 2018 Park on the Move award during the board’s annual convention on April 13. Leisureland general manager, Kevin Harcourt, says it has been a challenging past three years but the support from their board and the community has made all the difference since starting in the position in the spring of 2015. “We went through some tough times and when we took over it was very precarious in terms of financial, moral, and everything.” No one was to blame for this position, says Harcourt, it was bad circumstances but with a new board united everyone; the community, the board, the staff, the customers, the sponsors,

everybody, needed to start pulling in the right direction. With a new board, new staff, and a renewed enthusiasm, Harcourt says the only place to go was up. “It took a lot of work and a lot of public relations by everybody and it become quite successful.” This award is a stamp of approval for all the work they have done, says Harcourt. It makes the community very proud of that, he says, but it took community support to get this point as well. “It takes the community support of all the surrounding communities, all the municipalities and towns around that support us. You can do the best job possible but unless you have support, the hard and cold facts are you need the people.” Harcourt has a lot to look forward to this summer with new additions and events coming to the park.

The LeRoy Leisureland was recognized during the Regional Parks of Saskatchewan conference on April 13, earning the Park on the Move award after vast improvements to the financial and physical state of the park over the past three years. Pictured (L to R): John Cales, chairman of the LeRoy Leisureland Board, Kevin Harcourt, LeRoy Leisureland Park general manager and Leona Wakelam, representative for the Saskatchewan Regional Parks Board. photo courtesy of Kevin Harcourt

Ag

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Emergency Preparedness Week is about being ready By Becky Zimmer Editor

E m e r g e n c y Preparedness Week was proclaimed across the country from May 6 to 12. The average household should be able to sustain themselves for 72 hours during any kind of emergency, from fire and flood to train derailment, says Phil Wilson, Humboldt’s Deputy Emergency Measures Coordinator. Emergency services are extremely taxed during an emergency so ensuring your family can survive on their own means services can be directed to people who need them. “Unless you’re in danger, (emergency services) may not get to you very quickly,” says Wilson. That is why they preach being prepared, he says. Humboldt is generally prepared for most emergencies, he says, with some emergencies unlikely in the area, like widespread flooding since we are not on a flood plain. Some emergencies, like tornados,

and rail and highway accidents involving dangerous goods, are more likely, says Wilson. Pat Pomedli also takes part in emergency preparedness meetings as a councilor for Ward 5 with the RM of Humboldt and municipality representative on various emergency services boards. The list of emergencies they have prepared for is

endless, he says, because there are many factors to consider when responding to an emergency. “The particular situation, the location, the scope, and the timing, that’s all going to dictate how you respond to it.” During an emergency, the first priority is saving lives, he says. Being prepared means having a kit ready and

mobile with food, clothing, and water. During an emergency, a family may be safe in their homes but they also may need to move away from the disaster. They should have every opportunity to be ready and sustainable in either case. For times when people are still in their homes, find a spot in the house that is structurally enforced to set up shop,

Emergency Kit How-to Your emergency kit should be able to help your family members (including those with special health concerns and pets) be selfsufficient for at least 72 hours. You can purchase pre-made kits or assemble your own that you will pack in an easy-to-carry bag(s) or a case-on-wheels. Items* you may wish to include in your kit: • Food (non-perishable and easy-toprepare items, enough for 3 days) • Bottled water (4 litres per person each day for drinking, hygiene, washing) • A manual can opener • Plastic plates and cutlery • Candles and matches/lighter • Garbage bags and zip-lock bags

• First-aid kits • M edications and copies of prescriptions • Hand sanitizer or moist towelettes • Personal items (soap, toothpaste/ toothbrush, shampoo, comb, etc.) • Flashlight • Radio (crank or battery-run) • Extra batteries • Sleeping bags or blankets • Spare clothes, shoes • Playing cards, travel games, other activities for children • Extra car keys • Cash • Photographs of each family member and pets (write their age, weight, height and other characteristics on the back)

says Wilson, including doorways. The most important advice that Wilson can give, always listen to emergency crews, he says. “If you’re told to evacuate, you should evacuate.” Regional partners can be a big part of disaster response, says Pomedli, since farmers with large equipment can make a

• Whistle (to attract attention, if needed) • Items for babies and small children like diapers, formula, bottles and baby food • Copies of important papers, such as insurance, driver’s licence, passports, birth/marriage certificates, wills, etc. • Printed procedures to shut off home utilities (water, electricity, gas) Your kit should be tailored to your family’s needs. For example, you may need to develop specific plans and store emergency food and supplies for family members with specific medical conditions. The local evacuation or reception centre may not allow your pet(s) to stay with you, so you may need to develop specialized plans and have emergency food and supplies stored for each of your animals. Source: Saskatchewan.ca

difference during different types of disasters. “Water trucks are a big thing for fighting fires and there’s always some guys who will always have a tank of water on their truck, just incase. Sometimes they’ll keep it right out in the field with them.” Pomedli says they have a list of different resources that would be available to them during an emergency. At recent Mid-Sask Municipal Alliance (MSMA) meetings, connecting these resources like these throughout the region has been a recent topic of discussion. There is a chance to connect emergency response people throughout the district as a way of services supporting one another, says Celine Favreau, director of Operations & Planning with the MSMA. Connecting those services means connecting emergency response teams from across the region, she says. “We have a couple of smaller ones that don’t that are looking for support. We could share the resources.”

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Young entrepreneurs honoured with awards Devan C. Tasa Trader Contributor

Community Futures NewSask celebrated the region’s up and coming youth entrepreneurs. At the Youth Business Excellence Awards May 5, awards were presented to students from the Kinistin Business Group, Nipawin’s LP Miller, St. Brieux, Naicam and Hudson Bay. The Kinistin group, which attends Tisdale Middle & Secondary School, operates Tasty Towne Catering, a functioning business created when the students saw a need for such a service in their area. For group member Wesley Brabant, it was his third time at the awards, while for Bentley Scott, it was his first. “I think it’s encouraging and it inspires us,” Scott said, “to get more and get out there and work harder.”

The best of youth entrepreneurship was recoginzed at the Youth Business Excellence Awards May 5. From left are Jaylyn Berthold and Jade Missler from Naicam School, Bentley Scott and Wesley Brabant from the Kinistin Business Club, and Roan Woodward from Nipawin’s LP Miller Comprehensive. Photo by Devan C. Tasa “It feels good because the first time we came here, we only got one prize and the third time, we got more than the first time,” said Brabant. This year, the group, which also includes Kirkland Ahpey, Eja Severeight, Aidan Lumberjack and Taya Thomas, received best business venture for a

Grade 10 to 12 group, an agricultural business award and a special achievement award. Brabant said business continues to go well for Tasty Towne Catering. “We actually get a lot of requests to cook for venues and stuff like that. It feels good knowing that we can improve our work.”

He also added it was good to see a lot of young entrepreneurs coming to these awards. R o a n Wo o d w a r d , along with his partner Cohen Morin, received third place for a Grade 6 to 9 group businessplan for a hockey camp aimed at ages 12 and under. They also received a special achievement award.

The LP Miller student said he and Morin got the idea based on their experience. “I play hockey lots and it’s really fun.” Woodward said the awards were a good experience and that they’d work on the business plan for next year. “It was me and Cohen and I think it was a good

idea and I think we’ll try and make it better next year.” St. Brieux School received five awards at the event. “I was really proud of them for all of the work they did and it’s just really nice for them to get some recognition,” said Jeremy Rolheiser, the teacher that taught their entrepreneurship class. For those students, creating business plans was a class requirement, so for the students, entering the awards just requires filling out an extra form. The teacher said the plans were based on what the students like. “We had some kids that really liked food, so they wanted to make their business plans about the food they love to eat, we had lots of athletic kids, so they made business plans about the sports they are into, like basketball.”

Plan to let spray planes water bomb rural fires By Devan C. Tasa Trader Contributor The stubble in the fields is dry, ready to go off with a spark. The field itself is too wet to support a fire truck. The solution: attack from the air. Since September 2016, Fred Bradshaw, the MLA for Carrot River Valley, has been working on a project that will allow spray plane pilots to legally fight fires. The MLA, who’s a former aerial applicator and volunteer firefighter, said the aircraft

have a dump door on them, which can be used to water bomb the fires. “With your aerial applicators, they can go out and help fight that stubble fire, so the fire department doesn’t have to run their fire trucks out into the field and drag hoses all around and potentially get caught out there in a fire.” The problem: due to liability issues, spray plane pilots can’t legally go fight fires in that manner. That’s why Bradshaw has

been working to make it possible for the pilots to add firefighting to their Transport Canadaapproved operating certificates. “We were fortunate I knew a fellow that did the single-engine air tanker training down in Idaho, so I had him come up and train the pilots up here to be able to do this, so they could add the firefighting capability onto their operating certificate.” Bradshaw said 25 pilots have gone through the training

program, with another 25 wanting to take it next year. The MLA added that since he knows the trainer, the trainer hasn’t charged for the service, meaning the only thing the government is spending money on is renting the training facility. The pilots also don’t have to pay for the training. Once the pilots are trained, the idea is to have local fire departments being able to summon them when they need their help. Bradshaw said the

government is looking at having the fire department pay the sprayer each time they are called. Despite the progress made on the project, Bradshaw said there’s a few items that still have to be dealt with, so the pilots won’t be fighting fires this year. “What we have to do is train the local fire departments as to what to do when they call up the aircraft,” he said. That could be possible through a course at a Saskatchewan Volunteer

Fire Fighters Association school. As well, the emergency communications system needs to be adjusted so that the pilots can be called to a fire. Once those kinks are dealt with, Bradshaw said the spray plane firefighting program will be a useful tool for rural fire departments. “It’s going to be something that’s going to be very helpful in the province,” he said. “It’s something that should have been done years ago.”

One man in hospital after collision on Hwy 5 By Becky Zimmer Journal Editor

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Calgary pitcher sparks ‘baby braves’

By Bruce Penton Sports Columnist The latest Canadian to make a big splash in Major League Baseball is part of one of the best early stories of 2018 — the Baby Braves. Mike Soroka of Calgary, all of 20 years old, made his major league debut May 1 and came away a winner, going six innings and giving up only one run in an eventual 3-2 victory by the visiting Atlanta Braves over star pitcher Noah Syndergaard and the New York Mets.

Soroka, picked from Canada’s junior national team in the first round of the amateur draft by Atlanta in 2015, is one of three Braves who comprise the youngest trio in all of baseball — the others being outfielder Ronald Acuna, 20, and infielder Ozzie Albies, 21. All three have been highly touted for the last couple of seasons, and Braves fans have been eagerly anticipating their arrival with the big club. That all three of them have apparently matured enough to make the team in 2018 has been a surprise, but not totally unexpected. Acuna has been the No. 1 rated prospect for the past 12 months and was called up in late April from AAA Gwinnett. Through his first nine games, Acuna was batting .342, showing power, base-running skills and speed in the

outfield. Albies, the old guy of the three at 21, has been with the Braves all season and the 5-foot-8 165-pounder pounded 10 home runs by early May, two off the league lead. Overall, the Braves were leading the entire National League in almost every offensive category, with veterans Freddie Freeman, Nick Markakis and Ender Inciarte joining with the kids to beat up on opponents. Their team batting average of .275 on May 5 was 20 points higher than nextbest. Soroka joined the Braves on the first day of May, and stymied the Mets, and if he carries on as he did in his debut, the Braves’ starting rotation (Julio Teheran, Brandon McCarthy, Mike Foltynewicz and Sean Newcomb are the others) would rank among baseball’s best. “He (Soroka) was re-

ally good. It’s not like it shocked me,” Braves manager Brian Snitker told Mike Fitzpatrick of the Associated Press. “The stuff, the composure, how he went about it was all very impressive.” Atlanta management has been promising fans that the current ‘rebuild’ would bear playoff fruit by 2019 or 2020 at the latest. From the looks of things after the first month (the Braves overtook the Mets for top spot in the NL East on May 2), that rebuild might find success in 2018. • Dwight Perry of the Seattle Times: The two youngest players in Major League Baseball — Ronald Acuna Jr., 20, and Ozzie Albies, 21 — both homered for the Braves in a win over the Reds. Not that they’re young or anything but ... after the game teammates took them to Dairy Queen.”

• TC in BC: “Colin Kaepernick’s tryout was cancelled at the last minute by the Seahawks. His agent wanted Colin to be in the game only when Seattle was up by more than 17 points inside the two-minute warning, and he could just come in and take a knee.” • Hall of Fame golfer Sandra Post in Scoregolf Magazine, on golfers coping with age: “Don’t confuse yourself with wine, you don’t get better as you get older.” • Randy Turner of the Winnipeg Free Press, on Twitter: “I’m cool with Preds fans throwing catfish on ice because it finally means there’s something in arena with worse whiskers than Patrik Laine.” • Norman Chad of the Washington Post, on the NFL draft: “I last watched the NFL draft in 2005; after intense therapy, doctors removed

Chris Berman’s voice from my head by 2009.” • Comedy writer Alex Kaseberg: “A 20-year-old Colorado man has been bitten by a rattlesnake, a bear and a shark. My advice to him is to avoid the Westminster Dog Show at all costs.” • Headline at the onion.com: “Bears GM Wavering Between Drafting Good Player Or Bad Player.” • Headline at sportspickle.com: “Teddy Bridgewater announces retirement: ‘I didn’t do all this rehab to play for the Jets’ “ • Janice Hough of leftcoastsportsbabe.com, after Carmelo Anthony said he’ll refuse to play a bench role for the Thunder next season: “Proving once again: Maybe you can’t cure cancer, but you can sometimes trade it.” Care to comment? Email brucepenton2003@ yahoo.ca

Viscount news The Blankets for Canada ladies are still meeting every Monday at the Viscount Library. We hope to keep going until the end of May, although designing may continue throughout the summer in Plunkett.

We now have many beautiful squares given to us, so a very big thank you to everyone who has taken the time to make them. Please call Evelina at 1-306-944-4820 if you would like to learn more about what we do.

On May 12, it was a little quieter than usual for our Community Garage Sales. Though we all still had great sales, and great visiting with out of town people and people from town that one doesn’t see much of.

It was a good day as well for the Viscount Wheatland Library as they hosted the Hamburger sale, with very delicious and an easy lunch. Also held on May 12, was the Viscount Seniors fundraising breakfast.

There were 20 people that attended. Chris Rault and Monica Palfy did the cooking and the cleaning. Karen Dale won the lucky loonie pot. On May 7, at the Viscount Seniors, coffee and great conversation was

enjoyed. Then on that afternoon, games of pool and cards was enjoyed by all that attended. Best wishes to anyone that is under the weather, hope you feel better soon. Have a great week and enjoy the weather.

Rolling out the red tape may tie up farmers Over the years there have been many stories of European farmers pulling up roots and moving to Canada. There have generally been two motivating factors in the decision to make what is a huge change. The first has been simple economics. There are often limited opportunities for expansion of farms in Europe in terms of available acres to buy. The acres which do come on the market are also high cost because of the limited supply. As a result a farmer can often sell there and buy more

Calvin Daniels acres here. The second reason I have often heard from recent farming immigrants is a wish to get away from the increasing red tape of European farming. The rules and regulations imposed by government

are seen not just for being restrictive in terms of farmer choices, but of adding additional costs to production without a corresponding bump in returns. There may still be a difference in terms of prices for land between Canada and Europe, but the red tape of government is spreading faster than clubroot in canola crops. In Alberta, producers are expecting new rules this summer which will require them to have a health and safety plan. The rules, which come into effect June

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4 ECT Friday, May 18, 2018

1 and apply to farms with paid employees, are part of the government’s plans to update the Occupational Health and Safety code. Other industries have already been dealing with what may be seen as logical and certainly fair terms of employee safety. Now having farmers following regulations for employees is adding red tape for farmers to deal with. And on the federal side, as of Dec. 1, veterinary prescriptions will be required for antibiotics for Canadian livestock.

The new federal legislation means and covers most forms of livestock so whether a bee producer, or hog producer, they will be dealing with the changes. The new policy covers injectable products, boluses, calf scour treatments, and similar products. Drugs such as tetracycline and penicillin will no longer be available over the counter. What these changes will mean is significant cost increases. Veterinarians will see these changes as a way to add to their bottom line, and no one can fault

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them for wanting to be paid for their time. Still, this is a rule which is a massive change in how livestock producers go about doing their business. Growing up on a livestock farm, using penicillin to treat a sick animal was something which was done regularly, based on years of experience. The thought of having to pay the vet for a prescription will be hard to understand for producers. And so the red tape is definitely rolling off the government reel toward farming.

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Food story earns local student big scholarship By Becky Zimmer Journal Editor E m m a H i n z re a l ized she had a story to tell when she discovered the Saskatchewan Agriculture Student Scholarship. Her story would go on to win her the top prize of $4,000 towards her education. Her mom and her sister told her about the opportunity, which called for young people to send in an essay or video telling their food stories. Growing up on her family grain farm, Hinz sees how hard her dad works to put food on everyone elses’ table. “I think there’s a lot of fear surrounding food and some of the agricul-

Emma Hinz receives her $4,000 scholarship from Minister of Agriculture Lyle Stewart on May 8 at the Saskatchewan Legislature. photo courtesy of Government of Saskatchewan tural processes used in the industry. I know I

have a really good inside view and I wanted to try

and clear some of that up that it’s not scary.� Grain farming is sustainable and safe and Hinz has a special inside view to promote that side of agriculture, she says. Hinz sees a lot of the fear in agriculture is around genetically modified foods. Especially looking at the issue as a Type 1 Diabetic, Hinz says her insulin comes from the same processes as some genetically modified foods. “I have a healthy lifestyle thanks to insulin and I know it’s actually nothing wrong with it. It’s safe, sustainable, and is going to help us feed the growing population.�

While Hinz does not know where she is going to go yet for her post-secondary education, the scholarship will help in her first year wherever she goes. Right now, Hinz is maintaining a strong average and she wants to maintain that during university. “It’ll really let me focus on school. I don’t think I’ll have to work throughout the school year and I can just focus on my studies.� Whether it be veterinary medicine or other

avenues, Hinz says she will be going into an agriculture related field of study. A c c o rd i n g t o t h e Saskatchewan government press release, Laura Carruthers of Frenchman Butte, Kati Culbertson of Redvers and Crystal Daniel of Avonlea also took home prizes for their submissions claiming runnerup prizes of $2,000. Awards were presented by Agriculture Minister Lyle Stewart at the Legislature in Regina on May 8.

Regional partners major players in economic development By Becky Zimmer Journal Editor The Saskatchewan government proclaimed May 7-12 economic development week across the province. This was a chance for local organizations to amplify the work that is going on across the province, says Verona Thibault, CEO of the Saskatchewan Economic Development Alliance (SEDA). Much of the economic development happening in Saskatchewan is happening outside the two major centres, says Thibault, and includes many different aspects of sustainable communities. SEDA is constantly advocating for communities and community leaders and professionals have to be very future forward, she says. “There’s always ebbs and flows in sec-

tors. We stress that in Saskatchewan and of course there are so many opportunities now in certain agri-value areas, we’ve got the proteins and the cannabis.� Keeping local and regional economies strong are going to be an important part of taking advantage of these opportunities and developing those regional and local ecosystems, says Thibault. “That’s something we advocate here in Saskatchewan is not to forget about our local and regional economy and how we can strengthen those; buy for each other, get those ecosystems going a bit more.� Everyone buys into buying local philosophically but in practice, it can be harder to sustain for many communities. Locally and region-

ally, Thibault says the Humboldt area has a strong group of businesses and services available and a great foundation in regional partners in the Mid-Sask Municipal Alliance (MSMA). Economic development is going to be a large focus of the MSMA’s strategic plan that the alliance is curre n t l y w o r k i n g o n , says Celine Favreau, director of Operations & Planning with the MSMA. John Gunther with the Ministry of Government Relations with the Saskatchewan government is encouraging community organizations, like the MSMA, to take this route during the SEDA conference at the beginning of the month, says Favreau. “Our strong focus will still be being a planning commission, but the

foundations you build from doing good, solid planning at the local level are huge when it comes to doing economic development.� One strategy that the MSMA is already going forward with is their Investment Attraction Strategy where they work on filling municipally owned residential properties, and commercial and industrial vacancies in local communities. This is a way they can direct potential businesses and residents into investing and developing the region. “We’re seeing this as potential investment opportunities in all our member communities.� Thibault hopes to keep on seeing the regional economy grow in the Humboldt area, “seeing the regional buying, as well as supporting regional busi-

67 per cent adequate, 25 per cent short and five per cent very short. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as two per cent surplus, 55 per cent adequate, 31 per cent short and 12 per cent very short. Winter wheat assessment continues as fields green up. Pasture and hay land growth has been slow and some cattle producers are supplementing feed. There have been multiple reports of grass and stubble fires due to the dry conditions and rain would be welcomed to help alleviate concerns. F a r m e r s a re b u s y

seeding, working fields, controlling weeds and moving cattle. SaskPower reports 25 cases of farm machinery coming into contact with electrical equipment over the last week, bringing the total for this month to 27. SaskPower reminds producers that most farming-related incidents happen during seeding and spraying. Check for overhead lines before beginning your work. More safety information is available at www.saskpower.com/ safety. Follow the 2018 Crop Report on Twitter at @ SKAgriculture.

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Crop Report regions in the province are reporting three per cent seeded. Little to no rainfall was reported last week in most regions, with the Swift Current area receiving the most – 9.5 mm. Many areas received rain earlier this week that will help with the dry field conditions. S t ro n g a n d w a r m winds have dried fields throughout the province, and many producers will need rain in the coming weeks to help crops germinate and establish. Provincially, topsoil moisture conditions on cropland are rated as three per cent surplus,

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Courtesy of the Government of Saskatchewan Seeding is underway for many producers, with more expecting to hit the field in the coming week. Nine per cent of the crop is now in the ground, behind the five-year (20132017) seeding average of 19 per cent for this time of year. A slow start to spring has delayed field operations in much of the province. Seeding is furthest advanced in the southwestern region, where 18 per cent of the crop is in the ground. Fifteen per cent is seeded in the southeast, while all other

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Thank you readers!

ecue recipes Enjoy these great barb Journal readers :-) courtesy of Humboldt

Dezi Monz

Barbecue Party Mixed Grill & Veggies

INGREDIENTS 1 bag mini white potatoes 680 g 1 pork tenderloin (1 lb/500 g) 2 zucchinis, cut in 1/2” (1cm) thick rounds 1/3 cup olive oil 75 mL 2 small red onions, quartered 1-1/2 tsp salt 7 mL 1 bunch asparagus, trimmed 1 cup Sensations by Compliments Spirited (approx.1 lb/500 g) Mickie Southern Gentleman Sweet Heat 2 lb boneless, skinless chicken breasts 1 BBQ Sauce, divided 250 mL kg 8 wooden skewers, soaked DIRECTIONS Place potatoes in large saucepan and cover with cold water. Bring to a boil; cook 10 to 12 min. or until just tender but not cooked through. Cool until comfortable enough to handle. Thread onto skewers. Keeping vegetables and raw meats separate, drizzle potato skewers, zucchini, onions, asparagus, chicken and pork tenderloin with oil and season with salt. Cook chicken and pork tenderloin on grill preheated to medium, 15 to 20 min., turning occasionally, basting with cup (150 mL) BBQ sauce near end of cooking. Check that internal temperature of chicken registers 165°F (74°C) and pork registers 160°F (71°C). Rest meats 10 min. Meanwhile, grill potato skewers and other vegetables 6 to 8 min., turning occasionally and basting with remaining BBQ sauce, until tender and lightly charred. Slice chicken and pork tenderloin. Arrange on serving platter with grilled vegetables.

Maryann Ross Best Chicken Marinade INGREDIENTS 1/2 cup extra virgin olive oil 1/2 cup balsamic vinegar 1/4 cup soy sauce 1/4 cup worcestershire sauce 1/8 cup lemon juice 3/4 cup brown sugar

2 tsp dried rosemary 2 tbsp dijon mustard 2 tsp salt 1 tsp pepper 2 tsp garlic powder 6 chicken breasts

DIRECTIONS Combine all ingredients, except for chicken, in a mixing bowl and whisk together. Remove half a cup of marinade and reserve for basting the chicken later. Place chicken in a large ziploc bag and pour marinade over the top. Close securely. Marinate for at least 4 hours and up to 24 hours. Preheat grill to medium-high heat and lightly oil the grates. Remove chicken from marinade. Grill chicken until cooked through, basting it occasionally with reserved marinade. Remove chicken from grill and tent it with foil. Let chicken rest for at least 5 minutes before serving. Optional: if you bring the reserved marinade to a boil, let simmer until slightly reduced, it makes a great sauce to put on top of the chicken!

Trina Holmgren

Janice Lloyd Barbecued Shish Kebabs KEBAB MARINADE INGREDIENTS 4lb beef sirloin or lamb steek,1/2” thick 2/3 cup soy sauce ¼ cup sugar 16 20 24 whole mushrooms, stems removed ¼ cup cooking oil 2 Tbsp Worcestershire sauce

14 oz canned whole onions 1 garlic clove, minced 2 green peppers, cut in squares 3 Tbsp red wine vinegar 2 red peppers, cut in squares ¼ tsp pepper 16 cherry tomatoes 1 zucchini,sliced

DIRECTIONS Stir first 7 ingredients together in bowl with tight fitting lid. Cut meat into (2.5cm) thick slices, then into squares. Combine with marinade, cover and chill for minimum of 30 minutes, up to several hours. Shake bowl often. Arrange meat on 8 or more skewers (presoak wooden skewers for 30 minutes) with vegetables. Place over medium-hot grill, turning as necessary, for about 20 mintues total time. Baste with marinade near end of cooking, If you prefer well done meat or if meat chunks are large, they may be partly precooked under broiler and chilled until needed.

Grilled Asparagus

Connie Danyluik

INGREDIENTS 1 bunch of asparagus MARINADE 2 Tbsp. Olive Oil 2 Tbsp. Soya Sauce 1-2 cloves of garlic 2 Tbsp. Lemon Juice 2 Tbsp. Brown Sugar DIRECTIONS Mix marinade together. Cut ends off aparagus, leaving in full lengths. Marinade for 1 hour or longer. Place on grilling sheet and grill on BBQ over low heat for 10 to 15 minutes.

Just add

Pulled Pork Sliders with Garlic Aioli INGREDIENTS One 3 to 5 pound pork shoulder (bone-in or no bone) Salt Pepper Garlic Powder Your favorite barbecue sauce (I used Sweet Baby Ray’s) Slider buns

AIOLI ¾ cup mayonnaise 1 teaspoon minced garlic 2 pinches of black pepper 1 tablespoon lemon juice or white wine vinegar 1 tablespoon chopped chives (I used Gourmet Herbs slightly dried chives)

DIRECTIONS Generously season the pork shoulder with salt, pepper and garlic powder, and rub pork shoulder with your favorite barbecue sauce (I used a pastry brush to help me do this). Place in a slow cooker and cook on low for 8 hours (or high for 4-5 hours). Once cooked, remove pork shoulder and slightly shred - discard any fatty parts. Careful not to shred the pork too much - you want nice chunks of pork on your sandwich. Add about ½ cup to 1 cup of your favorite barbecue sauce and gently mix. To make the aioli, add all the ingredients to a bowl and mix. Toast the slider buns in the oven at 375 for a few minutes until crispy. Assemble sliders by adding the pork on the bun and topping with a dollop of aioli.

Honey & Garlic Ribs Dianne Walby INGREDIENTS 3 to 4 lb meaty pork ribs 1/4 cup soya sauce 1 cup ketchup 1 to 3 cloves garlic OR 1/2 cup liquid honey 3 tsp minced garlic DIRECTIONS Bring ribs to boil in salt water for 1 to 1 ½ hours, or until meat is tender. Drain and transfer to bowl. In a bowl, combine ketchup, honey, soya sauce and garlic. Pour over ribs and place in a bowl with a lid and marinate for a couple hours or overnight. Place on barbeque to heat.

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Englefeld’s Cael Zimmerman (left) captured the provincial bronze medal in boys singles badminton action at the provincial championships in Wilkie on May 12. Taevan Athmer and Kara Miskolczi (right) earned the silver medal in mixed doubles badminton. Photos courtesy of Jeff Burton

BADMINTON PROVINCIALS

Englefeld wins pair of medals By Christopher Lee Humboldt Journal

High school badminton wrapped up over the weekend with the provincial championships in Wilkie on May 12, with Englefeld the lone local rural school in action. Mixed Doubles It was an excellent weekend for the Eagles’ mixed doubles squad as they picked up the provincial silver medal after posting a record of 3-2. The competition got off to a tough start for the Eagles as they dropped their opening match two sets to none against NB Comprehensive. Knowing they would need to run the table to have a shot at the playoffs, the Eagles came back refocused, and made quick work of Fox Valley and O’Neill #1, winning two sets to none each time. With the 2-1 round robin record, the Eagles moved into the semifinals where they took on Melville. Their semi-final contest was an even affair as Melville took the opening set, before watching Englefeld roar back to win set number two. With the match going to a third and decisive set, the two teams slugged it out, with each coming within three points of victory.

Fortunately for the Eagles they were finally able to get over the hump, winning set number three to take the match two sets to one (16-21, 24-22, 21-18). Wi t h t h e w i n t h e Eagles moved into the championship final where they took on Wilkie. The Eagles ran out of steam against an excellent Wilkie squad, and were quickly dispatched two sets to none (21-5, 21-7). With the loss the Eagles saw their gold medal hopes come to an end as the pair came home with silver. Boys’ Singles While the mixed doubles squad were busy enjoying a run to the championship final, their boys singles teammate enjoyed only marginally less success, as the Eagle made a playoff run of his own, culminating in a provincial bronze medal. The tournament got off to a tough start for the Eagle as he lost his opening match two sets to none to Evan Hardy. Knowing a win would keep his hopes of a playoff spot still alive, the Eagle once again could not quite put together his best effort, losing two sets to none to Fox Valley. With the loss, the

Eagle sat 0-2, needing a win and some help to make the playoffs. Fortunately, he was able to have both happen, as he got his win, and some help to pull into a three-way tie for second at 1-2. With the tournament now in the hands of the officials, as they worked out the tiebreaker, it was the Eagle who emerged victorious and moved into the playoffs where he took on Saskatoon Walter Murray. It was a tough match for the Eagle as he struggled to gain any traction, and was soundly beaten by the eventual provincial champion losing two sets to none (21-4, 21-5). With the loss the Eagle moved into the bronze medal final where he took on Evan Hardy in a rematch of their round robin contest won by Evan Hardy. After losing in the round robin, the Eagle was out for revenge, and quickly earned it taking the first set. After Evan Hardy took the second set, the two players went into a third and decisive set with provincial bronze on the line. This time the Eagle would not be denied his second set win of the match as he edged passed Evan Hardy in

the third set to take the match two sets to one (21-16, 17-21, 21-18). Wi t h t h e w i n t h e Eagle brought home provincial bronze, giving Englefeld medals in each of the two events they entered. With the badminton season now complete, athletes will turn their focus to track and field, which begins this week with the pre-district championships in Humboldt, Quill Lake, and Strasbourg on May 15.

Bisons open season on high note By Christopher Lee Humboldt Journal Reporter

The Bruno Bisons kicked off their 2018 Saskatoon Men’s Baseball League season on a high as they picked up a win in their only contest. The Bisons, who were scheduled to play twice, saw their second game of the week rained out on May 10. In their opening game of the season, the Bisons knocked off the Wombats 9-3 on May 7. It was an excellent night both offensively and defensively for the boys from Bruno as Adam Olchowski picked up the win pitching four solid innings, before Jason McRae pitched the final three, while Jeremy Sibley provided a two-run homerun in the win. Wi t h t h e w i n t h e Bisons move to 1-0 on the season.

After enjoying a longer than expected break, the Bisons are scheduled to return to the field for a pair of contests next week, as they take on the Royals at Stonebridge South on May 15 and the Tigers at Stonebridge North on May 16.

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North Central baseball season kicks off By Christopher Lee Reporter Wi t h t h e c a l e n dars flipping to May, baseball is back and so too, is the North Central Baseball League. Midget The smallest of the NCBL comes in the midget division, with just three teams in action including Lanigan, Quill Lake, and Wynyard. It was an excellent start to the season for Lanigan as they picked up a 10-9 win over Quill Lake and a 6-5 win over Wynyard. Bantam While the midget side sees only three teams, the bantams feature five, with Bruno, Foam Lake, Watrous, Wadena, and Wynyard all in action. It was an excellent week for Watrous as they picked up wins in each of their first two contests, knocking off Wadena 20-7 and Bruno 13-10. Bruno meanwhile, picked up the only other win of the week as they knocked off Foam Lake 13-12. Peewee The peewee division also features just five teams this year, with Foam Lake, Wynyard,

Quill Lake, Lanigan, and Archerwill all taking part. It was an excellent start to the season for Wynyard as they picked up wins in each of their first two contests, knocking off Foam Lake 16-3 and Archerwill 28-1. Lanigan enjoyed a decent week as they picked up a 15-6 win over Quill Lake before suffering a 20-9 loss to Foam Lake. Mosquito The largest of the four leagues, comes in the mosquito division, where seven teams are in action including Wadena 2, Wadena 1, Foam Lake 1, Foam Lake 2, Archerwill, Wynyard and Quill Lake. Wadena 2 and Foam Lake 1 each enjoyed a solid start to the season with each opening with a pair of wins as Wadena 2 knocked off Wynyard 12-6 and Foam Lake 15-9, while Foam Lake 1 upended Quill Lake 14-7 and Wynyard 8-7. Wadena 1 and Archerwill added the other wins through the early part of the season as Wadena 1 knocked off Archerwill 18-7 and Archerwill beat Quill Lake 11-7.

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Red Sox drop three of four By Christopher Lee Reporter It was a tough weekend for the Muenster Midget AAA Red Sox, as they managed just a single win in four contests, losing each game of their May 12 doubleheader in Regina, and splitting their May 13 doubleheader in Estevan. Red Sox vs. Athletics – Game 1 Defence was a major concern for the Red Sox as they committed five errors in a 10-0 loss to the Regina Athletics. Quinn Jeworski did the majority of the damage for the Athletics, coming one walk and one hit batter away from a perfect game, as the 18-year-old no hit the Red Sox. Chris Major and Drew Bauml were the lone Red Sox to reach base, as Major was hit by a pitch and Bauml walked on back-to-back at bats in the fourth inning. Aaron Aquino was charged with the loss on the mound for the Red Sox, giving up seven runs, with three earned, on five hits and five walks, while striking out none in two innings of work. Nicholas Silcox came on in relief of Aquino and did not fare much better allowing three runs all earned, on four hits and five walks, while striking out one in 3.1 innings. The contest got off to an ugly start for the Red Sox, as they gave up three runs in the first and four more in the second to trail 7-0 after just two

Muenster Midget AAA Red Sox outfielder Jayden Huls unloads a liner down the third base line during Midget AAA action. Photo by Christopher Lee innings. Three more in the sixth spelled the end of the game for the Red Sox, as the Athletics reached the ten-run mercy rule, to take the contest 10-0. Red Sox vs. Athletics – Game 2 Pitching continues to be an issue for the Red Sox as they gave up eight runs in an 8-5 loss to the Regina Athletics. The eight runs were the fewest given up in the Red Sox’s first four games, as the young squad has already surrendered 43 runs this season. Matthew McGrath and Aquino led the way offensively for the Red Sox as they combined to drive in all four earned runs. Josh Doepker was charged with the loss on the mound after allowing seven runs, all earned, on eight hits, and three walks, while striking out one in four innings

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of work. Rylan Elmy and Kyle Froehlich came on in relief of Doepker, and the pair pitched three innings allowing one earned run on two hits and three walks, while striking out four. After a quiet first inning that saw neither team manage a run, the game broke wide open in the second, as the Athletics scored four, before watching the Red Sox respond with five to take a 5-4 lead after two innings. The Athletics refused to fold after a tough inning, and were rewarded for their persistence as they plated two more in the third and another in the fourth to take a 7-5 lead through four innings. Another run in the seventh spelled the end of the afternoon for the Red Sox as they fell 8-5 to suffer the doubleheader sweep, their first in more than three years. Red Sox vs. Twins – Game 1 After suffering three straight losses, the Red Sox finally got back to their winnings ways as they knocked off the Southeast Performance Pump Twins 9-6 in extra innings. Doepker led the way offensively for the Red Sox finishing the afternoon 1-for-4 with three runs batted in, while Carter Burkart chipped in with a 3-for-4 afternoon that included two runs batted in, and two runs scored. Drew Bauml picked up the win on the mound allowing five runs, all earned, on five hits and eight walks, while striking out six in four innings of work. Cody Bauml came on in relief of Drew, and pitched 3.1 innings giving up just two walks, while striking out three, before Froehlich came on to get the final two outs

and register the save. The Red Sox came out swinging offensively and were rewarded early for their efforts as they piled up three runs in the top half of the first inning, to take an early 3-0 lead. Unfortunately for the Red Sox, two runs in the bottom half of the first and three more in the bottom half of the third had the Red Sox trailing 5-3 through three innings. A two run sixth saved the afternoon for the Red Sox, as it pulled them into a 5-5 tie, and sent the game into extra innings. The Red Sox tacked on four more in the eighth, and the Twins could not complete the comeback, scoring once, as the Red Sox won 9-5. Red Sox vs. Twins – Game 2 The Muenster Red Sox dug themselves a hole they could never climb out of as the squad dropped a 4-2 decision to the Southeast Performance Pump Twins in the back-half of their Sunday doubleheader. Froehlich was charged with the loss on the mound for the Red Sox allowing four runs, all earned, on three hits and one walk, while striking out three in four innings of work. McGrath came on in relief and pitched three excellent innings allowing just one hit and two walks, while striking out five. Cody Bauml and Elmy had the only runs batted in for the Red Sox, as the pair combined for just one hit and two RBI. After the teams combined for no runs through the first two innings, the Twins broke the game open in the third scoring three times, before adding another in the fourth to take a 4-0 lead. The Red Sox responded with runs in each of the sixth and seventh innings, but it was too little. Next Up After a busy weekend that saw the Red Sox play four times in just over 24 hours, the boys from Muenster will enjoy a much needed break, as they will not be returning to the diamond until May 23 when they visit Saskatoon to take on the Cubs. It’s another busy week for the Red Sox as they open the home portion of their season with weekend doubleheaders, May 26 against the Regina Whitesox and May 27 against the Regina Wolfpack.


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Market features home grown goodness "Y#HRIS,EEs2EPORTER Homemade is something many of us strive for but can not always achieve. The Humboldt Farmers’ Market tries to make those goals easier for us, as the market has returned for 2018. The market features home-grown and homemade food, as well as many other homemade items. “It’s kind of a hobby I guess you could say for some people or a full-time job for others. There’s everything from baking to crafts to vegetables,” said market manager Heather Crone. This year people coming to the market will find a new vendor focusing on a medicinal tea called Chaga, Crone added. Providing people from Humboldt and the surrounding area with homemade products is great, said Crone, adding that organizers work hard to make sure the shoppers know they are getting quality. “We are governed by the Sask Health Region, so we have guidelines to follow for them. We also follow the guidelines for the Saskatchewan Farmers Market Cooperative, so everything we know is very well done. Everyone had to list ingredients; they all have to take food safe course.” Crone says she sees a large desire for

homemade in the area, noting over the last 14 years she has seen demand increase. “I wouldn’t say it’s something that they target every Saturday, but there’s lot of people out there that love homemade and either don’t have time or the resources to do it themselves. So we get to see lots of people over and over again that are really excited to see what we have to bring.” Having people return time and again is nice, said Crone. She has been able to strike up friendships with some of the recurring shoppers throughout the years. The market also features a new-old location, moving to Misty Gardens this year after spending the previous two at the Humboldt Community Gathering Place. Crone called it a homecoming of sorts, noting that the market had been held at Misty Gardens for 10 years before moving to the Gathering Place. “I really enjoy it here,” she said of the Misty Gardens location. “The people here are awesome. Sometimes the parking lot’s a little rough, but it’s all in fun.” With the change in location, Crone noted the market is also undergoing a minor change in its schedule. Four Thursday dates have been added, each coming before a long weekend.

Crone said the change was made following a vendor’s request. “We see lots of people on long weekend Saturdays, but there’s also those that leave Friday orr Saturday mornings gs and they don’t stop op at at the market first. So So wee thought maybe we’d we’dd try we tryy a Thursday afternoon onn ffrom room 2 to 6 [pm] right here att M Misty Gardens, isty is ty G arrde d ns, and we’ll see how goes.” w it goe oes. oe s” s. There will be four Thursdays on the schedule for 2018: June 28, August 2, August 30 and October 4. Currently, the market is home to five vendors, a number Crone says she would like to see grow. “We’re always looking for new vendors, if there’s someone out there that has something that they are interested in bringing. If it’s homemade, home-baked, home-grown – give me a call.” Crone can be reached by calling

Fresh produce is one of the staples of local farmers’ markets, along with hand-made kitchen gadgets, baking and much more. 1-306-366-2140, by visiting the Humboldt Farmers’ Market on Facebook or by stopping by the market. The market is open biweekly until June 23, when the weekly schedule kicks in, running until Dec. 22.

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Spring Home

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Secrets to being an organized family

When messes start to creep up, it is probably time to commit to getting more organized.











































the house each morning in a timely manner. Each member of the household should have a designated area where they keep the items they will need for the next morning. Backpacks and briefcases should be prepacked, and lunches made the night before. In addition, sort the next day’s clothes before going to bed. These efforts should make it easier to get out of the house on time each morning. Sort the entryway Home entryways are usually hubs of traffic. These areas are the first and last place family members go when entering or leaving the house. As a result, these areas are in need of some routine organizational attention. Use sorting bins for shoes, hooks for coats, trays for mail or homework, and other sorting equipment to keep things tidy and orderly. Embrace the purge Take a hard look at what you use and what you don’t use around the house. Holding on to items you rarely use can contribute to clutter and create a disorganized home. Save only a few sentimental items, donating, recycling or discarding the others.















Deposit your cheques in the field…





Holding on to items you rarely use can contribute to clutter and create a disorganized home.

Many organizational experts suggest going through items one by one and asking oneself if this is something that has been used recently. If it’s been collecting dust for a year or more, it can go. Sensible storage Analyze what you have and then find sensible storage solutions. Store belongings in the same place each day so items are easy to find when needed. Frequently used items should be easily accessible. Seldom used items, such as holiday decorations, can be stored out of the way. It takes commitment and time to get organized. However, life tends to move along much more smoothly in organized homes than homes marked by clutter.

 









or from the comfort of home…

and use your time for what really matters.

Reminding you of LeRoy Credit Unions Mobile App! With the App you can: - Deposit cheques with your mobile device using Deposit Anywhere. - Send and receive E-transfers † - Check your balances, pay bills, make immediate and scheduled transfers. Visit us at www.leroycu.ca or stop in to see us!

Available on Iphone and Android devices. 10 ECT Friday, May 18, 2018

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Spring Home

Garden

Springtime is garden time Paul Kneeshaw says preparing your garden before planting will yield better results. photo by Becky Zimmer

Fertilizers give you up, down, and all around health with the nitrogen being beneďŹ cial to the leaves, phosphorus being beneficial to the roots, and potash being good for all-around plant health. “Fertilizer is magic forr plants. When you are rototillling, you have a chance to make ke a nice seed bed plus get the ďŹ bre and fertility back into the ground und to produce an awesome crop.â€? The larger the numbers thee stronger it is and the less you have to use, says Kneeshaw. Always consult thee instructions on the bag before applying to the garden. “There are recommendations tions on the containers and they should go with that,â€? he says, and can always consider adding more if not happy with the results. Types of manure; whether cattle, sheep, or ďŹ sh, does not matter when planters consider adding that to the soil. Some manure mixes that Kneeshaw provides at Misty Gardens have certiďŹ ed 1:1:1 ratios meaning that minerals have been added to the mix to ensure those ratios. If planters do not see the certiďŹ cation, this could mean that the minerals may still be there but are not certiďŹ ed at certain levels, says Kneeshaw. Judging from his own crops this year, manure mixes do provide something extra.

“

A garden a masterpiece

“Fertilizer is magic for plants. When you are rototilling, you have a chance to make a nice VHHGEHGSOXVJHWWKHĂ€EUH and fertility back into the ground to produce an awesome crop.â€?

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By Becky Zimmer Journal Editor Springtime is here, for the most part, and for a lot of people that means getting the garden ready for planting. Before the seeds go in the ground, a lot can be done to make sure that those seeds perform better, says Paul Kneeshaw of Misty Gardens. Green thumbs like to get a jump on planting by getting starters going in the early spring months. Heat is going to be the biggest factor in climatizing plants to the outdoors, says Kneeshaw. Moving plants from indoors to outdoors, Kneeshaw says they will need a few hours each day outdoors and that time outdoors can get longer over time. However, planters will still have to work about frost so they should be in a position to easily cover their starters if frost is going to be an issue. Heat within the plants is also a major factor. Red mulch produces more heat, says Kneeshaw, so they will make better use of the water, help keep the weeds down and help plants ripen and mature faster. “They grow faster and mature more quickly so you’ve got produce sooner. That’s especially for plants that take a long time to provide fruit and produce to you, like tomatoes and peppers.â€? Winter can wreak havoc on soils so those need to be broken up with some rototilling. Garden additives can bring something extra to the soil work, says Kneeshaw. “That’s an opportunity to put some ďŹ bre back in your soil and you can do that with compost, peat moss, and manure,â€? he says. Mixing in some mulch, including lawn trimmings and leftover leaf clippings, can break up tough soils and make the ground more pliable, says Kneeshaw. Hard packed soils can keep roots from moving around and keep plants from getting the air they need to thrive. Clay soils can also retain too much water, essentially drowning the seeds and reducing the air they need. Fibre breaks up the soil while manures and compost can add that extra fertility to help your garden thrive. The more ďŹ bre that Kneeshaw has put into the soils over the years the more mellow it is to work with, he says. Fertilizer is also something planters should consider as an addition to their soil. Ratings are made up of three numbers that correspond with minerals in the fertilizer: the nitrogen, the phosphorus, and potash.

– Paul Kneeshaw

Stock up on gardening essentials When it comes to outďŹ tting a gardening shed, gardeners will not want to be without certain tools and gear. s$IGGINGSHOVEL!ROUNDED BLADEDIGGING shovel is needed to plant shrubs and trees as well as to excavate areas in a landscape. s2AKE!RAKECANBEUSEDTOCLEARTHE ground, remove thatch and leaves from a lawn and level soil in a garden bed. s(ANDTOOLS(ANDTOOLS SUCHASAHAND fork and trowel, are essential for small digging

jobs, especially when working with ower pots or containers. s%DGINGSPADE4HISmAT BLADESHOVELIS handy to have around because of its versatilITY%DGINGSPADESCANSLICETURF EDGEGARDENS and cut through roots. s 0RUNERS 3HARPENED PRUNERS CAN CUT through stems and branches effortlessly. s(OSE#HOOSEAHIGH QUALITYHOSETHATIS lightweight and durable, as hoses will always be necessary.

Monday - Friday 9:00 am - 8:00 pm Saturday 9:00 am - 6:00 pm Sunday 1:00 pm - 5:00 pm 534 Bruce Street Highway 5 East One mile east of Humboldt

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Friday, May 18, 2018 ECT 11


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Malinoski & Danyluik Funeral Home 100% LOCALLY OWNED AND OPERATED Hwy 5 East Humboldt

Obituaries

Obituaries

In Memoriam

HESSDORFER: Joan April 3, 1930 - May 1, 2018 Joan (nee Greenwood) Hessdorfer passed away at the Rosthern Union Hospital, Rosthern, SK, on Tuesday, May 1, 2018. She was 88 years of age. Joan was born in Saltcoats, SK, to Walter and Doris (nee Brimacombe) Greenwood. They moved to Naramata, BC, when she was six years old, and that’s where she attended school. After her schooling she worked in a fruit packing house where she met Leo Hessdorfer. They were married on January 6, 1949 in Naramata and shortly after that they moved to St. Benedict where Joan lived until 2000. Joan moved to Evergreen Court in Cudworth and then to St. Michael’s Haven and finally to Rosthern Hospital where she lived for the last two months. Joan worked numerous jobs within St. Benedict throughout the years. She loved gardening and flowers and enjoyed ceramics. Joan was a loving wife, mother, grandmother, great-grandmother and great-great-grandmother. Joan will be lovingly remembered by her children: Patrick (Maureen) Hessdorfer, David (Joyce) Hessdorfer, Gale Hessdorfer (John Reid), Gerald (Beth) Hessdorfer, Wayne (Diane) Hessdorfer; 11 grandchildren, 13 great-grandchildren and 4 great-great-grandchildren; siblings: Reg (Darlene) Greenwood, Betty Peters and Marion (Charles) Salting; numerous nieces, nephews and cousins. Joan was predeceased by her husband of 51 years Leo Hessdorfer; parents Walter and Doris (nee Brimacombe) Greenwood; and brother-in-law Louis Peters. A Prayer Service was held at St. Benedict Roman Catholic Church on Sunday, May 6, 2018 at 7:00 p.m., presided by Fr. Colin Roy. A eulogy was delivered by Gerald Hessdorfer. A Funeral Mass was offered at St. Benedict Roman Catholic Church, St. Benedict, SK on Monday, May 7, 2018 at 10:30 a.m., celebrated by Fr. Colin Roy. Others taking part were: Diane Hessdorfer, crossbearer; Tina Searcy and Amy Smith, scripture readers; Diane Hessdorfer, intentions; Wayne Hessdorfer and Gale Hessdorfer, giftbearers; Renee DeMoissac as organist with members of St. Benedict Parish Choir, music ministry. Honorary pallbearers were “all those who shared in Joan’s life.� Active pallbearers were Ward Hessdorfer, Louis Hessdorfer, Brett Hessdorfer, Aron Wehage, Ian Hessdorfer and Ryan Hessdorfer. Interment followed at St. Benedict Roman Catholic Cemetery, St. Benedict, SK. Memorial Donations may be directed to either St. Michael’s Haven P.O. Box 220 Cudworth SK. S0K 1B0, Parkinson’s Society 2103 Airport Dr #110B, Saskatoon, SK. S7L 6W or the MS Society 2-706 Duchess St, Saskatoon, SK S7K 0R3. Schuler-Lefebvre Funeral Chapel, Humboldt, SK (306-682-4114) www.schuler-lefebvrefuneralchapel.com Announcements

Announcements

All the visits are free. No obligations. Compliments of local businessess. ARE YOU NEW TO THE COMMUNITY? PLANNING A WEDDING?

682-1622

Check out our website for upcoming services and Obituaries

ARE YOU EXPECTING OR RECENTLY HAD A BABY?

ZZZPGIXQHUDOKRPHFD

Call 1-877-251-8685 Call 1-844-299-2466

Come-and-Go Tea Sunday, May 20, 2018 2 pm to 4 pm

BAKER: Keith November 26, 1924 - May 19, 2008. In loving memory of a dear husband, father, father-in-law, grandfather and great grandfather.

Lovingly remembered and sadly missed by wife Alvina, children: Brian, David, Rhonda, Yvette, Bill, Tom, Gail, Rob and their families.

Hoey Humboldt Jansen -XQFWLRQ  -XQFWLRQ  Kandahar Kelvington Kinistino Kuroki Kylemore Lake Lenore Lanigan Leroy Lestock Lockwood Manitou Margo Meacham

12 ECT Friday, May 18, 2018

St. Benedict St. Brieux 6W*UHJRU St. Louis Star City Sylvania 7LVGDOH Viscount :DGHQD :DNDZ :DNDZ&5 :DWURXV :DWVRQ :HOGRQ :LVKDUW :\Q\DUG Young

Advertisements and statements contained herein are the sole responsibility of the persons or entities that post the advertisement, and the Saskatchewan Weekly Newspaper Association and membership do not make any warranty as to the accuracy, completeness, truthfulness or reliability of such advertisements. For greater information on advertising conditions, please consult the Association’s Blanket Advertising Conditions on our website at www.swna.com. For Sale: 8�X12� garden shed. Wood frame, vinyl siding, asphalt singles,with metal rolling door. Asking $850. can be seen at 12 Chapman Place, Humboldt. Call 306-244-0391 for more information.

PROVINCE-WIDE CLASSIFIEDS. Reach over 550,000 readers weekly. Call this newspaper NOW or 306-649.1405 for details.

Farm Implements

BERNHARD: Hedwig March 27, 1925 - May 15, 2017 If roses grow in heaven, Lord please pick a bunch for us, Place them in our Mother’s arms and tell her they’re from us. Tell her we love her and miss her, and when she turns to smile, place a kiss upon her cheek and hold her for awhile. Because remembering her is easy, We do it every day, but there’s an ache within our hearts that will never go away. Lovingly remembered by her family.

Wanted

Announcements

For Sale Three 2000 bu. Westeel Roscoe Grain Bins - Floors are rotten, price is negotiable. Phone: 231-9572 or 682-0088

Business Opportunities NEW JUST LAUNCHING...MINI MAX PROFIT CENTERS. World’s First Counter top Vending Machine. Selling Top Brand M&M’s and Skittles. Protected TerritoriesFinancing-Training. CALL NOW 1-866-668-6629. WEBSITE www.sweetsforacause.com

Business Services

Notice to Creditors IN THE ESTATE OF ALBERT HOESS late of St. Brieux, in the Province of Saskatchewan, Retired Farmer, deceased. ALL CLAIMS against the above Estate, duly verified by Statutory Declaration and with particulars and valuation of security held, if any, must be sent to the undersigned before the 22nd day of May, A.D., 2018. BEHIEL, WILL & BIEMANS Barristers & Solicitors P.O. Box 878 Humboldt, Saskatchewan S0K 2A0 Solicitors for the Executor. IN THE ESTATE OF ELAINE PATRICIA TKATCH late of Prud’homme, in the Province of Saskatchewan, Administrator, deceased. ALL CLAIMS against the above Estate, duly verified by Statutory Declaration and with particulars and valuation of security held, if any, must be sent to the undersigned before the 22nd day of May, A.D., 2018. BEHIEL, WILL & BIEMANS Barristers & Solicitors P.O. Box 878 Humboldt, Saskatchewan S0K 2A0 Solicitors for the Executors.

Auto Miscellaneous Wrecking over 250 units... cars and trucks. Lots of trucks... Dodge... GMC... Ford... Imports... 1/2 ton to 3 tons... We ship anywhere... Call or text 306-821-0260. Lloydminster.

Personal Messages

PREGNANT? Need to Talk? Call the Helpline Toll Free

1-800-665-0570 Looking for a lady friend for a relationship. Preferably 65 - 70 years old. Call 306-328-3810 to get acquainted.

2 Quarters Available April 1, 2018 NW 16-38-24 W2 SW 21-38-24 W2 Call Ken Fay at 306-382-6575 for more information.

Melfort Middle Lake Muenster Naicam Nokomis Pathlow Peterson Pilger Pleasantdale Plunkett Punnichy Quill Lake Quinton Raymore Rose Valley Semans Silver Park 6SDOGLQJ

No Gifts Please - By Request

Larger used Deep Freeze for sale. Call 306-287-3589.

LAND FOR RENT

DISTRIBUTION AREA

Annaheim Archerwill Beatty Birch Hills Bruno Burr Carmel Clair Colonsay Cudworth Dafoe Domremy Drake Englefeld )RVVWRQ )XOGD *XHUQVH\ Hendon

The Community Gathering Place 701 - 6th Ave., Humboldt Light refreshments provided

For Sale - Misc You never said I'm leaving You never said goodbye You were gone before we knew it And only God knew why. A million times we needed you A million times we cried If love alone could have saved you You never would have died. In life we loved you dearly In death we love you still In our hearts you hold a place That no one could ever fill. It broke our hearts to lose you But you didn't go alone For part of us went with you The day God took you home.

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Coming Events

90th Birthday Celebration You Are Invited to Gladys Burton's 90th Birthday Celebration

Call Welcome Wagon today to receive your free gifts and information

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Career Opportunities

Career Opportunities

Compeon # 1718-42

Electrician Applied Cerficate Instructor

Locaon - Humboldt Region Contract For a complete job descripon, go to www.carltontrailcollege.com The successful applicant will be required to complete a criminal background check that is sasfactory to Carlton Trail College. We thank you for your interest and applicaon. Only those candidates selected for an interview will be contacted.

Join us on Facebook at: www.facebook.com/carltontrail

Career Opportunities

Career Opportunities

The Quill Lake Housing Authority is now accepting applications for a contract Maintenance/Caretaker. The Housing authority manages 28 senior and family unit located in Quill Lake. The successful candidate will report & take direction from the manager and board and be responsible for regular seasonal ground maintenance and for performing minor repairs as well as some cleaning responsibilities. Basic working knowledge of carpentry, plumbing, heating, electrical, appliance repair, and general maintenance is an asset. Must be able to perform manual labor and lifting tasks. Must be able to work independently. Tools and equipment to be supplied by the contractor. For Further details, please contact Heather Gabriel at

306-287-4241

Please submit written resume along with Criminal Record check by May 23, 2018 to Quill Lake Housing Authority, P. O. Box 218, Watson, Sask., S0K4V0 Resume may be faxed to 306-287-4241. Career Opportunities

Career Opportunities

Maintenance Person Required

Deadline to Apply June 1, 2018

CarltonTrailCollege. Contact: Human Resources; P.O. Box 720, Humboldt, SK, SOK 2A0 Ph: 306.682.2623 Fx: 306.682.1348 Email: careers@carltontrailcollega.com

Swine Technician HyLife Ltd is a progressive Manitoba based company. ,LJ>ŝĨĞĂŶĚŝƚƐĂĸůŝĂƚĞƐŚĂǀĞĨĞĞĚĂŶĚƉŽƌŬŽƉĞƌĂƟŽŶƐ ĂŶĚ ŐĞŶĞƟĐƐ ƐĂůĞƐ ŝŶ ǀĂƌŝŽƵƐ ĐŽƵŶƚƌŝĞƐ ĂƌŽƵŶĚ ƚŚĞ ǁŽƌůĚ͘  dŚĞ ,ĞĂĚ KĸĐĞ ŝƐ ůŽĐĂƚĞĚ ŝŶ ƚŚĞ ǀŝďƌĂŶƚ ĐŽŵŵƵŶŝƚLJ ŽĨ >Ă ƌŽƋƵĞƌŝĞ͕ DĂŶŝƚŽďĂ ǁŚŝĐŚ ŚĂƐ Ă ƌĞƉƵƚĂƟŽŶĨŽƌŝƚƐďĞĂƵƚLJĂŶĚŚŝŐŚƋƵĂůŝƚLJŽĨůŝĨĞ͘tĞ ĂƌĞ ĐƵƌƌĞŶƚůLJ ƐĞĞŬŝŶŐ ŚŝŐŚůLJ ŵŽƟǀĂƚĞĚ ƉĞŽƉůĞ ƚŽ Įůů ƚŚĞƉŽƐŝƟŽŶŽĨ^ǁŝŶĞdĞĐŚŶŝĐŝĂŶŝŶƚŚĞ^ŽƵƚŚĞĂƐƚĞƌŶ ĂŶĚ ^ŽƵƚŚǁĞƐƚĞƌŶ ĂƌĞĂƐ ŽĨ DĂŶŝƚŽďĂ͘  dŚŝƐ ƉŽƐŝƟŽŶ ƌĞƉŽƌƚƐĚŝƌĞĐƚůLJƚŽƚŚĞĂƌŶDĂŶĂŐĞƌ͘ dŚŝƐƉŽƐŝƟŽŶǁŝůůŝŶĐůƵĚĞƚŚĞĨŽůůŽǁŝŶŐƌĞƐƉŽŶƐŝďŝůŝƟĞƐ ĂŶĚĚĂLJͲƚŽͲĚĂLJĨƵŶĐƟŽŶƐ͗ ͻ ĂƌƌLJŽƵƚĨĞĞĚŝŶŐƉƌŽŐƌĂŵ ͻ ƌĞĞĚŝŶŐ͕ĨĂƌƌŽǁŝŶŐĚƵƟĞƐ ͻ tĞŝŐŚĂŶĚƐŽƌƚƉŝŐƐĨŽƌƚƌĂŶƐƉŽƌƚ ͻ tĂƐŚ ĞŵƉƚLJ ƌŽŽŵƐ͕ ƉƌĞƉƉŝŶŐ ƌŽŽŵ ĨŽƌ ĂŶŝŵĂů entry ͻ WĞƌĨŽƌŵŵŝŶŽƌŵĂŝŶƚĞŶĂŶĐĞƚĂƐŬƐ ͻ WĞƌĨŽƌŵŐĞŶĞƌĂůŽŶĨĂƌŵĚƵƟĞƐ ͻ ZĞĐŽŐŶŝnjĞĂŶĚƚƌĞĂƚůŝǀĞƐƚŽĐŬŚĞĂůƚŚŝƐƐƵĞƐ ͻ DĂŝŶƚĂŝŶůŝǀĞƐƚŽĐŬƉĞƌĨŽƌŵĂŶĐĞƌĞĐŽƌĚƐ ͻ KƚŚĞƌĚƵƟĞƐĂƐĂƐƐŝŐŶĞĚ dŚĞƐƵĐĐĞƐƐĨƵůĐĂŶĚŝĚĂƚĞƐŚŽƵůĚƉŽƐƐĞƐƐƚŚĞĨŽůůŽǁŝŶŐ ƋƵĂůŝĮĐĂƟŽŶƐ͗ ͻ ^ĞůĨͲŵŽƟǀĂƚĞĚ ͻ 'ŽŽĚǁŽƌŬĞƚŚŝĐ ͻ tŽƌŬǁĞůůǁŝƚŚŽƚŚĞƌƐ ͻ DŝŶŝŵƵŵϭLJĞĂƌƐǁŝŶĞƚĞĐŚĞdžƉĞƌŝĞŶĐĞƌĞƋƵŝƌĞĚ tĞ ŽīĞƌ Ă ĐŽŵƉƌĞŚĞŶƐŝǀĞ ďĞŶĞĮƚƐ ƉĂĐŬĂŐĞ ĂŶĚ ĐŽŵƉĞƟƟǀĞ ĐŽŵƉĞŶƐĂƟŽŶ ďĂƐĞĚ ŽŶ ĞdžƉĞƌŝĞŶĐĞ ĂŶĚ ŬŶŽǁůĞĚŐĞ͘ ^ĂůĂƌLJ ƌĂŶŐĞ ŝƐ ďĞƚǁĞĞŶ Ψϭ͕ϭϵϳ Ͳ Ψϭ͕ϰϵϲ͘Ϯϱ;ŝͲtĞĞŬůLJͿ͘zŽƵŵĂLJƋƵĂůŝĨLJĨŽƌĂŶĂŶŶƵĂů ƉĞƌĨŽƌŵĂŶĐĞ ŝŶĐƌĞĂƐĞ ĂŶĚͬŽƌ ďŽŶƵƐ ƉƌŽŐƌĂŵ ĂŶĚͬŽƌ ĂƉƌĞŵŝƵŵ͘,LJ>ŝĨĞŚĂƐďĞĞŶƌĞĐŽŐŶŝnjĞĚĂƐĂWůĂƟŶƵŵ DĞŵďĞƌŽĨĂŶĂĚĂ͛ƐĞƐƚͲDĂŶĂŐĞĚŽŵƉĂŶŝĞƐ͘ /ĨLJŽƵĂƌĞŝŶƚĞƌĞƐƚĞĚŝŶƚŚŝƐŽƉƉŽƌƚƵŶŝƚLJ͕ƉůĞĂƐĞĂƉƉůLJ ŽŶůŝŶĞĂƚǁǁǁ͘ŚLJůŝĨĞ͘ĐŽŵͬĐƵƌƌĞŶƚͲŽƉƉŽƌƚƵŶŝƟĞƐ Applicants who are not currently eligible to work in Canada will ŶŽƚďĞĐŽŶƐŝĚĞƌĞĚĨŽƌƚŚŝƐƉŽƐŝƟŽŶ͘ tĞƚŚĂŶŬĂůůĂƉƉůŝĐĂŶƚƐ͘,ŽǁĞǀĞƌ͕ŽŶůLJƚŚŽƐĞƵŶĚĞƌ ĐŽŶƐŝĚĞƌĂƟŽŶǁŝůůďĞĐŽŶƚĂĐƚĞĚ͘

Advertise with us! Call 306-682-2561 for more information

Pet of the Week

Heavy duty mechanic required Tools required and experience is an asset. We offer competitive wages, benefits, pension and apprenticeship for heavy duty equipment or trailer technician. Contact us or submit resume to: P: 204.571.1531 E: service@luckystarservice.ca F: 204.726.4910 Online application@ www.luckystarservice.ca

St. Peter’s Abbey is looking for a full time maintenance person able to work independently. Job requires experience in maintaining and repairing buildings and equipment. General knowledge of carpentry, boilers, plumbing, heating, electrical, mechanical and painting would be an asset. Deadline for applications is May 25, 2018. Please email resume with references to: businessoffice@stpeters.sk.ca, fax: 306-682-1766, or mail to St. Peter’s Abbey, Box 10, Muenster, SK S0K 2Y0.

MEDICAL TRANSCRIPTION! Indemand career! Employers have work-at-home positions available. Get online training you need from an employer-trusted program. Visit: CareerStep.ca/MT or 1-855768-3362 to start training for your work-at-home career today!

Tenders

Tenders

TENDER THE VILLAGE OF ANNAHEIM IS NOW ACCEPTING TENDERS FOR THE CONSTRUCTION OF A VILLAGE OFFICE. Broad Description of Project Includes: - Site Preparation - Installation of Septic Tank &RPSOHWH&RQVWUXFWLRQRI9LOODJH2I¿FH - Materials Used for Construction - Plumbing Installation - Electrical Installation - Painting of Interior - Floor Covering Tenders will be accepted on individual projects or as a complete package. For more information or for a copy of the plans, please contact Debra Parry, Administrator for the Village of Annaheim on Tuesday or Wednesdays by phone: 306-598-2006 or by email: villageofannaheim@sasktel.net or contact Mike Bold at 306-231-7128. Tenders Close June 13, 2018 The lowest or any tender will not necessarily be accepted.

ACREAGE FOR TENDER Block A, Plan 101713610, Ext 18 Portion of NW-29-38-20-W2nd R.M. of St. Peter No. 369 ‡ 3.78 Acres ‡ SHL Rural Pipeline at curb-stop ‡ SHL Hookups within 150’ of curb-stop included ‡ Sewer System must be upgraded ‡ Property “As Is” – No Warranty ‡ Approximately 5 kms SW of Annaheim Tenders must be received by 4:00 p.m. on May 31st, 2018. 5% Deposit required on acceptance. Balance payable within 60 days. For more information, contact the undersigned. Highest or any offer not necessarily accepted. R.M. OF ST. PETER NO. 369 P.O. Box 70 Annaheim, SK S0K 0G0 ATTENTION: Angie Peake Telephone: (306) 598-2122

>ĂƵƌŝĞŚĂƐďĞĞŶǀĞƌLJƉĂƟĞŶƚĂŶĚŝƐĚĞĮŶŝƚĞůLJ Ɵ ƌĞĂĚLJĨŽƌŚĞƌĨŽƌĞǀĞƌŚŽŵĞ͊tŚŽ͛ƐůŽŽŬŝŶŐĨŽƌ ĂƉůĂLJĨƵůĂŶĚůŽǀĂďůĞŐŝƌů͍^ŚĞŚĂƐŐŽŶĞƚŚƌŽƵŐŚ ƚƌĂŝŶŝŶŐ͕ĂŶĚŝƐƌĞĂĚLJƚŽƐŚŽǁƐŚĞŝƐĂůŽLJĂů ĐŽŵƉĂŶŝŽŶ͘WůƵƐ͕ƐŚĞŝƐĂďƐŽůƵƚĞůLJŐŽƌŐĞŽƵƐ͊ ĂůůƚŚĞ,ƵŵďŽůĚƚ^͘W͘͘͘ϯϬϲϲϴϮͲϱϱϱϬƚŽ ŵĂŬĞĂŶĂƉƉŽŝŶƚŵĞŶƚƚŽŵĞĞƚŚĞƌ͘ HUMBOLDT S.P.C.A Please come in to view 10464 Highway 5 New Hours of operation: 7XHVGD\WR6DWXUGD\SPWRSPf&ORVHG6XQGD\ 0RQGD\ www.humboldtspca.com KWWSZZZIDFHERRNFRPKRPHSKS"JURXSVKXPEROGWVSFD

Volunteers, foster homes & donations welcomed. Please call 682-5550. Leave messages with any concerns. Brought to you by

and the S.P.C.A One un-spayed cat and offspring produces 420,000 in 7 years One un-spayed dog and offspring produces 67,000 in 6 years

Auctions

Auctions

Dispersal Sale for Dave Tasiuk June 2, 2018 @ 10:00 AM

12 miles North West of Wakaw- WATCH FOR SIGNS (10 miles West on Hwy 312, 2 miles North on Bellvue Grid) 1985 Versatile 836– New Tires 1998 New Holland TR 98 1998 Bourgault 8800 Air Drill 36’ – ¾ Knives, New Hoses 1998 Bourgault 2155 Tank 1996 100’ Brandt Sprayer Auto Fold 1992 Massey Ferguson 885 25’ SP Swather 1997 Case IH 8480 Baler Highline 6600 Bale Processor 36’ Melroe Disc Drill Factor Drill carrier 28’ Versatile push table – fits versatile 150 1981 Versatile 150 Bi- Directional Tractor 1997 Yardman 24 Hp -42” Cut 2008 Honda CRV AWD John Deere B Model Tractor- Not Running John Deere D Model Tractor- Not Running 1976 F600 Ford 3Tonne –Roll Tarp 361 Engine 1979 F700 Ford 3 Tonne – Roll Tarp 374 Engine 20’ Shop Built Gooseneck Trailer 7X41 Westfield Auger 18 Hp Kohler Engine 7X 51 Westfield Auger 5 Hp – 240 Volt Electric Motor 2003 MXZ Skidoo

This and Much More Sale Subject to Additions and Deletions Lunch will be sold Hardy Auction Services Box 1917, Melfort, SK, S0E 1A0 Call: 306-921-3411 OR 306-921-9608 • Fax- 306-752-9836 Email: hardyauctionservices@outlook.com PL- 310351 Apartments/Condos for Rent

Apartments/Condos for Rent

2 Bedroom Apartments Newly Renovated East View Manor, Humboldt Water & gas included. No smoking, no pets. $700/month. References Required. Available Now! Phone: (306) 682-2798 Cell: (306) 231-7112 Apartments / Condos-For Sale

Houses for Sale

2 bedroom Condo at Kinsmen Court for Sale / or Rent. Ideal for seniors, wheel chair accessible and only 1 block from post office. Fridge and stove included, $117,000. Phone 306-231-9864 or 306-231-7174.

HOUSE FOR SALE BY TENDER Tender closes May 31, 2018 at noon. Mail to: Box 194, Humboldt, SK., S0K 2A0. Attention: Randall & Sharon Harriman. 106 - 5th street. For viewing or more information, please text Randy at 306320-1895. Upon acceptance of tender, you will be contacted of the acceptance to your tender and a 10% DEPOSIT IS REQUIRED.

Condo For Sale East College Park - Saskatoon, SK - 1076 sq. ft. - 2 bedroom - 2 full bathrooms - all new appliances and decor - close to mall. Asking $193,300. Call 306-934-2568

Duplexes for Rent DUPLEX - Muenster 1400 sq. ft. Newly Renovated Main Floor Laundry Will consider pets No Smoking, No Vaping, No Large Dogs $800 per month plus Utilities or $850 with pets Call or Text 306-740-8344

Houses For Rent Bruno, 517 Main Street 3 Bedroom Washer, Dryer, Fridge, Stove 350/month + utilities 231-8488 or 369-2657

Friday, May 18, 2018 ECT 13


Land Wanted

More Farmland Wanted - Justin Yin Cell: 306-230-1588 Office: 306-361-8926 Fax: 306-665-1443 justin.yin.ca@gmail.com NOA Realty

Land Wanted

Tell dad I love you by sending us your best father-kid photo.

• Powerful multiple marketing networks • Powerful English & Chinese websites • Farmland marketing specialist • Featured on CTV / Global TV • Featured on The Globe & Mail • Featured on The Western Producer 112 Reindeer Road, Saskatoon SK

Mobile/Manufactured Homes for Sale

Feed & Seed

HEATED CANOLA WANTED!! - GREEN CANOLA - SPRING THRASHED - DAMAGED CANOLA FEED OATS WANTED!! - BARLEY, OATS, WHT - LIGHT OR TOUGH - SPRING THRASHED HEATED FLAX WANTED!! HEATED PEAS HEATED LENTILS "ON FARM PICKUP" Westcan Feed & Grain 1-877-250-5252

Please drop your photo off at 535 Main Street, Humboldt or email lwilkinson@humboldtjournal.ca by Thursday, June 7 at 5:00 p.m. Your photo will be displayed in our Father’s Day feature in the June 13 Humboldt Journal and June 15 East Central Trader.

EARLY VARIETIES. Want to be finished combining in August? Go early HRS Wheat, AC Juniper Oats. Busby & Sundre Barley. AAC Peace River Field Peas (earliest yellow pea). Early One Polish Canola (one month earlier); mastinseeds.com. 403-556-2609. FORAGE SEED FOR SALE: Organic & conventional: Sweet Clover, Alfalfa, Red Clover, Smooth Brome, Meadow Brome, Crested Wheatgrass, Timothy, etc. Free Delivery! Birch Rose Acres Ltd. 306-921-9942.

FATHER’S DAY IS SUNDAY, JUNE 17

www.humboldtjournal.ca /HumboldtJournal

Land for Sale

Feed & Seed

Buying/Selling FEED GRAINS heated / damaged CANOLA/FLAX Top price paid FOB FARM

Western Commodities 877-695-6461 Visit our website @ www.westerncommodities.ca CERTIFIED SEED. Go early HRS Wheat. Super hardy Pintail, Winter Wheat, AC Juniper, AC Morgan, AC Mustang & Derby Oats. Busby, Seebe, Sundre Barley. Very early yellow peas. High yielding Silage Peas. Polish Canola. Spring Triticale. mastinseeds.com; 403-5562609.

Full Colour Printing & Design

Saddle up for the most fun ladies golf tournament!

Saturday, June 2 at the Humboldt Golf Club

For all your print needs

Call or email us today! info@humboldtjournal.ca 306-682-25611

Posters s Business Cards s Brochures s Flyers s Post cards s Gift certificates s

Loyalty cards s Invitations s Announcements s Save the date s Stationery s Note pads s

14 ECT Friday, May 18, 2018

Envelopes s Labels s Tickets s Carbonless forms s Photocopies s Colour copies s

Call Big Brothers Big Sisters of Humboldt office 306-682-2829 or visit our Facebook page for more information and registration. Men we need your help, looking for volunteer caddies, please join us! Thank you to all our volunteers and sponsors!


Humboldt & District

‘”ƒ†˜‡”–‹•‹Â?‰‹Â?ˆ‘”Â?ƒ–‹‘Â?‰‹˜‡‘—”Â…ÂŽÂƒÂ•Â•Â‹Ď”Â‹Â‡Â†ƒ†˜‡”–‹•‹Â?‰†‡’ƒ”–Â?‡Â?– a call at 306-682-2561 or email info@humboldtjournal.ca

BUSINESS & SERVICE DIRECTORY

ACCOUNTANTS

SERVICES

HERGOTT ELECTRIC LTD.

SMALL BUSINESS OF THE YEAR 2013

‡&RPPHUFLDO ‡3KRQH&DEOLQJ ‡&HQWUDO9DF ‡7UHQFKLQJ

623 7th Street Humboldt, SK 306-682-5058 www.hsacpa.ca

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For all Your Electrical Needs.......

&RQVXOWLQJ‡3UHSDUDWLRQ &RUSRUDWH‡)DUP 6PDOO%XVLQHVV 3HUVRQDO‡(VWDWH Thursdays: 535 Main Street Humboldt Journal Building 306-376-0008

LEGAL

6

John Will, Q.C. Aaron Behiel, LL.B. Amber Biemans, B.A., LL.B. Morgan Jaster, B.Sc., M.Sc., J.D Jonathan Adams, B.A., B. Ed, J.D. 602-9th Street, P.O. Box 878 Humboldt, Sask. S0K 2A0 Phone 682-2642 Fax: 682-5165 E-mail: RIÂżFH#EHKLHOZLOOFRP Website:ZZZEHKLHOZLOOFRP

FAX: 306-682-3414

mparkernd@gmail.com | (306) 682-0099

Deborah Bryson-Sarauer, MSW, RSW, (SK) Phone or E-mail for appointments and fee schedules Cell: 306-361-6373 E-mail: brysodeb@gmail.com

Custom Express

www.itstartswithnature.com | 819 6th Ave, Humboldt, SK

Landscaping

Mobile Welding Service Farm and Industrial Welding, Pressure Welding, Machining, Custom Fabricating, CNC Plasma Cutting, Customized Steel Signs TEL (306) 682-3424 8 miles North, Hwy #20 rswelding@sasktel.net

BARIL ROOFING New roofs ‡ Asphalt shingles Hidden Fastener Metal Repairs ‡ Re-roof Rubber Tile Insurance claims Warranty

Call Shawn at 306-231-9477 ‡

Serving Humboldt, Watrous and Naicam areas

G. NETT

ROOFING & PAINTING ‡1HZ5RRIVRU5HURR¿QJ ‡$OOW\SHVRI6KLQJOHV ‡0HWDO5RRIV :DOOV ‡&ODG:LQGRZV 'RRUV ‡,QWHULRU ([WHULRU3DLQWLQJ ‡)UHH(VWLPDWHV

Call Gary at 306-369-7803 (cell) 306-369-2325 5XVVHO:HEHU%$//% 7DEEHWKD0*DVSHU%$//%

SEWING

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Sewing Machine Service New & Used Sewing Machines & Sergers and Repair Service “Just a phone call away� Sales & Phone (306) 287-3941 Service Watson, SK

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RENTAL STORE JAY’S CARPENTRY Specializing in renovations and Ă€QLVKLQJFDUSHQWU\,QFOXGLQJ - Windows/Doors 6LGLQJ6RIĂ€W)DVFLD 'HFNV)HQFHV - Kitchen/Baths - Basement Development $OO,QWHULRU)LQLVKLQJ ,QVXUDQFH&ODLPV Jason Schlachter Journeyman Carpenter  ‡   j.schlachter@sasktel.net

DARIN PRAY, 306-682-5263 OR 306-231-9779

P9 designs inc. MICHELLE Zimmer A.SC.T. Humboldt, Saskatchewan 306-231-9270

OFFICE HOURS 8 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. Mon. - Thurs. 8 a.m. - 2:00 p.m. Fri.

(306) 682-4434 2IÀFH+RXUV 0RQGD\²7KXUVGD\ DPWRSP 1HZ3DWLHQWV:HOFRPH

617 - 7th Street, Humboldt General Dentistry Phone 306-682-2313 Dr. Atul Dhir Dr. Sok Sun Dr. Evan Jarvi

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AND MUCH MORE 6725$*( ),5(:22'

Luxury Heated and Self Storage Units RV Storage

Inc.

ACTION ERVICES

ARCHITECTURAL DRAFTING & DESIGN

David D. Mueller, A.Sc.T. Phone: (306) 682-4751 dmueller@sasktel.net

www.accentins.ca P.O. Box 4080 517 Main Street Humboldt, SK S0K 2A0 PH: (306) 682-5017 FAX: (306) 682-5019

CONTRACTORS

R. BENDER’S PAINTING ‡,QWHULRU ([WHULRU3DLQWLQJ ‡6WLSSOLQJ ‡)UHH(VWLPDWHV 5D\%HQGHU‡%UXQR 3KRQH &HOO

P.O. Box 10 74 Main Street Quill Lake, SK S0A 3E0 Ph: (306) 383-2383 or (855) 383-2383 Fax: (306) 383-2333

OPTOMETRISTS

Dr. Alaina Elias

O P T O M E T R I S T 0DLQ6WUHHW‡+XPEROGW6. Call: 682-1590 2IÂżFH+RXUV 0RQGD\)ULGD\ DPSP

“We offer a full service dispensary and diagnostic services including cataract, glaucoma and macular degeneration.�

Humboldt Vision Centre

Dr. Michele Ackerman 2414 Westwood Dr.

‡5LGH2Q3DFNHUV (ideal for yard & grain bin prep) ‡7RZDEOH0DQ/LIWV

www.alpinestorage.ca | Service is our top priority

Pitka’s

DENTAL

(behind Canalta Hotel)

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BUNZELECTRIC@SASKTEL.NET

Free Estimates!

Behiel, Will & Biemans

f th yea e r

Dr. Megan Parker, ND

Bryson-Sarauer Counselling &Consulting

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PH. 306-682-4588

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306-682-2060

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SERVING SASKATCHEWAN SINCE 1970

Ph (306) 682-3352 Fax (306) 628-5490 Email: hergott.electric@sasktel.net Website: www.hergottelectric.com

Humboldt & Area’s Largest Independent Accounting Firm

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Electrical Contractors

rd wa

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Dr. Curtis Knight Dr. Trevor Styan Dr. Paige Helmers

Optometrists

Our office has provided quality family vision care in our community for over 85 years. 2305 8th Ave.

Quill Centre

Hours Mon. - Fri. 9-5

Call for appointment / emergency 306-682-2335 New patients always welcome.

ADVERTISE YOUR BUSINESS HERE! CALL 306-682-2561 FOR MORE INFORMATION.

Emergency Water Damage / Fire-Smoke Damage Clean-up Mould Removal Rebuild / Repair Construction Specializing in Insurance Claims

306-682-1999 / Toll Free 1-877-895-1999 24/7 EMERGENCY 306-231-3500

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CARPET CLEANING

FOR A LONG LASTING CLEAN! CARPETS & UPHOLSTERY PROFESSIONALLY CLEANED EMERGENCY FLOOD CLEANUP & DRYOUT WE DO INSURANCE CLAIMS HIGHLY RECOMMENDED BY THOSE WE SERVE

338-3303 Wadena

682-5353 +XPEROGW

554-2181 Wynyard

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unity Comm or f based s 5 year 231 Main Street (back entrance) Ph. 306-231-6828 Sharon info@renewedhope.ca C.P.C.A. #3171

ERNIEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S MOBILE AG REPAIR Ernie F Peters - Owner Box 5156, Humboldt, SK S0K 2A0

Cell: (306) 231-8819 Home: (306) 682-1470 Will work on all types of Farm Machinery + Air Conditioning Also Available for After Hours Emergency Work!

Friday, May 18, 2018 ECT 15


North Central softball season gets underway By Christopher Lee Humboldt Journal Reporter With the calendar flipping to May, baseball players from around the area return to the diamond, with the North Central Softball League kicking off at the beginning of the month. Bantam/Midget It was an excellent start to the season for Watrous as they kicked off their year with wins in each of their first three contests. Watrous began their season with a nail biting 9-8 win over Humboldt 1, a 22-7 win over Wadena, and an 11-6 win over Humboldt 2. Wynyard meanwhile, enjoyed a solid start to the season of their own as they opened up the season with a 2-1 record thanks to an edge-ofyour-seat 15-14 win over Wadena, a 24-9 win over Kelvington, and a 15-10 loss to Humboldt 1. Wadena meanwhile, did not enjoy a great start to the season as they added a 14-5 loss to Humboldt 1 to their losses against Watrous and Wynyard. Peewee The biggest of the four leagues is the peewee league, which features 11 teams from eight different communities in-

cluding Tisdale, Watrous, H u m b o l d t , Wa d e n a , Melfort, Lanigan, Carrot River, and Wynyard. The Tisdale Riverdogs enjoyed the best start to the season as they piled up wins in each of their first three contests, knocking off Wadena 165, Melfort 1 16-8 and the Tisdale Rangers 18-16. Watrous 1 also started their season in excellent fashion as they picked up wins in each of their first two matchups, upending Lanigan 14-4 and Wynyard 28-8. Humboldt also started their season with a pair of wins as they beat Melfort 2 11-10 and Lanigan 20-5. Watrous 2 meanwhile, enjoyed a middling start to their season as they split a pair of contests, knocking off Wynyard 28-14, before losing to Wadena 22-17. The Tisdale Rangers won the only other game of the week, as they side knocked off Carrot River 28-3. Squirt Foam Lake and Wynyard each enjoyed the best starts to the squirt season, as each won their first two contests, with Foam Lake beating Lanigan 1 24-21 and Watrous 18-9, while Wynyard upended Lanigan 2 27-20 and Naicam 12-8. Wadena and Lanigan 2

rounded out the winning teams from last week as Wadena knocked off Humboldt 16-8 and Lanigan 2 upended Humboldt 22-16. Mite The lone division in the league to not contain an undefeated team is the mite division. While not undefeated, Muenster has enjoyed an excellent start to the season as the squad posted a 3-1 record to start the season thanks to an 11-2 win over Humboldt 2, a 14-4 win over Humboldt 1, a 5-1 win over Humboldt 2, and a 9-2 loss against Wadena. Lanigan 1 meanwhile, split the first two games of their season, as they suffered a 4-3 setback against Humboldt 1, before beating Wynyard 6-3. Wynyard meanwhile, picked up the only other win of the week as they upended Wadena 7-5.

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LAWN & GARDEN

2018 Ferris IS2100Z,61â&#x20AC;?,26hp,fab,f&r Susp,........... $11,500 2018 Ferris IS2100Z, LD eďŹ , 61â&#x20AC;?, fab..................$13,000 SO28hp, 2018 Ferris IS700Z, 27hp, 61â&#x20AC;?, fab........................... $8,800 2018 Ferris IS400Z, 23hp, 48â&#x20AC;?, fab............................ $5,500 2017 Ferris IS700Z, 27hp, 61â&#x20AC;?, fab............................ $8,150 2017 Ferris IS700Z, 27hp, 52â&#x20AC;?, fab............................ $7,700 2017 Ferris IS600Z, 25hp, 48â&#x20AC;?, fab............................ $7,100 2017 Snapper 560Z, 25hp, 61â&#x20AC;?, fab........................... $6,200 2017 Snapper 560Z, 25hp, 52â&#x20AC;?, fab.......................... $5,700 2017 Snapper 360Z, 22hp, 46â&#x20AC;?, stamped.................. $3,450 2016 Ferris IS700Z, 10hrs, 27hp, 61â&#x20AC;?, fab................. $7,800 2015 JD Z235, 20hp, 42â&#x20AC;? bagger stamped ................ $4,500 2009 JD 820A, 25hp LD60â&#x20AC;?, 840hrs....................... $3,900 SOkaw,

COMBINES

2012 MF 9560, 520 dls, greaser, 900sp hrs, elc tpr, lg unldr ...................................................... $265,900 2010 MF 9895, dls, 920 hrs ................................... $225,000 2009 MF 9795,1500 sp hrs, dls, 350, sm pu .......... $175,900 2009 MF 9795, 1061sep, chopper, chaff, sm, dls .. $189,900 2008 MF 9790, 1054hrs, big work order,duals, mav ..$174,900 2006 MF 9790, dls, sw pu, cpr&cf sdr, shedded every night,1800h .................................. $133,900 2004 CIH 8010, 2229sep hrs, singles, big work odr, shopper ............................................$119,900 2004 Challenger 670, rake up, 900â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tirs, c&csdr ...$99,000

HEADERS

2013 MF 9250, 40â&#x20AC;? pea, fx hdr, hc reels ...................$65,900 2008 MF 8200, ďŹ&#x201A;ex, 35â&#x20AC;&#x2122;, hc pu rlsQ ......................... $33,900 2007 MF 5100, 36â&#x20AC;&#x2122;, one piece reel, mf adptr ............$36,000 2006 MF 5000, dpr, 36â&#x20AC;&#x2122;, mf adp ................................$26,000 HONEYBEE SP36, ull split reel, NH adpt .................. $6,900

HAY

2014 CIH HDX 162, rubber rls, 16â&#x20AC;? ..........................$22,900 2014 MF 1375, Mower con, disc, 300 acres .............$44,900 2013 MF 2856A, 5500bls, axel susp, twine & net ....$37,900

WINDROWERS

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(4) 2017 MF 9860, 40â&#x20AC;&#x2122;, trans, auto str, 200 sep hrs, ďŹ&#x201A; ld ................................................... $225,900 2016 MF 9860,40â&#x20AC;&#x2122;, dsa, trans, auto str, roller, 200 hrs ........................................................ $205,900 2015 MF WR9740, 36â&#x20AC;&#x2122;auto srt, 620â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s full ld........... $139,900 2015 MF 9840, 137hp, 40â&#x20AC;&#x2122;, dsa, auto str, cab&axle susp, 250hrs ........................................ $179,000 2012 MF WR9740, 36â&#x20AC;&#x2122;, loaded, 1060hrs, auto str . $102,900 2012 MF WR9740, 36â&#x20AC;&#x2122;, loaded, no auto str, 654hrs.................................................................. $102,900 2012 MF WR9740, 36â&#x20AC;&#x2122;, 1082hrs, auto str, full ld ... $106,900 2012 CIH WD1903, 956hrs, 36â&#x20AC;&#x2122;, 190hp, roller, ezee str $95,900 2011 JD 450D, 36â&#x20AC;&#x2122; jd header, 583hrs, big rbr, out back ...................................................................$99,000 2009 MF 9430, 30â&#x20AC;&#x2122;, cd, roller, sheers, 1027hrs, wghts ....................................................... $72,900 1997 MF 220, 2400hrs, 30â&#x20AC;&#x2122;, sch drive, ull ................ $12,900 1996 HESSTON 8100, 30â&#x20AC;&#x2122;.......................................$17,900

TRACTORS

2017 Fendt 1050, 517hp, dls ft&rr, loaded ....................CALL 2017 MF 6713, ldr, palt, 130hp, dlx, 12x12 shut, Dem .$79,900 2015 MF 4610M, 99hp, 12x12, ldr, dlx cab ....................CALL 2015 Versatile 550, 800â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ps, pto, 1220hrs, dif lks, wghts, 6elc ................................................ $359,900 2015 Versatile 2375,1200hrs,pto,710â&#x20AC;&#x2122;sdls,wghts, outback, ................................................................ $205,900 2014 MF 7616, ldr, grpl, delux cab, cab susp, cvt, 3400hrs .......................................................... $142,900 2014 Fendt 724, 2500hrs, 18.4dls, cvt, loaded, ft 3pth&pto ............................................................ $209,900

Visit Us At: www.kmksales.com 2013 CH 545D, ldr, grpl, 1511hrs, 24sp, dl pto ...... $129,900 2013 CH MT955C, 475hp, 800â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, pto, loaded, 2400hrs................................................................ $279,900 2013 Versatile 2375, 950hrs, pto, 710â&#x20AC;&#x2122;sx38 ......... $195,900 2012 CH MT675D, 320hp, 520dls, cvt, ft&cab susp, 2568hrs, 4hyd ................................. $195,900 2012 CH MT655D, 1467hrs, 5hyd, 480x50 dlswghts, cvt ....................................................... . $175,000 2012 CH MT655D, 2215hrs, 520/46dls, cvt, 4hyd, wghts .......................................................... $175,000 2010 Fendt 820, loader, 710â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, cvt, 4hyd .............. $137,900 2010 Versatile 340, 1880hrs, ps, pto, dlx cab, wght, gps, 620x42 ................................... $199,900 2010 Versatile 535,4200hrs,12sp std,800dls,full wghts, valve, .................................................................... $187,500 2009 CH 675C, F&R dls, 1900hrs, 320hp.............. $175,000 2009 NH T9040,3535hrs,std hyd,710dls,rear wghts, ps trans, ................................................................ $195,900 2007 MF 5465, 110hp, 16sp, eco pto, sl ldr, 3300hrs, fwa ........................................................... $72,500 1990 CHALLENGER 65, ps trans ...........................$29,900 1989 CIH 7120, 8200hrs, ps tran, fwa, 650x38.........$49,000 1986 MF 1010, 581hrs, gear, fwa, turf, c/w 54â&#x20AC;? mower, 3pth .................................................. $5,900

SPRAYERS

2017 RG1300B, 120â&#x20AC;&#x2122;, 1300gl, raven, loaded.................CALL 2016 RG1100B, 120â&#x20AC;&#x2122;, 1100gl, raven, loaded .................CALL 2016 8400B, appl, air max, cvt, 393hp ...........................CALL 2011 Versatile SX275, 100â&#x20AC;&#x2122;, 1200gl, dls, raven, div, camera ................................................ $199,000 2005 Rogator 1074, 100â&#x20AC;&#x2122;, 1000gl, 3500hrs ............$89,000

INDUSTRIAL LIFTS

2005 SKYJACK SJ8841, 4x4, sissorlift, 41â&#x20AC;&#x2122; lift, 1500lbs........................................................ $17,900 1999 TEREX TB44, man bskt, foam tires ................$19,900 1994 TRAVERSE TLC6044, 6000lbs lift, 4x4x4 .....$21,900 1990 Gradall 534B...................................................$24,900

SKIDSTEERS

2013 VOLVO MC85C, 60hp, 1750lbs Lf, 300hrs .... $29,900 2006 VOLVO MC110B, 2400lb lf, a/c, cab, 80hp ....$29,000 2004 Cat 236B,cab a/h,2 spd,49hp,1750lb lift..........$29,900

WHEEL LOADERS

1998 SAMSUNG SL150, 5.9 cummins, 3.5yrd, 158hp.......................................................... $39,900

BACKHOES

2007 TEREX 860B, 94hp, 4x4, 14â&#x20AC;&#x2122;8â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;&#x2122;dd ...................$69,900

MISC

New Elmers Super 7, 50â&#x20AC;&#x2122;, 70â&#x20AC;&#x2122;, 90â&#x20AC;&#x2122;, 7 bar .....................CALL 2011 Elmers, 1000, tarp, 900â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, hyd&pto, hyd spy&pivot ......................................................... $45,900 2011 Unverferth 9250, 1000bus, 900â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, pto, scale, tarp ............................................................... $45,900 2010 Elmers, 850, tarp, pto&hyd, hyd spt&pivot, 30.5â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, scale.............................................................$39,900 2009 Riteway 8165, 68â&#x20AC;&#x2122;, 20â&#x20AC;? tines .......................... $27,900 1993 DRESSER 870 grader, 201 hp, 14â&#x20AC;&#x2122; blade, cummins, fresh eng .................................................$33,900 1981 TAMPO RP28D, comp, 84â&#x20AC;? drum,107hp, cab ... $9,900 1977 DYNAPAC CA15, 66â&#x20AC;?smooth, Dd dsl .............$10,900 INGERSOLL 185, air compressor, jd 3cyl dsl ............ $8,900 Wolfpac WP2500, 28â&#x20AC;? smooth drum, gas .................. $3,900 2010 AMIDA AL4060D4MH, light tower, 6 KW gen .. $5,900

East Central Trader May 18, 2018  
East Central Trader May 18, 2018  
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