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Under The Shadows of

SHASTA Featuring Shasta, Siskiyou, Tehama, Plumas, Lassen, Trinity, Modoc, Butte, and more....

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SHASTA

WELCOME TO NORTHERN CALIFORNIA Under the shadow of Shasta we find a nature’s wonderland filled with mountains, lakes, fields, and streams. Whether your plans include snow or water skiing, fishing or houseboating, hiking or just getting away from it all, the fashionable small towns, quaint yet trendy communities, and amazing cities have something to offer everyone. The areas covered by this magazine include the state’s northernmost counties: Shasta, Siskiyou, Trinity, and Lassen. Also included are pieces of Modoc, Plumas, Butte, and Tehama counties. Bounded by Oregon to the north, Nevada to the east, and the coastal counties of Humboldt and Del Norte to the west, and the Sacramento Valley to the south, the land area encompasses nearly 20 percent of the Golden State, (approximately the size of the state of Ohio) but the population is a mere 1.4 percent of the 39 million people calling California home. The Shasta area is a summertime playground with warm water lakes and all kinds of activities that go with them. It is also a wintertime playground for alpine enthusiasts. This scenic region serves as a major supply and support center for anyone traveling the I-5 corridor. With the exceptions of Redding area, having upwards of 105,000 in population, and Chico having more than 94,000, most towns in the region are small and the surrounding countryside is sparsely populated. Within the area, there are seven National Forests, twelve State Parks, and four National Parks. Redding boasts a significant amount of culture. You can’t drive through the town without noticing the famous Sundial Bridge off to the west of I-5. Downtown Redding is becoming quite the hub of entertainment in the area, as it has restored a big section of its historical area including the Cascade Theatre area and the Market Street Promenade, and is expanding constantly. Throughout the year you can find several festivals, quaint cafés, wine bars, shopping, art shows, Marketfest, and fine dining. As mentioned, the region is served from north to south by I-5. Smaller routes traverse the area from west to east and include highways 36, 44, 70, 96, and 299, among others. The roads are mostly two-lane and offer incredible scenery for motorists. Some of them are designated National Scenic Byways. Major rivers in the area include the Sacramento, Klamath, Trinity, Feather and McCloud. The waterways provide excitement for anglers, whitewater rafters and kayakers, as do the area’s lakes and reservoirs. The dominant body of water in the region is, of course, Shasta Lake, with more than 400 miles of shoreline created by the second largest dam in the United States, Shasta Dam. The lake is visible to travelers at several points along I-5 starting about 15 minutes north of Redding, and continuing north until just past the small town of Lakehead. Mt. Shasta, our towering beauty, seems impossibly

massive, especially on clear days. Its lofty peak seems to be out of this world. Standing at 14,162 feet, the mountain is the highest volcano in the state. The mountain attracts hikers, skiers, campers, mountain climbers, mountain bikers, snowboarders, and serious mountaineers who strive for its summit. Mt. Shasta is part of the Cascade Range, which runs diagonally through the region. Southeast of Mt. Shasta is Lassen Volcanic National Park, with 106,000 acres of volcanic terrain that includes steaming mud pools, hot springs, cinder cones, and lava pinnacles. Other portions of the park feature thick forests, clear streams, and wildflower dotted meadows. Bird enthusiasts can see the state’s largest resident population of bald eagles at Shasta Lake. Hundreds of species can be seen at wildlife refuges such as the Klamath Basin National Wildlife Refuge and the Tule Lake National Wildlife Refuge northeast of Mt. Shasta near the Oregon border. At Lava Beds National Monument, visitors can view miles of hardened molten lava flows, lava tubes and caves. Cave enthusiasts will also enjoy Lake Shasta Caverns, which is 17 miles north of Redding and features a one-hour guided tour after a boat ride across the lake, and a bus ride to the cavern entrance. New this year are Shasta Lake Dinner Cruises which depart from Lake Shasta Caverns. In the western portion of the Shasta Cascade region lie the Trinity Alps and Marble Mountain Wilderness Areas. Accessible by Hwy 299 and Hwy 3, the mountains draw backpackers to 9,000 foot peaks, alpine meadows and more than 50 mountain lakes. Lake Siskiyou and Lake Shastina in Siskiyou County feature miles of beautiful shoreline and are growing in popularity. Farther east, Eagle Lake is the second largest natural lake completely within California’s borders. It is home to abundant wildlife and the famous Eagle Lake Trout, which grow very large in size. Lake Almanor is a large manmade lake in Plumas County and is a popular recreation destination. Whiskeytown Lake is another popular lake and is located within a National Recreation Area abundant with activities to enjoy, having 36 miles of shoreline. Whiskeytown’s most popular activities include mountain biking, hikes to waterfalls, kayaking, and sailing. Lake Oroville is a manmade lake, with the largest earthen dam in America. All of these lakes have similar outdoor recreation possibilities, including water-sports, houseboating, camping, fishing, hiking, and all around exploring.

101 THINGS TO DO MAGAZINE The goal of 101 Things To Do Magazine, Shasta is to serve as a guide while you explore the area. We have organized the magazine in a logical, orderly fashion to make it easy to use. The 101 Things To Do is divided by geographic area. The table of contents

ON THE COVER ...

is listed in sections according to the area the activity or topic is located. Our map in the front of the magazine shows the major roads and towns in the area. Inside the magazine, you’ll find many maps of the towns, major roads, areas, lakes, and more. The 101 Things To Do editorials explain exciting activities that will entertain and thrill the entire family. It is a great way to learn about and enjoy this magnificent area. As you read through the magazine, you’ll see that we’ve included information about adjacent regions and counties for those who may be continuing their travels. We urge visitors and locals alike to patronize the many fine businesses that will make your stay more enjoyable. Through their support, we can share this magazine and the beauty of Shasta. 101 Things To Do in Shasta works in conjunction with guides published along the Oregon and California Coasts. For those traveling to our other regions, please look for the 101 Things To Do magazines in Del Norte, Humboldt, Mendocino, Sonoma, and Marin in California. Also available is the Bento, Coos, Curry, Tillamook, Polk, Yamhill, Deschutes, Klamath, and Marion counties in Oregon. Be sure to look for the 101 Things To Do Magazines in San Diego, Palm Springs, Hawaii, and South Carolina as well. New areas to explore with 101 Magazines in 2013 will be Sacramento and Sierra Nevada Gold Country. Meanwhile, please enjoy your stay in the Shasta area, and let the advertisers know that you saw their ad in 101 Things To Do Magazine.

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All photos on this year’s cover taken and provided courtesy of Scott Leak. www.sleakphotos.com, or search “Sleakphotography” on facebook to see more of his work!

Scan these codes for the smartphone APP!

101 THINGS TO DO MOBILE APP To continue in providing the best on-the-go service to our readers, we have started development of mobile applications, starting with our very own Shasta edition! Follow along with the content of the magazine, see current events, GPS locations of your favorite attractions, directions to the 101 Things To Do, talk with us through social media and our fan wall, and even take photos and submit them through the app. All this and more! Download our FREE mobile app today by visiting the links provided below or scan the QR codes below for either the app store or android Google play today!

QR CODE SCANNING QR codes are scannable codes that you can scan with your Smartphone or device. They have information on the product they are attached to. All you have to do is get a FREE app for your smart device such as i-nigma (recommended), quiQR, QR Reader, and start scanning today. (Locations on maps are approximate locations. Searching for exact addresses may be necessary once in the GPS or mapping application. As this technology gets better we will be making additions and improvements. Photos Courtesy Scott Leak, www.sleakphotos.com

Featuring Shasta, Siskiyou, Tehama, Plumas, Lassen, Trinity, Modoc, Butte, and more....

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SHASTA

101 Things To Do, Shasta Volume 27, No. 7 2013 Brought to you by: Trading Post Partners P.O. Box 991150 Redding, CA 96099 (530) 223-1227

In This Edition AREAS All Around Shasta Cascade… 6 Winter Wonderland……….. 30 Shasta Lake……………….. 13 Redding…………………... 8 Anderson………………..... 21 Whiskeytown……………... 23 Lassen & Intermountain……............. 38 Volcanic Legacy Scenic Byway…................... 41 Plumas ............................... 37 Siskiyou County………...... 26 Klamath & Modoc………... 31 Tehama County………...... 34 Trinity…………………..... 42 Butte County…………...... 45 Del Norte County………... 46 Humboldt County ............. 47 National & State Parks…... 48 MAPS Anderson……………….. 21 Hwy 299………………... 42 Hwy 96………………..... 31 Intermountain………...... 38 Lassen VNP…………....... 41 Mt. Shasta…………........ 35 Mt. Shasta City………..... 26 Red Bluff……………...... 35 Redding………………... 8 Shasta Cascade Region…. 3 Shasta Lake…………..…. 16-17 Shasta Lake City……….... 13 Whiskeytown…..….......... 23 Volcanic Legacy Byway.…. 33 A CLOSER LOOK 101 Things To Do Under the Shadow of Shasta Under The Shadows of Shasta 6 1. Mountain Biking in Shasta Cascade 6 2. Traversing the Pacific Crest Trail 6 3. Enjoying a Drive on a Scenic Byway 6 4. Fishing the Waters of Shasta Cascade 6 5. Go RV’ing in Shasta Cascade 6 6. Golfing Under the Shadow of Shasta 6 7. Take a Gamble at Shasta’s Casino’s 6 8. Stop at Historic Granzella’s 6 Shasta County 8 9 Play at Jeter’s 8 10. Explore Turtle Bay Exploration Park 8 11. Turtle Bay Botanical Gardens 8 12. Stroll, Bike, Jog the Sundial Bridge 8 13. Go Fast & Enjoy the Scenery on a Jetboat 8 14. Take a Raft Down the River 9 15. Glide N’ Ride the Sundial Bridge 9 16. Walk or Run the Sacramento River Trail 9 17. Step Back in Time in Old Shasta 9 18. Take in the Culture of Redding 9 19. See Stars at the Planetarium 9

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20. Gander at Clear Creek Preserve 9 Shasta Lake, Shasta County 13 21. Take a FREE Tour of Shasta Dam 14 22. Take in Three Adventures in one at Lake Shasta Caverns 14 23. Go 4x4’ing at One of the Northstate’s Largest OHV Areas 14 24. Hike and Bike the Shasta Lake Trails 14 25. Rent or Bring your Boat 14 26. Go Houseboating! 15 27. Camp Under the Stars at Shasta Lake 18 28. Have the Ultimate Shasta Lake Experience 18 29. Experience Shasta Lake Dinner Cruises 19 Anderson, Shasta County 21 30. Experience the Equestrian Wonders of NorCal Trail Rides 21 31. Catch and Amazing Salmon Experience 22 Whiskeytown, Shasta County 23 32. Experience the Wonders of Whiskeytown 29 33. Sail the Blue Waters of Whiskeytown National Recreation Area 29 34. Picnic on the Beach at Brandy Creek 29 35. Explore the Waterfalls of Whiskeytown 29 36. Take a Kyak Tour of Whiskeytown Lake 29 Siskiyou County 26 37. Pick a Vacation Headquarters 26 38. Stroll a Ski Resort Town 26 39. Spend the Day Lakeside in Siskiyou 26 40. Hike or Bike in the Wild 26 41. In the Spirit for Mountaineering? 27 42. Enjoy the Wonderful Waterfalls 27 43. Hike the Trails and Enjoy the Lakes on Mt. Eddy 27 44. See the Spectacular Views atop Black Butte 27 45. Gaze at the Living Memorial Sculpture Garden 28 46. Spend a Day in Mt. Shasta City 28 47. Go Rock Climbing in Shasta 29 48. Take in the Splendor of Castle Crags State Park 29 49. Ride or Stay in a Train 29 50. Visit McCloud 29 51. Stay at a Bed & Breakfast 29 52. Visit Iron Gate Reservoir 29 53. Enjoy the Shasta Valley Wildlife Area 29 Winter Wonderland 30 54. Take a Snowmobile for a Spin 30 55. Experience Snowshoeing 30 56. Enjoy Nordic Cross-Country Skiing 30 57. Ski or Snowboard in Style at Mt. Shasta Ski Park 30 Klamath & Modoc 31 58. Explore the Lava Beds National Monument 31 59. Gander at the Amazing Wildlife at Tulelake 31 60. Visit Medicine Lake Volcano & Glass Mountain 31 61. Explore Kamath National Forest 31 Tehama County 34

62. Revel at Wildlife at the Sacramento River Bend Area 34 63. Take it Easy at Black Butte Lake 34 64. See Amazing Gemstones, Rocks, and Minerals at Gaumers Jewelry 34 65. Relive the Gold Rush Era at Ide Adobe 34 Red Bluff, Tehama County 35 66. Learn the History of Bull Riding at Red Bluff Round Up 35 67. Attend a Big Event at the Fairgrounds 35 68. Absorb History at the Tehama County Museum 35 Plumas County 37 69. Travel a National Scenic Byway 37 70. Explore Chester at Lake Almanor 37 71. Wander through Plumas National Forest 37 72. Visit the Quaint Towns of Graeagle & Quincy 37 Lassen County & Intermountain Area 38 73. See the Wild Horses at the Wild Horse Sanctuary 38 74. Take in the Beauty of Lavender Farms 38 75. Experience the Majestic Landscape in the Lassen & Intermountain Areas 38 76. Spend the Day or Camp and Stay at McArthur-Burney Falls 39 77. Boat, Fish, or go for a Hike at Lake Briton 39 78. Immerse Yourself in History 39 79. Explore Fields of Lava 39 80. Hike through the Ishi Wilderness 39 81. Learn About Radio Astronomy 39 82. Explore Subway Cave 39 83. Discover Lassen Volcanic National Park 39 84. Hike the Waterfalls of Lassen VNP 40 85. Go Camping in Lassen VNP 40 86. Hike the Trails of Lassen VNP 40 87. See Charming Chester and Lake Almanor40 88. Hike the Bizz Johnson Rail Trail 40 89. Fish Eagle Lake 40 Trinity County 42 90. Experience White Water Rafting on Trinity 42 91. Discover Trinity and Lewiston Lakes 42 92. Visit Historic Weaverville 42 93. Be Amazed at Chinese History and the Joss House 43 94. See Weaverville’s Art & History 43 95. Take a step back in History at the JJ Jackson Museum 43 96. Spend Time on the Trinity River 43 97. Fish the Waters of Trinity 43 98. Take a Motorcyclists Dream Ride Down Hwy 36 43 99. Visit Secluded and Peaceful Ruth Lake 44 Butte County 45 100. Visit Feather River Falls 45 101. Visit the National Yo-Yo Museum 45 Other Areas: Del Norte County 46 Humboldt County 47

Shasta 2013 Edition 101thingshasta.com Say “I saw it in 101 Things To Do!”

PUBLISHERS JACQUELINE JOLLEY Account Executive

(530) 223-1227

STACEY COUNCILMAN Editor (530) 227-6026

The 101 Things To Do® magazine in the Shasta Cascade region is distributed free in hundreds of locations. For advertising information, call (530) 223-1227. 101 Things To Do® magazines are available for Humboldt, Sonoma, Shasta, Butte, Lassen, Plumas, Tehama, Trinity, Siskiyou, Modoc, Del Norte, Mendocino San Fransisco, Sonoma Napa & Marin, Santa Cruz, Monterey/Carmel, Orange County, San Diego, Palm Springs counties, and coming soon; El Dorado, Placer, Sacramento, Sierra Nevada in California, and Curry, Jackson, Josephine, Benton, Coos, Douglas, Klamath, Lane, Lincoln, Linn, Marion, Polk, Tillamook and Yamhill counties in Oregon. Copies of each 101 Things To Do® magazine are available free of charge in certain locations, are online in their entirety at www.101things.com, or are available by mail for a handling fee: $5 for one, $10 for two, $12 for three, $15 for four, or $18 for all editions. Mail to 101 Things To Do®, Post Office Box 1374, Eureka, CA 95502. Proudly printed by Valley Web Printing of Medford, Oregon

101 Things To Do® Under the Shadows of Shasta is published by Chase Winthrop & Associates, LLC Trading Post Partners & NorCal Marketing & Publishing All content of the 101 Things To Do® magazine is copyrighted. No part may be reprinted without the expressed written consent of NorCal Marketing & Publishing and Chase Winthrop & Associates, LLC. The name 101 Things To Do® is a registered trademark and cannot be used without written permission. ©2013Chase Winthrop & Associates, LLC Please visit www.101things.com to view all editions

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SHASTA CASCADE REGION Featuring the counties of Shasta, Siskiyou, Tehama, Plumas, Lassen, Trinity, Modoc, Butte, and more...

Featuring Shasta, Siskiyou, Tehama, Plumas, Lassen, Trinity, Modoc, Butte, and more....

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SHASTA

UNDER THE SHADOWS OF SHASTA 2013

This first section of our publication focuses on some valuable information needed while staying in our beautiful region of Far Northern California such as Wildlife details, water safety, and general information regarding activities that can be enjoyed throughout the entire area. For more information on each subject you can follow the links and/or QR codes at the end of each topic. ANIMALS IN THE WILD

gray fox can climb trees in search of food.

You may not see them at first, or they may decide to show themselves at the most inconvenient times, such as crossing the road while you are driving, coming up to your boat while you are eating a sandwich, or deciding to sip from the lakeside while your kiddos are taking a mid-summer swim. Regardless of if you see them or not, they are there. Many of the animals that roam the forests in and around Shasta are secretive in their ways, moving about at night or concealed from your eyes by the forest cover. The following are just a few of the examples of wildlife you may catch a glimpse of on your visit.

River Otters are highly accomplished swimmers feeding mostly on fish, crawdads, frogs, and freshwater mussels. The make their dens in tree root cavities, hollow logs, or in dense brush alongside rivers and lakes.

MAMMALS Black bear range in color and size. They are not always “black,” but can be seen in brown, cinnamon, and golden as well. Bears eat berries, fish, grubs, grass, mice, ground squirrels, deer, fish, and domestic animals. They will also eat your garbage or your breakfast, so always remember while visiting the forests of Shasta, to keep your garbage and food locked up tight. Columbian Black Tail Deer are the most commonly seen deer in Far Northern California. These deer are much smaller than their relatives the Mule Deer. These deer can be seen at all times of the night and day, but tend to be most active at night, during the early morning or late evening. Be aware of these deer while driving in Northern California, as they are often seen along side roads. Raccoons are nocturnal and make their dens in the holes of trees, in hollow logs and in the crevices of rocky ledges. They are often seen swimming in streams and alongside riverbanks where they are hunting for their food, which include crawdads, frogs, fish, and freshwater mussels. Raccoons are clever and because they have “fingers” they can undo latches on coolers and boxes. So, again, make sure you keep your food and garbage locked up tight while camping in the area. They are not shy about sharing your food if you leave it out. Skunks are of course known for their obnoxious scent, sprayed when offended or frightened. Skunks generally warn whomever or whatever is threatening them before spraying by hunching over and pointing their tails at the threat, and then stomping their feet. If you see this, you probably want to back up slowly. Skunks are nocturnal and feed on large insects and small rodents. Mountain Lions, also called pumas or cougars, are rarely seen. They prey mainly on deer, but will also eat rodents, rabbits, and porcupines. Mountain lions will attack humans, so never taunt a mountain lion if you happen upon one. Bobcats are seen occasionally, but are mostly nocturnal. They hunt rabbits, rats, mice, squirrels, birds, reptiles, and some invertebrates. Coyotes are seen frequently in the forests in Northern California, and aren’t shy about making their presence known. Coyotes are heard at night singing and howling. They hunt rats, rabbits, insects, squirrels, and mice. They will also eat birds and berries. They live and hunt in packs. The gray fox has a long bushy tail and is seen often darting across fields or roads in search of food. Like most of the other wildlife mentioned, gray fox is nocturnal but can be seen throughout the daytime as well. It eats almost anything available from small rodents to insects to berries. Unlike other members of the dog family, the

Western Gray Squirrels are tree dwellers. They are most comfortable in cavities or nests on branches off the ground. They are most active during the day and can often be seen sunning themselves on branches of trees or running around the ground in search of seeds. Chipmunks are seen almost everywhere running around campsites looking for goodies that people leave behind. The Golden Mantled Ground Squirrel is not a chipmunk, but is often mistaken as one. They are much larger than chipmunks. You can tell a ground squirrel apart from a chipmunk because it has no stripes on its head, whereas a chipmunk does. The ground squirrel often acts like the chipmunk, begging for food around campsites. Black-tailed Jackrabbits can be seen in both forest areas and large fields. They are active at all times of day and night and eat grass. They are an important food source for all sorts of omnivores of the area. There are several species of bats that are found throughout the area, some of which migrate through the area at different times of the year. The little brown bat is the most common bat here making their homes in crevices of rocks, trees or caves, and occasionally in buildings and attics. They are very important for insect control around lakes and rivers. You can often see them darting around overhead in the evenings eating insects. Elk were almost hunted into extinction in the 1800’s, and were reintroduced to the area in the early 1900’s. They can rarely be seen but there are a few herds in the eastern part of far northern California. Other Mammals in the area consist of Moles, Shrews, Pikas and other rodents, Mule Deer, Antelope, Mountain Sheep, Mink, Weasel, Fisher, and possibly Grizzly Bear. BIRDS Birds of the area include Red-tailed Hawk, Swainson Hawk, Golden Eagle, Bald Eagle, Woodpeckers; Red shafted Flicker, Nightjars, Hummingbirds, Jays, Finches, Tanagers, Warblers, Nuthatches, Chickadees, Kinglets, and Thrushes, Loons, Pelicans, Cormorants, Herons, Spoonbills, Vultures, Waterfowl, Pheasants, Shorebirds, Doves, Roadrunners, Owls, among others. FISH The popular fish of Northern California include Steelhead, Chinook salmon, Rainbow Trout, King Salmon, Brown Trout, Spotted Bass, Largemouth Bass, Smallmouth Bass, Channel Catfish, Crappie, Bluegill, and Sturgeon, among others. REPTILES Reptiles of Northern California in the Shasta area include Northern Rubber Boa, Aquatic Garter Snake, Sierra Garter Snake, Terrestrial Garter Snake, Common Garter Snake, Coast Night snake, Western Rattlesnake, North American Racer, Striped Racer, Striped Whip snake, Common King snake, California Mountain King snake, Gopher Snake, Common Sharp-tailed Snake, Ring-necked Snake, Alligator Lizard, Horned Lizard, Skinks, Sagebrush Lizard, Fence Lizard, Western Whiptail Lizard, Western Pond Turtle, Pond Slider Turtle, Central Pacific Chorus Frog,

Western Spade foot Frog, Coastal Tailed Frog, Foothill Yellow legged Frog, Cascades Frog, American Bullfrog, Western Toad, Coastal Giant Salamander, Shasta Black Salamander, Shasta Salamander, Long toed Salamander, Rough-skinned Newt, Sierra Newt, among others. FISHING Fishing is one of those things that is worth mentioning, over and over, as an “all-around” Shasta area thing to do. Northern California fishing is by far the most rewarding experience in the Sacramento River watershed where its streams, rivers and lakes provide hundreds of thousands of acres of water surface. The Sacramento River itself is 384 miles long and holds the state record for the largest King Salmon (88 lbs). When anglers talk about “California” fishing they usually mean Northern California, where there are world-class streams and lakes and national competitions are held. The Northern California region is home to some of the most pristine rivers, lakes, and streams with exceptional fishing opportunities and many species. The high mountain lakes, such as found in Trinity Alps, Marble Mountains, Lassen Park and Mt. Shasta are full of native and hatchery stocked Trout. The larger lakes such as Trinity Lake, Whiskeytown, and Shasta are the lakes to find trout, bass and catfish. Shasta even boasts sturgeon and landlocked salmon. The rivers are an angler’s paradise and boast seasonal salmon and steelhead runs, as well as trout, rainbow trout, German brown trout, and cutthroat trout. Some of the most popular fishing spots are Sacramento River, Trinity River, Klamath River, Shasta Lake, Whiskeytown Lake, Eagle Lake, Lake Siskiyou, Castle Lake, Lake Almanor, Lake Oroville, Trinity Lake, and the American River where you will find salmon, catfish, trout, bass, crappie, sturgeon, and shad, among others. For more information, contact Shasta Lake Visitor Information Center at (530) 275-1589. www.shastalake. com/visitorcenters, Phil’s Propellers www.philsprop.com

CAMPING Whether you are camping in a remote region by backpacking in the backcountry or if you are traveling by RV or going on a Houseboat trip, there is a great abundance of camping in the Shasta Cascade region. Camping is often enjoyed in conjunction with hiking, whitewater kayaking, hill walking, climbing, canoeing, mountain biking, motorcycling, swimming, and fishing. Whatever your camping forte you will be pleased to find a wide range of land to roam and play in throughout the shadows of Shasta.

HIKING Whether you are looking for a leisurely stroll or a multiday extreme hike, you will find what you are looking for in any county throughout the Shasta Cascade region. From flat land to steep mountaineering you will find all levels existing here. You can find several equipment retailers throughout all the major cities and towns throughout the region as well. The natural environments in which hikers seek adventure may be fragile. Remember in these areas such as National Recreation Areas, National Parks, and National Forests, we strongly recommend that you stay on marked trails so that you have a lesser effect on the fragile surroundings of the trail. Be aware of noxious plants, inclement weather, hazardous terrain, or exacerbation of pre-existing medical conditions. Obtain information regarding your hike before you go, such as maps, information via the Internet, or local visitor centers.

BOATING SAFETY & REGULATIONS BOAT SAFE AND SOBER! Alcohol and drug use have been cited as contributing factors in many boating injuries and fatalities. Studies indicate that the effects of alcohol and drugs are more pronounced when operating a boat. Alcohol and/or drug use combined with wind, increased noise levels, vibration, wave action and sun glare have been shown to have a tremendous adverse influence on judgment and response times. It is unlawful to operate a recreational vessel while under the influence of alcohol or drugs. Under California State law, a person with a blood alcohol level of .087% or greater is considered to be under the influence. FLOATING DEBRIS Floating debris (such as limbs, logs and bark) generally enter the lake through rivers and streams. Following winter storms and during spring runoff, a considerable amount of debris may accumulate in Shasta and Trinity lakes. The rising lake also “refloats” any debris beached on the shoreline from previous years. The larger debris can present a physical obstacle for boaters, while smaller debris can clog water intake ports in boat engine cooling systems, and can ruin props. Boat operators should maintain a constant watch and travel at reduced speeds when these conditions exist. LAKE FLUCTUATIONS AND UNDERWATER OBSTACLES Annual precipitation and the demand for water are primary determinants of lake levels. Lake levels can vary from a few inches to several feet per day. Underwater obstacles, such as rocks, trees, stumps, and landforms may become exposed or may lie just below the water surface when the lake level changes. In an effort to notify visitors of the presence of obstacles, the Forest Service provides free Boating Safety brochures and maps at designated public boat ramps. HOW TO BUILD A CAMPFIRE: Build your campfire away from overhanging branches, steep slopes, rotten stumps or logs, dry grass and leaves. Pile wood away from the fire. Scrape away litter, duff and any flammable material within 5 feet of the fire in all directions. This will keep a campfire from spreading. Have a shovel available at the campfire site for preparing and extinguishing campfires. Keep at least 5 gallons of water available to yourself and your party. Quick action will usually prevent a fire from getting out of control. Keep campfires small. A good bed of coals or small fire surrounded by rocks will provide plenty of heat for cooking. Extinguish campfires with water, using the “drown, stir and feel” method. No water? Use dirt. Mix enough soil and/or sand with the embers and the fire will go out. Continue adding and stirring until all material is cold enough to feel with your bare hand. Don’t just bury your fire...it may smolder and break out again after you have left the area. NEVER LEAVE ANY FIRE UNATTENDED! Fireworks Possession and use of fireworks are illegal on National Forest lands and in Trinity & Shasta County. Anyone found in possession of fireworks will be cited. Discharging or igniting a firecracker, rocket or other firework, or explosive is prohibited. Firearms Discharging a firearm or any other implement capable of

Photos Courtesy Scott Leak, www.sleakphotos.com

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taking human life, causing injury, or damaging property is prohibited: In or within 50 yards of a residence, building, campsite, developed recreation site, or occupied area, or across or on a Forest development road, or a body or water adjacent thereto, or in any manner or place whereby any person or property is exposed to injury or damage as a result of such discharge. Littering/Resource damage Resource damage and littering are common problems that occur when large crowds of people gather in one location. All recreation visitors need to be responsible for their garbage and campsites. Avoid crowding into one area; spread your campsites and houseboats apart. Please remember, if you “Pack it in, Pack it out.” You can gather enough dead and down wood for your campfire without a permit, but please do not cut any standing wood, dead or alive.

RULES FOR VISITORS TO NATIONAL FORESTS As a visitor to the National Forests, you are asked to follow certain rules designed to protect the land and the natural environment, to ensure the health and safety of visitors, and to promote pleasant and rewarding outdoor experiences for all visitors. Forest Officers are empowered to enforce the Federal Regulations that the rules are taken from. Please take time to read and understand them. When the need arises, Regional Foresters and Forest Supervisors may issue orders that will close or restrict the use of certain areas. Such prohibitions will be posted so that National Forest visitors can reasonably be expected to be familiar with them. Copies of the orders will also be available at the offices of Forest Supervisors and District Rangers. Information on all permit requirements is available from Forest Services office. If you have any questions or need help, please contact your nearest Forest Officer or visit the nearest Forest Service office. Please remember to be careful! You are primarily responsible for your own safety. Look out for natural hazards and dangers when you are in the forest. If you hike off trails or swim or dive in streams or lakes, you do so at YOUR OWN RISK! Camping Use picnic sites, swimming beaches, and other day use areas only between the hours of 6 a.m. and 10 p.m. Campgrounds and other recreation sites can be used only for recreation purposes. Permanent use or use as a principal residence without authorization is not allowed. In campgrounds, camp only in those places specifically marked or provided. At least one person must occupy a camping area during the first night after camping equipment has been set up, unless permission has otherwise been granted by the Forest Ranger. Do not leave camping equipment unattended in a developed recreation site for more than 24 hours

without permission from the Forest Ranger. The Forest Service is not responsible for any loss or damage to personal property. Remove all personal property and trash when leaving. Campfires Obey all restrictions on fires. Open fires may be limited or prohibited at certain times. Within campgrounds and other recreation sites, build fires only in existing fire rings, stoves, grills, or fireplaces provided for that purpose. Be sure your fire is completely extinguished before leaving. Do not leave fires unattended. YOU ARE RESPONSIBLE FOR KEEPING FIRES UNDER CONTROL. Property Do not carve, chop, cut, or damage any live trees. Preserve and protect your National Forests by leaving natural areas the way you find them. Enter buildings, structures, or enclosed areas in National Forests only when they are expressly opened to the public. Native American, old cabins, and other structures-- along with all objects and artifacts associated with them--have historic or archeological value. Do not damage or remove any such historic or archeological resource. Sanitation Throw all garbage and litter in containers provided for this purpose, or carry it out with you. Garbage containers, when provided, are reserved for the use of visitors to the National Forest, not visitors to or owners of private lands or lands under permit. Wash all food and personal items away from drinking water supplies. Use water faucets only for drawing water. Use toilets properly. Do not throw garbage, litter, fish cleanings, or other foreign substances in toilets and plumbing fixtures. Operation of Vehicles Motorized vehicles are restricted to designated roads, trails, and areas. Obey all traffic signs. Specific state traffic laws apply to the National Forest unless otherwise specified. When operating any kind of vehicle, do not damage the land or vegetation, or disturb wildlife. Do not drive on unpaved roads or trails when they are wet or muddy. Within campgrounds and other recreation sites, use cars, motorbikes, motorcycles, or other motor vehicles only for entering or leaving, unless areas or trails are specifically marked for them. Park only in marked parking areas. Do not block, restrict, or interfere with the use of roads, trails or gates. Pets and Animals Pets must always be on a leash while in developed recreation sites. Pets (except guide dogs) are not allowed in swimming areas.

Saddle or pack animals are allowed in recreation sites only where authorized by posted instructions. Fee Areas You must pay a fee to use certain sites and facilities. Such areas are clearly signed or posted as requiring a fee. Where fees are required, you must pay them before using the site, facility, equipment, or service furnished. Audio Devices Operate any audio device, such as a radio or musical instrument, so that it does not disturb other visitors. A permit is required for operating a public address system in or near a campsite, developed recreation site, or over a body of water. www.fs.fed.us/r4/recreation/rules.shtml

THEATERS & CULTURE Cascade Theatre 1731 Market St Redding, CA 96001 530-243-8877 cascadetheatre.org Riverfront Playhouse Redding’s Community Theater Since 1981 Cascade Theatre is the new ticket outlet for Riverfront Playhouse. For more information call 530-243-8877. State Theatre for the Arts 333 Oak Street Red Bluff, CA 96080 530-529-278 Mt. Shasta Cinema 118 Morgan Way Shasta, CA 96067 530-926-1116 Trinity Theatre 310 Main Street Weaverville, CA 530-623-3555 In the past we have highlighted a few of the area’s museums and theaters, but we have so many great historical treasures here in the region, that we wanted to make sure you didn’t miss out no matter what area you are visiting in this vast territory of California. Therefore we have compiled a more complete listing for you. SHASTA COUNTY · Anderson Historical Society, 2330 Ferry Street, Anderson, 530.365.7045 · Eaton House Museum, 1939 Butte Street, Redding · Fort Crook Museum, Hwy 299 East, Fall River Mills · Northern California Veterans Museum, 3711 Meadow View Drive #400, Redding, 530.378.2280 · Old City Hall, 1313 Market Street, Redding CA 96001 · Redding Museum of Art & History, 530.243.8801 · Shasta State Historic Park, Hwy 299, 8 miles west of Redding · Turtle Bay Exploration Park, 840 Sundial Bridge Drive, Redding · Shasta Historical Society, 1449 Market Street, Redding TEHAMA COUNTY · Gaumers of Red Bluff, 78 Belle Mill Road, Red Bluff, 530.527.6166 · Kelly Griggs House Museum, 311 Washington Street, Red Bluff 530.527.1129

· Red Bluff Round Up Museum, 670 Antelope Blvd. Red Bluff, 530.528.1477 · Tehama County Museum, 275 C Street, Tehama, 530.384.2595 · William B Ide Adobe State Park, 21659 Adobe Road, Red Bluff, 530.529.8599 SISKIYOU COUNTY · McCloud Historical Center, Hwy 89, McCloud 530.964.2604 · Mt. Shasta Volcanic Exhibit, 104 Siskiyou Avenue, Mt. Shasta, CA 96067 530.926.8600 · Siskiyou County Museum, 910 South Main Street, Yreka, hismus@inreach.com 530.842.3836 · Sisson Hatchery Museum, 1 North Old Stage Road, Mt. Shasta sissonmuseum@sbcglobal.net 530.926.5508 TRINITY COUNTY · Jake Jackson Museum, Hwy 299, Weaverville, 530.623.5211 · Joss House State Historic Park, Hwy 299, Weaverville LASSEN COUNTY · Lassen Historical Museum, Susanville, CA 530.257.4584 lashistsoc@citlink.net MODOC COUNTY · Modoc County Museum, 600 South Main Street, Alturas, 530.233.2944 PLUMAS COUNTY · Plumas County Museum, 500 Jackson Street, Quincy, 530.283.6320

DINING From small but quaint cafés, to B&B’s, GREAT Steakhouses, and small to large franchises, as well as the old but great mom & pop diners, there’s something for most every taste. We haven’t narrowed it down to the nitty gritty, however, we have listed the streets to check out, and we plan to expand this section of “dining” in future editions. Starting with the Redding area, check out Hilltop Drive, Dana Drive, and the Downtown Redding area close to the Cascade theatre and the Market Street Promenade. In the Shasta Lake area go to Shasta Dam Blvd on your way to or from Shasta Dam, or visit Lakeshore Drive. In the Mount Shasta area check out Siskiyou Lake Blvd, Lake Street, and Mt. Shasta Blvd. There are restaurants listed in the North State Dining Guide mentioned throughout this magazine.

REDDING

San Francisco Deli 530.244.1449

Umsted’s Smokehouse BBQ 530.223.4745

Clearie’s

530.241.4535

Grilla Bites 530.242.6656

View 202

530.226.8439

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Marie Callender’s 530.223.4310

Logan’s Roadhouse 530.221.0113

Spoon Me

530.638.4490

Applebees

530.221.1888

Call 530.223.1227 for more information on the North State Dining Guide and how to be listed here, or visit www.northstatediningguide.com

Featuring Shasta, Siskiyou, Tehama, Plumas, Lassen, Trinity, Modoc, Butte, and more....

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SHASTA

EVERYWHERE UNDER THE SHADOWS OF SHASTA

Mt. Shasta and the counties and areas that lay in its shadow hold some of the most amazingly beautiful terrain that provides visitors with summer and winter playgrounds that are unparalleled. With trendy communities to stay in, dine in, and enjoy culture in, and a surrounding recreation lover’s wonderland, we are sure that you will stay and play in our part of the state that is the Shasta region of California! The following Things To Do are activities you can enjoy all over Northern California. It doesn’t stop with 101 Things To Do! Be sure to download our 101 Shasta Mobile App.

1

MOUNTAIN BIKING IN SHASTA CASCADE

(1 hour +) As mentioned in several articles throughout this edition of 101 Things To Do, we will talk about Mountain Biking. Mountain Biking is extremely popular in the Shasta Cascade Region, with millions visiting year round to participate in competitions or just for the recreation of the sport. There are so many opportunities that even the most avid local most likely has not ridden all of the trails available. The best trails are as follows; Bailey Cove Loop (3.1 miles, Shasta Lake), Ball Mountain Loop (11.8 miles, Weed area), Boulder Creek Loop (8.5 miles, Whiskeytown), Carter Meadows Loop (11 miles, Klamath area), Clear Creek Vista Trail (5.8 miles, Whiskeytown), Clikapudi Trial (7.3 miles, Shasta Lake), Great Water Ditch Trail and El Dorado Mine Loop (9.8 miles, Whiskeytown), Gunsight Peak Loop (20 miles, Yreka), Herd Peak Lookout Loop (21 miles, Weed), Kelsey Trail (7.7 miles, Fort Jones), Mt. Shasta Loop (65 miles, Mt. Shasta), Mt. Shasta Mine Loop (3.1 miles, Whiskeytown), Oak Bottom Boulder Creek (14.5 miles, Whiskeytown), Recliner Loop (7 miles, Redding), Upper Klamath River (19 miles, Yreka), Waters Gulch Trail (4.1 miles, Shasta Lake). www.nps.gov/whis/index.htm (530) 242-3400, www.shastalake.com, www.fs.usda.gov/ wps, www.mtshastachamber.com

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TRAVERSING THE PACIFIC CREST TRAIL

(1 hour - 3 weeks) The majestic Pacific Crest Trail traverses 2,650 miles from Mexico to Canada and fewer people have completed the entire journey than have climbed to the top of Mt. Everest. The trail passes more than 1,000 lakes and towns, descends 19 canyons, and climbs nearly 60 major mountain passes. It crosses meadows, forests, deserts, and glacier-flaked mountains. Parts of it are in California, Oregon, and Washington. There are many ways to enjoy this trail, from a simple short stroll to a planned hiking and camping adventure. The sights are incredible, featuring the flora and fauna of this forested mountainous area. The Pacific Crest Trail crosses Interstate 5 north of Redding and you can access it in several places in Northern California such as McArthur-Burney Falls Memorial State Park and Castle Crags State Park. For more information, call the Pacific Coast Trail Association at (916) 349-2109.

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ENJOYING A DRIVE ON A SCENIC BYWAY

(1/2 day - 1 day) The beauty and diversity in terrain, landscape, wildlife and elevation is unsurpassed on the Feather River National Scenic Byway, a 130-mile northern California route. It follows the north and middle forks of the Feather River as it twists and turns across Butte, Plumas and Lassen Counties on State Hwy 70. Total estimated driving time is about 3.5 hours, but take into consideration the numerous stops you will want to make along the way to take photographs of waterfalls, river views and mountain vistas. The route winds through three ecosystems. Traveling from the west, the byway starts in the Sacramento Valley and ascends through dense forests and deep canyons into the Sierras, and finishes in the vast expanse of the Great Basin. The drive is impressively beautiful in the early spring when nearly 100 waterfalls cascade down vibrant green, steep, mountainsides ablaze with oak trees and wildflowers. The fall draws leaf-peepers to its magnificent groves of colorful foliage. The Feather River Canyon is an enormous gorge carved by the Feather River through layers of granite. While the scenery alone justifies a trip, the outdoor adventures may entice you as well. Enjoy fishing, spring kayaking, and swimming on a hot summer day on the river. There are also plenty of hiking trails including the Pacific Crest National Scenic Trail. If you have a day to spend between the larger communities of Sacramento and Reno‚ this is the road to follow! For more information, a self guided driving tour brochure and map of the Feather River National Scenic Byway, call the Plumas County Visitors Bureau at (800) 326-2247 or (530) 283-6345. www.plumascounty.org, www.byways. org/explore/byways/2196/stories/55669

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FISHING THE WATERS OF SHASTA CASCADE

(2 hours – All Day+) Fishing is one of those things worth mentioning, over and over, as an “almost everywhere in the Shasta area” thing to do. Northern California fishing is by far the most rewarding experience in the Sacramento River watershed, where its massive rivers and lakes provide hundreds of thousands of acres of water surface. The Sacramento River itself is 384 miles long and holds the state record for the largest King Salmon (88 lbs). When anglers talk about “California” fishing they usually mean Northern California, where there are world-class streams and lakes and national competitions are held. The Northern California region is home to some of the most pristine rivers, lakes, and streams with exceptional fishing opportunities and many species. The high mountain lakes, such as those found in Trinity Alps, Marble Mountains, Lassen Park and Mt. Shasta are full of native and hatchery stocked Trout. The larger lakes, such as Trinity Lake,

Whiskeytown, and Shasta are where to find trout, bass and catfish. Shasta even boasts sturgeon and landlocked salmon. The rivers are an angler’s paradise and boast seasonal salmon and steelhead runs, as well as trout, rainbow trout, German brown trout, and cutthroat trout. Some of the most popular fishing spots are Sacramento River, Trinity River, Klamath River, Shasta Lake, Whiskeytown Lake, Eagle Lake, Lake Siskiyou, Castle Lake, Lake Almanor, Lake Oroville, Trinity Lake, and the American River where you will find salmon, catfish, trout, bass, crappie, sturgeon, and shad, among others. For more information, contact Shasta Lake Visitor Information Center at (530) 275-1589. www.shastalake.com/visitorcenters

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GO RV’ING IN SHASTA CASCADE

(2 days+) Popular with both the Baby Boomer generation and parents with kids in tow, RV travel is a great way to roll through scenic Northern California. There are many benefits to RV’ing, such as all the money you can save, and the convenience of traveling with a bed and some of the other comforts of home. Plus with an RV there’s no need to make reservations at a hotel. Just pull into a campsite, at a fraction of the cost of a hotel, and slip into the back when it’s time for bed. Forget about the bother of hauling your gear into and out of a hotel, it all stays in your self-enclosed home on wheels. Furthermore, an RV kitchen allows you to bring even more of the comforts of home on the road, and gives you the opportunity to sample local produce by eating-in instead of eating-out. Don’t forget the social benefits of RV’ing, because you’re bound to meet a lot of like-minded folks when you set up camp. There are plenty of great RV campgrounds to choose from throughout the area. And if you pull into a park that doesn’t appeal to you, there’s no need to stay. If you find a place you absolutely love, then put her in park and enjoy. Shasta Lake RV Resort (530) 238-2370 www.shastarv.com Del Loma RV Campground (800) 839-0194 www.dellomarv.com JGW RV Park (800) 469-5910 (530) 365-7965 www.jgwrvpark.com Lakeshore Inn & RV (530) 238-2003 www.shastacamping.com Old Lewiston Bridge RV (530) 778-33894 www.lewistonbridgerv.com

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GOLFING UNDER THE SHADOW OF SHASTA

(3+ hours) One of the attractions you’ll find everywhere in the Shasta Cascade region is golfing. The Golf Courses in this part of Northern California range from 9 hole courses, to championship and world class courses. No matter what you are looking for or how novice or advanced a golfer you are, you will find one of your new favorite courses in the Shasta region. Mt. Shasta Resort 18 holes and over 6,065 yards with a par of 70 1000 Siskiyou Lake Blvd., Mt. Shasta 800-958-3363 http://www.mountshastaresort.com Fall River Valley Golf and Country Club (508) 672-0280 www.fallrivergolf.com Sevillano Links Golf Course (530) 528-4600 www.sevillanolinks.com

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TAKE A GAMBLE AT SHASTA’S CASINO’S

(20 minutes – 1 hour) If you are looking for an exciting gaming experience, then head to one of the casinos that the Shasta Cascade region has to offer. Choose from hundreds of slot machines, table games and bingo, as well as card tournaments and more. Gaming is not the only thing these great casinos offer. You can also enjoy a variety of live entertainment that will thrill everyone. The Shasta Cascade area casinos attract nationally renowned musicians and comedians to their stages. Various big-name artists perform in these world-class venues. There are also a variety of restaurants to enjoy great food at great prices. Many of the Casinos here also offer hotel accommodations, golf courses, RV parks, campgrounds, and parking for RV’s and trucks. There is an endless amount of entertainment at Shasta Cascade area casinos. Win River Casino has it all.

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STOP AT HISTORIC GRANZELLA’S

(20 minutes – 1 hour) Situated between Redding and Sacramento California, in Williams, lies Northern California’s best Italian American restaurant. But this is no normal restaurant. As most people that frequently travel I-5 know, Granzella’s is THE place to pull off the freeway for a “pit stop.” Granzella’s has been serving the public since 1976 and provides an experience like no other, whether you are looking for novelty items, a quick deli snack, espresso, ice cream, steak, pasta, or just a resting place between travel destinations. They also have a bakery, casual restaurant, and a sports lounge to provide a choice for any mood or atmosphere. Granzella’s now has a new 43-room motel, and a new gift shop across the street from the restaurant. www.granzellas.com 530.473.5583 Photos Courtesy Scott Leak, www.sleakphotos.com

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SHASTA

SHASTA COUNTY

Shasta County has the highest population of all the counties within the Shasta Cascade region. With 1-5 going north and south through the center and 44 and 299 going east and west, it is the natural hub for travel. It is also the home of Redding, the largest city in the region, and Shasta Lake, the largest lake in the region. Although Redding has a “small town” feel, it has most of the amenities of a large city. Any month of the year you can find many things to do in the urban and rural areas of Shasta County. Within minutes of anywhere within this county, you can find plays, festivals, shopping, lodging, dining, hiking, attractions, and recreation.

REDDING AREA, SHASTA COUNTY With a population over 104,000, Redding is the largest city in California north of Sacramento. Redding sprawls out from the crossroads of I-5, Hwy 299 east and west, and Hwy 44. The city offers all the amenities and economic opportunities of any modern California city. In fact, Redding was once rated by Money Magazine to be in the top 10 best places to start, relocate or expand a small business. Public and private concerns have worked diligently to provide for this expansion while protecting Redding’s quality of life. Redding was founded by miners during the 19th century, but was not very prosperous and became known as Poverty Flats. Named for railroad man Benjamin B. Redding, the town was rechristened Reading in 1874, honoring founder Pierson B. Reading. The railroad, however, would not recognize the change, and the original Redding was restored in 1880. In the 20th century, Redding’s main industry was lumber. Currently, Redding’s biggest industries are the medical, legal, and tourism industries. What a warm life it is, with 88 percent of the city’s days graced with sunshine. Visitors to Redding marvel at the obvious physical beauty of the surrounding mountains, lakes and rivers. The city’s Sundial Bridge, a stunning architectural landmark, serves as a pedestrian walkway, which leads to the Turtle Bay Exploration Park that features a natural history museum. The city is also home to the Sacramento River Trail. While being a great place to take a walk or ride a bike, it also

serves as an educational stroll through Redding’s history. Along the almost four-mile trail, point-ofinterest markers explain how the present trail encompasses the journey travelled by pioneers, mountain men and gold miners. Redding has a robust nightlife as well. With a revitalized downtown, a variety of new and old restaurants, dozens of accommodations, and a host of other services and culture, Redding bustles with life. Major performers are often in town for concerts at the Civic Center, Cascade Theatre, the Anderson Fairgrounds, or one of the local casinos. Community theatre and movies are first rate. Shopping is a dream in several fine centers, such as the Market Street Promenade, and the Mt. Shasta Mall. Festivals are held throughout the year in Redding; the Kool April Nites Car Show is held in April. Downtown Redding Marketfest happens each Thursday, mid June, through late August. Blues by the River Festival and the Redding Beer & Wine Festival are both scheduled for September each year. The Turtle Bay Arts &

Crafts Faire is held in September, and School (a private four-year Christian the Big Bike Weekend is in October. Redding has four colleges; Shasta College), and National University. College (a public two-year college), www.visitredding.org Simpson University (a four-year Christian college), Shasta Bible College and Graduate

Photos Courtesy Scott Leak, www.sleakphotos.com

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SHASTA

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PLAY AT JETER’S!

(1-3 hours) New to Redding, Jeter’s Playground has arrived to provide the ultimate party experience in a family fun atmosphere. Jeter’s has everything from a high-difficulty off road RC track, drifting oval track, a black-light mini golf course, arcade, and toddler/ adult friendly bounce houses. Jeter’s is the perfect place to throw a birthday party or event. Or, just relax with some lunch from Wrapped and a cup of joe from Naked Coffee (located right within the playground), while the kids play. Jeter’s has extended hours during the summer months but is closed on Mondays-Wednesdays and all major holidays. Please check their website for hours and days of operation. Jeter’s Playground 1501 Market Street, Redding CA 96001 (In the Downtown Promenade) 530-275-5870 www.jetersplayground.com

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EXPLORE TURTLE BAY EXPLORATION PARK

(1 hour – 2 hours) Turtle Bay Museum is the heart of the Turtle Bay experience. The beautiful museum is an outstanding compilation of everything nature in “Far-Northern California.” Here you can learn about river and forest habitats, the Native American Wintu Indian history and culture, caverns, and the delicate water cycle that is so important to all of California. The museum boasts a full size Wintu bark house, a lifelike walkthrough cavern, underwater fish viewing, and early American history of the region. You will also find rotating exhibits from around the world. There’s so much more at Turtle Bay… Don’t miss the McConnell Arboretum and Botanical Gardens, Animal Programs, Paul Bunyan’s Forest Camp, the Monolith, and the Museum Store, while you’re visiting! Turtle Bay Exploration Park 840 Sundial Bridge Drive Redding, CA 96001 (800) TURTLEBAY www.turtlebay.org

BAY 11 BOTANICALTURTLE GARDENS (1 hour – 2 hours) Made up of 20 acres of gardens, a children’s garden, water features, and a medicinal garden, the Botanical Gardens portion of the McConnell Arboretum & Botanical Gardens is the newest addition to the Park. The Arboretum itself extends over 200 acres adjacent to the Sacramento River Trail. The nursery is open to the public seven days a week, year round. All five of the world’s Mediterranean climate zones are located

within the latitudes of 30 and 45 degrees, and include the Mediterranean Basin, South Africa, Chile, southern and western Australia, and California west of the Sierra Nevada. Plants native to these areas thrive here. The design of the pathways, garden spaces, plant collections, and the integration of nature-based and nature-inspired original art build upon the beauty of the natural environment. The main entrance to the gardens is just to the west of the Sundial Bridge at Turtle Bay. Turtle Bay Exploration Park 840 Sundial Bridge Drive Redding, CA 96001 (800) TURTLEBAY www.turtlebay.org

BIKE, JOG 12 THESTROLL, SUNDIAL BRIDGE (10 min - 1/2 hour) In 2004, the Sundial Bridge at Turtle Bay was completed. The dramatic pedestrian span was designed by the noted Spanish architect-engineerartist Santiago Calatrava and links the north and south campuses of the 300-acre (1.2 km2) (1,200,000 m²) Turtle Bay Exploration Park. The pylon holds up the bridge support cables and also acts as a sundial (which is accurate only on the summer solstice - June 21 or 22). Turtle Bay Exploration Park 840 Sundial Bridge Drive Redding, CA 96001 (800) TURTLEBAY www.turtlebay.org

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GO FAST & ENJOY THE SCENERY ON A JETBOAT RIDE

(1 hour +) Located in the heart of Redding, at the foot of the magnificent Sundial Bridge. Climb aboard with Sundial Jet Boat Exursions for a unique sight-seeing and thrilling tour of the beautiful Sacramento River. Curising the rapids will allow you to witness the phenomenon of this famous river valley and its different habitats. This 26 mile jet boat excursion welcomes exclusive tours for couples, families, and large groups. Book your excursion today with Sundial Jetboat Excursions. (530) 222-3750 or email sundialjetboats@gmail.com We also recommend Jerry’s Jet Boat rides if you are in the Gold Beach area on Hwy 101 on the Oregon coast. www.roguejets.com (800) 451-3645.

North CouNtry

RAFT RENTAL It’s Fun & Easy!

244-4281

www.raftredding.com

Located at Turtle Bay

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TAKE A RAFT DOWN THE RIVER

(2 hours – 4 hours) Rafting down the Sacramento River is one of the best activities Redding has to offer. It’s fun, relaxing and easy with North Country Raft Rental! Rent the finest rafts and equipment for a scenic float with gentle rapids down the Sacramento River from Redding to Anderson. They will meet you in Anderson to shuttle you and your gear back to your car at the conclusion of the trip. Parking, shuttle and all necessary equipment are included with the raft rental. Join the crew for a guided trip on the scenic Sacramento River thru Redding. See wildlife and waterfowl and discover the “Urban Wilderness” at the heart of Redding. Rafting is an ideal activity for family, friends, and business groups. All rafting trips begin with a safety and navigation clinic. The clinic describes the water hazards on the river, how to avoid them, and general rafting techniques. They will highlight the important landmarks you need to know. If you are first-timers and need more information before heading out, it is not a problem. The crew at North Country Raft Rental will help you as long as it takes to get your raft crew ready and up to speed for a day on the river. North Country Raft Rental is located next to Turtle Bay Exploration Park. Rafting season starts Memorial Day Weekend and runs until Labor Day Weekend. Launch times are 9:00, 10:30, and Noon on weekends and pickups in Anderson are at 1:00, 3:00, and 5:00pm. Monday through Friday launch time is at Noon and pickup is at 5:00pm. Are you planning a paddle trip on your own? Feel free to contact N.C.R.R. for river conditions and information. They’ll even provide shuttle service for you. Schedule and times are subject to change and availability, North Country Raft Rentals (530) 244-4281 www.raftredding.com

GLIDE N’ RIDE 15 THE SUNDIAL BRIDGE (1 hour – 4 hours) Located at Turtle Bay Exploration Park in Redding, Shasta Glide n’ Ride is proud to be offering guided Segway tours of the Sacramento River Trail. Don’t miss a chance to glide through one of the most beautiful trails California has to offer. Though the trail is paved, the atmosphere of the trail keeps you amongst the abundant wildlife. You may see raccoons, turtles sunning in the turtle pond, otter, deer, or even bald

eagles as you glide one of California’s premiere trails. All tours cross the world famous Sundial Bridge and include great photo ops. Glide in utmost comfort and safety with supplied helmets and cooling vests for those warm summer days. Glide n’ Ride can accommodate groups up to 10, on only the newest 07’ i2 and X2 models. There is also a golf turf model. Bike rentals are available too! Take yourself on a biking adventure through one of Northern California’s natural getaways or join a Segway tour on a retro-style cruiser bike. There are bikes for the kids too. What a great family day! (Must be at least 6 years old to ride, children under 16 must be accompanied by parent.) To get to Shasta Glide n’ Ride, take Highway 44 to Auditorium Drive, bear to the right as you enter Turtle Bay Park, stay to the right and follow the signs to the end of the loop. For tour times and reservations, call (530) 242-1150 or toll free (866) 466-4111. www.shastaglidenride.com

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WALK OR RUN THE SACRAMENTO RIVER TRAIL

(30 min – 1 hour) This expansive system of gorgeous trails weaves and winds through 80 miles of open spaces, regional parks, neighborhoods, a commercial district, parts of Shasta Trinity National Forest, Whiskeytown National Recreation Area, Shasta Dam, and Turtle Bay Exploration Park. Complete with world-renowned bridges, an eight-foot wide paved trail, and variety of terrain, the Sacramento River Trail will provide a great opportunity to enjoy the outdoors for the entire family. Any motorized vehicle is strictly prohibited; so feel free to bring the kids, the grandparents, or the entire family for a stroll, go for a jog, a family outing, or bring your dog (on a leash) and a fishing pole for a relaxing afternoon on the river. Although this trail is near downtown Redding, it is a true nature walk with the river on one side and lush forests on the other. There are markers along the path that provide historical background. You can enter the trail anywhere along the Sacramento River in downtown Redding. It is easily accessed from the parking lot of the Redding Convention Center on Auditorium Drive off of Highway 44, or at Turtle Bay Exploration Park. Redding Community Services Department (530) 225-4512 www.reddingtrails.com

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STEP BACK IN TIME IN OLD SHASTA

(30 min – 2 hours) Just a short drive from Redding, (6 miles on 299 east towards Eureka, CA), you’ll see a row of old historic brick buildings. The Shasta region was thriving during the Gold Rush era. At Shasta State Historic Park, take a step back in time and see what life was like for people back then. At the Litsch Store Museum you can visit a general store that operated between the 1850s and 1960. There are wooden barrels that once stored pickles and whiskey along with shelves full of canned food, yardage and derbies. The Courthouse Museum is the county’s first fully restored courthouse. Inside you can see gold mining memorabilia, a jail and the gallows. You can also view a large collection of California landscape art and Pit River Indian basketry. There are nearby cottages and cemeteries that you can walk around. The Shasta State Historic Park is located six miles west of Redding on Highway 299. The park is open 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Wednesday through Sunday. Old Town of Shasta (530) 243-8194 www.parks.ca.gov

IN THE 18 CULTURE OFTAKEREDDING (1 hour – 4 hours) While visiting Redding be sure to include a stop at the Redding Convention Center and Visitors Bureau or the Cascade Theater where something exciting is always happening. Dance events, antique shows, live bands and even a Broadway show series are just a few of the many events that happen here. The Convention Center has a 2,000-seat auditorium that is often filled to capacity to see performances from stars such as Willie Nelson, Trace Adkins and Jazz phenomenon Chris Botti. There are events such as Kool April Nites, rodeo, blues festivals, craft fairs, big bike, and seasonal activities such as a Christmas fair and the largest fireworks display north of Sacramento. For trade shows, the seats are removed and the balcony is raised, providing abundant space for vendors to set up. Something fun for every member of the family

Reservations

800-469-5910 530-365-7965 6612 Riverland Dr. Redding, CA 96002

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can be found at the Convention Center and Visitors Bureau. Drop by the office, located in downtown Redding next to the Sacramento River and Turtle Bay Exploration Park on Exploration Blvd. For theatrical performances, a rich cultural experience awaits you at the Cascade Theatre, in downtown Redding. Performances take place year round and feature local artists from dance theatres, schools and churches. For more information regarding events, fairs, activities, shows and more, contact the Redding Convention Center, (888) 225-4130, or the Cascade Theatre, (530) 243-8877

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SEE STARS AT THE PLANETARIUM

(1 hour +) Light up the evening with a planetarium show. Take a seat in the Schreder Planetarium and see some of the most impressive constellations in existence. The stars appear on the domed ceiling, simulating the real night sky. Visitors learn about astronomy and space science, along with insights into how explorers and others used the constellations throughout history. There are a number of shows available in the digital theater, all with different themes. The planetarium offers education and fun at an affordable price. The Schreder Planetarium is located at the corner of Magnolia and Placer Street in Redding. For more information, call (530) 225-0295. www.schrederplanetarium.com

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GANDER AT CLEAR CREEK PRESERVE

(15 minutes – 1 hour+) Clear Creek Preserve is located off CA 273. Drive 8 miles south of Redding to Clear Creek Road and 5 miles west. It is managed by the BLM’s Redding office and offers over 3000 acres of open space, including 10 miles of trails, interpretive displays, and a creek side salmon viewing area. Over 100 bird species are found on this land adjacent to wetlands. Guided hikes are available in spring and fall, as well as abundant fishing, including Chinook salmon, steelhead, and trout. Other activities to enjoy here are biking, non-motorized boating, camping, fishing, hiking, backpacking, horseback riding, picnicking and wildlife viewing. BLM Redding Office (530) 244-2100 www.publiclands.org/explore/site.php?id+7887


SHASTA

Photos Courtesy Scott Leak, www.sleakphotos.com

Sundial Glide (30 min) $25 Arboretum Glide (1 hr) $35 Garden Glide (2 hr) $50 River Glide (3 hr) $65 Night Glide (1 hr) $40 All prices are “per person� and include training. Tour times are approximate.

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SHASTA

SHASTA LAKE AREA, SHASTA COUNTY

If you are looking for the premiere vacation retreat, look no further‚ Shasta Lake has everything you need. Whether seeking a day of exploration or a weeklong adventure, this area has it all. With 365 miles of shoreline, 40,000 surface acres, an average depth of 400 feet, and enough coves and inlets to be able to hide in seclusion when every personal and commercial boat in the area is on the lake, Shasta Lake is the ultimate vacation destination. For those who wish to spend only a day at the lake, you can enjoy beautiful vistas, hiking trails, mountain biking, fishing, ski and wakeboard lessons, waterfalls, cavern, and dam tours. For those who want to spend a little longer in this secluded, forested paradise, visitors take in the pleasures of houseboating. Known as the “houseboating capital of the world,” Shasta Lake is home to ten marina/resorts, with more than 450 houseboats available to rent. Houseboating can be one of the most pleasurable, relaxing vacations available. From small, rustic houseboats, to huge, luxury houseboats, there is sure to be something to fit your needs. Houseboating has come a long way in the last 20 years, now offering the most fashionable, modern amenities, such as full-size appliances, full suites, showers, TVs, DVD players, fireplaces, hot tubs, outdoor kitchens, fly bridges and much more. If being on the water is not for you, take your retreat on shore at one of the many cabin resorts, motels, RV sites or campgrounds. Most of these destination resorts provide docks, swimming pools, recreation areas, and game rooms for you and your family. For a land-based vacation, you may want to visit the beautiful Sundial Bridge in Redding before going out to a wonderful dinner in one of the many area restaurants. Or take your family to Waterworks Park before leisurely exploring the many waterfalls and scenic hikes. Shasta Lake is part of the Shasta-Trinity National Forest and supports more than a dozen types of game fish, including largemouth and smallmouth bass, catfish, rainbow and brown trout, landlocked salmon, sturgeon, crappie and more. There are also black bear, whitetail deer, otters, osprey, and one of California’s largest populations of bald eagles‚ having more than 22 pairs. Shasta Dam, on the Sacramento River just downstream from the confluence of the McCloud and Pit rivers, created Shasta Lake. Built in the 1940s, the dam is the keystone of the Central Valley Project. With 6.5 million cubic yards of concrete, standing 602 feet tall and spanning more than 3,000 feet, it is the second largest concrete dam in the United States. The concrete in it is enough to build a sidewalk around the equator of the earth, four inches deep and three feet wide. Shasta Lake is easily accessible off Interstate 5, approximately 20 minutes north of Redding. Lake Shasta is truly one of the premier lakes in California. Shasta Lake Business Owners Association (800) 795-2283 www.shastalake.org Shasta Lake Visitor Center (530) 275-1589 Shasta Lake Ranger Station (530) 275-1587 www.fs.fec.us/r5/shastatrinity SHASTA LAKE www.facebook.com/pages/shasta-lake Photos Courtesy Scott Leak, www.sleakphotos.com

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SHASTA

75TH ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION OF THE BUILDING OF SHASTA DAM!

How Shasta Lake City was Born Shasta Lake, known as “the Jewel of Northern California,” is truly a one-of-akind attraction. Not only is the area beautiful and awe-inspiring, but it is also an exciting place to spend a vacation. There are plenty of things to do for every member of the family, from camping and fishing, to horseback riding, hiking, waterskiing and house boating. Shasta Lake also has a rich history. In 1937, at a time when the Great Depression still held a poverty-ridden grip on the area, it was announced that a dam would be built on the Sacramento River. This notice drew thousands of desperate people seeking what was then very rare jobs. Some lived in shabby tents, others in cramped trailers, and some even stayed in their cars waiting for the hiring to begin. By the summer of 1938, construction of what was to become the Shasta Reservoir was in full swing and soon little residential areas began to spring up along Shasta Dam Boulevard. Grocery stores, cafes, smoke shops and dry goods stores were built, along with beer halls, saloons, taverns, dance halls, and even schools for the workers’ children. That same summer, a developer named Jonathan Tibbitts organized the Hell’s Gulch Festival as a way to forget the hardships of the Great Depression and celebrate the success of the new communities around the Dam. During the celebration, a coffin representing “Old Man Gloom” was actually ceremoniously burned to signify the belief that the desperate times were almost over. The Festival became an annual event, drawing people from miles in every direction. Between 1938 and 1941, the area grew and its economy boomed, fueled by real estate and land deals. But when World War II began, many men left the area to join the service, others to get better paying wartime jobs in Los Angeles, San Francisco and Seattle. The Hell’s Gulch Festival was forgotten and, for many years until the war ended, the area became virtually a ghost town with many homes left vacant. This is a photocopy of your ad as it will appear in the 2007 edition of the war, formAgAzine lumber and .paved roads was high so the area once 101 After Things To the Dodemand shAsTA again attracted job seekers. This time se check this proof carefully and notify us as soon as possible the work was in the lumber mills and ow you would like us to proceed, or this ad will appear exactly as shown. nt assumes full responsibility for accuracy and completeness information. atofthe construction site of the Keswick Publisher will not be responsible for errors if proof is notDam returned. that is just down river from Shasta s sheet back or reply to this email, any changes if were PRooF is oK. building Dam. or Jobs also available other infrastructure for the blooming ____________________________________________________ surroundings. According to Dr. Al Rocca, a local __________________________________________________________ Date ______________________________ historian, “Dozens of Shasta Dam area Authorized Signature workers recall car pooling to the giant own by___________________________________________________ Date_ _____________________________ Shasta Plywood plant in Anderson. Authorized Signature Others commuted south to Redding and Anderson for employment.” The oil-embargo of the mid 1970s put a slight dip into the economic growth. But since the 1980s growth has been sustained. From that time to the current day, the Shasta Lake communities have continued to grow. In 1993 the City of Shasta Lake was officially incorporated. Today, its remote scenic wonders and the humming of a popular recreational destination fuel the area’s growth.

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TAKE A FREE TOUR OF SHASTA DAM

(1 hour) From the second largest dam in America, you’ll have an amazing view of the three Shasta’s:, Shasta Dam, Shasta Lake and Mt. Shasta. The dam was constructed between 1938 and 1945 to form scenic Lake Shasta. The dam is 602 feet high and 3,460 feet long, with a base thickness of 883 feet. Shasta Dam was created as the main feature of the Central Valley Project and was built for irrigation supply to farmers and flood control through a stretch of land that extends nearly 500 miles from the Sacramento River in the North to the San-Joaquin River in the South. A one-hour tour of the dam will explain how this incredible dam was built and how it works. Free tours operate daily and leave regularly from the visitor center at the dam. This is an experience that you will not want to miss. Take Interstate 5, five miles north of Redding, to exit 685 and west onto Shasta Dam Boulevard, continue six miles to the Shasta Dam. Shasta Dam Visitors Center (530) 275-4463. http://www.usbr.gov/mp/ncao/shasta/tour.html

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TAKE AN ADVENTURE AT LAKE SHASTA CAVERNS

(2 hours) Imagine being in a cavern, light glistening off calcite crystals embedded in stone walls made of limestone and marble. Water crashes on rocks as it falls from the ceiling high above your head. The cavern tour begins with a cruise across beautiful Shasta Lake, followed by a ride in a comfortable tour bus offering the most scenic view you can get of the McCloud Arm of the lake. The caverns are a fascinating and enchanting vision of Mother Nature’s beauty. Known as the “Little Carlsbad,” Lake Shasta Caverns offer a spectacle of speleothems (cave formations) such as soda straws, stalactites, stalagmites, cave coral, helictites and much more. The entire tour is two hours in length, including a one-hour trip through the caverns that explains this natural wonder. Lake Shasta Caverns is privately owned and part of the National Caves Association. Also offered on the site are two gift shops, a playground for children and a gemstone-mining sluice. The caverns also serve as an educational venue and classes are offered for second through sixth-graders in the Underground Classroom. You can find the Lake Shasta Caverns 15 miles north of Redding and 1.5 miles east of Interstate 5 on Shasta Caverns Road (exit 695). Lake Shasta Caverns (800) 795-CAVE (2283) www.lakeshastacaverns.com www.facebook.com/pages/Lakehead-CA/LakeShasta-Caverns

Photos Courtesy Scott Leak, www.sleakphotos.com

• Shaded RV Sites • Secluded Tent Sites • Private Boat Dock • Rental Cabins

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www.shastalaker v .com P.O. Box 450, Lakehead, CA 96051

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4X4’ING AT ONE OF THE LARGEST OHV AREAS

(2 hours – All Day) The Chappie-Shasta OHV Area is located just 10 miles northwest of Redding and offers the area’s largest public land area for off-road vehicle usage. Elevation varies from 600 to 5,000 feet with a wide variety of terrain and soil, as well as a change in scenery from the different elevations. The area covers 200-miles of roads and trails and over 52,000 acres of off-road-accessible wilderness. Some of the best views of Shasta Lake, Mt. Shasta and the Trinity Alps can be seen from this special BLM area. Camping is available in the staging area adjacent to the Shasta Dam for a small fee. For more information and maps of this area, call The Bureau of Land Management, (530) 224-2100. Copley Mountain OHV Staging Area The Copley Mountain OHV Staging Area is a day use only OHV staging facility providing parking for 15-20 vehicles, information kiosks, toilet facilities, unloading ramps, and trail access. From the Copley Mountain OHV Staging Area you can access either route #4 or #3. Both of these routes provide southern access into the Chappie-Shasta OHV Area. The Copley Mountain OHV Staging area is maintained and administered by the Bureau of Land Management Redding field office. BLM Redding www.blm.gov/ca/st/en/fo/redding/recreationmain/ reddingrecreationohvmain.html

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HIKE AND BIKE THE SHASTA LAKE TRAILS

(1 hour – All Day) There is also much of Shasta Lake that can be experienced on foot. Along the lake’s shoreline, hiking, mountain biking, and running trails offer inviting side adventures. Some of the most popular trails are Bailey Cove, Packers Bay, and Clikapudi Trails. Anglers will love the trail at Dry Fork near the dam and Sugarloaf Trail follows a wooded creek back into the mountains. The Samwel Cave Nature Trail will take you through limestone formations to a very interesting cave with historical significance. There are trails for people of all ages. To find the bestsuited trail ask for guidance at the Shasta Lake Visitor Information Center off Interstate 5 at the Mountain Gate/Wonderland Boulevard, exit 687. Follow signs to the center. It is on the east side of the freeway on Holiday Road. For more information, call (530) 2751589.

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RENT OR BRING YOUR BOAT!

(2 hours – All Day+) The best way to experience all that Shasta Lake has to offer is definitely by boat. Explore the many inlets,


SHASTA

the entire shoreline, the dam and other out-of-theway places inaccessible any other way. Rent a boat from one of the many marinas and resorts around the lake. Rentals include kayaks, canoes, rowboats, paddleboats, fishing boats, ski boats, patio boats, and houseboats. Rental periods vary from an hour or two up to a week. Shasta Lake Visitor Information Center (530) 275-1589. Antlers Resort & Marina (800) 238-3924 www.shastalakevacations.com www.facebook.com/pages/Lakehead-CA/AntlersResort-Marina-Houseboating Bridge Bay Marina (800) 752-9669 www.sevencrown.com http://www.facebook.com/pages/Bridge-BayResort/144003225638272?ref=ts Holiday Harbor (530) 238-2383 www.lakeshasta.com www.facebook.com/pages/Shasta-Lake-CA/HolidayHarbor-Shasta-Lake-Resort-Marina Jones Valley Resort & Marina (530) 275-7950 www.houseboats.com www.facebook.com/pages/houseboatscom Shasta Marina Resort (530) 238-2284 www.shastalake.net www.facebook.com/shastamarinaresort Silverthorn Resort (530) 275-1571

www.silverthornresort.com www.facebook.com/silverthornresort Shasta Lake Visitor Information Center (530) 275-1589 www.shastalake.com www.facebook.com/pages/Shasta-Lake

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Shasta Dam an engineering marvel!

FREE TOURS DAILY

GO HOUSEBOATING!

(2 hours – All Day+) Houseboating on Shasta Lake is convenient and rewarding. Eat, sleep, swim, fish and explore the lake from the comfort of your floating hotel. Select a houseboat that best suits your needs based on the size of your vacation party and length of your stay. The newest houseboats offer a range of amenities, such as full-size appliances, central heating and air conditioning, hot tubs, fireplaces, satellite TV and DVD players, as well as modern sound systems, outdoor kitchens and more. Antlers Resort & Marina (800) 238-3924 www.shastalakevacations.com www.facebook.com/pages/Lakehead-CA/AntlersResort-Marina-Houseboating Bridge Bay Marina (800) 752-9669 www.sevencrown.com http://www.facebook.com/pages/Bridge-BayResort/144003225638272?ref=ts Holiday Harbor

Call

(530) 275-4463 for information and tour times

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(530) 238-2383 www.lakeshasta.com www.facebook.com/pages/Shasta-Lake-CA/HolidayHarbor-Shasta-Lake-Resort-Marina Jones Valley Resort & Marina (530) 275-7950 www.houseboats.com www.facebook.com/pages/houseboatscom Packers Bay Marina (530) 275-5570 www.packersbay.com www.facebook.com/pages/Packers-Bay-MarinaHouseboat-Vacations Shasta Marina Resort (530) 238-2284 www.shastalake.net www.facebook.com/shastamarinaresort Silverthorn Resort (530) 275-1571 www.silverthornresort.com www.facebook.com/silverthornresort Shasta Lake Visitor Information Center (530) 275-1589 www.shastalake.com www.facebook.com/pages/Shasta-Lake

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CAMP UNDER THE STARS AT SHASTA LAKE

(1 day – Several Days) Imagine falling asleep to the sounds of an owl hooting, water rippling and the wind whispering

through the trees. That’s the experience you get when camping on Shasta Lake. With many miles of shoreline there are numerous places to stay, whether it is in a boat on the water or back among the pine and oak trees. Choose from a broad spectrum of primitive to lush campgrounds, offering electric hookups and swimming pools. During the day, you can swim, picnic and fish. There are numerous hiking and biking trails weaving around the lake. There is boating as well, so exploring the lake or water-skiing is easily planned. Check out one of the many marinas or resorts dotting the lake for rentals. Memories of the day’s adventures will linger while watching the sun drift below the horizon and turning the sky amazingly vivid colors. Shasta Lake Visitor Information Center (530) 275-1589 www.shastalake.org www.facebook.com/pages/Shasta-Lake

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been returning for years. It can be an opportunity for families to come together at a special location, share stories and develop memories that will last a lifetime. Enjoy the experience of having fun sharing a meal with new friends, or sitting around the swimming pool visiting after spending the day water skiing, or learning a new trick on your wake board. Maybe go for a mountain hike or drive just to see and experience something new. Wonderful restaurants are nearby which allow everyone to relax and enjoy a vacation that may truly become an important part of your family history. Visit and stay at one of these unique cabin resorts near the shore of beautiful Shasta Lake. Facilities are open year-round and

THE ULTIMATE SHASTA LAKE EXPERIENCE

(2+ days) Stay in a cabin and enjoy both the mountains and the lake. Cabins provide you with a home-away-fromhome. They have everything you need to make your vacation great. Shasta Lake has over 360 miles of shoreline with vacation rentals dotted throughout. There are many one-of-a-kind resorts, some providing private moorage for their guests and their boats. Guests can easily enjoy a setting where families have

Shasta Marina Resort Houseboat vacations... Lifelong family memories... This is the life.

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Check out our website

Shasta Marina Resort 1-800-959-3359 www.shastalake.net Shasta 2013 Edition

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present opportunities to visit not only in the summer but also to experience the beauty of fall and spring. Shasta Lake Business Owners Association www.shastalake.org Antlers Resort and Marina (800) 238-3924 www.shastalakevacations.com Antlers RV Park (530) 238-2322 www.antlersrvpark.com Mt. Gate RV Park (530) 275-1905. www.mt-gatervpark.com Shasta Lake RV Resort (530) 238-2370. www.shastarv.com Silverthorn Resort (800) 332-3044. www.silverthornresort.com Sugarloaf Cottages Resort (800) 953-4432 www.shastacabins.com Tsasdi Resort (530) 238-2575 www.tsasdiresort.com

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setting, beautiful sunsets, emerald green waters, and the company of your family and friends, this is definitely an experience you’ll want to enjoy time and time again! Shasta Lake Dinner Cruises depart twice weekly on Friday & Saturday evenings at 6:00pm from Memorial Day to Labor Day. Tickets and Departures are at Lake Shasta Caverns Gift Store, Exit 695 on I-5, 17 miles north of Redding. Lake Shasta Caverns and Dinner Cruises (800) 795-2283 www.lakeshastacaverns.com

www.mountaingaterecreationalstorage.com

EXPERIENCE SHASTA LAKE DINNER CRUISES

(2 hours) Your adventure in Northern California is only complete if you experience a Dinner Cruise on Shasta Lake! With a mouth-watering menu, gorgeous lake

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SHASTA

Full-Service Marina HouSeboatS cabinS SMall boat rentalS

Relax and enjoy the splendor of the outdoors at Antlers Resort and Marina

Luxury Houseboats

Antlers Road, Lakehead, CA · (530) 238-2553 (800) 238-3924 · www.shastalakeevacations.com

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ANDERSON AREA, SHASTA COUNTY

The Shasta District Fairgrounds, the Anderson River Park, and several opportunities to participate in a variety of recreational, multicultural and educational activities. The Coleman Fish Hatchery is located along the Battle Creek tributary of the Sacramento River, and is responsible for the production of various species of fish, and their goal is to produce over 13 million on an annual basis. The Shasta District Fairgrounds is the home of the Shasta District Fair in June, horse racing, craft shows, RV shows, and more. The Battle Creek Wildlife Area boasts 582 acres of riparian forests, marshes, and oak woodland support for hundreds of species. If you’re a horse lover be sure to go take a trail ride at NorCal Trail Rides. Offering safe, comfortable trail rides for all ages, NorCal Trail Rides is open year round with rides in the morning and afternoon. Up until a few years ago, Anderson was primarily a lumber town, but now with new commercial opportunities in north Anderson, it is becoming the place to stop and shop as well. At the intersection of I-5 and Hwy 273 you will find the Shasta Outlets, a Wal-Mart Supercenter, the area’s only Sonic, and several mall franchises you find in larger metropolitan areas. City of Anderson, www.andersonchamber.info

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Memories to last a lifetime... Trail Rides & Lessons • Private Lessons • Special Events/Birthdays Complete Natural Horsemanship Skills! Indoor Arena • Family & Couples Rides Horsemanship Clinics • Summer Camps Leading & Tying ✦ Saddling ✦ Riding ✦ Grooming Walking Around A Horse ✦ Feeding ✦ Cleaning Hoofs Cleaning Stalls & Taking Care Of Horses Mounting & Dismounting ✦ Controlling A Horse Holding The Reins ✦ Cleaning Tack Reading A Horse’s Body Language Safely 21260 Hawes Rd., Anderson · 530-515-8958 · www.norcaltrailrides.com

EXPERIENCE THE EQUESTRIAN WONDERS OF NORCAL TRAIL RIDES

(2 hours) Take on the great outdoors in a way only an experienced wrangler can show you… by horseback. NorCal Trail Rides offers safe, comfortable trail-rides for all ages throughout the Northern California area. Open 7 days a week and offering two rides a day, one in the morning, and one in the afternoon (must call for times), year round. They supply everything you need to have a comfortable trip including the horses, tack, helmets, water, and an experienced guide. They also offer lessons, training, horsemanship clinics, kids’ summer camps, birthday parties, and specialty rides. NorCal Trail Rides (530) 515-8958 www.norcaltrailrides.com

Photos Courtesy Scott Leak, www.sleakphotos.com

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CATCH AN AMAZING SALMON EXPERIENCE

(1.5 hours) Everyone knows there is great fishing in Northern California. Tehama and the surrounding counties are widely known for amazing salmon fishing. One of the primary reasons for this fantastic salmon fishing experience is the Coleman National Fish Hatchery. This enormous hatchery is the largest in the continental United States, and tours are offered showing the techniques used to maintain salmon levels in Northern California. The hatchery uses more than 800 tons of fish food and rears about 15 million salmon a year. The Coleman National Fish Hatchery is open daily from 7:30 a.m. to dusk and is located beside Battle Creek, about 10 miles southeast of the town of Anderson. City of Anderson (531) 365-8622 www.fws.gov/redbluff/coleman.html

Photos Courtesy Scott Leak, www.sleakphotos.com

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WHISKEYTOWN NATIONAL RECREATION AREA, SHASTA COUNTY

Whiskeytown Lake was formed as a part of the Central Valley Water Project to help provide water for agriculture and started by diverting water through tunnels and penstocks from the Trinity River Basin to the Sacramento River Basin. President John F. Kennedy dedicated the lake and surrounding area in 1963. Other tributaries besides the Trinity River are Clear Creek, Brandy Creek, Crystal Creek, and Boulder Creek, among other small creeks. Many trails and secluded areas inside the park are dotted with Gold Rush Era buildings, mines, and miner’s ditches. Ranger guided programs and tours are available during summer months. Among the offered guided tours are Gold Panning and Kayak Tours. The Whiskeytown National Recreation Area has a total of 42,500 acres of land. Recreational opportunities include camping, fishing, boating, hiking, swimming, kayaking, mountain biking, and sailing. One of the most popular activities for this lake is mountain biking, with several competitions held every month during the summer. Camping is available near the water at Oak Bottom Campground and other smaller backcountry campsites. The most prominent peak in the area is Shasta Bally with an elevation of 6,209 feet. The summit may be reached by offroad vehicle, or by foot (only open during summer months). The park is open year round 24 hours a day. The Visitor Center is open daily Memorial Day - Labor Day 9 a.m. 6 p.m. Winter hours are 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. (closed Thanksgiving, Christmas, and New Years). Ranger Headquarters (530) 242-3400 www.nps.gov/whis/index.htm

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EXPERIENCE WONDERS OF WHISKEYTOWN

(1 hour – All Day) Whiskeytown Lake is approximately 8 miles west of Redding off 299w. The lake has a capacity of 241,100acre ft and is formed by Whiskeytown Dam on Clear Creek. The 263 foot tall earthen dam was completed in 1963. In that year President John F. Kennedy dedicated Whiskeytown Lake. Recreation available at the lake includes hiking, waterfalls, kayaking, sailing, mountain biking, gold panning, nature tours, swimming, boating, water skiing, camping, fishing, tours of Gold Rush Era buildings, mines and miner’s ditches. Fishing opportunities include rainbow and brown trout, largemouth and smallmouth bass, spotted bass, and kokanee salmon. Wildlife seen are black bears, mountain lions, blacktail deer, turtles and raccoons. There are several breeding pairs of bald eagles in the area. The lake is full to the brim from Memorial Day through Labor Day and remains within 15 feet of the crest year-round. For more information, see the following “things to do” and visit www.nps. gov/whis/index.htm or call 530.246.1225. The visitor center is located at 14412 Kennedy Memorial Drive, Whiskeytown, CA 96095.

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SAIL THE BLUE WATERS OF WHISKEYTOWN NATIONAL RECREATION AREA

(2 hours – All Day)

Sailors began meeting at Whiskeytown Lake soon after President John F. Kennedy dedicated the Whiskeytown Dam in September of 1963. Every year the Whiskeytown Sailing club has sponsored the Whiskeytown Memorial Regatta. Having over 300 participants in this event, some sailors are third generation. The club is heavily involved with the local Coast Guard, which brings its patrol boats out for sailing events. There are several Spring, Summer, and Fall events held by the club. For more information or to inquire about bringing your sailboat out for a spin on Whiskeytown, contact the Whiskeytown N.R.A. at 530.246.1225 or visit www.nps.gov/whis/index.htm.

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PICNIC ON THE BEACH AT BRANDY CREEK

(1 hour – All Day) There are several picnic areas around Whiskeytown National Recreation Area to enjoy. Brandy Creek, Oak Bottom and the Whiskey Creek boat launch area are all complete with tables, fire grills, and restrooms. Most visitors who visit Whiskeytown come for the main purpose of swimming in its clear, refreshing waters. At Brandy Creek you can enjoy swimming, wading, scuba diving, and more. Lifeguards are present during summer months, and there are areas of shoreline that are very shallow for young, learning swimmers. Pets are not allowed on the beaches. Watch children closely, and don’t forget the sun block! For more information, visit www.nps. gov/whis/planyourvisit/picnic-and-beaches.htm (530) 242-3400 or (530) 246-1225

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EXPLORE WATERFALLS OF WHISKEYTOWN

(1 hour – All Day) If you ask a local what the best recreational “thing to do” is, about 75% of them will say to visit one or more of the waterfalls in the region. There are literally hundreds of gorgeous waterfalls of all sizes in this area of Northern California. Some of them are tall, some of them are wide, and most of them are year round. In this edition of 101 Things To Do you will see several articles on waterfalls instead of just one… why? Because we just can’t pass them up! There are so many notable waterfalls that are worth your time that we can’t mention them in just one paragraph. That said, Whiskeytown National Recreation Area boasts several hikes to these beautiful wonders. So invite your friends and family out for a weekend of waterfalls and visit one of Whiskeytown’s four most beautiful, natural, year round water attractions;: Whiskeytown Falls, Boulder Creek Falls, Brandy Creek Falls, and Crystal Creek Falls. For the first three of these waterfalls, you will experience 3-5 miles of round-trip intermediate level hiking. Crystal Creek Falls is a level 0.25 miles from the parking lot. For more information on the Waterfalls of Whiskeytown, visit nps.gov/whis/planyourvisit/waterfalls-ofwhiskeytown.htm or call 530 242-3400.

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TAKE A KAYAK TOUR OF WHISKEYTOWN LAKE

(1 hour – 2 hours) Hop into your two-person kayak and explore the magnificent coves of Whiskeytown National Recreation Area. The guided tour is 1.5 to 2 hours long. Your guide will tell you all about the lake, wildlife, and how the National Park Service preserves this special lake. The National Park Service offers Moonlight kayak tours as well. Persons taking this tour must be in good physical condition, know how to swim and not be afraid of falling into the water. You can register with the ranger or volunteer 20 minutes prior to the start of the program. A valid park entrance pass must be displayed on the driver’s side dashboard of your vehicle. Bottled water, a change of clothes, sunglasses, sunscreen, insect repellent, and a hat are recommended. You are welcome to bring your own kayak with life vests, if you know how to use your equipment. From Redding turn left at the Visitor Center on JFK Memorial Drive, follow signs to Brandy Creek beach about 3.6 miles, follow the road to the very end of LOT B, and look for the brown metal shed. To make reservations or for more information, call 530.242.3462 Mon-Fri 9am –noon. You can also rent Kayaks for personal use at Oak Bottom Marina 530.359.2671. The visitor center’s number is 530.246.1225.

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SPINNER FALL LODGE & CIRCLE 7 RANCH

ENJOY THE PEACEFUL BEAUTY AND ASTONISHING FISHING OF CALIFORNIA’S FALL RIVER AT

SPINNER FALL LODGE AND CIRCLE 7 RANCH

Dining, rooms, houses, boat rentals, guides and more!

spinnerfalllodge.com For Reservations call 530.336.5300 for rooms or 530.336.5827 for houses. Email info@spinnerfalllodge.com Spinner Fall Lodge is located at 28076 Metzger Rd. Fall River Mills, CA Circle 7 Ranch is located at 27663 Island Rd. Fall River Mills, CA


Shasta Cascade Annual Events brought to you by

BUTTE COUNTY ANNUAL EVENTS ARTOBERFEST Chico, October FEATHER FIEST DAYS FESTIVAL Oroville, May SALMON FESTIVAL Oroville, October SILVER DOLLAR FAIR Chico, June SNOW GOOSE FESTIVAL Chico, January WILDFLOWER CENTURY BIKE RIDE Chico, April

LASSEN COUNTY ANNUAL EVENTS CHESTER CLASSIC 4TH OF JULY RUN/ WALK Chester, July

MODOC COUNTY ANNUAL EVENTS ANNUAL ART CENTER LIVE AUCTION Alturas, February FRIENDS OF MODOC COUNTY WINTER GALA Alturas, February

PLUMAS COUNTY ANNUAL EVENTS MOHAWK ARTISTS GUILD’S HOLIDAY ART & CRAFT FAIR Graeagle, November

SHASTA COUNTY ANNUAL EVENTS ANDERSON EXPLODES Anderson, July ARTSMART Redding, November BIG BIKE WEEKEND Redding, October BIG BIKES AND FUN IN THE SUN Anderson, August BLUES BY THE RIVER FESTIVAL Redding, September BOARD & SKI SWAP Redding, November BURNEY BASIN DAYS Burney, July C.A.S.T. FOR KIDS Shasta Lake, June COLEMAN FISH HATCHERY FREE ENTRANCE DAYS Anderson, November FALL DRIVE-THROUGH TRI-TIP FUNDRAISER Redding EHS, October FALL FLING Burney, October FALL RIVER CENTURY Fall River Mills, July FALL RIVER VALLEY WILD RICE FESTIVAL Fall River Mills, August FOCUS FILM FESTIVAL Chico, October FREEDOM IN THE SKIES AIR SHOW Redding, September

FRIDAY NIGHT IN THE PARK Shasta Lake City, June-August FURBALL Win River Casino, Redding, January HAM RUN Burney, May HAPPY VALLEY STRAWBERRY FESTIVAL Happy Valley, May HARRISMAS DAY Shasta Lake City, August HERITAGE DAY Burney, October HISTORIC HAWES FARMS EVENTS Anderson, October HONEY BEE FESTIVAL Palo Cedro, September INTERMOUNTAIN FAIR McArthur, August KOOL APRIL NITES Redding, April LIGHTED CHRISTMAS PARADE Redding, December MARTIN LUTHER KING JR. COMMEMORATION Redding, January MASQUERADE BALL Palo Cedro, October MOSQUITO SERENADE Anderson, June NASH RANCH PUMPKIN PATCH Redding, October NATIONAL PUBLIC LANDS DAY Shasta Lake, September NORTH COW CREEK FALL FESTIVAL Palo Cedro, October NORTHERN CALIFORNIA FLY FISHING FEDERATION Redding, October NORTHERN CALIFORNIA INT Red Bluff, September OCTOBER FEAST Redding, October PAESANO DAYS AND BOCCE TOURNAMENT Anderson, August REDDING BEAR & WINE FESTIVAL Redding, September REDDING MARKETFEST Redding, June-August Thursday Nights REDDING RADIO Redding, May RENAISSANCE FAIR Anderson, May RETURN OF THE SALMON FESTIVAL Anderson, October ROSE GARDEN TOUR Redding, May SHASTA DAM WORKERS REUNION AND DAMBOREE Shasta Lake, May SHASTA DISTRICT FAIR Anderson, June SHASTA LAKE TROUT DERBY Shasta Lake, October SHASTA TRINITY FLY FISHERS FISHOUT Lassen, October SILENT FILMS FESTIVAL Redding, October SPAGHETTI FEED, SONS OF ITALY Redding, October STILLWATER POW WOW Redding, September SUNDIAL THINK PINK BRIDGE LIGHTING Redding, October TASTE OF REDDING Redding, June THINK PINK DAY Redding, October TURKEY TROT Redding, November

TURTLE BAY ARTS AND CRAFTS FAIR & DUCKY DERBY Redding, September WALK A MILE IN HER SHOES Redding, April WHISKEYTOWN DUATHLON Whiskeytown, May WHISKEYTOWN REGATTA Whiskeytown Lake, May WHOLE EARTH AND WATERSHED FESTIVAL Redding, April WINTER CRUSH Corning, December WYNTOUR GARDENS ROSE SHOW & WINE TASTING Redding, October

SISKIYOU COUNTY ANNUAL EVENTS 4TH OF JULY CELEBRATION Mt. Shasta, July ART WALK Mt. Shasta , October AUTUMN ART WALK Dusmuir, October BLACKBERRY MUSIC FESTIVAL Mount Shasta City Park, September HAOLLOWEEN FESTIVAL Yreka, Octoer KIDS FISHING DERBY Yreka, May LABOR DAY WEEKEND COOL MOUNTAIN NIGHTS Mt. Shasta, September LUMBERJACK FIESTA Hoo Hoo Park, July MCCLOUD MUSHROOM FESTIVAL McCloud, May MONTAGUE BALLOON FAIR Montague, September MONTAGUE JUNIOR RODEO Montagure Rodeo Arena, May OLD FASHIONEED CHRISTMAS Main Street McCloud, December RAILROAD DAYS Dunsmuir, June SISKIYOU FOLK AND BLUEGRASS FESTIVAL Lake Selmac, Siskiyou, July SISKIYOU GOLDEN FAIR Siskiyou Golden Fairgrounds, August STATE OF JEFFERSON BREWFEST Mount Shasta Ski Park, July SUMMIT CENTURY BIKE RIDE Mt. Shasta, August WEEDS CARNEVALE Bel Air Park, Weed, July WINTER MAGIC Mt. Shasta, November YREKA HOLIDAY PARADE Yreka, November

TEHAMA COUNTY ANNUAL EVENTS 4TH OF JULY PARADE Los Molinos, July ANTIQUE STREET FAIR Red Bluff, October CORNING HOMETOWN CHRISTMAS PARADE Corning , November CORNING WINE, FOOD AND ART FESTIVAL Corning, March DAIRYVILLE ORCHARD FESTIVAL Los Molinos, October

DUMMY ROPING COMETITION Los Molinos, May FALL GARDEN FESTIVAL Red Bluff, October FALL SCRAMBLE GOLF TOURNAMENT Red Bluff, October FUR, FEATHER AND UDDERS 4-H SHOW Tehama District Fairgrounds, June JP RANCH RODEO Red Bluff, January MANTON APPLE FESTIVAL Manton, October MAY MADNESS CAR SHOW Corning, May MONSTER TRUCKS Red Bluff, August MOTOCROSS NATIONALS Red Bluff, August NBC NEW YEAR’S EVE BULL RIDE Red Bluff, December NEW YEARS EVE RODEO AND DANCE Red Bluff, December NORTHERN COUNTIES QUARTER HORSE SHOW Red Bluff, February OLIVE FESTIVAL Corning, August RED BLUFF ROUND UP Red Bluff, February RIVER PARK CAR SHOW Red Bluff River Park, May TEHAMA COUNTY FAIR Red Bluff, September TEHAMA TRAIL PASSPORT WEEKEND Local Farms, June

TRINITY COUNTY ANNUAL EVENTS BBQ AND SHOW AND SHINE CLASSIC CAR SHOW Weaverville, June CCPRA RODEO Ruth , August CHINESE NEW YEAR CELEBRATION Weaverville, January FALL COLORS Coffee Creek, Ocotober HAYFORK CENTURY BIKE RIDE Hayfork, June INDEPENDENCE DAY CLEBRATIONS Weaverville, July OLD LEWISTON PEDDLERS’ FAIRE Lewiston, June RUTH LAKE BASS TOURNAMENT Ruth Lake, May SALMON FESTIVAL Weaverville, October TRINITY COUNTY FAIR Hayfork, August TRINITY LAKE FEST Trinity Lake, July TRINITY LAKE LIONS BBQ Trinity Lake, September

For up to date Calendar Events visit Trading Post Partners Websites: ButteTradingPost.com, LassenTradingPost.com, ModocTradingPost.com, PlumasTradingPost.com, ShastaTradingPost.com, SiskiyouTradingPost.com, TehamaTradingPost.com, TrinityTradingPost.com


SHASTA

SISKIYOU COUNTY

Siskiyou County provides the very best in accommodations, restaurants, tourist attractions, shopping and services that the northern part of the state has to offer. Here you can ski snowy mountains, fish and raft crystal clear rivers, camp and swim in crystal lakes, and hike and climb in the spectacular wilderness areas. California’s northern treasure, Mount Shasta, is a mountain of incredible scenic beauty that is known worldwide. Take the time to enjoy all of the things to do in this area. Test your physical abilities and determination by climbing Mt. Shasta, which is the second highest volcano in the United States, or one of the other nearby peaks such as Castle Crags, Mt. Eddy and Black Butte. Shoot the rapids during spring rafting time on the Upper Sacramento or the Klamath River. Tour the oldest hatchery west of the Mississippi, the Mt. Shasta Fish Hatchery, and feed trout from the handy fish food dispensers. Gaze at over a million dollars in Yreka at the largest display of gold south of Alaska. Catch and release a wild trout while fly-fishing the Upper Sacramento, McCloud, Klamath and Scott Rivers. Or simply hike or take a leisurely walk to one of the many impressive waterfalls in Siskiyou County. The towering Mt. Shasta, a 14,162-foot volcano, is the second-tallest peak in the Cascade Mountain Range. Mt. Shasta is an awe-inspiring sight that seems to burst from the earth, in an otherwise flat area. The city of Mount Shasta, located only 9 miles from the flank of the mountain has a great number of fabulous Bed & Breakfasts to choose from, great restaurants, and cute little shops. The city also boasts many hotels, resorts, modern amenities, shopping, sports rentals of all kinds, and all of your vacation needs, whether you are camping, hiking, RV’ing, off-roading, or just passing through the area to a more secluded region of the north state such as Modoc County. Hikers can choose from 17 trails leading to the summit. An estimated 15,000 climbers attempt the summit annually, with the Avalanche Gulch route among the most popular. Climbing for beginner and advanced mountaineers is available. Summit trips generally take one to two days. Late-May through midJuly is considered the best time to use the Avalanche Gulch route, but each of the trails has an optimal time of year for ascent. Wilderness permits are required to climb Mt. Shasta. They can be obtained at the trailheads or the Mt. Shasta or McCloud Ranger Stations. Reservations are not required. Mt. Shasta is off Interstate 5, about 60 miles north of Redding.

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PICK A VACATION HEADQUARTERS

(2 days+) If golf, romance, and fun in the sun sounds like your cup of tea, look no further than Mount Shasta Resort‚ a place for fun with the whole family. Hiking and biking trails surround the lush forests at the base of Mount Shasta. Rather ride without pedaling? Grab hold of the reins and take a guided tour on horseback through some of the serene beauty and wildlife that graces this area. If the weather gets hot, head for McCloud Reservoir for some waterskiing or wakeboarding, followed by a cool refreshing swim. Take in a bird’s eye view in a hot air balloon ride, or pamper yourself at Evergreen Day Spa. One of the main reasons people gather at Mount

Shasta Resort is for large group parties, banquets, reunions, and other special events. It’s no surprise that weddings are a common occurrence, enhanced by the brilliant backdrop of Mt. Shasta, one of California’s most glorious peaks. Business meetings are also quite popular‚. What better place to hold a meeting than on an 18-hole premier championship golf course? With all these great outdoor activities to partake in, one might think such a sunny resort like this is dreary in the winter but that’s not the case. The resort stays open, cozily lodging skiers, snowboarders and snowmobilers throughout the winter months. Mount Shasta Resort is located just off of Interstate 5, roughly 60 miles north of Redding. Get out and visit this piece of paradise in Northern California. Drop by for a day trip, or contact (800) 958-3363 for lodging reservations. www.mountshastaresort.com

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STROLL A SKI RESORT TOWN

(1 hour – 3 hours) If you are looking for that “ski resort” town – the one with all the snow-lined streets and quaint gift shops, cozy cafés, and you are searching for that unique something you can’t find anywhere else, look no further, the city of Mt. Shasta has all of this and more! Park and take a stroll down Mt. Shasta Blvd, and the neighboring streets and you will find anything you are looking for, including neighborhood cafés, outfitters and sports shops, art galleries, crystal and metaphysical shops unlike any other, jewelers, and beauty shops as well. Whether you are staying overnight in this beautiful city at the foot of Mt. Shasta or you are staying the week for a ski/board vacation, be sure to take a stroll. Mt. Shasta Chamber of Commerce l 300 Pine Street, Mt. Shasta CA 96067 530-926-4865 www.mtshastachamber.com

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SPEND THE DAY LAKESIDE IN SISKIYOU

(2 hours – All Day+) Nothing is better than dipping into a cool mountain lake on a hot day in the summer, or catching a bite

to eat from one of these gorgeous bodies of water! Siskiyou County has some of the most pristine mountain lakes around. It doesn’t matter whether you want to take a day trip with the kids and park alongside the lake and jump in, or if you want to hike

in, get into a secluded spot nestled in the wilderness and stay for awhile ~ the lakes in Siskiyou are the place to be to get away from it all! These high alpine lakes have very clear waters and views for miles around, which can make for a breathtaking photograph or just a vivid memory. Siskiyou Lake has a marina and a campground; most of the lakes we mention here are maintained and have campgrounds. There are over 270 named lakes in Siskiyou, but just to name a few…don’t miss Castle Lake, Little Castle Lake, Heart Lake, Siskiyou Lake, Lake Shastina, Medicine Lake, Deadfall Lakes, Tule Lake, and Klamath Lake. (800) 926-4865 www.fishingworks.com www.lakesis.com www.mtshastachamber.com www.yrekachamber.com

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HIKE OR BIKE IN THE WILD

(1 hour – All Day) Hiking around Mt. Shasta can provide incredible panoramic views. You can hike for just 15 minutes, or spend all day hiking as far as you please. It’s even possible to pitch a tent for the night. Farther up the mountain, your views will become more Photos Courtesy Scott Leak, www.sleakphotos.com

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breathtaking. Depending on the trail, you could see creeks, waterfalls, evergreen forests, volcanic rocks, caves or even glaciers. At the final destination, take some time to walk around, take some photos and have a picnic. Make sure that you bring plenty of water, a map and compass, appropriate clothing, lots of sun block and enough food. Most of the trails begin from Everett Memorial Highway in Mt. Shasta. For most hiking, you will need to get a permit at the trailhead permit station. The bicycling and mountain biking enthusiast will be in heaven in the Shasta Cascade Region of Northern California. There are hotspots around Whiskeytown Lake, Shasta Lake and Mt. Shasta. For biking, recommended trails include Panther Meadows or Old Ski Bowl off Everett Memorial Highway, the “Circle of Mt. Shasta,” and Mt. Shasta Board & Ski Park (in the summer). In the Whiskeytown and Shasta Lake areas, the best trails include Shasta Bally, Shasta Mine Loop Trail, and Clickapudi Trail. You can find more suggestions by asking a local retailer or outfitter such as Shasta Base Camp, the Fifth Season, or the local Chamber. Mt. Shasta Ranger District Office (530) 926-4511 McCloud Ranger District Office (530) 964-2184 Mt. Shasta Visitors Bureau (530) 926-4865 Shasta Trinity Headquarter (530) 226-2500 www.mtshastachamber.com

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IN THE SPIRIT FOR MOUNTAINEERING?

(1 – 3 days) Imagine making your way all the way up to the summit of Mt. Shasta and looking out for miles in every direction. Mountaineering on Shasta is a combination of hiking mixed with rock and ice climbing, which is what you would be doing to reach the top of this 14,162-foot mountain. Over 15,000 people try for the summit each year, but few have the privilege to sign the book at the top. You can be one of them. Many businesses in Mt. Shasta will help you on your journey by providing classes for mountaineer training, glacier seminars, or trips up Mt. Shasta that can be made in a day or at a more leisurely pace of several days. This is an adventure not soon forgotten. You will experience first-hand the excitement and wonder of nature that most people only see in pictures. The best time of year to go is between June and August. Sierra Wilderness Seminars (888) 797-6867 Mt. Shasta Visitors Bureau (530) 926-4865 www.mtshastachamber.com

42

ENJOY THE WONDERFUL WATERFALLS OF SISKIYOU

(1 hour – All Day+)

If you enjoy swimming, hiking, or just looking at spectacular natural beauty, then you should take a trip to the waterfalls along the McCloud River in the Shasta National Forest. The Lower McCloud falls are known for swimming and jumping into the deep pool below the falls. Middle McCloud falls is the largest waterfall. These falls are over 50 feet high and 100 feet wide. Just five minutes up the path from the Middle McCloud Falls viewpoint is the viewpoint for the Upper Falls. The 30-foot upper falls is hard to see from the path, but by wandering down the path to the base of the falls, you are treated to some of the most scenic sights you could ask for. Take Highway 89 east from Interstate 5 to McCloud, continue 5.5 miles east to the Fowler’s Camp and Lower Falls sign, turn right and drive 1.2 miles to the lower falls picnic area. To drive to Middle Falls and Upper Falls, turn left on the road before Fowlers Camp and follow the signs. Shasta National Forest (530) 964-2184 www.fs.fed.us/r5/shastatrinity

43

HIKE THE TRAILS AND ENJOY THE LAKES ON MT. EDDY

(3 hours – All Day+) The views from the summit of Mt. Eddy are worth the 9.4-mile round-trip hike. A top-of-the-world feeling will envelop you as you take in the panoramic views. Mt. Shasta can be seen to the east, Mt. McLaughlin in Oregon to the north and the Trinity Alps, Castle Crags

Featuring Shasta, Siskiyou, Tehama, Plumas, Lassen, Trinity, Modoc, Butte, and more....

and Mt. Lassen to the south. Mt. Eddy also has many alpine lakes and streams to explore. The geology of the mountain starts with granite, and then blends with green serpentine as you ascend. At just over 9,000 feet, it is the highest point in Trinity County. Make sure to bring water, since none is available at the trailhead. However, water can be obtained from Deadfall Creek, 2.5 miles from the start of the trail. The best time to climb Mt. Eddy is from early July (once the snow has melted) through late October. If you plan to make the trip an overnight adventure, camping at the Deadfall Lakes is the best bet. No wilderness permit is required to hike, but campfire permits are necessary. Mt. Eddy is abundant in red and white fir and pine. Enjoy wildflowers in June and July. Animals that frequent the area are deer, squirrels and frogs. To get there, take the Steward Springs exit off Interstate 5 a few miles west of Weed. Pass beneath the freeway and take a right. Turn left on Steward Springs Road. Take Forest Service Road 17 to a parking area by the Deadfalls Lake trailhead. Mount Shasta Ranger Station (530) 926-4511 www.shastaavalanche.org

44

SEE THE SPECTACULAR VIEWS ATOP BLACK BUTTE

(3 hours+) The summit of Black Butte provides a spectacular view of Mt. Shasta, the Sacramento River Canyon, Mt. Eddy and the Klamath Mountains.

27


SHASTA

EXIT 729 Close to skiing, fishing, and local lakes. All rooms are non-smoking and pet friendly. With clean, comfortable rooms and reasonable rates all year, we think you’ll find the Dunsmuir Lodge the best place to stay !

6604 dunsmuir Ave Dunsmuir, ca 96025

530-235-2884

The mountain often takes the second billing in the area thanks to the titanic Mt. Shasta, but Black Butte is really worth a visit. The Civilian Conservation Corps built a trail to the summit in the 1930s to provide access to a forest service lookout at the summit. The summit trail is easy to use and follow in the summer time. The trail may be a little more difficult in the winter and spring months, so be careful. The trailhead is located off of Interstate 5, two miles up the Everett Memorial Highway. You will not regret a hike to the top of this beautiful volcano. Dunsmuir Chamber of Commerce

RAILROAD PARK

CABOOSE MOTEL SISKIYOU COUNTY

Highland House Mt. Shasta 530.926.3030

Mike & Tony’s Mt. Shasta 530.926.4792

Located 40 miles North of Redding Exit 728 off I-5

Wayside Grill

AAA discounts * WIFI * Pet Friendly

Call 530.223.1227 for more information on the North State Dining Guide and how to be listed here, or visit www.northstatediningguide.com

Caboose Motel * RV Park * Campground

(530 ) 235-4440 www.rrpark.com 100 Railroad Park Road, Dunsmuir, CA 96025

Mt. Shasta 530.918.9234

(800) 386-7684) (530) 235-2177 www.dunsmuir.com

45

GAZE AT THE LIVING MEMORIAL SCULPTURE GARDEN

(30 min – 1.5 hours) Intense art and spectacular natural vistas combine at the Living Memorial Sculpture Garden. The ruggedly scenic Mt. Shasta provides the natural backdrop for ten amazing sculptures by Dennis Smith. The sculptures describe and depict the many passions and aspects of war. The sculptures, highly stylized and very modernistic, depict soldiers, nurses, prisoners of war and images of prisoners of war. The site also contains 58,000 pines, which serve as a living memorial to the 58,000 Americans who lost their lives in Vietnam. The garden is a somber reminder of the struggle for peace and freedom. The Living Memorial Sculpture Garden is located about 13 miles north of the town of Weed on Highway 97. (530) 938-2218 (530) 842-2477 www.visitsiskiyou.org/tour3.htm

46

SPEND A DAY IN MT. SHASTA CITY

(1 hour – All Day) Mt. Shasta is the place for the adventure enthusiast. The 14,162-foot volcano is the second-tallest peak in the Cascade Mountain Range. Mt. Shasta is an awe-inspiring sight that seems to burst from the earth, in an otherwise flat area. The city of Mount Shasta has a quaint resort town atmosphere, and has many fabulous Bed & Breakfasts to choose from, great restaurants, and cute little shops. The city of Mt. Shasta also boasts many hotels, resorts, modern amenities, shopping, sports rentals of all kinds, and all of your vacation needs, whether you are camping, hiking, RV’ing, off-roading, or just passing through the area to a more secluded region of the north state such as Modoc County. Hikers and climbers can choose from 17 trails leading to the summit. An estimated 15,000 climbers attempt the summit annually, with the Avalanche Gulch route among the most popular. Climbing for beginner and advanced mountaineers is available. Summit trips generally take one to two days. Late-May through mid-July is considered the best time to use the Avalanche Gulch route, but each of the trails has an optimal time of year for ascent. Wilderness permits are required to climb Mt. Shasta. They can be obtained at the trailheads or the Mt. Shasta or McCloud Ranger Stations. Reservations are not required. The mountain is known for extreme weather changes, so be ready for anything. If you climb, bring a map, compass, sunglasses, sunscreen, extra food and water, extra clothing, flashlight, matches, stove and knife. For more information check with the Mt. Shasta Ranger Station at (530) 926-4511, www. shastaavalanche.org

a 501c3 nonprofit Mt. Shasta sanctuary Prosperity & Mom Poppy

Halo

Baby & Powder

Wonder & Mom Miracles

Humanity for Horses was birthed by a group of Mt. Shasta residents; whose hearts were broken by the amount of horses that were being abandoned, abused and sent to slaughter in the United States. Having just started in 2012, we now home 88 horses from California, Oregon, Washington and New Mexico. We rescued other animals that were left behind and abused, such as goats, llamas, alpacas, donkeys and a sheep. Most of the wounds these animals have were inflicted by humans. Therefore, we believe it is our responsibility to heal this suffering by giving them as much love and care as possible. They will live out their lives peacefully and pampered at our 151 acre sanctuary. Humanity for Horses needs as much support as possible. One can foster a horse for $150 to $250 a month, buy a bale of hay, or donate any amount possible. Supplies are welcomed as well. To reach Humanity for Horses; call (530) 926-9990 or mail a donation to Humanity for Horses at P.O. Box 1510, Mt. Shasta, CA, 96067. All credit cards accepted. Donations will receive a tax deductible receipt. We welcome you to our website to see the magnificent creatures who found their way into our lives and hearts. save an animal – save an angel www.humanityforhorses.org.

Located in the Black Bear Building

Affordable Framing Original Paintings & Prints • • • • •

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Mount Shasta Paintings and Photos Native American Featured Artwork Wildlife Original Paintings and Prints 90% of Our Artists are Local Nationally Recognized Artists

To Fit Any Budget or Style Selected with an Artistic Eye

201 N. Mt. Shasta Blvd, Mt. Shasta Monday - Saturday 10am - 6pm

Amazing Gourmet Chocolates and Delicious Espresso Bar!

Handmade Jewelry and Handcrafted Gifts

Shasta 2013 Edition

530-926-2334 Rent The Gallery Experience Room for your next event or party!

101thingshasta.com Say “I saw it in 101 Things To Do!”

www.thegalleryinmtshasta.com thegalleryinmtshasta@yahoo.com


SHASTA

47

GO ROCK CLIMBING IN SHASTA

(2 hours – All Day) Rock climbing can be an incredibly rewarding experience. Just you, the rock, your mind and whatever gear you can carry with you to keep yourself and your climbing partners safe. It’s about being in the moment and pushing through to the next sequence of moves. When you finally reach the top of the rock face, there is an amazing feeling of accomplishment. Two of the best rock climbing treks are at Mt. Shasta and Castle Crags State Park. Above 10,000 feet on Mt. Shasta you will find fantastic rock and ice walls for climbing. It takes about a half-day hike to get there but the view is worth it. Castle Crags State Park offers great rock climbing for all levels of experience. You can summit Castle Dome via the Dome Trail. A 2.7-mile moderate hike will take you to the dome and a beautiful class three scramble will get you to the summit for amazing views of Mt. Shasta and the surrounding Shasta-Trinity National Forest. For the seasoned climber there is the East Face of Castle Dome (aka “The Dike Route”) 5.10+ grade, said to be the best alpine route of its grade in Northern California. This route requires a twohour approach on strenuous terrain followed by eight pitches of steep technical climbing on a super exposed quartzite dike, which you follow for the entire 1,000+ feet of climbing. And then there is the Cosmic Wall, 5.6 grade. This mega classic route has seen more ascents than any other single alpine route in northern California. This route is the perfect introduction to alpine rock climbing for the inspired up-and-coming climber. Three miles of moderate hiking takes you to the base of Mt. Hubris. Climb the right side of the face of The Ogre (a prominent face on Mt. Hubris) for five enjoyable exposed pitches to a notch, then an easy exposed class four ridge leads you to a fantastic summit with spectacular panoramic views.

48

TAKE IN THE SPLENDOR OF CASTLE CRAGS STATE PARK

(2 hours – All Day+) Castle Crags State Park was named after the 6,000-foot-tall, glacier-polished crags. There are so many things to do and see in this 4,350-acre park. You can go hiking, biking, or horseback riding along the 28 miles of trails, including the Pacific Crest Trail, that winds through forests, past rivers and streams while you take in the views of the crags and Mount Shasta. There is a 3-mile long trail that passes into the Castle Crags Wilderness area, which is a part of the Shasta-Trinity National Forest. In the warmer months, you can enjoy swimming and fishing on the Sacramento River. One night might not be enough at this impressive park, so you can stay at one of the dozens of campsites. Make sure to stop by the Visitors Center on your way into the park to see the exhibits. Castle Crags State Park is located six miles south of Dunsmuir on Interstate 5.

Castle Crags State Park (530) 235-2684 (530) 225-2065 www.parks.ca.gov/?page_id=454

49

STAY IN A TRAIN

(2 hours – 2 days) Since 1968 the Railroad Park Resort in Dunsmuir has been living the romantic days of railroading. Lounge inside restored antique railroad cars, live the life of a railroader in the Caboose Motel. Find a nostalgic treasure in their gift shop, explore relics like the geardriven steam logging locomotive, the 1893 Wells Fargo Car or the wooden snow plow and flanger. This one-of-a kind motel is more than the railroad buff’s delight. Railroad Park Resort is an easy pull-off of I-5 at Railroad Park rd. Call (530) 235-4440, or visit www. rrpark.com.

50

VISIT MCCLOUD

(Several hours to days) Providing a endless variety of outdoor recreation, the quaint town of McCloud has become a popular destination hideaway. Year round activities available include casual and luxurious lodging, fine dining, square dancing, shopping, and romantic getaways. In the cooler months you can enjoy winter sports such as skiing, snowboarding, cross country skiing and snowmobiling. In the warmer months, you will find hiking, waterfalls, swimming, fishing, backpacking, mountaineering, climbing, kayaking, mountain biking and more. Hwy 89 is a scenic byway, which is part of the Volcanic Legacy Scenic Byway, and it runs directly through the town of McCloud (only 9 miles from I-5), and leads to Burney Falls and Lassen Volcanic National Park.

51

STAY AT A BED & BREAKFAST

Make your visit to Northern California’s outstanding and diverse countryside more memorable by staying in a charming bed and breakfast. This unique area’s B&Bs range from rustic to historic, elegant to casual, and will take your escape from the ordinary to the extraordinary. Take a trip back in railroad history by staying at any of the B&B’s on this pages advertisements. The establishments offer a serene atmosphere nestled among pine trees. An easy walk will take you to the McCloud Historic District.

52

Reservations: 800.562.3617 • Information: 530.926.4029 • Email: mtshastakoa@gmail.com

• • • •

2 day ski & stay packages Fully Contained LUXURY Lodges! Walk downtown in minutes Just minutes to Mt. Shasta Ski Park

MT. SHASTA

http://koa.com/campgrounds/mount-shasta/ 900 North Mt Shasta Blvd., Mount Shasta City, CA 96067

If you enjoy spending a lazy day at the lake fishing, catching, cleaning and eating delicious fish, then the Iron Gate Reservoir is the ideal spot for you. The Iron Gate Reservoir is one of the best spots in Northern California for catching tasty Yellow Perch. These delectable treats are a small tackle fisherman’s dream. There are plenty of perch to go around, and if you’re lucky you might snag one of the illusive native rainbow trout that lurk in the reservoir. There are a number of parks and campsites around the banks of the reservoir, providing everything from campsites and facilities to boat ramps and swimming beaches. There are plenty of things to explore and enjoy at the beautiful Iron Gate Reservoir. The reservoir is located about eight miles east of Interstate 5 near the Oregon border. For more information, call the Yreka Chamber of Commerce, at (530) 842-1649. www.yrekachamber.com

53

ENJOY THE SHASTA VALLEY WILDLIFE AREA

Outdoor activities abound in the Shasta Valley Wildlife Area. The area is a diverse mixture of juniper woodland, riparian forest, seasonal wetlands and croplands, administered by the California Department of Fish and Game. This beautiful wilderness offers a variety of options including hunting, fishing, nature and wildlife viewing. The Shasta Valley is home to a number of game birds, including quail, doves and more. You will enjoy the abundant opportunities and open ranges for that perfect bird hunt. The area is home to some excellent ponds for both bass and trout fishing. Bass Lake boasts beautiful rainbow trout and bass.Trout Lake is home to an excellent selection of fish. If you enjoy observing wildlife instead of catching it, you can keep your eyes peeled for pronghorn antelope, coyote, porcupine, beaver, muskrat, jack rabbits, long-tailed weasels and many other creatures of different shapes and sizes. The wildlife area is located off Highway 3 beyond Montague on Ball Mountain/Little Shasta Road. For more information, call the Shasta Valley Wildlife Area, (530) 459-3926.

VISIT IRON GATE RESERVOIR

Photos Courtesy Scott Leak, www.sleakphotos.com

We Rent Excitement!

Private Guided Boating Adventures on McCloud Reservoir. Lake Sis Q, Lake Shastina, Shasta Lake, and Irongate Reservoir. Enjoy a Scenic Lake Tours, Fishing, Tubing, Wakeboarding, Water Skiing, and Swimming!

www.FunFactoryRentals.com (530) 926-5387 or 926-Lets Ride Featuring Shasta, Siskiyou, Tehama, Plumas, Lassen, Trinity, Modoc, Butte, and more....

29


SHASTA

A SHASTA CASCADE WINTER WONDERLAND

Many travelers believe that the Shasta area is a summer only attraction. But don’t let the winter weather fool you! In this section of the magazine you will find an abundance of winter activities! Pretty much any activity you are looking for can be found in this winter wonderland. Here you will find Mt. Shasta Ski Park with downhill, cross-country skiing, snowboarding, and telemarking. You can also enjoy ski town shopping, snowshoeing, snowmobiling, dogsledding, ice-skating, ice fishing, and good old favorites like tobogganing and staying in that winter cabin you dream about. From snowmobiling with Michelle and Daren at the Fun Factory on the northeast side of the mountain, to dog sledding and Nordic Skiing on the south side, to the great views from the town of McCloud just off Hwy 89. Photo opportunities abound with breath taking scenery in the summer and the winter. If you are looking for that winter getaway, look no more – read on and plan your winter vacation or weekend getaway in Shasta!

54

TAKE A SNOWMOBILE FOR A SPIN!

(2 hours – All Day) See some of the most pristine, wild and visually stunning winter scenery in Northern California from Deer Mountain Snowmobile Park near Weed. Explore 250 miles of groomed winter trails in the Klamath, Modoc and Shasta-Trinity National Forests on a snowmobile from Fun Factory Snowmobile Rentals at Deer Mountain Snowmobile Park. There, owners Michele and Daren will greet you warmly and put you through your own tailored snowmobile riding/ safety course. If you can make the parking lot loop by yourself, off you go on your own snowmobile adventure. Make sure you pack a lunch and camera, dress for the weather, have your driver’s license with you and be ready for a winter outdoor experience that will take your breath away. To find the Fun Factory, head north on Interstate 5, exit at Highway 97 / Central Weed, continue on Highway 97 another 16.2 miles to Deer Mountain Snowmobile Park Road on right, then 4 miles up to the Deer Mountain / Chuck Best Memorial Snowmobile Park. For more information, or to book a reservation, visit their website, or call the 24-hour answering service at (530) 926-5387. www.FunFactoryRentals.com. Book your Snowmobiling Adventure today! 1 and 2 person Polaris Snowmobiles. $65per hr., $150/3hrs, $250/7hrs, $350/24hrs. + Deposit *Reservations Recommended* 24 hr Info (530) 926-5387 ,www. SnowmobileShasta.Com E-mail Reservations at funfactory@snowcrest.net Directions: Heading North on I-5 / exit at HWY 97 / Central weed, onto HWY 97 another 16.2 miles to the Deer Mountain Snowmobile Park Rd. on right, then up 4 miles to the Deer Mountain / Chuck Best Memorial Snowmobile Park!

55

EXPERIENCE SNOWSHOEING

(2 hours – All Day) Snowshoeing is quickly becoming a popular winter activity. With rentals available at many outfitters in the area, as well as the opportunity to buy, if the sport fits you. That said, there is an ever-demanding request for more trails and areas to participate in this great activity. Some of the most popular trails include the Castle Lake trails, Bunny Flat, the Sand Flat area of Mt. Shasta, and the trails designated for snowshoeing at the Nordic Ski Center. The Mt Shasta region has a large number of trails that are undocumented and unmarked and an abundance of un-groomed, backcountry winter trails, which are suitable for snowshoeing and Nordic skiing. Castle Lake is located about 20 minutes from the town of Mt. Shasta The Mount Shasta Nordic trailhead is located approximately 10 miles off of Interstate 5 near Mount Shasta City. You can also experience Snowshoeing

at Lassen Volcanic National Park at the Southeast entrance to the park. The main park road is closed in the winter months, but the south entrance is open for snowshoeing trails and sledding. Call 530-5954480 for more information.

56

ENJOY NORDIC CROSS-COUNTRY SKIING!

(2 hours – All Day) Mt. Shasta Nordic is a community-based non-profit organization that strives to provide outstanding opportunities for Nordic skiing throughout the Mt. Shasta region. They provide marked backcountry and groomed Nordic trails, a donation-based Nordic ski trail access, a full-service facility, and an array of ski programs for diverse populations. They also have education programs, competitive events, and Nordic skiing showing it to be a fun, health-beneficial, aerobic activity. They have 25 km of groomed trails; provide rentals and lessons, and a warming hut at the trailhead. When you use the trails, you are encouraged to become a member or donate $10 per adult and $5 for children/seniors, which is much needed to provide the groomed and maintained trails. The Mount Shasta Nordic trailhead is located approximately 10 miles off of Interstate 5 near Mount Shasta City. For more information, go to www. mtshastanordic.org or call 530-926-2142.

57

SKI OR SNOWBOARD IN STYLE AT MT. SHASTA SKI PARK!

(2 hours – All Day+) Built in 1985 MT. SHASTA SKI PARK is the newest winter resort in California and one of the newest in the entire United States. This winter season 2010-2012 marks the 26th anniversary of its existence. Within the park there are 425 acres of terrain, 32 trails, 3 triple chair lifts, and terrain parks. Mt. Shasta Board & Ski Park also offers night skiing on 14 trails and 3 lifts. The ski park has enough excitement for each level, whether a beginner, intermediate, or advanced. All trails are groomed to the highest expectations, and when the weather is bringing more sun than snow, the 22 snowguns on the mountain help keep it coming. Also on premises you will find rentals, dining facilities, snack bars, lessons for all ages, a lodge, restrooms, and lockers. In the summer time you can also enjoy the ski parks chairlifts, grounds, and trails for mountain biking, hiking, and disc golf. The proposed opening day for skiing & boarding in 2011 is December 15th(depending on snow). Night Skiing will open December 16th (depending on snow), and the park’s estimated closing day is April 18th. Thursday through Saturday the park is open from 9am – 9pm, and Sunday through Wednesday it’s open from 9am – 4pm. For details, weather report and conditions, and updates, visit www.skipark.com or call 530-926-8610, or 1-800-SKI-SHASTA.

skipark.com • • • • • • • • • • •

425 acres of skiable terrain 32 trails Night Skiing Snowmaking Grooming 3 triple chairs 1 rope tow lift 1 conveyor lift Super Halfpipe Terrain Parks Longest run 1.75 miles

DIRECTIONS I-5 to Exit 736 (Hwy 89) 4 miles east on hwy 89, turn onto Ski Park Hwy and drive 4.5 miles to the resort 530.926.8686

530.926.8610

1-800-SKI-SHASTA

Snow Phone Ski Resort (winter hours) Outside Shasta & Siskiyou

30

Shasta 2013 Edition

101thingshasta.com Say “I saw it in 101 Things To Do!”


SHASTA

MODOC COUNTY & KLAMATH AREA

Northern Siskiyou area consists of the Klamath River, Hwy 96, and the historic towns of Weed and Yreka. Don’t miss a drive on Hwy. 96, which was designated the Bigfoot Scenic Byway by Six Rivers National Forest in 2000. It is a river lover’s idea of heaven. Where it first leaves Highway 299, the route follows the south fork of the Trinity River before it reaches the Hoopa Valley Indian Reservation. At Weitchpec, the road turns and follows the course of the Klamath River through the town of Orleans. At Somes Bar, the byway crosses the Salmon River. The rest of Highway 96 parallels the Klamath almost to Interstate 5 and Yreka. The Klamath River is a premier California camping destination. The river offers something for the entire family. The most popular activity on the river is fishing. Trout, Steelhead and Salmon make this river one of California’s most sought after by anglers. In the summer the Klamath becomes a virtual outdoor water park with rafters and kayakers floating down and enjoying the warm summer sunshine. The upper reaches are known for intense rapids. The Lower Klamath is suited to more mild family activities. Gold panning continues to be a popular activity on the Klamath River. Millions of dollars worth of gold has been extracted from the region and there are small dredging operations still working claims. Recreational gold-panners are also welcome in the area. All along the route are river access points, campgrounds, hiking trails and beautiful views of the river. Whitewater enthusiasts will find plenty of excitement on any of the rivers. Local rafting companies offer trips for all skill levels, from half-day to multi-day adventures. Hikers can gather information at the Happy Camp Ranger Station for forays into the nearby Marble Mountain Wilderness, (530) 493-2243. www.fs.fed.us/r5/klamath The Modoc area is a land of Indian lore, Modoc County is a land of scenic beauty and abundant natural resources. It encompasses the extreme northeast corner of the Shasta Cascade region. For those who long for a quiet, calm retreat from the corporate culture of big city life, Modoc County is a tempting Garden of Eden. Modoc has over a million of the most beautiful unspoiled acres in the state of California. For a taste of “where the West still lives,” visit one of the many turn-ofthe-century towns, ranches or farmlands. If you just want to get away from it all, enjoy crisp air and gorgeous scenery‚ this is the place to be. Alturas Chamber of Commerce (530) 233-4434, www.alturaschamber.org

58

EXPLORE THE LAVA BEDS NATIONAL MONUMENT

(3 hours – All Day+) Exploring Siskiyou County, which abuts the Oregon border, should start with a visit to Lava Beds National Monument. An enormous shield volcano has created a diverse landscape with over 700 lava tube caves, many explore able. The tubes offer endless possibilities for learning about caves. There are also numerous lava flows, spatter cones and pit craters. This area is known for its impressive geological formations, Native American rock art, historic battlefields and a dramatically rugged high desert wilderness. During the Modoc Indian War (18721873), the Indians, led by Captain Jack, used the lava tubes to gain a distinct advantage. A mere 53 Modoc held off over 500 U.S. Army troops for more than five months, staying safe and fortified in their natural lava fortress. This unique history is just one

of the incredible things to ponder at the Lava Beds National Monument. The monument is located just outside the town of Tule Lake. Medicine Lake and Glass Mountain are just south of Lava Beds National Monument. Medicine Lake is an area that is sacred to the native peoples of the region and has been recognized for countless generations as an area, which has natural healing energy. Glass Mountain is a volcano whose last eruption happened around 1,000 years ago. The mountain stands almost bare of tree or plant life, and looks like a spectacular mound rising from the earth. Lava Beds National Monument (530) 667-8100 www.nps.gov/labe

59

Watching graceful and majestic wild animals is reason enough for a trip to the Tule Lake National Wildlife Preserve. Tule Lake is the site of the largest annual concentration of waterfowl in North America. Eared grebes, Canada geese, mallards, gadwalls, pintails, cinnamon teals and other birds make their homes in the wetlands of Tule Lake. These wild birds are not the only creatures that live in this beautiful and rugged area. Mule deer, porcupines, chipmunks, beavers, and pronghorn antelope all scurry, scramble and burrow in the preserve. This big lake and vast marsh and wetlands provide a perfect habitat for an amazing amount of wildlife and a perfect viewing area for everyone else. Tule Lake is located just north of the Lava Beds National Monument and just south of the Oregon border off Highway 139. Tule Lake National Wildlife Refuge (530) 667-2231 www.fws.gov/klamathbasinrefuges/tulelake/ tulelake.html

60

VISIT MEDICINE LAKE & GLASS MOUNTAIN

(1 hour – All Day+) Most people don’t know that Medicine Lake Volcano is the largest volcano by volume in the Cascade Range! Lava from the volcano is estimated to have 140 cubic miles of volume. It is a shield volcano, rising 3,900 feet above the Modoc Plateau to an elevation of 7,795 feet. Medicine Lake is a caldera in the summit area of the volcano, and provides great fishing, camping, hiking, boating, and swimming in the summer months. To get to Medicine Lake; From the junction of Highway 139, and Co. Rd. 97 go approx. 18.5 more miles west on Co. R d . 97 to Forest

Service Road 44N75 and turn right, then go 1 mile to Forest Service Road 44N38 and go 0.5 more miles. Turn right and follow signs to Medicine Lake Campground. Glass Mountain covers 4,200 acres to the east of Medicine Lake and has been designated as a Modoc National Forest Special Interest Area for its unique obsidian flow. This is the location that American Natives gathered obsidian for their tools and weapons. www.fs.fed.us/r5/modoc/

61

EXPLORE KLAMATH NATIONAL FOREST

Is there really a Big Foot? Try to catch a peek of him in the Klamath National Forest. There have been several sightings of the elusive beast in the Klamath National Forest. The forest is also home to the Pacific Coast’s oldest mountain ranges. The Klamath Mountains are characterized by the crisscrossing ridgelines, deeply entrenched streams and rivers and glacier-capped peaks. The Klamath River is also known for its splendid white-water and abundant wildlife. There are five designated wilderness areas left in the Klamath National Forest. There are lakes, meadows and old growth forests that are just as they were thousands of years ago. In the 1,700,000 acres of the Klamath National Forest, there are more than 200 miles of rivers suitable for rafting, and 152 miles of wild and scenic rivers. The forest covers much of Siskiyou County, California, and Jackson County, Oregon. For more information, call the Klamath National Forest, (530) 842-6131. www.fs.fed.us/r5/klamath

GANDER AT THE AMAZING WILDLIFE AT TULELAKE

(1 hour – 3 hours)

Photos Courtesy Michele, www.funfactoryrentals.com

Featuring Shasta, Siskiyou, Tehama, Plumas, Lassen, Trinity, Modoc, Butte, and more....

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L A N O I T A N ATURAL #

N S K R A M D N A L #2 #3

n o i g e R e d a c s a C a t s a h S e h t Of McArthur-Burney Falls Memorial State Park

Lake Shasta Caverns The NEWEST NATIONAL NATURAL LANDMARK IN THE UNITED STATES!!!

Shasta 2012 Winter/Spring Edition 101thingshasta.com Say “I saw it in 101 Things To Do!”


#1

Mount Shasta

The National Natural Landmarks (NNL) Program recognizes and encourages the conservation of sites that contain outstanding biological and geological resources, regardless of landownership type. It is the only natural areas program of national scope that recognizes the best examples of biological and geological features in both public and private ownership. NNLs are owned by a variety of land stewards, and participation in the program is voluntary. National Natural Landmarks are selected for their outstanding condition, illustrative value, rarity, diversity, and value to science and education. Sites are designated by the Secretary of the Interior, with landowner concurrence, and to-date, nearly 600 landmarks have received the NNL designation within the United States, American Samoa, Guam, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. The National Park Service administers the program, reports on the condition of the NNLs, acts as an advocate for the protection of designated sites, and raises public awareness of our Nation’s natural heritage. Ongoing partnerships with public and private landmark owners allow participants to share information, solve problems cooperatively, and conserve outstanding sites that illustrate the rich and diverse tapestry of the country’s natural landscape. For further information about how the National Park Service’s National Natural Landmarks Program is is serving its mission, be sure to visit http://www.nature. nps.gov/nnl/index.cfm.

MT SHASTA Mt Shasta is located at the southern end of the Cascade Range in Siskiyou County, California and at 14,179 feet is the second highest peak in the Cascades and the fifth highest in California. Mount Shasta has an estimated volume of 85 cubic miles which makes it the most vouminous stratovolcano in the Cascade Volcanic Arc. The mountain and its surrounding area photo by Tina Prestwood are managed by the U.S. Forest Service, Shasta Trinity National Forest. Mount Shasta is not connected to any nearby mountain and dominates the northern California landscape. It rises abruptly and stands nearly 10,000 ft (3,000 m) above the surrounding terrain. On a clear day, Mount Shasta can be seen from about 150 miles (240 km) away. The mountain has attracted the attention of poets, authors, and presidents. Many climbers attempt the summit of Mount Shasta. The summer climbing season runs from late April until October, although many attempts are made in the winter. In winter, Sargents Ridge and Casaval Ridge, to the east and west of Avalanche Gulch respectively, become the most traveled routes, to avoid avalanche danger. Mount Shasta is also a popular destination for backcountry skiing. Many of the climbing routes can be descended by experienced skiers, and there are numerous lower-angled areas around the base of the mountain. The oldest known human habitation in the area dates to about 7,000 years ago, and by about 5,000 years ago, there was substantial human habitation in the surrounding area. BURNEY FALLS Burney Falls, located within McArthur-Burney Falls Memorial State Park, contains some of the best examples in the western United States of a river drainage regulated by stratigraphicallycontrolled springs, and of a waterfall formed by undercutting of horizontal rock layers. The park is within the Cascade Range and Modoc Plateau natural region, with forest and five miles of streamside and lake shoreline, including a portion of Lake Britton. The park’s centerpiece is the 129-foot Burney Falls, which is not the highest or largest waterfall in the state, but possibly the most beautiful. Additional water comes from springs, joining to create a mistfilled basin. Burney Creek originates from the park’s underground springs and flows to Lake Britton, getting larger along the way to the majestic falls. The park’s landscape was created by volcanic activity as well as erosion from weather and streams. This volcanic region is surrounded by mountain peaks and is covered by black volcanic rock, or basalt. Created over a million years ago, the layered, porous basalt retains rainwater and snow melt, which forms a large underground reservoir. Within the park, the water emerges as springs at and above Burney Falls, where it flows at 100 million gallons every day. Burney Falls was named after pioneer settler Samuel Burney who lived in the area in the 1850s. The McArthurs were pioneer settlers who arrived in the late 1800s. Descendants were responsible for saving the waterfall and nearby land from development. They bought the property and gave it to the state as a gift in the 1920s.

www.lakeshastacaverns.com 1-800-795-CAVE

LAKE SHASTA CAVERNS Congratulations to the newest designated National Natural Landmark! Lake Shasta Caverns is an extraordinarily welldecorated solution cave that contains an especially diverse assemblage of calcite cave formations ranging from millimeters to tens of meters. The caverns are developed in the lower Permian McCloud Limestone, an unusual carbonate rock for the region in that it is not highly re-crystallized or metamorphosed, thus preserving a diverse fossil fauna and flora marine Featuring Shasta, Siskiyou, Tehama, Plumas, Lassen, Trinity, Modoc, Butte, and more.... record from 270 million years ago.


SHASTA

TEHAMA COUNTY

The Tehama area, although flourishing with farmlands, grazing cattle, sheep, and horses, has much to offer the traveler, in the way of historical interests, old-west feel, and olives. Yes, olives. Within the boundaries of Tehama County lie the city of Corning, Orland, and Willows that as you will notice along I-5 is heavily covered in olive trees. Quaintly known as “The Olive Capitol of the World,” you will find many places to stop and indulge in the lively fruit. For much of its 120 plus years of history, Corning has been known for its awardwinning olive products, as well as almonds, walnuts, peaches, cattle and sheep that are grown and raised in the surrounding area. It has a fascinating history that began as an 1880s railroad town (it is named after John Corning, an officer of the Central Pacific Railroad), and the Maywood Colony that was responsible for much of the settlement and orchards that were planted in the surrounding area. Its rich history is displayed in the Corning Museum, located within the Corning Chamber of Commerce at the historic Hotel Maywood building at Third and Solano Streets. Corning has a near-perfect climate for olives, and so it is not surprising that it is known as the “Olive City.” Mission olives were planted on the Maywood Colony lands in the 1890s, and were used in the production of olive oil. By 1897 Nevadillo Blanco and Manzanillo olives became the choice for oil producers because they were less expensive. Later an unknown variety of olive trees were planted that produced olives “as big as plums.” In time they were called the Sevillano Olive, the “queen‚” of all olives, and their production led to the establishment of the colony’s Maywood Colony Canning and Olive Pickling Association. The highlight of the olive season is marked by the Olive Festival, which is held in August. The two-day festival features a parade, bed races, an olive cook-off, Dutch oven cooking contest, olive tasting, missing olive contest and a number of craft vendors in the park. Corning Chamber of Commerce (530) 824-5550.

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REVEL AT WILDLIFE A T THE SACRAMENTO RIVER BEND AREA

(1 hour – All Day) Families, sportsmen and students can all find a wild and natural outdoor adventure in Tehama

County’s Sacramento River Bend Recreation Area. The Sacramento River Bend Area is a valuable historic and natural resource that presents a wide range of recreational and educational opportunities. From the Sacramento River with its lush riparian areas and tributaries to the expanse of the majestic rolling hills, the Sacramento River Bend Area offers diverse habitat for bald eagles, osprey, migratory and song birds,

Gaumer’s jewelry · museum · lapidary

Mineral & Mining Museum

Since 1967

Free Admission

Minerals & Fossils Gold Mining Exhibit Fluorescent Rock Display

deer, salmon and many other native species. The Payne’s Creek Wetlands area was created to enhance populations of native birds and other species. The project was a collaboration of several organizations including California Fish and Game, the Bureau of Reclamation, California Wildlife Conservation Board and Ducks Unlimited. This protected wetlands area is located along the great Pacific Flyway and offers extraordinary opportunities for recreation, cultural and natural interpretation, as well as education for nature enthusiasts of all ages. The area also offers amazing wildflower viewing in the spring. The rolling hills of oak woodland are carpeted with purple and yellow in all directions. The Hog Lake Plateau and Yana Trail are great locations to view large open expanses of blooming wildflower fields. Foot, mountain bike or horse can reach most of the attractions along the river. Many trails are rugged and unmarked and encourage self-discovery. While there are no developed campsites, camping is allowed in most areas for up to 14 calendar days per year. The Sacramento River Bend Area Bureau of Land Management (530) 224-2100 www.blm.gov/ca/st/en/fo/redding/recreationmain/ reddingrecreationtehama.htm

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TAKE IT EASY AT BLACK BUTTE LAKE

(2 hours - All Day) Picture this, a voyage on the lake, enjoying a perfect day fishing with magnificent black volcanic buttes on all sides. If this sounds like a great time to you, then you should take a trip to Black Butte Lake. Black Butte Lake provides one of the most scenic backdrops to enjoy all of its outdoor activities. Fishing, hiking, biking, boating, and camping are favorite pastimes for visitors at Black Butte Lake. For a little more excitement, enjoy a ride on one of the many offroad vehicle trails that surround the lake. Hunting is popular, but just looking at the animals is allowed and there is an abundance of wildlife to see and photograph. Black Butte Lake is located about eight miles west of the town of Orland and Interstate 5 on Newville Road. For more information, call the Army Corps of Engineers office at (530) 865-4781. (530) 335-2334. When you head along Hwy. 299 to Humboldt County plan a stop at Blue Lake Casino (877) 252-2946

A Truly Unique & Unforgettable Experience Open Monday through Friday · 9am – 5pm

78 Belle Mill Road | Red Bluff, CA 96080 | (530) 527-6166 www.gaumers.com | follow us on Facebook

VISITORS

RED BLUFF ROUND-UP 1921 - 2013

MUSEUM

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SEE AMAZING GEMSTONES, ROCKS, AND MINERALS AT GAUMERS JEWELRY

(20 min – 1 hour) Gaumer’s Jewelry has been in business for over 40 years (since 1967). Founded in partnership between Al and Mabel Gaumer and their son John and his wife Terry, the business has continued to grow with the addition of a third generation of jewelers and rock-hounds through Bill Gaumer. Gaumer’s carries a great selection of fine gold and silver jewelry,

Free Admission! See the Red Bluff Round-Up History on Display

RedBluffRoundUp.com

530.528.1447 670 Antelope Blvd., Suite #1 Red Bluff, CA 96080

Open from 1 to 5 pm, Thurs-Sat East Gate Tehama Fairgrounds

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original handcrafted jewelry, semiprecious and precious stones, lapidary equipment and jewelry making supplies. The giftware portion of the business offers books, coasters, vases, unique decorative items and beautiful handcrafted jewelry boxes. The Gaumer family interest in gems and minerals has been actively pursued for four generations, as John O. Gaumer was a gold miner in Northern California for 25 years. His son Al continued the tradition with formal education in the field of mining engineering before returning to gold mining with his father and a lifelong pursuit of prospecting and rock hounding throughout the western United States. The family passion for rocks turned a hobby into a full time business when John and Terry decided to open a store utilizing the family’s extensive rock collection and John’s jewelry making skills. This combination served Tehama County until 1993, when Bill came on board and really shook things up. Four years later, the business remodeled, adding an 800 square foot mineral and mining museum and additional retail and manufacturing space. In 1999, Bill finished his course work with the Gemological Institute of America and received the prestigious Graduate Gemologist diploma. In 1999, Sharla Gibson joined the business. Today she is the office and sales manager. Jim Wade joined the bench department and brings a wealth of talent. He grew up in a family silversmith business in Reno and added to his skills through the GIA’s bench jeweler program. The sales staff consists of two full time employees: Jill Russell and Melanie Zelwick. On special occasions they are also happy to have the assistance of Tonya Robinson and Maxine Mapes. Maxine has worked with them for many years and is still the principal pearl stringer. Gaumer’s Mineral and Mining Museum features fifty years and four generations of collecting. Beautiful, rare gem and minerals specimens from around the world, stone carvings, fossils, Native American artifacts, a fluorescent mineral display, and a detailed replica of an old mine tunnel complete with ore car, tracks and mining equipment. The free museum is open to the public during normal business hours; group tours are available for schools and special interest groups. (530)527.6166 www.gaumers.com

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RELIVE THE GOLD RUSH ERA AT IDE ADOBE STATE HISTORIC PARK

(20 minutes – 1 hour) The Gold Rush is perhaps the most recognized event to have ever happened in the State of California. This remarkable time was full of highs and lows for individuals as well as the entire region. The William B. Ide Adobe State Historic Park is the perfect place to encounter the sights, sounds, smells and experiences of the Gold Rush period of the 1840s and 1850s. At this park, it’s not just looking at exhibits and pictures of what it was like 150 years ago, but also actually becoming immersed in the experience. Visitors are invited to try their own hand at the activities and chores demonstrated at events held at the Park. The park is located south of Redding, about two miles northeast of the town of Red Bluff on Adobe Road. Photos Courtesy Scott Leak, www.sleakphotos.com


SHASTA

RED BLUFF AREA, TEHAMA COUNTY

Pull on your cowboy boots and take a ride to Red Bluff. Named for the area’s reddish cliffs, this distinctly western Victorian town was founded along the banks of the Sacramento River in 1850 as a supply center for the gold mines in Trinity County. The 4-acre William B. Ide Adobe State Historic Park features the reconstructed home of William Ide, President of the short-lived Republic of California, also known as the Bear Flag Republic, established in 1846 after a band of settlers revolted against Mexican authority. The revolt ended when the Mexican-American War broke out in the same year. The Stars and Stripes replaced the Bear Flag when U. S. troops came to occupy the area. This 3-acre park and adobe home exhibit early-day furnishings and implements commemorating the California Republic’s first and only President. An adobe smokehouse, carriage shed, and a small corral are also on the park grounds. Today, Red Bluff is still as much western outpost as thriving contemporary town. Still one of the State’s biggest rodeo towns, it hosts the nationally known Red Bluff Roundup each summer along with several other state and national rodeo events. There are great shops, colorful restaurants and plenty of comfortable accommodations available for travelers. The Sacramento River Bend Area is a historic and natural resource offering many recreational and educational opportunities. From the lush riparian areas surrounding the Sacramento River and it’s tributaries to the expanse of the rolling hills of the blue oak savannah, the Sacramento River Bend Area offers diverse habitat for bald eagles, osprey, migratory and song birds, deer, and salmon as well as hunting, camping, hiking, boating, picnicking and wildlife viewing for the public. Located at the eastern end of Northern California’s scenic Highway 36 and junction of Interstate 5, Red Bluff is a colorful hub for many businesses and families. For more information on the Red Bluff area, contact the Red Bluff Chamber of Commerce at (530) 527-6220. www.redbluffchamberofcommerce. com William B. Ide State Historic Park (530) 529-8599 www.parks.ca.gov/?page_id=458

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LEARN THE HISTORY OF BULL RIDING AT RED BLUFF ROUND UP

(20 minutes – 1 hour) In 1918 Tehama County cattlemen and their hands started gathering together after rounding up their herds and held a picnic and informal rodeo. The “round-ups” started drawing in a crowd to see the cowhands try their luck at riding. In 1919 Jess Bennett and Ivy Bell decided to have an informal bronco riding and roping contest on their ranch, which was so successful that they continued doing it in years to come. In 1920 a group of businessmen from Red Bluff and Chico started the Northern California Round-Up Association. From there they started holding the Round Up at the Tehama County

County and other places on the West Coast. Your imagination will be triggered when you make a stop at the Tehama County Museum. The Museum is open from 1 to 4 p.m. Friday through Sunday, and it is located at the corner of C and 3rd Sts., in the town of Tehama. For more information, call the Tehama County Museum at (530) 384-2595.

Put some WOW back in your game.

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ABSORB HISTORY AT THE TEHAMA COUNTY MUSEUM

To learn about Tehama County’s interesting past and how its settlers lived over a hundred years ago, visit the Tehama County Museum. The museum hosts all sorts of interesting exhibits. Everything from antique rifles, to old saddles and tack, to exhibits of furniture sets from over 100 years ago, all are on display at this fascinating museum. There are models of campsites that the pioneers and settlers stayed in as they made their way across the Great Plains and Rocky Mountains to get to Tehama

67 (1 hour - 4 hours)

Visit Amazing Finds in both Red Bluff and Redding. From Antiques to one of a kind Treasures, you’re sure to find something that will intrigue you. Music memorabilia, art, collectibles and much more can be found at Amazing Finds. There’s something there for everyone.

Links at Rolling Hills Casino

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530 528-4600 • www.sevillanolinks.com

COMFORT

Fair. Today the event is a week long including bowling tournaments, foot races, a pancake breakfast, chili cook-off and more. Rodeo week is usually held in April every year. The museum is right next to the Fairgrounds on Antelope Blvd/hwy 99 in Red Bluff, and displays Round-Up paraphernalia, signs, hats and a photo collection dating back to 1918. www.redbluffroundup.com 800-545-3500

GO HUNTING FOR AMAZING FINDS!

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Comfort Inn

a Red Bluff Hotel near the Sacramento River 90 Sale Lane, Red Bluff, CA 96080 530-529-7060 www.comfortinn.com/hotel771 Featuring Shasta, Siskiyou, Tehama, Plumas, Lassen, Trinity, Modoc, Butte, and more....

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SHASTA

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SHASTA

PLUMAS COUNTY

Although it is the second smallest of the eight counties that make up the Shasta Cascade region, Plumas County is one of the most spectacular. The countryside provided sustenance to the original inhabitants, the mountain Maidu Indians, who traveled between mountain and valley depending on the time of year. The abundance of fish, game and fowl, supplemented with acorns, seeds and berries, allowed the Maidu to prosper. That same abundance and natural beauty are available to modern-day visitors to Plumas County, which has a population that adds up to only eight people per square mile. The county offers year-around recreation, from golf and hiking during the summer months, to skiing and snowmobiling during winter months. The Cascades and Sierra Nevada ranges meet in the county, so the terrain is ruggedly picturesque. Lake Almanor, which sits at an elevation of 4,500 feet, is the largest and most popular lake in the county and offers every sort of water sport along with great fishing. A paved hiking and biking path along the west shore of the lake offers great scenery. Lassen Peak is often visible to the northwest. A public boat ramp is located at the southwest end of the lake, just north of the dam. There are several marinas, RV parks, resorts and beaches along the lake’s 52 miles of shoreline. Anglers might hook rainbow trout, brown trout, smallmouth bass and carp. The Feather River Scenic Byway follows Highway 70 along the north fork of the river to the west of Quincy and north of Oroville. Quincy is the Plumas County seat and features an airport, theater, museums, galleries and retail shops. Like many area towns, Quincy takes pride in its historic downtown, which is highlighted by its four-story courthouse on Main Street. More history is displayed at the Plumas Eureka-State Park and Museum in Blairsden. Rail buffs flock to the Western Pacific Railroad Museum facility, located on the former Western Pacific Railroad Portola locomotive servicing facility, located in Portola. The museum has over 30 locomotives and 80 cars of various ancestries. Unlike many other museums, visitors to the Western Pacific Railroad Museum soon discover that this is a hands-on facility, and they are encouraged to climb up in the cabs of locomotives, to sit in the engineer’s seat, and to browse through the many cabooses and passenger cars that are on display. The museum also maintains a gift shop located within the diesel shop, as well as a snack bar which is open weekends during the summer months. For more information on Plumas County, call the Plumas County Visitors Bureau at (800) 326-2247 or (530) 283-6345. www.plumascounty.org

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TRAVEL A NATIONAL SCENIC BYWAY

The beauty and diversity in terrain, landscape, wildlife and elevation is unsurpassed on the Feather River National Scenic Byway, a 130-mile northern California route. It follows the north and middle forks of the Feather River as it twists and turns from across Butte, Plumas and Lassen Counties on State Hwy 70. Total estimated driving time is about 3.5 hours, but take in consideration numerous stops along the way to take photographs of waterfalls, river views and mountain vistas. The route winds through three ecosystems. Traveling from the west, the byway starts in the Sacramento Valley and ascends through dense forests and deep canyons into the Sierras, and finishes in the fast expanse of the Great Basin. The drive is impressively beautiful in the early spring when nearly 100 waterfalls cascade down vibrant green, steep, mountainsides ablaze with oak trees and wildflowers. The fall draws leaf-peepers to its magnificent groves of colorful foliage. The Feather River Canyon is an enormous gorge carved by the

Feather River through layers of granite. While the scenery alone justifies a trip, the outdoor adventures may entice you as well. Enjoy fishing, spring kayaking, and swimming on a hot summer day on the river. There are also plenty of hiking trails including the Pacific Crest National Scenic Trail. If you have a day to spend between the larger communities of Sacramento and Reno—this is the road to follow! For more information, a self guided driving tour brochure and map of the Feather River National Scenic Byway; call the Plumas County Visitors Bureau at (800) 3262247 or (530) 283-6345. www.plumascounty.org www.byways.org/explore/byways/2196/ stories/55669

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EXPLORE CHESTER AT LAKE ALMANOR

The charming town of Chester, located at the northern end of Lake Almanor, is the gateway to the Lassen

Volcanic National Park and a recreational paradise. One of California’s best-kept hidden treasures is the Lake Almanor Basin. Here you will find yearround with activities to delight visitors of all ages and interests, from water and snow sports, hiking and camping, horseback riding and picnicking, to shopping and golfing. Dairy farming, logging and tourism have all impacted the area and their past is chronicled at the Chester Museum, which also displays a number of Maidu Indian baskets and artifacts, (530) 258-2742. The Chester Library, built in 1929 and located at the Museum, is the only log library in California. After visiting the museum, walk over to see “Dinky,” the locomotive on display on the Collins Pine Company lawn on Main Street. Chester is surrounded by the Lassen National Forest, and located west of Westwood on Route 36. For more information, call the Plumas County Visitors Bureau at (800) 326-2247. www.plumascounty.org

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WANDER THROUGH PLUMAS NATIONAL FOREST

Deep canyons, bubbling streams, crystalline rivers, rolling mountain valleys, gentle meadows and soaring mountain peaks await in the

P l u m a s National Forest. Situated in the Sierra Nevada just south of the Cascade Range, this beautiful and vast expanse of land is known for its tremendous bird watching opportunities. But bird watching is not the only activity to look forward to in the Plumas National Forest. Opportunities are everywhere for excitement in the wild and rugged outdoors. You can explore the diverse animal and plant life that the forest has to offer. Man has valued this rich land for many years. For more than 8,000 years, Native American tribes have inhabited and hunted in the area. The Plumas National Forest will give everyone a chance to get out and enjoy the great outdoors. The forest covers over a million acres from the foothill

Featuring Shasta, Siskiyou, Tehama, Plumas, Lassen, Trinity, Modoc, Butte, and more....

country near Lake Oroville east to the rugged high country near US 395 on the east side of the Sierras. For more information, call the Plumas National Forest, (530) 283-2050. www.fs.fed.us/r5/plumas

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VISIT THE QUAINT TOWNS OF GRAEAGLE & QUINCY

Vacations just don’t get any better than in the central part of the northern Sierras. Located between Oroville, California, and Reno, Nevada, you will find some of the most attractive, quaint, historic towns. Quincy, the Plumas County Seat, is located at the edge of American Valley, and is surrounded by the peaks of the Sierra Nevada range. It is at the midpoint of the Feather River Scenic Byway. Here you will find beautiful historic buildings, cottages, gift stores, cafes and bed and breakfast accommodations. Quincy is a town with a strong commitment to the arts and to its intriguing history. Visit the Plumas County Museum, the historic Town Hall Theatre and newly-built West End Theatre, as well as locally-owned art stores. Graeagle is a farm and lumber town surrounded by beautiful mountain peaks, and lush forests. Six pristine golf courses make the area a golfers Mecca and a renowned golf vacation destination. The town itself, a former lumber mill town, features identical red buildings that provide an

awesome array of gift shops, galleries, and other small retail services. During the summer visit Graeagle Mill Pond for the town’s annual Fourth of July celebration. Arts and crafts fairs held during the summer are also a great attraction to visitors. This area is a backpacker’s paradise and offers many trails for hiking and mountain biking. Also visit the small towns of Blairsden, Johnsonville, La Porte, Greenville, Little Grass Valley and Indian Valley for more beautiful scenery in this pristine countryside. For more information, call the Plumas County Visitors Bureau, (530) 283-6345. www.plumascounty.org www.graeagle.com

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SHASTA

LASSEN COUNTY & INTERMOUNTAIN AREA

Distinctively rural, Lassen County encompasses forested plateaus, mountains, lakes, rivers and vast agricultural valleys. Situated in scenic Northeastern California, the region is bordered by Modoc County to the north, Shasta County to the west, Plumas County to the south and Nevada to the east. The population hovers around 35,000 with almost half of those people living in the county’s main town, historic Susanville. Located where Highways 139 and 36 meet, Susanville lies next to the Susan River and at the foot of the Sierra Nevada range. The town was established as a trading post in 1854. Like much of California, Lassen County blossomed after the 1848 discovery of gold, which sparked westward migration. Seeking an alternate route from Donner Pass, Peter Lassen was the first to explore the area now known as Lassen County. In 1851, settlers followed a route from the Humboldt River (in Nevada) to Shasta City at the northern end of the Sacramento Valley. Some of those settlers made their home in what was the Honey Lake Valley. One of those early settlers was Isaac Roop, whose daughter was named Susan. The town has gone through a few name changes, from the Honey Lake Valley then to Rooptown before and finally settling on Susanville. The Lassen Historical Museum in Susanville showcases the rich history of the area with displays of logging equipment, a fort built by Roop in 1854 and many pictures dating back to the mid-1850s. Home to Lassen National Forest, Lassen Volcanic National Park, the Bizz Johnson Trail, the Honey Lake Wildlife Area and Eagle Lake, Lassen County is a big draw for nature lovers. Eagle Lake, about 17 miles northwest of Susanville, is the secondlargest natural lake in California. It is well known for its trophy Eagle Lake trout. The average-size fish caught is 3 to 5 pounds. In addition to fishing, Eagle Lake offers camping, boating, bicycling, picnicking and birding (it is home to osprey and Bald Eagles). Two great festivals to check out in Susanville are Bridgefest Music Festival, a festival celebrating music and art in June; go to www.myspace.com/bridgefest for more information. Don’t miss the Rails to Trails Festival at the historic Susanville Railroad Depot in October. www.bizzjohnsontrail.com/index_files/Page671.htm Approximately the size of Connecticut, Lassen County has an ideal climate. All four seasons are relatively mild, with an average summer high of 93 degrees and an average winter low of 28 degrees. Winter snow dustings are normal in an area that receives about 10 inches per year. Lassen County is within driving distance of cities including San Francisco, 280 miles; Sacramento, 223 miles; Reno, 86 miles; and Redding, 112 miles. Lassen County (530) 257-4323 www.lassencountychamber. org

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SEE WILD HORSES AT THE WILD HORSE SANCTUARY

(30 min – All Day+) The Wild Horse Sanctuary was created in 1978 to protect and preserve America’s wild horses as a “living national treasure.” It is located near Shingletown on 5,000 acres of beautiful mountain and forestland. It is the home to around 300 wild mustangs and burros. The Sanctuary conducts pack trips, participates in research projects on wild horse management, and sponsors “resistance free” horse training seminars. They are open to the public for wild horse viewing on Wednesday’s and Saturdays from 10 am – 4pm for no cost. They also offer 2-3 day trail rides, 4 day cattle drives, and 4-6 day cattle round ups. This is an unique opportunity for those who would like to ride the countryside and experience the Wild West as it was 100 years ago. www.wildhorsesanctuary.org 530-474-5770

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TAKE IN THE BEAUTY OF LAVENDER FARMS (30 min – 1 hour) Did you know there are 39 documented species, and nearly 400 known sub-species of Lavender plants around the world? If you visit the local Lavender farms you will experience not only a variety of this wonderfully scented and gorgeous plant, but you can surround

yourself with pleasure and peace as you stand and walk amidst these gardens. You will also be able to take in other flower varieties while there, as well as herbs, and wine grape vineyards. Of course, lavender is seasonal, and it does get cold in the Shasta region in the winter, so the lavender gardens are open to the public from early June until mid/late July, but you can visit gift shops and order their products online as well. Mt. Shasta Lavender Farms is located at 9706 Harry Cash Rd, in Montague, CA off of Hwy 97 (which starts in Weed, CA), take A12 ~ www.mtshastalavenderfarms. com 530-926-2651. Tuscan Heights Lavender Gardens has the additional gardens and vineyards and is located in Whitmore, CA approximately 35 miles from Redding ~ take Hwy 44E from Redding, past Palo Cedro take a left at Old Hwy 44, take a right on Whitmore Rd and drive for 16 miles, drive through the town of Whitmore and turn left on Fern Road EAST. (530) 472-3066, www.tuscanheights.com

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EXPERIENCE THE MAJESTIC LANDSCAPE

(Drive through - All Day) An outstanding and majestic landscape awaits travelers northeast of Redding where Highway 299 intersects with Highway 89. With limitless, breathtaking scenery, this is without a doubt one of the most beautiful and unspoiled places in California. It is also the ultimate recreational playground for all ages, offering excellent fly-fishing, camping, hiking, hunting, white water rafting, mountain climbing, mountain biking, water-sports, and so much more. The area has some of the best examples of clean and comfortable lodging facilities, campgrounds, resorts, ranches, bed and breakfasts, lodges and RV parks in California. Just west of the crossroads on Highway 299 is Burney, one of the larger country towns in the region, and known for its logging history. Until 1887, the area was one big farm with a huge orchard, potato fields, hay fields and a big garden that grew every kind of vegetable one could want. Burney is now a full-service town that serves the communities of Johnson Park, Cassel, Hat Creek, Old Station and other outlaying areas. These communities have a year-round population of less than 5000. Traveling east from the crossroads on Highway 299 leads to the gorgeous Fall River Valley and the towns of Fall River Mills and McArthur. Almost entirely spring fed, the Fall River winds for 16 miles through mostly private agricultural land. Fishing is plentiful in several lakes and rivers, and hunting is great for deer and waterfowl. The soil is hearty and the area is known for “Fall River Wild Rice.” You will find motels, restaurants, and a Clark Glasson-designed golf course. Heading Photos Courtesy Scott Leak, www.sleakphotos.com

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SHASTA

south on Highway 89 takes you into Lassen National Forest and the towns of Hat Creek and Old Station. Hat Creek is famous for its exceptional fly-fishing and is nestled in the shadow of stunning Mt. Lassen. Lava tubes, dormant and extinct volcanoes, massive lava flows and fault lines reveal a fascinating volcanic past in this area. Old Station is possibly the most well kept secret in the area, and is a delightful escape for camping, fishing, hunting, or a getaway for rest and relaxation at one of the old-fashioned B&Bs or cabin resorts. Lassen & Intermountain Region, www. lassencountychamber.com, www.shastahome.org, www.burneychamber.com

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SPEND THE DAY OR CAMP AND STAY AT MCARTHUR-BURNEY FALLS

(1 hour – All Day+) Amidst evergreen forests and within the Cascade Range and Modoc Plateau natural region is the McArthur-Burney Falls Memorial State Park. This falls is incredibly unique because its not fed by a river, it is feed by large springs above and within the falls. It is hard to believe that this massive waterfall pours out an average of 100-million gallons of water per day, even through the dry summer months. The 129-foot waterfall has been called one of the most beautiful falls in California, and President Theodore Roosevelt stated that McArthur-Burney Falls was the “Eighth Wonder of the World.” This 910-acre park is perfect for a nature lover. There are over five miles of trails to investigate on foot or on horseback. A portion of the Pacific Crest Trail passes through the park as well. There are also over five miles of streams and lake shoreline for fishing, swimming or just exploring. Natural springs dot the landscape and there are numerous campsites to spend a night or two. McArthur-Burney Falls Memorial State Park is located northeast of Redding, six miles north of Highway 299 on Highway 89 near Burney. (530) 335-2777 www.parks.ca.gov/?page_id=455

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BOAT, FISH, OR GO FOR A HIKE AT LAKE BRITTON

(2 hours – All Day) For a nice afternoon on the water in the mountains outside of Burney, go to Lake Britton. There are boat and canoe rentals available during the summer months. There are public boat launches and docks

for those bringing their own boat. There are miles of hiking trails looping the lake and running back into McArthur-Burney Falls Memorial State Park, which touches a portion of the lake. Anglers may catch different kinds of bass, crappie, catfish, trout and carp. Lake Britton is located five miles east of Burney on Highway 299. Take Highway 89 North six miles to the McArthur-Burney Falls Memorial Park, or the boat ramp. McArthur-Burney Falls Memorial State Park, (530) 335-2777, www.parks.ca.gov/?page_id=455

78

IMMERSE YOURSELF IN HISTORY

(1 - 2 hours) Fall River Mills, founded in 1871 as Fall City by Captain William Henry Winter, has undergone many changes. The history can be reviewed at the Fort Crook Museum, named for the fort that protected travelers on the Shasta-Yreka Road and the Lockhart Ferries in the 1850s. At the museum you can investigate a log cabin, Pittville schoolhouse, pony barn, round barn, James showcase, WPA jail and a machinery barn. The museum is free and is open from noon to 4pm Tuesday through Sunday May through October. The Fort Crook Museum is located in Fall River Mills on Fort Crook Avenue off Highway 299. For more information, call (530) 336-5110.

79 EXPLORE FIELDS OF LAVA (2 – 4 hours) The Ahjumawi Lava Springs State Park, located in Fall River Mills, is a special place where you can walk over fields of lava with views of snow-capped mountains. Two-thirds of what is now the park was covered by a lava flow 3,000 to 5,000 years ago. There are also oak, pine and juniper forests along with aqua bays and tree-studded islets dotting the shoreline of Ja-She Creek Crystal Springs and Horr Pond. Wildlife is plentiful with mule deer, bald eagles, ospreys and great blue herons known to reside in the area. With fantastic views of lava flows and the mountains beyond them, you will be sure to have a great time. The park is only accessible by boat. There are no public roads to it and private motor vehicles are not permitted within the park. Boat access into Big Lake is at a public boat launch known as “Rat Farm.” For more information on how to access the park, call (530) 335-2777. www.parks.ca.gov/?page_id=464

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HIKE THROUGH THE ISHI WILDERNESS

(2 – 4 hours) RRugged country awaits hikers through the rough Ishi Wilderness. This unique low-elevation wilderness is crisscrossed with ridgelines, dotted with caves, marked by lava pillars and branded by basalt rock formations. There is never a lack of wondrous things to see or do. The wilderness is named for the last surviving Yahi Yani Indian who, with a few others, hid in this harsh area away from the white settlers. Long abandoned Indian paths have now become hiking trails for visitors to the area. The area includes a population of coyote, bobcat, mountain lion, black bear, wild hog and a large Tehama deer herd. The Ishi Wilderness is the perfect place to plan an outdoor adventure and is located in the Lassen National Forest, about 20 miles east of the town of Red Bluff. For more information, call the Almanor Ranger District, (530) 258-2141.

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LEARN ABOUT RADIO ASTRONOMY

(30 min – 2 hours) The Hat Creek Radio Observatory is not a normal observatory with enormous telescopes that let scientists look at distant stars. This observatory researches radio astronomy by using radio telescopes, which are instruments designed to collect and focus radio waves coming from space. It was founded in the 1950s and is operated by the Astronomy Department at the University of California, Berkeley. A tour is offered with a glimpse of the gigantic antennas, a video about the history of the observatory and details about radio astronomy. The Hat Creek Radio Observatory is located off of Highway 89 near Burney. Five miles east of Burney at the intersection of Highways 299 and 89, turn south on Highway 89. After almost 10 miles turn left onto Doty Road and again on Bidwell Road. For more information, call (530) 335-2364.

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EXPLORE SUBWAY CAVE

(30 min – 2 hours) LLess than 20,000 years ago a river of lava called the Hat Creek Flow crawled northward near Old Station

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for 16 miles, and covered the floor of Hats Creek Valley. The outside of the lava cooled but the inside continued flowing. Eventually, as the lava drained, a lava tube remained. Today, a visit to these tubes is absolutely amazing. One tube is named the Subway Cave because of its resemblance to a subway tunnel. The tube is over 1,300 feet long with heights varying from six to 17 feet. Although this lava tube is safe, make sure you do not go down alone. Also, be aware that it gets very cold and dark as you go deeper into the tube, so bring a jacket and two sources of light. The Subway Cave is located north of the intersection of Highway 44 and Highway 89 near Fall River Mills. Hat Creek Ranger District (530) 336-5521 http://www.fs.fed.us/r5/lassen/recreation/hatcreek_ ranger_district/subway.php

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DISCOVER LASSEN VOLCANIC NATIONAL PARK

(drive through – All Day+) With abundant old-growth forests, mountain streams and lakes, and almost every type of volcanic feature imaginable, Lassen Volcanic National Park is a California treasure worth seeing. It’s easy to explore the powerful volcanic life of the park on miles of walking and hiking trails, or from the comfort of a car driving down the park’s scenic byways. Educational programs are offered in the summer months, and in the winter you can learn to snowboard. Camping, boating, fishing, stargazing, bird watching, kayaking and other activities are also popular in Lassen Volcanic National Park. Lassen Peak is captivating with its aweinspiring power. The volcano last erupted in the 191421 volcanic cycle that sent ash over seven miles into the sky. Today you can climb to the top of the 10,457 ft Lassen Peak and look down into its crater. Visible are the aptly named Chaos Crags, Devastated Area, Cinder Cone, Butte Lake and Mt. Harness, along with other landmarks. While visiting the park, take notice of the many hydrothermal features, including boiling mud pots, steaming ground, roaring fumaroles and sulfurous gases. The park once served as a warmweather meeting area for Native Americans, including the Atsugewi, Yana, Yahi and Maidu tribes. During the summer months, members of the Atsugewi tribe demonstrate basketry, tool technology and cultural traditions. Endless possibilities await the park visitor during a trip to this captivating 106,000-acre national park. Lassen Volcanic National Park is located about 50 miles east of Redding on Highway 44. (530) 595-4444 www.nps.gov/lavo

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84

HIKE THE WATERFALLS OF LASSEN VOLCANIC NATIONAL PARK

(3 hours – All Day) Lassen Volcanic National Park is the home to so many beautiful attractions it’s hard to dedicate just one of the 101 Things To Do to this majestic arena. The waterfalls of Lassen are exceptional, starting with Kings Creek Falls. Kings Creek Falls are located 12 miles inside the south entrance to Lassen Park (or 17 miles from the north entrance). There is a long parking area along the roadside at the trailhead. Kings Creek cascades along the trail and then falls into a 43 ft fall, and is a 3 mile round trip, moderate hike from the parking area. Another waterfall to see is Mill Creek Falls, which is also inside the park. The trailhead for Mill Creek Falls is at the campground just inside the south entrance to Lassen Park at the north side of the campground. The trail is a moderate hike and 3.6 miles in distance. This is the tallest fall within the park at 69 feet tall. West Fork Hat Creek Falls is a mere 31 feet tall, but consists of a series of four very pretty falls, and the hike is an easy 2.6 miles. This trail is located 18 miles inside the south entrance to Lassen National Park (or 11 miles from the north entrance). www.nps.gov/lavo (530) 595-4480

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GO CAMPING IN LASSEN NATIONAL PARK

(2 Days+) Throughout the summer months Lassen Volcanic National Park’s campsites are nearly always full. However, you can make reservations in four of the campsites, and can call anytime during the year to make them. There are an additional four campgrounds that are first-come, first served basis. All group sites must have reservations. All campgrounds have fire rings, grills, and bear boxes. The Campgrounds are Butte Lake, Lost Creek, Crags, Manzanita Lake, Summit Lake, Warner Valley, Southwest, and Juniper Lake. Most sites are open June through September. Daily fees range from $4 - $12 or $30 - $50 for a group of 10-25. www.nps.gov/lavo/planyourvisit/camping_in_ campgrounds.htm

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Hiking in Lassen is probably the most popular of all activities within the parks boundaries. The areas of the park are broken down into four regions. In the South Park Road Region you can hike Mill Creek Falls (4.6 miles round trip), Brokeoff Mountain (7 miles), Ridge Lakes (2 miles), Bumpass Hell (3 miles), Lassen Peak (5 miles), Cold Boiling and Crumbaugh Lakes (2.6 miles), Terrace, Shadow, and Cliff Lakes (4 miles), Kings Creek Falls (3 miles), and Sulphur Works (on the side of the road). In the North Park Road Region you will find Echo Lake (4.4 miles), Paradise Meadow (2.8 miles), Manzanita Lake (1.5 miles), Lily Pond Nature Trail (1 mile), Devastated Area Interpretive Trail (easy), Crags Lake (4.2 miles), and Manzanita Creek (7 miles). In the Butte Lake Region you can check out Cinder Cone (4 miles), and Prospect Peak (a strenuous 7 mile trip). And finally, in Warner Valley, Drakesbad, and Juniper Lake Region you will find Mount Harkness (3.8 miles), Devil’s Kitchen (3 miles), and Boiling Springs Lake (3 miles). All four types of

HIKE THE TRAILS OF LASSEN NATIONAL PARK

(2 hours – All Day)

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VISIT SUSANVILLE; HIKE THE BIZZ JOHNSON RAIL TRAIL

89

FISH EAGLE LAKE

(1 hour - All Day) Eagle Lake is a fisherman’s dream, and is famous for its spectacular trophy trout. Trolling and shore fishing have yielded enormous trout, the record for the lake is 15 pounds. There are also many other different activities to choose from on or around the lake. You can rent a boat or cabin, explore the pine, sage and juniper-lined shorelines or go on a camping trip, bike ride or just a casual walk. Eagle Lake provides the perfect peaceful backdrop for any adventure. Much of the lake’s western shore is within the Lassen National Forest. Bureau of Land Management Eagle Lake Field Office (530) 257-0456 www.blm.gov/ca/st/en/fo/eaglelake.html

SEE CHARMING CHESTER AND LAKE ALMANOR

(Drive through – All Day+) The charming town of Chester, located at the northern

(2 hours – All Day+) Biking, horseback riding, walking, cross country skiing, camping and many other activities are at their best along the Bizz Johnson Rail Trail. Designated a National Recreational Trail, the route follows the route of the old Fernley and Lassen Branch Line of the Southern Pacific Railroad. The trail winds along the Susan River Canyon for 16 miles, and then follows

Spinner Fall Lodge

P

28076 Metsger Rd. Fall River Mills, CA 530.336.5300 spinnerfalllodge.com

Call 530.223.1227 for more information on the North State Dining Guide and how to be listed here, or visit www.northstatediningguide.com

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roads to the old lumber town of Westwood. All of the seasons‚ spring, summer, autumn and winter‚ are on display and at their best along this trail. The Susanville Railroad Depot serves as a visitor center for the trail system. The depot provides the perfect starting point for adventures on the converted railroad tracks. There are a number of exciting events that are held on the trail each year including nature camps for kids, races, and a farmer’s market. Each year the Railroad Depot hosts the Rails to Trails Festival. This year the event will be held October 3-5. Everyone will enjoy spending time on the Bizz Johnson Rail Trail. Lassen Chamber of Commerce (530) 257-4323, www. bizzjohnsontrail.com, www.lassencountychamber. org

volcanoes found in the entire world are represented in Lassen Volcanic National Park. Volcanoes found in the park include shield (Prospect Peak), plug dome (Lassen Peak), Cinder Cone (Cinder Cone), and Composite (Brokeoff Volcano) volcanoes. If you have time to do just one thing in Lassen Volcanic National Park, take a hike to one of these great examples of Mother Nature at her fiercest. www.nps.gov/lavo/planyourvisit/ hiking_lassen_park.htm

87 INTERMOUNTAIN

end of Lake Almanor, is the gateway to the Lassen Volcanic National Park and a recreational paradise. One of California’s best-kept hidden treasures is the Lake Almanor Basin, here you will find year-round activities to delight visitors of all ages and interests, from water and snow sports, hiking and camping, horseback riding and picnicking, to shopping and golfing. Dairy farming, logging and tourism have all impacted the area and their past is chronicled at the Chester Museum, which also displays a number of Maidu Indian baskets and artifacts, (530) 258-2742. The Chester Library, built in 1929 and located at the Museum, is the only log library in California. After visiting the museum, walk over to see “Dinky,” the locomotive on display on the Collins Pine Company lawn on Main Street. Chester is surrounded by the Lassen National Forest, and located west of Westwood on Route 36. Lake Almanor is a large manmade lake with a capacity of 1,308,000 acre-feet of water. The maximum depth is 90 feet. It is a PG&E owned lake, but the southern shore is in the Lassen National Forest. You will find plenty of camping available at the West Shore Lake Almanor Campground. 530-258-2141. Also available in the area are boat rentals, cabin rentals, and B&B’s. RV sites are available as well at the campground. Plumas County Visitors Bureau (800) 326-2247 www.plumascounty.org

Shasta 2013 Edition

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VOLCANIC LEGACY SCENIC BYWAY

The Volcanic Legacy Scenic Byway that leads from California’s Lake Almanor north to Oregon’s Crater Lake National Park is so special that it has been designated an “All-American Road” by the Federal Highways Administration. What makes it unique, and the common legacy of the 500-mile byway’s diverse scenery, is its volcanic past. While the California portion of the byway could be driven in a single day, the journey through spectacular scenery with many opportunities for unique recreational activities, invites a much longer, unhurried sojourn. Along the way you can find adventure, places to explore and stops that will allow you to experience the culture and history of the region. The route in California encompasses the diverse landscapes of the Klamath, Shasta-Trinity and Lassen National Forests, Lassen Volcanic National Park, Lava Beds National Monument, National Wildlife Refuges, soaring mountain peaks, volcanic domes, lava fields, geothermal pools and vents, scenic waterways and broad plains. The convergence of habitats along the route provides a significantly higher number of plants and animal species than in most other regions of the West. The Volcanic Legacy Scenic Byway is one of BUTTE VALLEY REGION the most scenic drives in California, but it would be a shame to spend all the WATERFALLS REGION OF BURNEY & MCCLOUD travel time in a car. Along the route there is ample opportunity for sportsmen, The lava plain north of Mount Shasta presents a birdwatchers, hikers, skiers and backpackers. White-water rafting and traditional North of the Hat Creek region the scenery changes vivid contrast to the region further south of the lake and stream recreation possibilities abound. Major highlights along the into a panorama of towering pines, quiet meadows mountain. The valley showcases far-reaching vistas of rangelands, farms and the Butte Valley National and beautiful waterfalls. President Theodore volcano-to-volcano byway include the following: Grasslands.

LAKE ALMANOR REGION Lake Almanor is a water-enthusiast’s playground known for its glass-like surface that is perfect for skiing, wakeboarding, sailing, sail-boarding and jet skiing‚ all with splendid vistas of Mt. Lassen. It also has a well-deserved reputation for fine lake fishing, with exceptional stream fishing nearby. Downhill and cross-country ski runs are available at Stover Mountain, with snowmobiling trails found in the surrounding forests and meadows. Golf resorts abound on the Lake Almanor Peninsula.

MOUNT LASSEN NATIONAL PARK The dormant volcano last erupted from 19141921. The park provides an excellent introduction to volcanic landforms and geothermal areas. Park highlights include the short interpretive trail to

Bumpass Hell, the road across the flanks of Mount Lassen and the Loomis Museum.

HAT CREEK RIM REGION

Hat Creek is readily accessible along much of the byway north of Mt. Lassen, and it has an incredible reputation for trout fishing and wildlife viewing. The Hat Creek Rim Overlook provides an impressive view of the valley, which was formed when it gradually dropped 1,000 feet below what is now the top of the Rim. To learn more about the creek and the surrounding region, such as the nearby Subway Cave and the Spattercone Trail, visit the Old Station Visitor Information Center. The information center is open 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., Saturdays and Sundays only, from late April until early December. For more information, contact the Hat Creek District Ranger office at (530) 336-5521. www.fs.fed.us/r5/lassen/recreation/hatcreek/osvc. php

Roosevelt called Burney Falls the “eighth wonder of the world’” and today it is the centerpiece of McArthur-Burney Falls State Park. Further north near McCloud, the McCloud Waterfalls offer unforgettable hikes and stunning vistas of three distinct waterfalls. The historic town of McCloud is a well-preserved former lumber mill town that sits in the shadow of Mt. Shasta. The charming town is complete with historic buildings, elegant lodging, and has many opportunities for shopping and fine dining.

MOUNT SHASTA REGION This region is dominated by Mount Shasta, which stands at 14,162 feet and has the distinction of being the tallest volcano in California. The Everitt Memorial Highway leads up the mountain for 15 miles to an elevation of 7,800-feet, and provides access to many splendid hiking possibilities‚ the views of the surrounding country can’t be matched. The town of Mt. Shasta has an inviting downtown shopping area with many distinctive shops, galleries, fine dining and lodging.

Photos Courtesy Scott Leak, www.sleakphotos.com

Featuring Shasta, Siskiyou, Tehama, Plumas, Lassen, Trinity, Modoc, Butte, and more....

TULELAKE AND LAVA BEDS NATIONAL MONUMENT REGION Just south of the Oregon border Route 161 leads east through the farming community of Tulelake to more natural wonders as it passes the wetlands and marshes of the Lower Klamath and Tule Lake National Wildlife Refuges. Depending on the season, the Tule Lake Refuge’s ten-mile auto tour provides opportunities to view bald and golden eagles, several species of geese and the threatened peregrine falcon. Photo-blinds at the Lower Klamath Refuge allow photographers to capture portraits of birds as they fly, feed and nest in the protected environment. A short distance south, the vast and very rugged Lava Beds National Monument preserves significant sites of Native American history‚ such as Captain Jack’s Stronghold, the site of the Modoc Indian Wars in 1872-1873‚ as well as the geologic wonders of lava tube caves and trails. The rugged landscape is dotted with more than 700 caves, Native American rock art sites and a high desert wilderness.

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TRINITY COUNTY

Trinity County is a rugged, mountainous region west of Redding and east of Humboldt County. Highway 299 serves as the main east-west corridor through the county. Just west of Redding is Whiskeytown Lake, which provides boating, swimming, fishing, hiking and more. The first town west of Redding on Highway 299 is Lewiston, which has a restored downtown area. This National Historic District offers a glimpse into the past of a vibrant Gold Rush. Continuing west, visitors reach the town of Weaverville, the county seat and largest town in Trinity County. Weaverville serves as a hub for hikers and campers who wish to explore the nearby Marble Mountains, Trinity Alps or area lakes. Weaverville boasts numerous historic sites such as the Joss House State Park, home to the oldest Chinese Taoist Temple in California, and the J.J. Jackson Museum, where artifacts, photographs and documents reveal the history of the community. Approximately 15 miles north of Weaverville on Highway 3 lay Trinity Lake, possibly the most beautiful hidden recreational treasure in the Shasta Cascade Region. Like Shasta Lake, Trinity Lake has an abundance of recreational opportunities, as well as the opportunity to stay on one of many houseboats available at Forever Resorts and Trinity Alps Marina. Spend a day or spend a week, whatever suits your needs and outdoor desires. A trip could include fishing, canoeing, kayaking, patio boating, wakeboarding, water skiing, hiking, mountain biking and so much more. Trinity Lake was originally named for the late Clair Engle, who was instrumental in the construction of Trinity Dam in 1961. The name was changed in 1997 to better reflect the lake’s location. The communities of Trinity Center, Lewiston, Covington Mill, Carrville and Coffee Creek are nearby. Whether a visitor prefers an RV hookup site or rugged wilderness backpacking, Trinity Lake offers possibilities for almost any outdoor adventure. Highway 299 crosses the Trinity River at Cedar Flat as the river enters the turbulent Burnt Ranch Gorge. The class IV and V rapids of the gorge, from Cedar Flat to Grays Falls, are some of the most challenging in the U.S. and suitable only for expert boaters. Trails at Burnt Ranch and Grays Falls campgrounds offer the hardy hiker a streamside view of the gorge and its impressive rapids. At Salyer the river becomes calm and peaceful. West of Salyer, Highway 299 continues into Humboldt County and the town of Willow Creek, known as Bigfoot Country due to several reported sightings of the elusive forest beast. For more information regarding Trinity County, call the Trinity County Chamber of Commerce at (800) 487-4648 or (530) 623-6101. www.trinitycounty.com

Bigfoot Rafting Co. Highway 299

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EXPERIENCE WHITE WATER RAFTING ON TRINITY

(4 hours+) Rushing rapids, calm and peaceful waters and fantastic sights are just a few of the things that await you on the Trinity River. You can enjoy exciting whitewater rafting adventures that will satisfy even the most experienced thrill seekers. Portions of the river are rated a 4 and 5 based on the International Rating Scale of 1-6. 1 is very relaxing and easy-going and 6 is sometimes considered impossible to raft. Boulders strewn through the water make the trip seem like an obstacle course at times. Along the way, you might be able to spot a deer or bear feeding from the shoreline, or a bald eagle soaring effortlessly overhead. Many companies in the area will take you on an adventure filled with tossing, turning and gliding down rapids. Raft the river’s rapids, then enjoy the peace and quiet the river has to offer by having a picnic or just soaking up the natural beauty from shore. Every member of the family can have plenty of fun. For more information, call the Humboldt County Convention and Visitors Bureau at (800) 346-3482. Trinity River Rafting (800) 30-RIVER www.trinityriverrafting.com

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DISCOVER TRINITY AND LEWISTON LAKES

(2 hours – All Day+) From Trinity Lake, located in the Shasta-Trinity National Recreation Area, there are views of the jagged peaks of the Trinity Alps Wilderness. With cold streams, lush meadows and rugged crests, the Alps attract thousands of nature lovers every year to hike, climb and ride through the spectacular scenery. Down below, Trinity Lake with its 145 miles of shoreline is a recreational wonderland.

Action-packed, guided whitewater adventures for first-timers and seasoned veterans. Huge raft and kayak rental department.

BigfootRafting.com

TWO LOCATIONS

40630 Hwy 299 in Willow Creek

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530-629-2263

and 31221 Hwy 299 in Big Flat Shasta 2013 Edition

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As California’s third largest lake, Trinity’s rugged and forested shoreline and pleasant temperatures draw water sports enthusiasts from all around the country. Houseboaters, jetskiers, wakeboarders and waterskiers, boaters and fisherman may launch from any one of the lakeside marinas and six public boat ramps. This wilderness area also provides ample opportunities to view wildlife, including osprey, golden eagles, bald eagles, quail, bobcats, deer and bear. Dozens of accommodations can be found along the lake and in the towns of Coffee Creek, Lewiston, Trinity Center and Weaverville. Nearby activities include panning for gold, hiking and backpacking trails, camping, mountain biking and climbing, snow skiing and river rafting. Located only an hour west of Redding off Hwy. 299, Trinity Lake is a must do. For more information, call the Trinity County Chamber of Commerce, (530) 623-6101. Lewiston Lake is a great place to fish. This magnificent cold-water lake provides the perfect place to find those elusive trout. Many different types of trout make Lewiston Lake their home. Species ranging from German and Loc Levin browns to rainbow, brook and Eagle Lake trout provide the thrills and excitement that every fisherman loves and pursues. While on the lake, don’t just keep your eyes on the water; the skies around the lake are filled with osprey, bald eagles, falcons and herons. If you look to the banks, you will see otter and deer. Trinity County Chamber of Commerce (530) 623-6101 www.trinitycounty.com

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VISIT HISTORIC WEAVERVILLE

(2 hours+) Weaverville takes its special place on the National Register of Historic Places, and hosts a variety of quaint gift shops, cafés, historic buildings, and performing arts. It’s one of those great, historic, one-street, gold mining towns, where you can always


SHASTA

find culture, be immersed in history, and enjoy art. With ongoing festivals, events, farmers markets, and plays, you can always find something to see or do in Weaverville. Weaverville can also serve as a hub to the adjacent wilderness that surrounds it. With the Trinity River, Trinity Lake, Lewiston Lake, the Weaver Basin Trial (great for all of you Mountain Bikers), and all the great fishing of the Trinity County streams you can imagine. Visit www.trinitycounty.com, or call 800-487-4648

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BE AMAZED AT CHINESE HISTORY AND THE JOSS HOUSE

(30 min – 1 hour) The tremendous beauty and mystique of a Chinese temple is unparalleled. Chinese immigrants have played a huge role in the history of Northern California, and the oldest Chinese temple that has been in continuous use is at what is now known as the Joss House State Historic Park. Along with the temple are exhibits and artifacts that include artworks, mining tools, pictures and even weapons used in the Tong War of 1854. The temple is on the site of a previous temple that burned down in the early 1870s. This amazing temple provides a glimpse into the distinct Chinese culture that has left a profound impact on the development of the West Coast. The Joss House State Historic Park is located in the middle of the town of Weaverville on the corner of Highway 299 and Oregon Streets. For more information, call (530) 623-5284. www.parks.ca.gov/?page_id=457

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SEE WEAVERVILLE’S

ART & HISTORY (AT THE HIGHLAND ART CENTER)

(30 min – 1.5 hours) Northern California is widely known for the tremendous amount of high quality art that is produced in the area. Art is displayed and sold at the Highland Art Center, which is dedicated to furthering the visual arts in Trinity County. The art center has all sorts of fabulous art on display‚ everything from pottery to basketry, photography, sculpture, painting and fiber arts are represented. There is even room for those interested in creating their own art. The art center offers many classes that give instruction in a variety of different artistic forms. The center is open everyday except Sunday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; and on Sundays from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. from May through December. The Highland Art Center is located at 503 Main Street in the historic town of Weaverville. For more information, call (530) 623-5111. www.snowcrest.net/wb6fzh/hiart3.html

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TAKE A STEP BACK IN HISTORY AT THE JJ JACKSON MUSEUM

(1 hour +) From Native Americans to early Anglo settlers and from the Gold Rush to the present day, Trinity County and all of Northern California have had an amazing and storied past. If you are interested in learning about this rich history first hand, the J.J. Jackson Memorial Museum and the Trinity County Historical Park are the perfect places to start investigating this wonderful area’s past. The museum houses informative exhibits that will captivate the imagination including several on Native American basketry and tools; bottles and artifacts of the early settlers; implements, tools and machines used at the time of the Gold Rush, and many more. It includes a stamp mill, tin shop and blacksmith shop. Children and adults alike will have a blast at the museum. The J.J. Jackson Memorial Museum is located at 508 Main Street in Weaverville. For more information, call (530) 623-5211. www.trinitymuseum.org

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SPEND TIME ON THE TRINITY RIVER

(1 hour – All Day) The Trinity River is the longest tributary of the Klamath River. It rises in Northeast Trinity County in the Shasta Trinity National Forest and flows along the west side of the Trinity Mountains into Trinity Lake, Trinity Dam, and Lewiston Lake. From here it flows past Weaverville and continues until it reaches the Klamath approximately 20 miles from the Pacific Coast. The river is known for gold mining, and as you drive alongside in on 299w you can still see people trying their hand at it, or stop and try for yourself! Most of the area alongside the river is managed by BLM. The river is one of the greatest areas for fishing. You can fish for Steelhead, Trout, and Salmon anywhere on the river. There are many guides to choose from in the area as well. White Water Rafting is the best on Trinity as well. Whatever leads you to the area, don’t miss out on Trinity River! For more information visit www.trinityriveradventures.com, www.fishtrinity.com, www.trinitychamber.com Or call the Trinity Chamber at 530-623-6101.

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FISH THE WATERS OF TRINITY

(1 hour – All Day) Rushing rapids, calm, peaceful waters and fantastic fishing are just a few of the attractions that await you at the Trinity River. Fishing is the name of the game. The Trinity River, along with its feeder streams, provides over 1,500 miles of fishable waters that start high in the Trinity Alps. Fly-fishing is at its best on the banks and in the waters of the Trinity River. Trout, salmon and steelhead are all there for the catching in this beautiful river, as it flows towards the junction of the Klamath River. The Trinity River runs from the Trinity Alps near Weaverville, through a magnificent canyon, past Weaverville and the Hoopa Reservation. For more information, call the Weaverville Ranger

Station, (530) 623-2121. www.fs.fed.us/r5/shastatrinity/contact

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TAKE A MOTORCYCLISTS DREAM RIDE DOWN HWY 36

(All Day) Heading east on Highway 36, from just south of Fortuna in Humboldt County to Red Bluff in Mendocino County is 140 miles of twists, turns and scenic views, affording a motorcyclist’s paradise. It

Bridgeville is also well known for the “Intergalactic Flying Saucer Trials‚” at Bridge fest fair on a bridge with live entertainment, food and crafts. Continue on for about another 24 miles to the town of Mad River where you’ll find the Mad River Burger Bar, a landmark in the area for locals as well as visitors. The Burger Bar is open year-round so you’ll be able to grab a burger before heading on to the Ruth Lake Reservoir. This slender lake offers sailing, water skiing and swimming, plus great fishing opportunities away from crowds. The lake offers fishing throughout the year and rainbow trout, pan fish, catfish, small and large mouth bass can all be found in the clear waters

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is considered by many to be the finest motorcycle roadway in California. Ruth Lake is 68 miles from Fortuna, and whether on a sanctioned bike ride or a family trip, this stretch of road is worth the drive. Starting from U.S. Highway 101 near Fortuna, Highway 36 passes through the towns of Hydesville, Carlotta, and Bridgeville, which were named after a local bridge crossing the Van Duzen River.

TEHAMA COUNTY

Countryside Cafe` 638 Washington St. Red Bluff CA. 96080 530.527.2799

Woodside Grill

4125 Riverside Place Anderson CA 96007 530.365.7077 Call 530.223.1227 for more information on the North State Dining Guide and how to be listed here, or visit www.northstatediningguide.com

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of this beautiful lake. The annual Ruth Lake Bass Fishing Tournament takes place the first weekend in May. All boating is permitted as well as jet skis, wakeboarding and waterskiing. The lake has a full service marina with boat rentals and launching facilities available. There are several annual events at Ruth that draw crowds from all over the country and coastal areas‚ the Ruth’s Summer Festival, Aug. 2-3; the Ruth Rodeo; and the annual Ruth Lake Bass Derby. There are several campgrounds located on the

east side of the lake that accommodate tents, RVs and trailers, as well as a group-camping area. The Ruth Lake Community Services District Office manages the recreational amenities at Ruth Lake that include the Ruth Lake Marina, various full service and primitive campgrounds, and the recreational sub-leases around the lake. For information about Ruth Lake, call the Community Service District Office at (707) 5746332, for camping and reservations call (800) 8409545. http://www.ruthlakecsd.org/

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SECLUDED AND PEACEFUL RUTH LAKE

(All Day) Heading east on Highway 36, from just south of Fortuna in Humboldt County to Red Bluff in Mendocino County is 140 miles of twists, turns and scenic views—a motorcyclist’s paradise. It is considered by many to be the finest motorcycle roadway in California. Ruth Lake is 68 miles from Fortuna, and whether on a sanctioned bike ride or a family trip, this stretch of road is worth the drive. Starting from U.S. Highway 101 near Fortuna, Highway 36 passes through the towns of Hydesville, Carlotta, and Bridgeville, which was named after a local bridge crossing the Van Duzen River. Bridgeville is also well known for the “Intergalactic Flying Saucer Trials” at Bridgefest—a fair on a bridge with live entertainment, food and crafts. Continue on for about another 24 miles to the town of Mad River where you’ll find the Mad River Burger Bar, a landmark in the area for locals as well as visitors. The Burger Bar is open year-round so you’ll be able to grab a burger before heading on to the Ruth Lake Reservoir. Ruth Lake, at an elevation of 2,650 feet is bordered by

ponderosas and firs, and was formed in 1962 by the damming of the Mad River. The lake is off the beaten path, but the Ruth Airport makes this area easily accessible by small airplanes. Waterfowl viewing is excellent, especially in spring and fall, with more than 200 bird species in the area. Songbirds are abundant in the spring, ospreys nest in spring and remain through the fall, and bald eagles may also be spotted nesting in the area throughout the year. This slender lake offers sailing, water skiing and swimming, plus great fishing opportunities away from crowds. The lake offers fishing throughout the year and rainbow trout, panfish, catfish, small and large mouth bass can all be found in the clear waters of this beautiful lake. The annual Ruth Lake Bass Fishing Tournament takes place the first weekend in May. All boating is permitted as well as jet skis and waterskiing. The lake has a full service marina with boat rentals and launching facilities available. There are several annual events at Ruth that draw crowds from all over the country and coastal areas— the Ruth’s Summer Festival, Aug. 2-3; the Ruth Rodeo; and the annual Ruth Lake Bass Derby. There are several campgrounds located on the east side of the lake that accommodate tents, RVs and trailers, as well as a group-camping area. The Ruth Lake Community Services District Office manages the recreational amenities at Ruth Lake that include the Ruth Lake Marina, various full service and primitive campgrounds, and the recreational sub-leases around the lake. For information about Ruth Lake call the Community Service District Office at (707) 574-6332, for camping and reservations call (800) 840-9545.

Photo Courtesy Cheryl Harmon

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SHASTA

BUTTE COUNTY

Butte County dangles from the southern edge of the Shasta Cascade region. It is bordered by the Sacramento River on the west and the Sierra Nevada on the east. Its original inhabitants, the Maidu Indians, found sustenance from plentiful acorn-bearing oak trees and salmon from area streams and the Feather River. But the discovery of gold on the middle fork of the Feather River in the late 1840s, by Gen. John Bidwell, changed life irrevocably for native and newcomer alike. Gold seekers streamed into the region by the hundreds. By 1850 Butte County became one of the original 27 counties in California. In 1859, a 54-pound gold nugget was unearthed near the town of Paradise, the largest ever found in California. Although gold helped create Butte County, it was agriculture that assured its survival. Almonds, apples, olives and kiwi fruit, among others, are important crops in the county today. Butte County includes the towns of Chico, Oroville, Gridley and Paradise. Today, the city of Chico has grown to over a 30.78 square mile Charter city of 84,396 with an urbanized, unincorporated area immediately adjacent to it, making the total population of the Chico urban area 105,080. Chico maintains a historic downtown, a wide variety of services and familyoriented neighborhoods. It is known as a well-managed city that values quality infrastructure and services, and maintains a special sense of community and small-town living as it has developed into a vibrant regional center for business, recreation and cultural activities. The name Bidwell has become synonymous with the town of Chico. Gold made him a wealthy man, but Gen. Bidwell was interested in creating a good community in which to live. He donated a portion of his 28,000-acre ranch to start Chico, and later offered property to anyone who would build there. More land was given for a state teacher’s college, which is now California State University, Chico. CSU. Chico is a residential campus that offers more than 100 undergraduate majors and maintains one of the highest graduation rates in the CSU system. Known for its small class sizes, Chico is among the top CSU’s for freshman retention rate. Visitors can view Bidwell’s three-story 1868 home at Bidwell Mansion State Historic Park. Chico is also home to the National Yo-Yo Museum. Oroville, Spanish for “City of Gold,” was an early gold camp. Like Chico, agriculture is what eventually sustained it. The town is home to Lake Oroville, created in 1967. The Lake Oroville Visitor Center holds a wealth of information about the lake and the entire Oroville area, (530) 583-2219. Paradise is a quaint town, located on Highway 191, east of Chico. Its moderate elevation helped it prosper in its earlier days, when it was known for its farms, orchards, livestock and logging. Paradise has numerous antique shops that keep collectors busy. Hikers will enjoy Butte Creek Canyon, also known as “Little Grand Canyon.” Gridley is a true valley town, with prime agricultural land that produces rice, peaches, kiwi, prunes, nuts and more. The town features Victorian buildings along “Silk Stocking Row.” South of town is the Gray Lodge Wildlife Area, a 8,400acre marshland that attracts waterfowl and hundreds of other birds. www.chicochamber.com, www.orovilleareachamber. com, www.paradisechamber. com

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VISIT FEATHER RIVER FALLS

YO-YO 101 VISIT THE NATIONALMUSEUM

(4 hours – All Day) Rugged natural beauty is a given in this region of Northern California. There is something amazing everywhere you look. One thing not to be missed is Feather Falls. This magnificent waterfall plummets over a rocky cliff more than 640 feet into the Feather River. Feather Falls National scenic Trail is a ninemile-long loop trail, and provides access to this awesome area. The trail goes all the way to Feather Falls, as you pass moss covered boulders and beautiful forests. The power of the water is amazing as it rushes, crashes and falls. No trip to the area would be complete without a hike to Feather Falls, the sixth largest waterfall in the country. The Falls are located outside of Oroville on Lumpkin Road. For more information, call the Oroville Chamber of Commerce, 530-538-2542. www.orovilleareachamber.com

(1 hour+) The National Yo-Yo Museum houses the largest public display of yo-yo’s and yo-yo memorabilia in the country. It is open 10 am to 6pm Monday through Saturday and noon-5pm on Sundays. The largest working wood yo-yo is on display and was featured in the 1982 Guinness book of World Records and weighs in at 256 pounds. The earliest commercial production was in the 1920’s and 1930’s. Many historical yo-yo’s are featured on display as well as the current performance designed yoyo’s. The national yo-yo contest is held every year in Chico on the first Saturday of October. There is even a national yo-yo league which serves as the administrating forum for National, Regional, and State contests in the United States. Held annually in conjunction with this contest, is the National Spin-Top Contest. The Yo-Yo Museum is located at 320 Broadway in downtown Chico, California. For more information visit nationalyoyo.org

YOUTH FOR CHRIST

Every Year, hundreds of troubled youth walk the streets and school hallways of Shasta County. Some are ignored or forgotten, while others aren’t viewed as kids in need of intervention. Still, a handful are offered the gift of encouragement and unconditional love from a group of local citizens dedicated to making a difference in the life of a child. Ginger Salido and her husband, Bob, dreamed of a farm where abandoned horses and troubled kids could come together to find love, purpose and new direction for their lives. In 2002, the couple stepped out in faith and opened their farm’s gates – and their hearts – to local youth. Exodus Farms in Anderson was born. For more than 30 years, Duane Helle, program director of Youth for Christ Shasta, a non profit, non-denominational youth ministry dedicated to working with junior high and high school students, has worked with youth in various ministries, including Youth for Christ’s Horse Program. The horse program kicked off in 1997 as a joint effort between Helle and local wranglers Tom Orr and Lee Cribbs. Orr and Cribbs had worked with youth at Kidder Creek and Lassen Pines Youth Camps, where they’d witnessed the life-changing effects a horse can have on a child. Recognizing the benefits of offering a horse camp from a biblical perspective, the trio worked closely with local school administrators to develop a program that introduced under privileged students to horses and God. In 2009, when Salido was asked to help with the horse program, which was then being held at the Redding Rodeo Grounds, she never imagined the camp would move to her farm. But in 2011, Youth for Christ’s horse camp converged on Exodus Farms and has been held there since. For one week in May, a dozen kids, ages 12 to 18, ride a dozen horses known as the “healing herd”. The training they receive helps students renew selfesteem, overcome fears, learn responsibility and accountability, and build respect for themselves and others. “When kids look at the horse, it looks like this big, insurmountable thing that doesn’t want to have a relationship with them” says Helle. “But we try to overcome that and show them that we want to have a relationship with them, God wants to have a relationship with them and so does that horse.” Using the horse as a teaching tool, wranglers help youth build self confidence. “Nobody believes they can do great things if there’s nobody on the sidelines telling them “Yes, you can”, says Salido. Salido says, “It just takes one person, and it’s not me, to let these kids know they are loved and valued. It’s that person who says “I want to make a difference in a child’s life.” To find out more about Youth For Christ and their ministry, go to their website www.yfcsr.org.

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OTHER COUNTIES: DEL NORTE

California’s northernmost coastal county Del Norte‚ and Oregon’s southernmost coastal county‚ Curry‚ share a common lifestyle. Both counties contain miles of unspoiled beaches and rivers famous for salmon and steelhead. Most of the communities in both counties are situated along coastal Highway 101. Southern Oregon’s Josephine and Jackson Counties are east of Curry County and offer warmer summertime temperatures, winter skiing, white-water excitement, wineries and Shakespearean performances. The major communities of these counties are situated along Interstate 5. Small, charming villages can be found along east-west routes such as Highway 199 and Highway 62. Del Norte County is located 366 miles north of San Francisco via Highway 101 and 383 miles south of Portland via Interstate 5 and Highway 199. Towering redwood forests can be seen in Redwood National Park, Jedediah Smith State Park and Del Norte Coast Redwoods State Park. The town of Klamath is the southern-most in Del Norte County. It is a favorite getaway for campers, hikers, boaters and fishermen. Klamath’s most popular attraction, Trees of Mystery (800) 638-3389, offers tours through a pristine redwood forest. The Skytram takes visitors on an aerial tour through the lofty canopy of an ancient redwood grove. For more information, visit www.treesofmystery.net. Among the many things to do in the Klamath area are jet boat rides, try Klamath River Jet Boat Tours (800) 887-JETS. Crescent City (population 7,000) is the county seat and Del Norte’s largest city. The Redwood National and State Parks Visitor Center is located at 1111 Second Street. Attractions include Battery Point Lighthouse, Crescent City Harbor, scenic drives, public fishing piers, a history museum and the Elk Valley Casino. The town also has a wide variety of stores, restaurants, RV Parks and lodging facilities. Nearby the majestic Smith River flows to the ocean and offers a number of recreational activities, including rafting, inner tubing, kayaking, fishing and more. When in the Crescent City area, check out Ocean World. This privately owned and operated aquarium has over half-a-million gallons of water in its massive viewing tanks. The aquarium has an abundance of aquatic life including sharks, seals, sea lions, rays and wolf eels, and features shark petting, an interactive tide pool and

highflying sea lion performances. For more information, call (707) 464-4900. www.oceanworldonline.com Just north of Crescent City is the tiny, quiet agricultural community of Smith River, where the river of that name enters the Pacific. Located on coastal plains 13 miles south of the Oregon border, the flat, fertile land attracted settlers and farmers as early as 1852. Each year, several hundred acres of lily bulbs are planted in Smith River and, along with Brookings to the north, account for 90 percent of the Easter lilies sold in the nation during the holidays. Further north is Brookings (population approximately 6,000), the southernmost town in Oregon’s Curry County. It offers many of the same retail amenities as Crescent City and is near spectacular coastal parks such as Harris Beach and Samuel H. Boardman state parks. Still further north, Gold Beach (population under 2,000) and charming Wedderburn flank the mouth of the Rogue River, where fishing is a major activity year-round. The Rogue is also well known for its jet boat trips. Rogue River Mail Boats are located in Gold Beach. For a fun-filled adventure, call (800) 458-3511, www.mailboat.com.

OTHER COUNTIES: HUMBOLDT

Humboldt County is a haven for travelers and residents alike. It contains more than 160 miles of unspoiled coastline, hundreds of thousands of acres of coastal redwood trees, many wild rivers, as well as bustling seaports, quaint farming communities and historical areas. Everywhere in the county, travelers will find exceptional accommodations, fine restaurants, a multitude of shopping and numerous campgrounds. The county is situated on the Northern California coast 90 miles south of the Oregon border. The largest towns are adjacent to U.S. Highway 101. The county is approximately 200 miles north of San Francisco and 350 miles south of Portland, Oregon. Humboldt County has a variety of climates and terrain. Coastal Humboldt is wild, mostly rocky, and cool in the summer. Inland, Humboldt has small communities that are quite warm in the summer. Many sit next to major rivers such as the Photos Courtesy Scott Leak, www.sleakphotos.com

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Regional Visitor Publications  Post Office Box 1374  Eureka, California 95502  707-443-4887  FAX 707-443-1234

SHASTA

Eel, Trinity and Klamath. In southern Humboldt, Highway 101 is lined by some any other of the state’s 58 counties. Eureka is a busy seaport with a large fishing of the first redwoods spotted by northbound travelers. Richardson Grove State fleet. A variety of activities can be found in and around the waters of Humboldt Park is a magnificent 2,000 acres of redwoods located nine miles south of the Bay including kayaking, fishing and even spotting a harbor seal or two. There are town of Garberville. The state acquired the area in the early 1920s, making it one harbor tours aboard the M.V. Madaket, and the Woodley Island Marina is a great of the oldest state parks in California. A jaunt down smaller side roads that exit spot to enjoy a panoramic view of the waterfront. Highway 101 will lead travelers to the King Range National Conservation Area Seven miles north of Eureka is Arcata, home to Humboldt State University. Arcata is also known for its unique marsh and wildlife area that serves as a natural sewage and Humboldt County’s Lost Coast. This adventure leads to Hamlets such as Hidden Valley, Whitethorn, and ultimately treatment filtration system. East of Arcata, along Highway 299 and Highway 96 ends at the town of Shelter Cove. Further north on Highway 101 is the Avenue of are sunny Willow Creek and Hoopa, known for recreation along the Trinity and the Giants, a 31-mile stretch of two-lane road that winds through stands of huge Klamath rivers and tributaries. redwoods along the Eel River. Humboldt Redwoods State Park is located along Back along Highway 101 the town of McKinleyville serves as the home of the the avenue and covers more than 51,000 acres. After leaving the Avenue of the Arcata-Eureka Airport, the county’s only commercial airport. In northern Humboldt Giants, the traveler will once again be on Highway 101 and will pass the village County are the coastal jewels of Trinidad, which overlooks a beautiful sheltered of Scotia, owned by the Pacific Lumber Company, and Rio Dell, an ever-growing harbor, and Orick, the gateway to Redwood National Park. town of around 3,200 people. Further north is the sunny inland town of Fortuna, known as the jewel of the Eel River Valley. Friendly Fortuna has developed tremendous accommodations for tourists in recent years, including several hotels along the Eel River and an attractive community center. East of Fortuna along State Highway 36 is Grizzly Creek State Park, a favorite for hiking, camping and summer sun. The Victorian Village of Ferndale is just northwest of Fortuna and 16 miles south of Eureka. The entire town has been named a State Historical Landmark because of its strong 2009 MENDOCINO preservation policies of commercial buildings and residences.COUNTY  Make corrections shown: Eureka is the Humboldt county seat and reply contains fine fax examples of Victorian Please bymore email, or postal mail. Name ___________________________________________ (707) 443-1234 architecture, particularly in theIndicate Old Townchanges, section along the ifcity’s‚ waterfront. or sign APPROVED. ads@101things.com Old Town is home to the extravagantly ornate Carsonproof Mansion, one ofaretheindicated) most (we will send a revised if changes Date ____________________________________________ Fax: (707) 443-5309 photographed buildings in California. Eureka’s population of nearly 28,000 Your Advertising Please fax this sheet back or reply to this email, any changes or if PROOF IS OK. Ifmakes proof is this ad run as San shown. The publisher will not border. be responsible for any errors, the client it not the returned, largest coastal citywill between Francisco and the Oregon Please Print Name _________________________________________________________ assumes full responsibility for accuracy and completeness of information and for payment of advertisement. SIZE AD:___________page 1/2 Eureka has a multitude of excellent restaurants, cafe`s, specialty shops and q PROOF IS OK BY ________________________________________________________ Date ________________________ 1,390 (per ad, inc trade) lodging facilities. The city is also known for its large and active arts community. In Date _____________________________ ANNUAL FEE: $____________________ FAX 707-443-1234  Proof APPROVED __________________________________________________________ Authorized Signature billed after printing fact, Humboldt CountySignature hasqtheMake ofalso having more artists perfee capita or distinction email approval authorizes and annual of ad. than the corrections shown bysize __________________________________________________ Date_ _______________________

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Ferndale Chamber of Commerce • P.O. Box 325 • Ferndale, CA 95536 • Phone/Fax (707) 786-4477 Featuring Shasta, Siskiyou, Tehama, Plumas, Lassen, Trinity, Modoc, Butte, and more....

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NATIONAL & STATE PARKS INFORMATION Informational Numbers: Road Conditions (800) 427-7623 • Weather Recording (961) 971-3051 NATIONAL FORESTS Siskiyou National Forest 333 West 8th St. Medford OR 97501 (541) 858-2200, TTY (866) 296-3823 www.fs.fed.us/r6/rogue-siskiyou The Siskiyou National Forest is located in the Klamath Mountains and the Coastal Ranges of Southwestern Oregon with a small segment of the Forest extending into Northwestern California and the Siskiyou Mountain Range. The Siskiyou is the most florally diverse National Forest in the country. The old and complex geology, the global position and transverse orientation of the Siskiyou Mountain Range across the Forest region are responsible for creating this myriad of species. Recreation includes camping, hiking, mountain biking, horseback riding, hunting, river rafting, winter sports and wildlife viewing.

Klamath National Forest

1312 Fairlane Road Yreka, CA 96097-9549 (530) 842-6131 • www.fs.fed.us/r5/klamath The Klamath National Forest covers an area of 1,700,000 acres and is located in Siskiyou County, California, and Jackson County, Oregon. The forest comprises some five-wilderness areas: Marble Mountain, Russian, Trinity Alps, Red Buttes and Siskiyou wilderness areas. This beautiful Forest is a haven for campers, hikers, wildlife watchers, hunters, fishermen, mountains bikers, white water enthusiasts and naturalists. Trailheads are numerous, and hike range from easy to very challenging.

Modoc National Forest

800 West 12th Street Alturas, CA 96101 (530) 233-5811, TTY: (530) 233-8708 www.fs.fed.us/r5/modoc Nestled in the extreme northeastern corner of California, the Modoc National Forest is famed for its mountains, pine forests and meadows, lakes, streams, rugged canyons, wetlands, lava beds and high desert plateaus. The forest is named for the Indian tribe, the Modoc, who fought at the lava beds from 1872-1873. Lava Beds National Monument is located within the boundaries of the forest.

Lassen National Forest

2550 Riverside Drive Susanville, CA 96130 (530) 257-2151, TTY: (530) 252-6624 www.fs.fed.us/r5/lassen The Lassen National Forest lies at the heart of one of the most fascinating areas of California, called the Crossroads. Here the granite of the Sierra Nevada, the lava of the Cascades and the Modoc Plateau, and the sagebrush of the Great Basin meet and blend.

Plumas National Forest

159 Lawrence Street Quincy, CA 95971 (530) 283-2050, www.fs.fed.us/r5/plumas The Plumas National Forest’s diverse 1.2 million acres between the rugged Sierra Nevada and the fringes of the Cascade Range provides a magnificent backdrop for a variety of recreational activities. Recreational areas offer outstanding exploration opportunities including camping and hiking, as well as aesthetic attractions. Of particular interest is the Butterfly Valley Botanical Area, a 500-acre area is set aside to protect and study special botanical resources including the California Pitcher Plant (Darlingtonia California). Four other insectivorous plants are also studied here.

Six Rivers National Forest

1330 Bayshore Way Eureka, CA 95501 (707) 442-1721, www.fs.fed.us/r5/sixrivers This forest lies east of Redwood State and National Parks in northwestern California, and stretches southward from the Oregon border for about 140 miles. It encompasses 957,590 National Forest acres and 133,410 acres of other ownership.

Shasta-Trinity National Forest

USDA Service Center 3644 Avtech Parkway Redding, CA 96002 (530) 226-2500 www.fs.fed.us/r5/shastatrinity

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With a diverse landscape ranging from 1,000 to 14,162 feet, the 2.1 million acre forest encompasses five wildernesses (including Mt. Shasta Wilderness), hundreds of mountain lakes (including Trinity, Shasta & Whiskeytown Lakes) rivers and streams. The forest is a haven for outdoor enthusiasts providing recreational opportunities for hunting, fishing, hiking, biking, camping, mountain climbing, skiing and scenic driving.

NATIONAL PARKS Whiskeytown National Recreation Area P.O. Box 188 14412 Kennedy Memorial Dr. Whiskeytown, CA 96095 Headquarters (530) 242-3400 Visitor Info (530) 246-1225, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. daily www.nps.gov/whis Of the three parts of the Whiskeytown/Shasta/Trinity National Recreation Area, the Whiskeytown Unit is the only unit administered by the National Park Service and offers many summer activities such as hiking and boating, as well as historical remains of the California Gold Rush of 1849. Whiskeytown Lake is excellent for swimming, scuba diving, water skiing, boating and fishing. Picnicking, hiking, hunting, interpretive programs and horseback riding are also popular. The other two units (Shasta and Trinity) offer additional activities and are administered by the Forest Service, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture. In addition, the land area surrounding the lake provides areas for hiking, horseback riding and mountain biking. The Historic District dates back to the California Gold Rush era and before. Opportunities include gold panning, interpretive signs and the Camden House built in the 1850s. The park is open year round, and the Visitor Center is open daily 9 a.m.-6 p.m. in the summer; and 10 a.m.4 p.m. in the winter (closed Thanksgiving, Christmas and New Year’s). Park Headquarters is open daily from 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m. From I-5, take Hwy. 299 W toward Eureka for approximately 8 miles to reach the Visitor Center.

Lava Beds National Monument

1 Indian Well Headquarters Tulelake, CA 96134, Headquarters (530) 667-8100 Visitor Info (530) 667-8113, www.nps.gov/labe Volcanic eruptions on the Medicine Lake shield volcano created an incredibly rugged landscape punctuated by cinder cones, lava flows, spatter cones, lava tube caves and pit craters. During the Modoc War of 1872-1873, the Modoc Indians took refuge in these tortuous lava flows and held off US Army forces ten times their strength for five months. Caving and wildlife viewing, particularly bird watching in the spring and fall, are popular activities. Walks, evening slide programs and cave tours are offered daily during the summer. Tours of special resource areas are available in winter months by reservation only. From the I-5 corridor, take Hwy. 97 north at Weed to Hwy. 161. Travel east to Hill Road, turning south/ right, following monument signs. From Hwy. 299 from the Redding or Lassen National Volcanic Park areas travel north at Bieber on Hackamore/Lookout Road to Hwy. 139 travel north on Hwy. 139 and follow signs. The visitor center is open year-round, 8 a.m.-5 p.m. during winter, and 8 a.m.-6 p.m. during summer (closed Christmas Day).

Lassen Volcanic National Park

PO Box 100, Mineral, CA 96063, (530) 595-4444 TTY (530) 595-3480, www.nps.gov/lavo Lassen Volcanic became a national park in 1916 because of its significance as an active volcanic landscape. In 1914, Lassen Peak awoke and was active through 1921. All four types of volcanoes in the world are found in the park. Over 150 mi. of trails and a scenic highway provide access to volcanic wonders including Bumpass Hell and Mt. Lassen itself, in addition to steam vents, mud pots, boiling pools, volcanic peaks and painted dunes. Lassen Volcanic National Park lies at the crossroads

Shasta 2013 Edition

of three great biological provinces‚ the Cascades range to the north, the Sierra Nevada Mountains to the south and the Great Basin desert to the east. Over 700 flowering plant species grace the park, providing shelter and food for a host of wildlife. Interpretation and Education programs are offered late June through late August. Snowshoe programs are offered to the public mid January to early spring. Park roads usually open early summer, but have been covered by snow as late as August. High-elevation trails usually are not clear until July. The park is open year-round and is located 50 miles east of Red Bluff on Hwy. 36, or 50 miles east of Redding on Hwy. 44.

STATE PARKS Camping Reservations: (800) 444-PARK (7275) (916) 638-5883 • TDD: (800) 274-7275 www.reserveamerica.com, www.parks.ca.gov

SHASTA COUNTY

Ahjumawi Lava Springs State Park is a place of exceptional beauty. Two-thirds of the park’s 6,000 acres are covered by lava flows including vast areas of jagged black basalt. The park is a wilderness area and can only be reached by boat; no public roads provide access the area, and private motor vehicles are prohibited within. It is located north of McArthur off Hwy. 299. For more information, call (530) 335-2777. www.parks.ca.gov/?page_id=464 Castle Crags State Park offers swimming and fishing in the Sacramento River, back country hiking and views of Mount Shasta. There are 76 developed campsites and six environmental campsites. The park is named for 6,000-feet tall glacier-polished crags and is located six miles south of Dunsmuir on I-5. For more information, call (530) 235-2684. www.parks.ca.gov/?page_id=454 McArthur-Burney Falls Memorial State Park centerpiece is the 129-foot Burney Falls, created by volcanic activity and erosion from weather and streams. Burney Creek originates from the park’s underground springs and flows to Lake Britton, getting larger along the way to the majestic falls. NE of Redding, six mi. N of Hwy. 299 on Hwy. 89 near Burney. On the Sunday of Columbus Day weekend, the park hosts Heritage Day, with demonstrations and recreations of 19th century activities and crafts. For more information, call (530) 335-2777. www.parks.ca.gov/?page_id=455 Shasta State Historic Park consists of the half-ruined remains of gold-rush-era Shasta City. The County Courthouse is restored to its 1861 appearance with historical exhibits and historic California artwork. The park is six miles west of Redding on Hwy. 299. For more information, call (530) 243-8194. www.parks.ca.gov/?page_id=456 Weaverville Joss House State Historic Park The Temple of the Forest Beneath the Clouds is the oldest continuously used Chinese temple in California. On display are art objects, pictures, mining tools and weaponry. The park is located in the heart of Weaverville on Hwy. 299 about 50 miles west of Redding. For more information, call (530) 623-5284. www.parks.ca.gov/?page_id=457

TEHAMA COUNTY

William B. Ide Adobe State Historic Park was named after the president of the short-lived California Bear Republic, which lasted 22 days. It features an old adobe home, blacksmith shop and visitor center. The park is south of Redding, two miles north east of Red Bluff on Adobe Road. For more information, call (530) 529-8599. www.parks.ca.gov/?page_id=458 Woodson Bridge State Recreation Area has a boat ramp and sandy beach on the Sacramento River. The recreation area is nestled along the Sacramento River between Chico and Red Bluff, on South Ave. just three

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miles west of Hwy. 99 at Vina, or six miles east of I-5 at Corning. For more information, call (530) 839-2112. www.parks.ca.gov/?page_id=459

BUTTE COUNTY

Bidwell Mansion State Historic Park is home to a beautiful, three story Victorian House Museum and memorial to the Bidwell’s, important social and political pioneers. 525 The Esplanade; Visitor Center open Wed.-Fri. 12-5, Sat. & Sun. 10-5; tours on the hour, last tour at 4 p.m. For more information, call (530) 895-6144. www.parks.ca.gov/?page_id=460 Bidwell-Sacramento River State Park - Enjoy bank or boat fishing for salmon, steelhead and shad, or cruising down the river‚ on inner tubes, canoes or kayaks. Includes several day use areas and a boat launch. From I-5 take Hwy. 32 exit at Orland. The Irvine Finch River Access is just east of Hamilton City. To access the rest of the park proceed east on Hwy. 32, and turn right on River Road. For more information, call (530) 342-5185. www.parks.ca.gov/?page_id=463 Clay Pit State Vehicular Recreation Area is a motorcycle, off-highway vehicle (OHV) use area and rifle range. From Hwy. 70 go west on Oroville Dam Boulevard (Hwy. 162); proceed two miles south on Larkin Road, to the entrance. For more information, call (530) 538-2200. www.parks.ca.gov/?page_id=409 Lake Oroville State Recreation Area covers about 28,450 acres near Oroville, and offers picnicking, horseback riding, hiking, sailing and power boating, water-skiing, fishing, swimming, boat-in camping, floating campsites and horse camping. This manmade lake was formed by the tallest earth-filled dam in the country, rising 770 feet above the streambed of the Feather River. The area also includes the Feather River Fish Hatchery and the Lake Oroville Visitor Center with a museum, exhibits, gift shop and more. From Hwy. 70 go east on Hwy. 162 (Oroville Dam Blvd.) turn right at Olive Hwy. (Hwy. 162), proceed approximately six miles on Olive Hwy. to Kelly Ridge Road and turn left, the road ends in Visitor Center’s parking lot. For more information, call (530) 5382200. www.parks.ca.gov/?page_id=462

PLUMAS COUNTY

Plumas-Eureka State Park - The focal point is the museum building. Originally constructed as a gold miner’s bunkhouse, it now serves as a visitor center and displays the natural, cultural and goldrush history of the park. Across the street from the museum are stamp mills, a stable, a mine office and a blacksmith shop. During the summer docents and park staff conduct blacksmithing demonstrations and tours of the buildings. Visitors can also enjoy fishing in Madora and Eureka lakes, cross-country skiing, nature study and hiking within the 5,500 acres of the park. The park is located 5 miles west of Blairsden, on County Road A-14. For more information, call (530) 836-2380. www.parks.ca.gov/?page_id=507

BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT Redding BLM Field Office

355 Hemsted Drive, Redding, CA, (530) 224-2100 www.blm.gov/ca/st/en/fo/redding.html

Alturas BLM Field Office

708 W 12th St., Alturas, CA, (530) 233-4666 www.blm.gov/ca/st/en/fo/alturas.html

Surprise Field Office

602 Cressler St., Cedarville, CA, (503) 279-6101 www.blm.gov/ca/st/en/fo/surprise.html

Eagle Lake Field Office

2950 Riverside Drive, Susanville, CA (530) 257-4831 www.blm.gov/ca/st/en/fo/eaglelake.html


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101 Things To Do Shasta 2013  

Your Activtity and Exploration Guide for the Shasta-Cascade Region

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