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s elected work s of

HUMBI SONG Har vard GSD M . Arch I

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HUMBI SONG academic

2015 - 2019

Har vard Graduate School of Design, M. Arch I

skills

Writing Research Rhino AutoCAD Photoshop Indesign Illustrator Woodworking Lasercut 3D Print CNC

references

Jeffr y Burchard

Har vard College, B. A . 2009 - 2013 Social Studies, History of Art & Architecture

Thesis: ‘From Social to Architectural: Designing Park Hill, a Council Housing Estate in Postwar England’

work experience

Michael Van Valkenburgh Associates (MV VA)

2014 - 2015

Davis Square Architects

2013 - 2014

Studio Assistant

Designer Level 1

Har vard Winthrop House Librar y

Head Librarian

2011 - 2013

American Civil Liber ties Union of MA Summer Intern

leadership

Radcliffe Union of Students President

City of Cambridge Council for Children, Youth, and Families

2010

Principal at Machado Silvetti and Faculty at GSD

Elizabeth Silver Senior Associate at Michael Van Valkenburgh Associates

2009 - 2012

2008 - 2011

Voting Member, Representative

music

Debuted with Seoul Philharmonic Orchestra at age 9 (Mozart piano concerto No. 21)

awards

Valedictorian (High School), City of Cambridge Dedication to Community Service Award, Harvard-Cambridge UK Summer Fellowship

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table of contents 0 . M a n i fe s to 0 6 1 . Pl a ne t a r iu m Clubhou se 0 8 2 . H idden R oom 16 3 . A rch ite c t u r a l i z i ng Hy p erbol ic Pa r aboloid s

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4 . Con s t r uc t ion Sy s tem s 2 4 5 . Di ag r a m m i ng Movement 2 6 6 . H ip -Hugg i ng B ench 3 2 7. The si s E xcer pt 3 4

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Roger Mayne, Children around a Lorry, from series: ‘Southam Street’, 1958

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MANIFESTO During the course of my undergraduate thesis research, I stumbled upon an incredible photograph of a street scene from a workingclass neighborhood in Britain. Titled Children around a Lorry, it was taken in 1958 by the British photographer Roger Mayne. In the photo, an oil truck parked on the side of the street is overwhelmed by twenty-three children who climb and crawl over its cab. A string of children explore the space between the cab and the oil tank, taking advantage of the many possible footholds that this nook provides. A boy stands on the lip protruding over the truck’s left tire, enjoying the new view of the street from his raised position. Just to his right, two children hang on tight to the outstretched arms of another child who has managed to make it up to the roof of the truck. All this happens to the befuddlement of the driver who sits inside, isolated aurally and visually from the hullabaloo surrounding him. I love this photograph because it captures an amazing moment of a socially vibrant usage of the street. The children playfully subvert expectations about how one is to interact with a truck. They maximize its spatial possibilities rather than obeying its prescribed function as a mode of transportation. They encounter the truck as a ‘found object’, not as a signifier of status or mobility, but rather as an oddity intruding upon the space of the street. For the children, the street is more than just the domain of traffic circulation. It is a space where they and their peers help each other explore the surfaces, contours, and nooks of the objects they encounter. The children repurpose these features as spaces where they can reinforce their social bonds—nurtured by their shared urge for exploration. I am interested in designing architecture that inspires this urge for interaction and play. I want to analyze how physical forms can bring about interactions between people and their built environment that subvert a functional conception of how a space should be used. Of course, the prescribed functions of a space are essential organizing principles that provide a basic scheme for the architect. However, the driving strategy of a design should emerge from a comprehensive understanding of the social needs of its users. The architect must design with the awareness that a person is not merely a productive agent. In order to thrive, people must interact, wonder, contemplate, and discover together. Therefore, my project as an architect is to research people’s interactions with the spaces around them and design structures that encourage forging social relationships through users’ explorations of their surroundings. I hope that one day, I may be able to emulate the power that the truck sustained over the throng of children – that one sunny day in Britain in 1958.

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Filmmakers’ Clubhouse Critic: Jeffr y Burchard GSD Core II, 2016

This clubhouse transpor ts visitors to alternate dimensions using a range of cavernous spaces. A cubic grid provides the frame from which one can draw lines or bezier cur ves in plan and section. These are then extruded or lofted to create walls. Occasionally, they also touch and clip each other to create openings, connecting auxillary program to primary programs (e.g. small dining rooms to large dining halls.)

SINGLE CUBIC BAY

JOINED

CURVES CLIPPED TO CREATE OPENINGS

SURFACES CLIPPED

Overlay of all walls in the building:

Lines and bezier curves hang on to the cubic grid space-frame. 8


Diagrammatic Structural Model:

The 4th and 8th floors (filled with columns) function as ‘tables’ in the sky. The three rigid cores (two elevator shafts and one stair core) provide the ‘legs’ stabilizing the building. Extruded walls, shown as orange lines, assist in transferring load.

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Fragment model showing the first to fourth floors:

Oculus: View at the base of the projection bowl into the large dining hall

Curvature of the lobby sweeps the visitor up the stairs and into the dining hall

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3RD FLOOR

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5TH FLOOR


ELEVATOR CORE

STAIR CORE

WORK + PLAY BAR & CLUB

MAKING + WATCHING

BLACK BOX

LARGE MAIN THEATRE RECEPTION

SCREENINGS PROJECTION BOWL

EXHIBITS

STUDY + STAY LIBRARY

FOOD + STAY GUEST RMS LOUNGE

LARGE DINING HALL

SM. DINING RM

ENTRY & ADMIN INFO

LOBBY

KITCHEN

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Hejduk-ian / Playfulness 14


Spaces of Curvature /

A rendition of how colors might be projected upon the curved surfaces for a special event 15


Hidden Room Critic: Cristina Parreno-Alonso GSD Core I, 2015

This project involves designing f ive rooms, one of which seems to be hidden from the other four. To achieve this, I explored the proper ties of a double helix, and designed the path of circulation so that a guest might experience 4 rooms on the way up, and then discover a 5 th hidden room on the way back down.

5 SPACES FROM 2 FLOORS? ROOM 5 ROOM 4 ROOM 3 ROOM 2

1ST REVOLUTION

ROOM 1

DIFFERENT

5 SPACES FROM 2 FLOORS?

SECTION 1

SECTION 2

The diagrams to the right explain how this is done. FREQUENCIES

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2ND REVOLUTION

Study Model:

With two helixes operating at different frequencies, where / how often do the two coincide?


ENTER: On the way up the interior circulation, there are 4 rooms experienced by the visitor.

EXIT: Visitors can exit from last room using an exterior ramp, which has 5 doors the four rooms and a hidden room.

EXIT ROOM 1

ROOM 1

ROOM 2

ROOM 3

ROOM 2

ROOM 3

ROOM 4

LOBBY

Level 1a

Level 1b

Level 2a HIDDEN ROOM

ENTER

1ST revolution

Level 2b

2ND revolution

THIS IS POSSIBLE BECAUSE 1. the exterior ramp is much greater circumference than the interior circulation 2. the exterior ramp makes three revolutions, whereas the interior makes two. The frequencies of the two helixes do not match up.

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A Hint:

Because the interior par titions are not floor to ceiling, it is possible to look across just before entering the 4th room, and realize that a secret room exists below. 19


Architecturalization of Two Hyperbolic Paraboloids Critic: Cameron Wu Par tners: Suthata Jiranuntarat, Florence Lam GSD Projective Drawing, 2015

This is a geometric proposal of how two hyperbolic paraboloid (hypar) sur faces, devoid of a sense of enclosure, can collide, subdivide, and combine to imply architectural space.

Hyperbolic Surface

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Doubled Surface Reduced Height

Folded Plate Method (top) & Truncated Pyramid Method (bottom)

Mirrored Truncated Pyramid


Holes Created Aligned with Folded Plates

Edge Pyramid Surface Removed Neighboring Surface Added

Corner Condition Emphasized

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Inversion of negative space

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Pyramids truncated by folded plates

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Construction Systems Critic: Billie Faircloth Par tners: Cara Rober ts, Peiying Ban, Karen Stoltzenberg, Chantine Akiyama GSD Construction Systems, 2016

Exploded analysis of Honan-Allston Library’s construction systems, and a physical one-to-one scale 2’x3’ wall mock-up highlighting the assembly system

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OVERHANG + SLATE SILL W/ WOOD COLUMNS

SLATE SHINGLES ON EXT. SHEATHING / PLYWOOD BACKING


WINDOWS WITH WOOD FRAME

LIGHT-GAUGE STEEL STUD WALL SYSTEM

OPEN WEB STEEL JOIST SYSTEM

STEEL GIRDER, BEAM, AND COLUMN SUPERSYSTEM

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Diagramming Human Movement Columbia GSAPP New York/Paris - Introductor y Architecture Program, 2014

A. How to Tie a Windsor Knot 26


A smoker watches an agitated man on a phone

Two men exchange cigarettes and shake hands

A couple poses for photos with a store display

B. Movement of Feet Along a Section of a Street 27


C. Three People Bypassing within a Two-Foot Width 28


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D. Scaffolding Structure in Perspective 30


TIE DISPLAY ROOM

Public; strips of display areas at torso heights; ceiling angles up to let in diagonal rays of light

TIE DRESSING ROOM Private but not completely hidden; scaled to be intimate to the body

E. Human Movement as Infill to Structure 31


Hip-Hugging Bench Critic: Nathan Car ter Columbia GSAPP, 2014

Material: 12 ft of 2� x 10� maple, Danish oil finish Tools: Thickness planer, table saw, band saw, chop saw, orbital sander, CNC machine Constraints: No metal fasteners, only wood joinery reinforced by wood glue Form of a single-seat stool is extended to become a two seat bench. This allows customization during production as a stool, two-seat bench, three-seat bench, etc.

After thickness planar

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During CNC milling

Before cutting joinery


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Undergraduate Thesis Excerpt from Thesis for Har vard College, Social Studies Depar tment Advisor: Timothy Hyde (formerly GSD, currently MIT SA+P)

My interest in social theory and architectural theory led me to a thesis topic that makes use of both my sociological training and architectural interests. Under the guidance of Prof. Timothy Hyde at GSD, I wrote my 143-page thesis on the interweaving of 1950s’ British sociological and architectural thought in the design of a Brutalist public housing estate called Park Hill, at Sheffield, UK. The following is an excerpt from first chapter. I discuss the sociological research undertaken by Michael Young and Peter Willmott regarding the lower class ‘slums’ of London, later published in their canonical book Family and Kinship in East London, 1957. In subsequent chapters, I explore the flow of ideas between these sociologists, the photographers Roger Mayne and Nigel Henderson, and the architects Alison and Peter Smithson.

Alison and Peter Smithson’s “Urban Re-identification Grid”, a panel presentation prepared for CIAM 9 Conference in 1953 (Right) Photographs by Roger Mayne and Nigel Henderson

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Excer pt from thesis chapter, “The Dynamic Streets” The home is made accessible to the extended family, but at the same time, it maintains a strict separation from public spaces. Although family members and relatives freely make themselves at home at “Mum’s”, and to a lesser degree at other family members’ homes, neighbors and friends are rarely invited in. Michael Young and Peter Willmott use the words of an informant, Mr. Jeffreys, to describe the common attitude: I’ve got plenty of friends around here. I’ve always got on well with people, but I don’t invite anyone here. I’ve got friends at work and friends at sports and friends I have a drink with. I know all the people around here, and I’m not invited into any one else’s home either. It doesn’t seem right somehow. Your home’s your own. For residents at Bethnal Green, friendship networks are formed and enjoyed at work, at sports games, and at the pub. But the home is realm of the family, distinct from the realm of friends. According to Young and Willmott, this is a result of the dense spatial configuration of the people and the streets around them. Because living situations are already so packed, “where every front door opens on to street or staircase, and houses are crowded on top of one another, such an attitude helps to preserve some privacy against the press of the people.” A closed door helps maintain a sense of privacy, understood to mean the exclusion of the hectic quality of the public sphere and those who are not family members. On the other hand, the busy streets are not necessarily understood as undesirable or overly frenetic places as this observation might imply. Just as a closed door is a simple way to

preserve privacy, an opened door is an easy way to mingle the private and the public when the inhabitants desire it. Those who are not family members might still be excluded from passing the door’s threshold, but the doorstep (a small set of steps in front of the door, which is common amongst these houses) constituted a space where friends and neighbors could converse privately, in between the completely private sphere of the home and the completely public sphere of the street. As Mr. Lamb, an informant, recounts to the sociologists, “I suppose people who come here from outside think it’s an awful place, but us established ones like it. Here you can just open the door and say hello to everybody.” Whereas the home is the center of family life, the street is the site of social relations, and the doorstep is the intermediary between the two. When desired, a resident merely has to stand at the door to find a lively street of friends and neighbors passing by. The street may be defined in opposition to the private realm of the home, but it is also defined in relation to one’s sense of belonging and identification. The book Family and Kinship in East London observes that the working-class residents call the straight length of the street on which one resides as one’s “turnings” whereas the adjoining streets are called “back-doubles.” The street is thus delineated both physically—the extent of its straight length—and socially—the extent of one’s neighborhood unit. A back-double is within one’s socially acceptable boundary (which would be the borough of Bethnal Green), but beyond an invisible threshold of immediate accessibility and identification. The spatial elements are therefore socially informed; at the same time, social boundaries are spatially informed. 35


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contact: Humbi Song humbi.song@gmail.com 857-928-1222

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Humbi Song GSD Portfolio 2016  

Projects from the first year of GSD M.Arch I program

Humbi Song GSD Portfolio 2016  

Projects from the first year of GSD M.Arch I program

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