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Faculty of Humanities

Programme book 2019

Linguistics

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Table of Contents 1. WELCOME/INTRODUCTION

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2. INTRODUCTION TO THE PROGRAMME

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3. WHO IS WHO?

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3.1. Programme Coordinator .......................................................................................................4 3.2. Core staff ...........................................................................................................................4 3.3 Study advisor .....................................................................................................................5 3.4. Curriculum Committee .........................................................................................................6 3.5. Board of Examiners .............................................................................................................6 3.6. Partner organisation(s) ........................................................................................................6 3.7. Career services ...................................................................................................................7 3.8. International Office .............................................................................................................8 3.9. Student Information Desk ....................................................................................................8 3.10. Student Services ...............................................................................................................8 3.11. Student psychologist .........................................................................................................8

4. IMPORTANT DATES AND DEADLINES

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4.1. Academic calendar ............................................................................................................ 10 4.2. Registration deadlines ....................................................................................................... 10 4.3. Graduation ceremony ........................................................................................................ 10

5. PROGRAMME INFORMATION 5.1. 5.2. 5.3. 5.4. 5.5. 5.6. 5.7.

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Programme outline ............................................................................................................ 11 Courses ........................................................................................................................... 13 Career orientation ............................................................................................................. 19 Internship ........................................................................................................................ 21 Thesis .............................................................................................................................. 21 Policies en Procedures ....................................................................................................... 22 General information new Research Master students……………................................................... 24

6. PRACTICAL INFORMATION

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6.1. Study delay ...................................................................................................................... 26 6.2. Workshops ....................................................................................................................... 26 6.3. Graduation ....................................................................................................................... 26 6.4. Solis-id ............................................................................................................................ 27 6.5. Osiris ............................................................................................................................... 28 6.6. UU Gmail ......................................................................................................................... 28 6.7. Blackboard ....................................................................................................................... 28 6.8. MyUU app and MyTimetable ............................................................................................... 28 6.8. WiFi ................................................................................................................................ 29 6.9. Library ............................................................................................................................. 29 6.10. Course evaluations .......................................................................................................... 30 6.11. Locations........................................................................................................................ 30

7. GETTING AROUND

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7.1. Utrecht ............................................................................................................................ 31 7.2. Housing ........................................................................................................................... 31

8. LINKS

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1. Welcome/Introduction Utrecht is the place to be for linguistics: in 2019 the highly regarded Keuzegids Master’s Selection Guide ranked the RMA programme linguistics as the best in its field in the Netherlands and in the last edition of Elsevier Best Studies Survey, students have also rated our programme as the best in the field. We extend a warm welcome to you - new members of the community, and we are happy that you have chosen to do your Master’s at Utrecht University! You have two years of linguistic discoveries ahead of you, and we hope you will enjoy every moment of it. We offer a broad programme that is well structured, yet offers you many choices to specialize in the subdiscipline of linguistics that you are interested in. You will get challenging classes taught by top researchers. You will be exposed to many new academic insights that are freely accessible through our university library. You will get the opportunity to develop your research profile in the thriving and well connected research environment of UiL OTS, the Utrecht Institute of Linguistics. You will practice many new skills in modern computer rooms and the extensive UiL OTS lab facilities. But most importantly, you will meet kindred spirits, junior and senior researchers from all over the world, who share with you a love for language and languages.

Marijana Marelj RMA Linguistics Programme coordinator

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2. Introduction to the programme The very fact that we have and use languages is part of what makes us human. Many languages are spoken in the world. In the Research Master Linguistics, you get to reflect on the structure of languages and what drives language variation and change. Communication is a crucial ingredient of success in modern society. You will find out how children acquire their mother tongue, what is special about learning more languages, and the role language plays in communication. You will get to know more about the way language is processed in the brain, and what constitutes possible sources of language impairment. The key focus of the Research Master’s programme in Linguistics is on the cognitive faculties underlying human language, and their interaction. The programme offers a training in theory driven empirical research with a broad focus on (1) theoretical linguistics (phonology, syntax, semantics), (2) psycholinguistics (language acquisition, language processing), (3) language use (discourse studies, phonetics, language variation, clinical linguistics). You will acquire a solid background in all three domains, and then choose a series of elective courses to develop your research profile. You will receive training in empirical, computational, and experimental methodology. Under the supervision of senior researchers of the Utrecht Institute of Linguistics, you will practice designing, planning, and carrying out an original research project during your internship and thesis work. During the Research Master you acquire a broad understanding of the field of linguistics, and develop indepth knowledge of a particular linguistics subdiscipline. You learn to apply your knowledge to new topics and to reflect critically on existing knowledge and current research. You acquire the academic, communication and methodological skills that prepare you for carrying out your own research. The Utrecht Research Master in Linguistics offers a solid foundation in the main areas of linguistics, combined with a wide range of elective courses that lead to specialisation in a subdiscipline of theoretical linguistics, psycholinguistics or language use. Our programme is unique in its combination of a broad theoretical orientation with solid computational and experimental methodological training. The Master is well embedded in the international research community of the Utrecht Institute of Linguistics (UiL OTS). This creates many possibilities for internships in leading research projects and individual supervision by top researchers. UiL OTS has excellent lab facilities that students can use. We work closely with other linguistic institutes in the Netherlands in the Netherlands Graduate School of Linguistics (LOT), which widens your peer network through participation in LOT Summer and LOT Winter Schools. Choosing Utrecht University means choosing one of the best universities in the country. Several renowned international rankings place Utrecht University among the 100 best universities in the world. Utrecht University strongly supports an international teaching environment, and almost half of the Linguistics students come from outside the Netherlands. Through the UiL OTS international network, students can secure internships abroad if they wish to do so. The Research Master’s programme Linguistics prepares you for a broad range of jobs inside and outside academia that require academic skills, research methodology and advanced knowledge in the field of linguistics. Graduates of the programme are highly eligible to operate in the international field of linguistics research. About 50% of our graduates obtain PhD positions in the Netherlands or abroad. If you decide to embark on an industry career, you are fully equipped to apply for junior research, consultancy, junior data scientist, and teaching positions where specialised knowledge, research abilities, and insight into the structure of language and its use are relevant. For more information please visit www.uu.nl/masters/en/linguistics/career-prospects.

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3. Who is who? 3.1. Programme Coordinator Dr Marijana Marelj Trans 10 Room 2.14 3512 JK UTRECHT Phone number direct 030 253 4734 E-mail: M.Marelj@uu.nl Marijana Marelj is Assistant Professor in Linguistics and tutor of the Research Master. She takes part in the Research Group Language structure: variation and change. Besides the general coordination of the programme, she oversees admission, career orientation and alumni contacts. She is also the tutor of the 1st year students and internship coordinator. Her research interests include the architecture of grammar, syntactic theory, interfaces (grammar-internal and grammar-external ones), and linguistic correlates of psychological and psychopathological processes. Marijana Marelj teaches the course ‘Syntax and Cognition: Grammar-internal and External Interfaces’.

3.2. Core staff Prof Henriëtte de Swart Trans 10 Room 2.04b 3512 JK UTRECHT Phone number direct 030 253 6204 Phone number department 030 253 6006 E-mail: h.deswart@uu.nl Henriëtte de Swart is Professor of French linguistics and semantics. She is also affiliated to the artificial intelligence programme. Her research focuses on cross-linguistic semantics, especially in the area of nominals, tense and aspect, negation. In the Research Master, Henriëtte de Swart directs the Research Seminar and guides you through you participation at the LOT Winter School. Dr Iris Mulders Drift 15 Room 2.03 3512 JK UTRECHT Phone number direct 030 253 6239 E-mail: I.C.M.C.Mulders@uu.nl Iris Mulders is Assistant Professor in Linguistics. She is particularly interested in sentence processing, the syntax-semantics interface, eye tracking, and teaches experiment design and data analysis. As the manager of the UiL OTS lab she oversees students’ lab work during their internship and MA thesis. Iris Mulders teaches the course ‘Experimental design and data analysis’.

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3.3. Study advisor The Study Advisor can help you with questions about the more formal aspects of planning and putting together your degree programme and your study progress or lack thereof. Counselling and advice regarding: • exam requirements and complex curriculum planning • the graduation process • applications for exemptions • attending courses at other universities (in the Netherlands or abroad) • tuition, scholarships and grants or financial assistance • studying with a handicap or disability • ending your studies and termination of enrollment • problems studying (such as a lack of motivation, conflicts with lecturers or other UU employees, personal circumstances that could impede the progress of your studies) • study delay due to special personal circumstances (such as illness for example) If you think you are falling behind in your studies, please contact your Study Advisor as soon as possible. The Study Advisor for Linguistics is mrs. Eveline Eckelboom. Telephone Office Hour: Thursday 10.00-11.00 Walk-in Office Hour: Thursday 11.00-12.00 You can contact the Study Advisor without an appointment during her office hours. For general questions or urgent issues, feel free to make use of any of the office hours. +31 (0)30 253 6680 Muntstraat 2a, room 0.08/0.12 Make an Appointment Sometimes an issue may need more time than is available during the office hours. In that case, you may want to make an appointment (max. 30 minutes) via the Student Desk Humanities (see 3.10) or via the telephone office hours. Bring a printout of your Study Progress Review or Dossier from OSIRIS and a study plan to your appointment. Email e.eckelboom@uu.nl Personal contact is preferred to contact via email. The Study Advisor will generally answer you email within 4-5 working days. Do not forget to type your study programme and student number in the subject line!

3.4. Curriculum Committee Curriculum committees are representative bodies comprised of students and lecturers. They are responsible for advising on the Education and Examination Regulations and its annual evaluation, guarding the quality of education and addressing problems that might arise. If asked or of their own accord, they advise the Board of the study programme and the dean on all academic educational matters. The opinion of students plays a key role in the tasks of the curriculum committees. Through evaluations of the several programmes and course evaluations, curriculum committees review academic education and teaching. Half of the committee is comprised of students, who serve for a year. Please do not hesitate to contact them if you have an issue that you think needs to be addressed! Staff Members: Prof. Dr. S. (Sergey) Avrutin (chair); Dr. A. (Aoju) Chen; Dr. I.C.M.C. (Iris) Mulders. At the time of writing, the student members for the current academic year have not yet been appointed, but you can find them on our website. The curriculum committee can be reached via its chair, Prof Dr Sergey Avrutin.

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Sergey Avrutin Trans 10 Kamer 2.19 3512 JK UTRECHT Phone number direct 030 253 6189 Phone number department 030 253 8132 E-mail: S.Avrutin@uu.nl

Sergey Avrutin is Professor of Comparative Pycholinguistics. His research focuses on normal child language development and language impairment (aphasia) with special emphasis on the syntaxdiscourse interface and the application of information theory to the analyses of errors. He is the chair of the Research Master’s Curriculum Committee. Sergey Avrutin teaches the courses ‘Foundations of Language, Brain & Cognition’ and ‘Psycholinguistics: Information & Emotion’.

3.5. Board of Examiners The Board of Examiners is responsible for ensuring the quality of interim and final examinations and objectively determining whether a student has passed the final exam. The Board draws up regulations and guidelines for assessing the results of interim and final examinations. In addition, the Board gives out diploma’s, deals with possible cases of fraud or plagiarism, and evaluates requests for delaying graduation, exemption or approval of non-standard units. The Board follows the regulations laid down in the faculty's rules and guidelines (pdf). Henriette de Swart represents Linguistics and the Department of Languages, Literature and Communication in the Board of Examiners.

3.6. Partner organisation(s) Utrecht Institute of Linguistics (UiL OTS) UiL is the abbreviation of Utrecht Institute of Linguistics, and OTS says the same in Dutch (Onderzoeksinstituut voor Taal en Spraak). UiL OTS is the research institute in the Faculty of Humanities and the Department of Languages, Literature and Communication that focuses on language and linguistics research. UiL OTS aims at developing scientific expertise in the cognitive systems underlying language, its acquisition and processing, and its use in communicative contexts. Research at UiL OTS is organized into six thematic research groups: (1) Language structure: variation and change: combining formal, sociolinguistic, and historical perspectives, this group studies variation across languages and dialects and language change over time. (2) Language, logic, and information studies the use of language for conveying information. Key themes are the structure of lexical meanings, semantics and pragmatics, and logical and computational approaches to language. (3) Linguistic theory and language acquisition investigates the acquisition of languages in relation to their formal and functional structure. (4) Language and speech: processing and disorders studies the cognitive mechanisms underlying speech and language perception and production, and their developmental foundations. (5) Language and Education focuses on language development and language use in educational contexts, with a special focus on foreign languages and literacy skills. (6) Language and Communication studies how people use language in specific discourse contexts, to share information with others, and to persuade or affect them. Special attention is given to medium and genre, and the social context of language use. The RMA programme Linguistics is firmly embedded in the large and diverse research community of UiL OTS. The teachers of the mandatory and elective courses are all affiliated with UiL OTS. You get to participate in the UiL OTS colloquium, and you are free to go to talks, join meetings of research groups, participate in lab meetings and generally be part of all the activities of the research institute as a junior member. The best senior researchers of UiL OTS are available for the supervision of your internship and thesis. Many of them have ongoing research projects that you can join as a rich embedding of your own research. You have access to the extended experimental UiL OTS lab facilities at Janskerkhof, and you

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benefit from support by the lab management team. UiL OTS is well connected to other linguistics institutes in the Netherlands through the Netherlands national Graduate school of Linguistics (LOT), see below. UiL OTS researchers also maintain extensive international networks that you can benefit from if you want to carry out part of your research abroad. Landelijke Onderzoeksschool Taalwetenschap (LOT) LOT is the acronym of 'Landelijke Onderzoekschool Taalwetenschap', the Netherlands National Graduate School of Linguistics. LOT unites about 400 faculty members and 150 PhD students and provides a meeting point to further national and international communication for the benefit of linguistic research and education. Researchers from the participating institutes share knowledge, work together on theoretical and methodological matters, discuss data and the outcome of their research in seminars, lecture series and in collaborations of various other kinds. LOT typically organizes the training of graduate students in linguistics. Each year, a LOT Winter School is held in January and a LOT Summer School takes place in June/July. Furthermore, all LOT graduate students can publish their dissertation in the LOT dissertation series. The research by the LOT institutes covers all major areas of linguistics, and exploits a wide range of methodological tools and theoretical frameworks. Recent evaluations of participating institutes are outstanding, and corroborate the excellent quality of linguistic research in the Netherlands.

3.7. Career Services During your programme there will be a focus on career orientation. The programme and the department work together with study associations and Career Services to make career orientation an integrated part of your programme. See also 5.3 for more information and keep an eye out for announcements of career orientation events during the year. The Faculty of Humanities has its own Career Officer: Sjoer Bergervoet. You can contact her for questions regarding your future, for practicing a job interview and to go over your resume. Appointments can be scheduled at the Student Information Desk. Sjoer Bergervoet Drift 10 Room 0.05 E-mail: s.a.bergervoet@uu.nl Appointments can be scheduled at the Student Information Desk

Career Services also offers help on the road to the job market through workshops and tests. Do the Career Check on www.uucareercheck.nl to see where you stand in the orientation process. The Department of Languages, Literature, and Communication has a coordinator for internships, alumni and labor market of the department who takes care of a huge network of alumni who work in interesting organizations. Together with her colleagues in the other departments and this alumni network, she organizes a series of evenings on Your Perspective: Career Opportunities for Humanities Graduates. We hope we can welcome you in our alumni network after graduation as well! If you wish to use our network to find an internship or gather information about your possibilities on the labor market, please contact her at Stagetlc@uu.nl.

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Karen Schoutsen Trans 10 Kamer 2.41 3512 JK UTRECHT Phone number 030 253 2475 E-mail: stagetlc@uu.nl website: https://www.uu.nl/medewerkers/KESchoutsen

3.8. International office If you are considering to go abroad during your master, you will find more information regarding exchange programmes, regulations and preparation at the International office. It is important to start the process of orientation at the start of your programme, as the application deadlines are early on and a lot of paperwork is needed to complete your application. You can find more information on studying abroad on: http://students.uu.nl/en/academics/study-abroad

3.9. Student Information Desk At the Student Desk GW you can address all kinds of study related issues, such as course enrolment, time schedules, registration of course results and graduation. You can also make appointments with the study advisor and Career Officer, have your diploma and study results authenticated and apply for exemption there. The Student desk can be reached by phone from Monday till Friday from 11.00-12.30 and 13.00-15.00 and the desk is open from Monday till Friday from 11.00-15.00. The Student desk is also available on whatsapp for simple questions from Monday to Friday from 9.0017.00 at the following number: 0641084538 (please note: this number is only available for whatsapp). Address Drift 10, 3512 BS Utrecht Phone number (030) 253 6285 E-mail address studiepunt.gw@uu.nl Always state your student number and course with correspondence.

3.10. Student Services You can contact Student Services for information and advice. This includes for example issues regarding admission, application and enrolment, tuition fees, financial assistance, having a paid job during your programme, insurance, schemes and facilities for outstanding student athletes, student housing, student organisations and information about studying with a disability or chronic illness. Address: Opening hours: E-mail: Phone number:

Bestuursgebouw, Heidelberglaan 6 (De Uithof) Monday to Friday 10.00 am-16.00 pm studentservices@uu.nl (mention your student number!) 030 253 7000 Monday to Friday 10.00-12.00 and 13.00-15.00

3.11. Student psychologist Utrecht University has two student psychologists. If you are a Dutch student, you can schedule an appointment yourself (www.students.uu.nl/afspraakmaken-met-een-studentenpsycholoog, information in Dutch). If you are an international student, please

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contact Student Services either by phone or by coming to the desk – not by e-mail - to schedule an introductory meeting. During the introductory meeting, the Student Psychologist will investigate your problem. This will involve focusing on your personal background. Sometimes this initial meeting will be sufficient to assist you with your problem, sometimes more meetings will be required. Either way, the student psychologists are happy to help.

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4. Important dates and deadlines 4.1. Academic calendar SEMESTER I start 1st period: Monday 2 September 2019 (week 36) start 2nd period: Monday 11 November 2019 (week 46) Christmas vacation: 23 December 2019 - 5 January 2020 (week 52 and week 1) SEMESTER II start 3d period: Monday 3 February 2020 (week 6) start 4th period: Monday 20 April 2020 (week 17) Non-teaching Days: 14-17 April and 22 May 2020 Reflection Week: 04-08 November 2019, 27-31 January and 06-09 April 2020 HOLIDAYS Christmas & Boxing Day: 25 and 26 December 2019 New Year’s Day: 01 January 2020 Good Friday: 10 April 2020 Easter: 12 and 13 April 2020

King’s Day: 27 April 2020 Liberation Day: 05 May 2020 Ascension Day: 21 May 2020 Whitsun: 31 May and 01 June 2020

4.2. Registration deadlines Utrecht University requires you to register for courses every semester, through Osiris. The deadline for registration for the courses in periods 3 and 4 will be 24 November 2019.

4.3. Graduation Ceremony The exact time and location of the graduation ceremony will be announced in a personal invitation which you receive by email. For more information about graduation, please check our website: https://students.uu.nl/en/hum/linguistics/practical-information/graduation/automatic-graduation

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5. Programme information 5.1. Programme outline In blocks 1 and 2 of year 1, the RMA programme offers 6 obligatory courses (italics in the schematic overview below = obligatory). They cover the fundamentals of the field, and create a common body of knowledge for all RMA students to build on for the electives from block 3 onwards. The Foundations of Semantics course takes place in the first half of block 2 and the second half of block 3 in order to allow students to participate in the LOT winter school (in January). There will be a special set of methodology courses (marked RM1 courses) available for first-year RMA students to choose from in the LOT winter school. These courses require special preparation before the school, and imply homework assignments to complete the course. For more details on the programme of the LOT winter school and the RM1 course requirements, consult the LOT website. In the blocks 3 and 4 of year 1, students can choose 2 electives (out of 7 in total: 4 in block 3 and 3 in block 4), in order to develop a more specialised research profile. All RMA students participate in the obligatory Research Seminar (part I) in block 4, UiL OTS organized EMLAR (Experimental Methods in Language Acquisition Research in April), and the LOT Summer School (in June or July). The LOT schools aim at a mixture of advanced RMA students, and PhD students, and offer 18 intensive one-week courses over a two-week period in all areas of linguistics. These courses are taught by Dutch and international experts upon invitation. RMA students can participate in all the classes on offer, except for the research discussion groups that are offered in addition to the regular 18-course programme, because they target a PhD audience. RMA students are expected to choose four courses over the two-week period of the school, and write their term paper related to the LOT school in block 1 of year 2, as part of the Research Seminar (part II). For more information on the courses offered in the LOT summer school, consult the LOT website. During the entire year, students are expected to participate in the UiL OTS colloquium. EC for this activity is earned in the context of the Research Seminar. Schematic overview of year 1 Block 1

Block 2

Foundations of sound patterns

Foundations of meaning & LOT Winter School (RM1 courses)

Language and its Structure: Syntax

Foundations of language acquisition

Language Contact, Variation, and Change: Comparing Language Systems

Foundations of Language, Brain & Cognition

Discourse, cognition and communication

Digital methods in linguistics

Block 3

Experimental design and data analysis

Block 4

Research Seminar & LOT Summer School Part I

Cognitive and computational aspects of word meaning L2 acquisition & education Language & speech pathology

Prosodic learning: linking sound to meaning Participation in UiL OTS colloquium Methodological training in linguistic research is an important component of the RMA. Methodological skills range from learning programming languages, statistics, experimental design, corpus analysis, database analysis, language and speech technology (e.g. the programme Praat for phonetic analysis), scientific

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integrity and ethical aspects of experimental research with human participants (infants, older children, adults, impaired speakers). An overview of methodological training: - The obligatory ‘Digital methods in linguistics’ course in block 1 introduces students to programming and corpus linguistics, and constitutes the embedding in Digital Humanities. - In block 2, students choose from a range of methodology courses specially designed for first year RMA students in the LOT winter school (January). - The elective ‘Experimental design and data analysis’ in block 3 aims at those students who intend to carry out hands-on lab research as part of their internship and thesis research in year 2. - Academic skills related to academic writing, conference presentations, publication, scientific integrity and career orientation are taught in the Research Seminar I (block 4). The electives represent subdisciplines of Linguistics that have a strong expertise in the research institute: Language acquisition, Discourse Studies, Phonetics & Phonology, Psycholinguistics, Semantics & Pragmatics, Syntax. There are two electives in each of these domains, spread out over different blocks, allowing the students to acquire in-depth knowledge. Course offerings within each block complement each other thematically to create a broad curriculum. We stimulate interdisciplinarity by encouraging students to combine two subdisciplines (e.g. syntax and psycholinguistics, phonology & language acquisition, syntax and semantics & pragmatics). Many electives explicitly aim to attract students from other subdisciplines besides their main orientation. For instance, ‘Discourse, cognition and communication’ is relevant to ‘discourse studies’, but also attracts students interested in psycholinguistics and the elective ‘Syntax and Cognition: Grammar-internal and External Interfaces’ attracts both students interested in syntax and semantics. In block 1 of year 2, students choose two more electives (out of three offered in that block). Furthermore, they finish up the second part of the Research Seminar with a preparation of the individual trajectory of specialization in an internship (15 EC) and a thesis (30 EC). For their internship, students can participate in ongoing research at UiL OTS, but they can also do their internship at one of the other LOT institutes (including the Meertens Institute/INL/Max Planck institute), or go abroad. Study abroad is possible not only for an internship, but also for an internship in combination with course work and/or thesis research. Study abroad is often made possible through the UiL OTS institutional connections, or individual researchers’ collaborative networks. Schematic representation of Year 2 Block 1

Block 2

Block 3

Block 4

Research Seminar & LOT school Part II

Reasoning about meaning in linguistic communication Psycholinguistics: information & emotion

Internship (UiL OTS or elsewhere in the Netherlands/ abroad)

Thesis (30 EC)

Syntax and Cognition: Grammar-internal and External Interfaces

The schematic representation of year 2 works out the variant with LOT summer school and 2 electives in block 1, and internship in block 2. However, the year planning is flexible, and other configurations are possible, including spreading out of the internship over blocks 1 and 2, with possibly additional course work in blocks 2 or 3. Thesis research is supported by a Thesis Seminar, during which progress is monitored by a senior faculty member, and students create a peer support group.

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The best senior researchers at UiL OTS are available as supervisors for the internship and the thesis, and students are free to choose who they want to work with. These individual choices can indicate progress on one particular topic, as part of an in-depth specialization path. However, the student may also choose different supervisors for internship and thesis, and thus develop a broader research profile, extending over two tracks.

5.2. Courses BLOCK 1 Foundations (obligatory) Language and its Structure: Syntax: Roberta D’Alessandro This course provides an introduction into the theory of syntax; it aims at providing insights into syntactic thinking, analysis, theorizing, and methodology. The theoretical perspective is that of mainstream generative formal grammar, and in particular the Minimalist Program (Chomsky 1995 ff.). The descriptive focus will be on major generalizations concerning core syntactic domains such as agreement, case, movement, and information structure. A prominent role will be attributed to features, and their position at the core of syntactic theory, and interfaces with sound and meaning representations. The architecture of grammar will also be prominently discussed. The course will provide an overview of the general principles and methodologies used to analyze these domains, concentrating on unresolved issues and problematic aspects. Students will be called to participate actively in the course by providing insights from their own native language, as well as other languages. While all issues will be discussed against a contemporary theoretical background, i.e. mainly within the Minimalist Program, the evolution of the various central concepts from Phrase Structure Rules, through Government and Binding will also be highlighted. Tutorials will be organized for students who have never studied any syntax before. This course aims to: (i) provide specialized knowledge and insight in (formal) syntactic theory; (ii) train students in syntactic research methodologies. Foundations of sound patterns: René Kager This course offers an introduction to major theoretical approaches and core methodologies in the areas of phonology, phonetics, and infant sound acquisition. The successful participant will - have acquired command of the basic theoretical concepts of phonology and phonetics; - be able to apply these concepts to given and self-collected empirical data; - have acquired command of the basic theoretical concepts of infant sound acquisition; - be familiar with core methods of data collection in these areas; - be able to write a research paper in these areas. Digital methods in Linguistics: Martin Everaert This course provides an introduction to the use of computers and information technology for research in theoretical linguistics. We will cover some basic techniques and tools, and fundamental concepts and skills. The focus is on managing written data, especially text corpora. While we touch on some methodological issues, the course does not cover experimental design, working with recorded sound, or anything that would be considered "computational linguistics". A substantial component involves writing scripts (simple programs) in the Python programming language. We will learn how to use scripts to manage and analyze texts (“corpus analysis”), carry out searches that go far beyond what you can do with a standard web form, count words and constructions, create randomized experimental stimuli, etc. Students will become familiar with different types of digital language resources, and some of their uses in theoretical or experimental research.

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Students will learn the use of information technology and information resources for research in theoretical linguistics. Main topics: using existing corpora and databases; writing scripts to collect, manage and analyze text.

BLOCK 2 Foundations (obligatory) Foundations of Language Acquisition: Peter Coopmans & Luisa Meroni The foundations course provides the theoretical and empirical foundation for current developments in acquisition research driven by linguistic theory. It does so by focusing primarily on (morpho-)syntactic and semantic phenomena taken to illustrate the relation and tension between the "logical problem of language acquisition", i.e., the observation that the knowledge children acquire goes far beyond the input to which they are exposed, and the "problem of actual language development", i.e., how and why children pass through certain developmental stages in their acquisition of their first language or – in the case of (simultaneous) bilingualism – languages. Questions to be addressed include: How is (monolingual and bilingual) first language acquisition guided by the principles of linguistic theory and general cognitive growth? And can the answers and explanations offered be naturally extended to adult and child second language acquisition, when acquisition starts with knowledge of one language (partly) in place? Topics will include: acquisition of argument structure, of referentential dependencies acquisition of scope relations; role and rise of functional categories; transfer; effect of age of onset; the role of input quantity and quality, plus other child-internal and child-external factors. Foundations of meaning: Joost Zwarts, [spanning over blocks 2 & 3] Semantics and pragmatics are the two linguistic subdisciplines that deal with meaning in language. Semantics studies meaning from the dual perspectives of reference and truth on the one hand and concepts on the other hand. Pragmatics studies meaning from the perspective of language use in communication and discourse. Many concepts and tools in these disciplines find their origins in philosophy and logic, and they have been successfully applied to a wide range of empirical phenomena in natural language that involve meaning. The course focuses on two subjects: 1 Semantics: The conceptual and mathematical basis for doing semantics and its application in accounting for entailment patterns and meaning composition. (Week 1, 2, 3 of teaching period) 2 Pragmatics: The role of context, discourse, expressiveness, implicatures, presuppositions, and subjectivity in language use. (Week 4, 5, 6 of teaching period) After the course the student will be able to - understand and appreciate different aspects of and perspectives on meaning - engage with semantic and pragmatic literature that is not too specialized - analyze basic meaning phenomena using important semantic/pragmatic notions and techniques LOT Winter School (RM1 courses) The LOT winter school offers 6 courses with a strong methodological component specially designed for first year RMA students. The students must register for exactly two of these RM1 courses, and cannot register for the general programme. LOT reimburses travel/accomodation for RM1 students for one week only, so students are encouraged to select two courses within the same week. For more information about the LOT winter school, visit https://lotschool.nl/. The Netherlands Graduate School of Linguistics is responsible for the content and organization of the LOT winterschool. If you have any questions on the LOT schools, please send them to Henriëtte de Swart (not to LOT). Foundations of Language, Brain & Cognition: Sergey Avrutin Psycholinguistics studies the psychological and neurobiological factors that enable humans to comprehend, produce and use language. The topics include an introduction to the computational theory of mind, basic notions of neuroscience, the organization of the brain with a specific focus on the language related networks, as well as discussion of language production, language comprehension, language impairment, and the relation between language and other areas of human cognition (e.g.

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memory, general information processing, emotions etc.). Students will also be introduced to the basics of experimental design in psycholinguistic experimentation and will participate (in groups) in designing a possible experiment, proceeding from formulating the research questions, hypothesis, method, analyses of the results and potential conclusions. The goal of the course is to introduce the students to the basic concepts in psycholinguistics as part of cognitive science and to provide for a basic understanding of how to design a theory based psycholinguistic experiment.

BLOCK 3 Foundations (obligatory) Foundations of meaning & LOT Winter School (RM1 courses): Joost Zwarts [continued from block 2] Electives

Language Contact, Variation, and Change: Comparing Language Systems: Norbert Corver & Marjo van Koppen Linguistic variation, just like linguistic sameness (universality), is a core property of human language. The focus of this course is on the design of (morpho)syntactic diversity. What makes an investigation of the variant part of human language challenging are the strong indications that grammatical variation is non-arbitrary, bounded and predictable. Thus, there is a system (a design) behind syntactic variation. In this course, you will learn about this design of linguistic variation and change by addressing questions such as: (i) Which (morpho)syntactic properties display variation and change? (ii) Which parts of the grammar are open to variation and change? (iii) How do variant properties within one and the same language interact and correlate with each other? (iv) To what extent can variation and change be captured in terms of the Interface levels (with e.g. semantics, pragmatics, affect, phonology, sociolinguistics)? We will investigate the design of syntactic variation and change by comparing language systems at a micro-comparative scale (micro-differences among language systems that are extremely closely related) and at a macro-comparative scale (differences among language systems that are genetically or typologically less closely related/unrelated). We will do this by examining (morpho)syntactic phenomena that have been studied in generative syntactic theory and in more 'conventional' historical/typological/dialectological studies, like agreement, case, movement and ellipsis. In this course, students will (i) acquire an understanding of theories on language variation and change (Principles and Parameters-theory/Minimalist Program/(generative-)linguistic typology), (ii) develop the tools to identify and analyze data sets displaying syntactic diversity, (iii) develop the ability to work with large digital linguistic data corpora, (iv) develop the ability to critically evaluate existing analyses, to generate own hypotheses and to provide empirical and theoretical contributions to the study of syntactic diversity. Discourse, Cognition and Communication: Ted Sanders Language users communicate through discourse. The constituting property of discourse is that it shows connectedness. This connectedness is a cognitive phenomenon: Language users make a coherent representation of the discourse under consideration. The discourse itself contains (more or less) overt signals that direct this interpretation process. Discourse coherence manifests itself in referential coherence (anaphora, pronouns, discourse topics) and in coherence relations, such as Cause-Consequence and Contrast. These relations are conceptual and they can be made explicit by linguistic markers, so-called connectives (because, so, however) and lexical cue phrases (The result is, In conclusion). First, we investigate the way in which various languages express coherence. Detailed corpus studies - of languages like English, Dutch, German, French, Russian and Chinese - provide interesting information on cross-linguistic similarities and differences. Second, the cognitive part studies the way language users process and represent these discourse structures during on-line processing and comprehension experiments. Third, we will investigate the way in which children learn to communicate on the discourse level. Finally, we discuss the implications for communication: how can we design texts that are optimally designed for effective communication?

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After successfully completing this course, students

• have an overview of the field of discourse studies and discourse processing, as well as of the leading questions in the field;

• can formulate specific research questions and operationalizations of research that contributes to the field

• are able to present these issues in an understandable and challenging way; • are able to relate research on language use and discourse representation to issues of optimal communication. Experimental design and data analysis: Iris Mulders This course aims to provide insight into psycholinguistic experimentation by carrying out a psycholinguistic experiment. The course consists of the following components: 1. Rationale of measuring in psycholinguistic research.. 2. Research question and experimental design. 3. Preparation: creating stimulus materials, implementing the experiment. 4. Piloting/running the experiment. 5. Analysis of the results. 6. Reflection on the relationship between design and analysis. 7. Reporting the results. The experimental work is carried out in groups (2-4 per group). Hands-on approach, with room for reflection on theoretical issues as we go along. NB: The group work in this course will take about 10 hours a week, takes place during lab opening hours (Monday-Friday 9-17h), and is scheduled by the group members themselves (2-4 students per group). Make sure that you have enough room in your schedule to accommodate this (obligatory) group work. If your availability is too limited to meet with your group (for instance due to work, travel, other commitments), you cannot participate in this course.

Prosodic learning: linking sound to meaning: René Kager & Aoju Chen This course addresses theoretical approaches and research methods in prosody in relation to meaning and acquisition, as well as views on how to connect these areas. - Regarding prosody, the emphasis will be on prosody at the level of the word (lexical tone, rhythmic grouping) and above the word level (intonation and its communicative functions). - Regarding acquisition, the emphasis will be on first language acquisition: the development of prosody in relation to meaning at the word level and above in infants, children and adult learners. Lectures will feature presentations by the instructors, discussion of readings, and presentations by students. The successful participant -has command of advanced theoretical approaches in the areas of prosody in relation to meaning and acquisition; -is able to apply theoretical approaches to data sets; -understands connections between theories of prosody in relation to meaning and acquisition; -is familiar and experienced with state-of-the-art methods for data collection in these areas; -is able to analyse self-collected data; -is able to write a research paper in this area. BLOCK 4 Foundations (obligatory) Research Seminar & LOT summer school Part I: Henriette de Swart/Marijana Marelj The research seminar (2 ects) teaches students academic skills (participation in scientific activities, planning, research ethics, writing skills, principles of peer review and other academic skills they need for their individual research projects during the second year and their future career. Students earn the remaining 3 ects through participation in the LOT summer school or other LOT activities (such as

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EMLAR). The aim of the research seminar (part I) (40%) is to teach students a set of academic skills they need for their individual research (term paper, internship and thesis) in their second year. The aim of the LOT school (part I) (60%) is to advance knowledge in the subdiscipline of the student's research profile and to create an embedding of their research in a national/international network. Electives

Cognitive and computational aspects of word meaning: Yoad Winter Natural language semantics relies on various empirical methods, involving experimental data, machine learning, corpus analysis and linguistic questionnaires. The course presents topics where developing formal and computational semantic models heavily depends on empirical work in lexical and conceptual semantics, common sense reasoning, and computational semantics. Students choose a research problem and study selected articles on that problem. Based on this study, students formulate an empirical hypothesis and test it in the end project. After the course, the student will be able to: critically study literature on computational and experimental semantics, connect semantic models to different types of empirical phenomena, formulate testable empirical questions (either experimental or computational), conduct a small empirical study, and analyze the results. Second Language Acquisition and Education: Bert Le Bruyn Second Language Acquisition has become a full-fledged subfield of linguistics with its own myriad of approaches. This course invites students to explore and develop a deeper understanding of the field and the way it interfaces with language teaching. To do so, we read and discuss overview and in-depth papers, compare approaches and interact with researchers in SLA and/or education in the Netherlands. The students gradually work towards making their own contribution to the field of SLA and/or language teaching based on their own research interests. After the course the student will be able to - understand and appreciate different ways of looking at Second Language Acquisition; - engage with current research on the linguistics/education interface; - formulate a relevant research question in SLA/education and transform it into a coherent research setup. Language and Speech Pathology: Hayo Terband This course looks at current research into the production and perception of speech. We will pay specific attention to the psycholinguistic and neurocognitive processes that underlie speech production and perception, and the interaction between the two. In addition, we will discuss the impact of (various types of) impairments on the production and perception of speech in adults and on speech (and language) development in children; the relation between underlying deficits, compensatory adaptations and how these express themselves in symptomatology. A recurring theme in the course is the interplay of clinical and theoretical issues. How can theory-driven research support clinical work, and how do clinical questions affect (fundamental) work on speech production and perception? Course goals: - To acquire advanced and specialized knowledge on the domain of speech and hearing sciences, and its clinical relevance. - To train critical reflection on and discussion of primary scientific literature relevant to the course topic. - To develop the skill of identifying questions for research, either on the basis of practical/clinical issues, or on the basis of an evaluation of available results of scientific research. - To develop the skill of transferring results of scientific inquiry to the speech and language therapy practice.

Year 2 Research Seminar & LOT summer school Part II: Henriette de Swart/Marijana Marelj The research seminar part II teaches students academic skills (abstract writing, presentation at conferences, publication strategies, grant acquisition) in connection to their individual research during the second year and their future career. Part II of the LOT school involves writing a paper. This paper can either be written under the supervision of the teacher of one of the LOT school classes the student participated in during the LOT summer school, or it can be written with the internship supervisor on a

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topic related to the LOT school. In both cases, the term paper constitutes the bridge between the knowledge acquired in the LOT school and the research questions that will be addressed in the internship and thesis. The aim of the research seminar is to teach students advanced academic skills they need for their individual research projects and future career. The aim of the term paper is to exercise academic writing in preparation for the internship/thesis.

Psycholinguistics: information & emotion: Sergey Avrutin and Jos van Berkum Language is a uniquely human capacity. Communication is not. All animals communicate but only humans use language for this purpose. The linguistic communication channel of Homo Sapiens is extremely interesting, as it pairs theoretically indefinite expressivity with a fairly narrow bandwidth. In part 1 of the course, we introduce a formal theory of information and explore to what extent informationtheoretical concepts can be applied to language. We will discuss what information, in its technical sense, means, how it can be quantified, and what effect the amount of information has on language processing (e.g., on lexical retrieval, sentence processing, and language acquisition). In part 2, we examine new ways of thinking about what all that sophisticated language-driven information processing brings about. The starting point here is that, in spite of having the expressive special power of language at their disposal, humans also happen to be animals with things at stake, and as such biologically predisposed to have 'affective' or 'emotional' responses to aspects of their environment (including, above all, people, and what they say). To understand how language-driven information processing interleaves with emotional responding, students will be familiarized with current thinking about emotion and its interface to language, as well as to empirical research in several arenas of emotionally rich language use (e.g., gossip, narrative, swear words). In the final week, we explore research that integrates informationtheoretic and emotion-relevant perspectives, e.g., on the use of language in special registers such as newspaper headlines and diaries. Although the course is designed for RMA linguistics students, we also welcome other RMA students with an interest in language processing, communication, information theory, and/or the role of emotion in cognition. If in doubt about the fit between you and this course, please contact the course coordinator for more information. Course goals: Our aim is to introduce you to theoretical and empirical perspectives on two central, interrelated properties of language processing: (1) language comprehension involves the processing of information transmitted via specific, bandwidth-limited communication channels, and (2) language comprehension is usually intertwined with emotional states, inevitably resulting from language-driven information processing, and often also influencing the processing itself. You will explore the main tenets of formal information theory and its application to psycholinguistics, modern thinking about emotion and its relevance to language research, and studies combining information-theoretic and emotion-related perspectives. After the course, you should have a firm grasp of how to apply formal information theory and emotion research perspectives to language processing research, as well as a richer understanding of how the use of language, a uniquely human cognitive system, helps to realize our sociality.

Reasoning about meaning in linguistic communication: Rick Nouwen Meaning is a slippery, multifaceted concept. This is mainly because, when we communicate by linguistic means, meaning comes about not just via linguistic conventions but also via reasoning processes that are integral to communicative interaction. In this course we look at formal and computational theories of both linguistic meaning and the reasoning that underlies meaningful communication. A key ingredient of any such theory is the semantics/pragmatics distinction. This division between conventional linguistic sources of meaning on the one hand and meanings that are intentional in nature on the other is often a core assumption made in theories of linguistic communication. But it is also a source of intense debate, since many of the hot topics in the study of meaning today are topics that straddle the semantics/pragmatics divide in interesting and largely unexpected ways. Interestingly, the emerging debates rely heavily on empirical and analytical methods that are new to the field, ranging from experimental to computational methods. As a result, the study of meaning in linguistic communication is shifting from an analytical philosophical discipline to a field that overlaps with cognitive science and artificial intelligence. A central question raised throughout the course is what analytical tools we need to conduct a science of meaning. The analytical philosophical tradition has it that it suffices to relate meaning to truth-conditions

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(the circumstances under which a sentence is true), but there are clear drawbacks to such a narrow view. In the course, we look at ways of going beyond the orthodoxy, for instance by asking what role probabilistic, or more in general, computational models could play in a theory of meaning. The goal of this course is twofold: (i) to allow the students to understand some of the key empirical and theoretical questions that drive research in this area; (ii) to have the students acquire skills that allow them to conduct their own research in this area and propose novel models of meaning in linguistic communication. Course goals: (i) to give the student a comprehensive overview of several key phenomena involving meaning in linguistic communication and of the theoretical frameworks that aim to model these phenomena, especially theories hailing from contemporary disciplines like formal, computational and experimental semantics and pragmatics and, more generally, cognitive science; (ii) to teach the student the skills needed to be able to do research themselves within the context of such theories; (iii) to give students the skills needed to formulate theoretical proposals, report on them and test them in the future.

Syntax and Cognition: Grammar-internal and External Interfaces: Marijana Marelj The notion ‘interface’ is central in grammatical theory and in linguistic practice: works on the lexiconsyntax, syntax-semantics, syntax-phonology, and syntax-morphology interface have led to a deeper understanding of different linguistic phenomena and of the architecture of the linguistic component of the mind/brain. The main focus here is on the lexicon-syntax interface. Whereas the rapidity of language acquisition supports the shared assumption that there is a correlation between the meaning (lexical properties of predicates) and the syntactic structure in which they are realized, researchers differ with respect to the nature of the correlation. We will analyze and evaluate some of the representative approaches with respect to issues of alternations, linking, and the nature of the lexicon. Coarse goals: Participants will acquire an understanding of the architecture of linguistic grammar, the interplay of different grammar-internal modules (lexicon-syntax-semantics) as well as the interplay between language as a cognitive module with other cognitive domains.. The participants will gain an overall understanding of the major issues at the relevant interface, develop the ability to identify conceptual, theoretical, and empirical issues that different theories raise, analyze and evaluate existing solutions, and ultimately generate their own hypotheses and give their own theoretical or empirical contribution. They will also develop skills of academic presentation and writing. The course content is related to the issues explored in other courses within the Syntax track, but also those in the Semantics and Pragmatics, Psycholinguistics-Neurolinguistics, and Language Acquisition tracks. Outside the subdomains of linguistics, we will focus on the cross-pollination between linguistics and clinical psychology and probe into the linguistic markers of psychological and psychopathological processes..In choosing their topics for their final paper, the students are strongly encouraged to integrate and utilize the factual, conceptual and procedural knowledge they have gained in the foundational courses, and other track courses.

5.3. Career orientation During your programme you will improve your knowledge, but you will also work on academic and professional skills. It is not always clear when you are dealing with career orientation during your Master’s programme, apart from the events and workshops explicitly dedicated to career orientation. However, it is advisable to prepare yourself for your future career during your Master’s year by going through – as research shows - the following phases: reflecting on your motivation and work values, researching your opportunities on the job market, creating ties with potential employers and practising skills as needed for your job application and the following interview. This way, you will establish yourself as a professional.

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The following outline shows the career orientation events per semester. Semester 1

Semester 2 Join the faculty of Humanities career night: www.carrierenachtgw.nl

Introduction: your classmates are part of your future network. Your tutor is there to help you with your studies but also knows where alumni have ended up working! Guest lecturers in MA rotation offer insight in how you can benefit from the research expertise at UiL OTS to shape your internship and thesis research. Participation in the LOT winter school: meet RMA students from elsewhere in the Netherlands to build a national network.

Semester 3

Workshop Self-analysis for the job market (or internship) parallel to the research seminar in collaboration with Career Services with a focus on transferable skills Do a test on the website of Career Services and discover your work values. The thesis fair orients you towards internship/thesis possibilities, and offers opportunities for networking with students who are one year ahead of you, and who have similar research interests. In addition, you can consult Geertje Wilmsen, the TLC internship/alumni coordinator. Participation in the LOT summer school: expand your national network with PhD students, and start building an international network (teachers/students). Semester 4

Participation in the Drongo Festival offers insight in the job market. LinkedIn profile: Creating a profile helps you to think about yourself as a professional (workshop available). Don’t forget to update your profile regularly. Your internship will help you to put your research skills and knowledge into practice. Workshop writing a CV and a cover letter parallel to the thesis seminar, in collaboration with Career Services.

At the alumni gathering alumni share their experience regarding the transition from university to the job market. The thesis fair strengthens your communication skills, and offers opportunities for networking with students who are one year below you, and who have similar research interests. take a break from your thesis research to follow up on the alumni event and have a cup of coffee with an alumnus to learn tips and tricks. Become a member of the alumni community of your programme and of an alumni LinkedIn group and keep in touch with your teachers. Alumni have a right to the services of Career Services up to half a year after graduation.

Career Services workshops might be incorporated in your Master’s programme (ask your coordinator) but you are also welcome to join (other) workshops as an individual, for which you can register at www.uu.nl/careerservices, on the following topics: LinkedIn, writing a curriculum and cover letter, transferable skills, preparing for a job/internship interview and working consciously & effectively. Career Services also offers several online tests: the career check, work values test, career choice test, personality test, and competence test (https://uucareercheck.nl/site); hosts an online vacancy site (uu.jobteaser.com); and organizes events such as the Humanities Career Night (https://carrierenachtgw.nl/en/), the UU CareersDay (https://www.carrieredaguu.nl/en/) and monthly evenings on Your Perspective: Career Opportunities for Humanities Graduates and twice a year a curriculum check and LinkedIn photo shoots. Visit www.uu.nl/careerservices for more information and check your email, blackboard or Facebook- and LinkedIn-groups for announcements!

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5.4. Internship Together with the thesis, the research master internship constitutes the individual trajectory of the student. The exact activities/tasks, mode of working, schedule and expected outcomes may vary across individual internship projects, but they are all always agreed upon prior to the beginning of the internship and spelled-out in the written Trainee Agreement form. The Trainee Agreement form must be signed by the internal supervisors, the student and (if applicable) the external supervisor to be valid. Trainees can participate in internships that take place i) in-house, ii) at another research institution in the Netherlands, or iii) abroad. Students are responsible for finding their own supervisor, but are strongly encouraged to consult with the internship coordinator (Marijana Marelj) on their choice. In all cases the trainee must have an internal (in-house) supervisor, who is responsible for filing the results in Osiris. All internships, even those predominantly oriented towards application and valorisation must have a clearly defined component of fundamental/basic research in it. All internship projects must have two final deliverables: a) Research Paper – a paper presenting the research question(s), relevance, theoretical framework, methodology, result(s), outcome(s), and conclusion(s) of the research project and b) Reflection Report - a short report following the internship (2 A4 pages), reflecting upon the suitability and desirability of the research environment the internship took place in, be it for theoretical, experimental, or applied work. Both are submitted to the local internship supervisor, who bases the final grade on their combined content (in conjunction with a second, possibly external supervisor when applicable). The Reflection Report is also submitted to the RMA internship coordinator and archived accordingly. The internship enables students to acquire hands-on experience with linguistics research in an ongoing project headed by a senior researcher. The aim is to practice research, academic and communicative skills the students have been equipped with during the RMA programme, and to prepare them for carrying out their own research in the RMA thesis. Therefore, the internship follows (most of) the electives, and precedes the thesis. The internship may but need not be directly connected to the student’s thesis, by providing, for instance, a pilot experiment or preliminary data/corpus collection that will be improved and further worked out/analyzed in the thesis or a critical evaluation of theoretical background.

5.5. Thesis Together with the internship, the thesis constitutes the individual trajectory of the student. During the internship, the focus is on research questions defined by the project the student is participating in. For the thesis, emphasis is placed on original research driven by the student's own questions. The exact activities/tasks, mode of working, schedule and expected outcomes may vary across thesis research projects, but they are all always agreed upon at the beginning of the thesis project. Students are responsible for finding their own supervisor. In all cases student must have an internal supervisor affiliated with UiL OTS. A student may have an additional internal or external supervisor. An external supervisor is a senior researcher affiliated with an institution other than UiL OTS. The responsibility for the final grade and its entering in Osiris lies always on the internal supervisor. The output of the thesis research is a report that meets the standards of a scientific publication in the subdiscipline of linguistics at hand. The thesis should be structured around a central research question to which it provides an answer. The central research question should be clearly formulated at the beginning and its relevance to scholarly discussions within the discipline set out. The body of the text should show how the question was answered, why the approach chosen is adequate, and what the final outcomes are. The conclusion should contain an analysis of the findings in the light of the original question, and explain the broader implications of the research carried out. There are no strict guidelines as to length, but most theses are between 40 and 70 pages long (including notes, bibliography and appendices). Most students write the thesis in the second semester of the second year. A thesis seminar is run in that semester for group and individual support. The aim of the thesis is to independently write a report of research conducted under supervision of a senior researcher. The thesis shows how the knowledge and skills acquired during the RMA programme has equipped the students with the research, academic and communicative skills to carry out original research.

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EVALUATION FORM The assessment of the thesis will be done by two evaluators by filling out a standard evaluation form. This form can be found under https://students.uu.nl/en/hum/linguistics/study-programme/thesis Aspects 1 up to and including 7 must be assessed satisfactory to be able to pass the Master’s thesis. In other words: one or more fails on these aspects will lead to a failed thesis. Compensation for one or more fails on any of these seven aspects is impossible. Moreover, the thesis must fulfil the formal preconditions, which are also mentioned on the evaluation form. If these preconditions are not fulfilled, the thesis may not be evaluated. PROCEDURES AND GRADING If your supervisor is affiliated with the programme, he or she will be your first evaluator. Your thesis will be graded by two evaluators, who will fill out the evaluation form separately and come to a final grade after joint consultation. Once the student has handed in the final version of the thesis, the evaluators have 10 working days to evaluate the thesis and inform the student of the final grade. If the first and second evaluator request assistance, and in cases in which the first and second evaluator cannot agree on the final grade for a thesis, a third evaluator will be approached and consulted by the first evaluator. The student will be given notice by the first evaluator that a third evaluator has been employed and that the grading period of 10 working days will be extended by another 10 working days. The third evaluator evaluates the grade of the first and second evaluator by examining their provisional grades and argumentation. The judgement of the third evaluator is binding. If the third evaluator agrees with the other two evaluators on the proposed grade (if all evaluators agree), no further argumentation is needed. A brief explanation will otherwise suffice. Eventually the master’s thesis should be uploaded in the digital theses archive of the University Library (Igitur). This is a compulsory part of graduating. It is also possible to view the work of other students in Igitur, sorted by faculty. PLAGIARISM Utrecht University considers any form of academic dishonesty to be a very serious offense. Utrecht University expects each student to be familiar with and to observe the norms and values that ensure academic integrity. Therefore, when you start writing your thesis you will have to hand in the Plagiarism rules awareness statement. With this, you declare to know about and abide by the norms and rules on fraud and plagiarism of Utrecht University. TOPIC SUGGESTIONS • first- and second-language acquisition, bilingualism, and bilingual acquisition • linguistic databases, corpora, and online tools for linguistic data analysis • origins of speech and language disorders, and research into potential treatments • language use in areas relevant to the general public (primary/secondary schools, and professional communication) • phonological, syntactic, semantic, and pragmatic research underpinning all of these fields

5.6. Policies and Procedures EDUCATION AND EXAMINATION REGULATIONS Every programme has its own Education and Examination Regulations (EER), in which the specific rules and regulations of that programme are described. There are also general Education and Examination Regulations that all Humanity programmes have to adhere to.

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The EER of your programme can be found by going to https://students.uu.nl/en/hum/linguistics/practical-information/academic-policies-andprocedures/education-and-examination-regulations FRAUD AND PLAGIARISM The most serious forms of deception that can impair integrity are fraud and plagiarism. Plagiarism is a form of fraud and is defined as the wrongful appropriation of another author’s work without proper citation. The text below provides further elaboration on what may be considered fraud or plagiarism, along with a number of concrete examples. Please note that this is not a comprehensive list! If the university discovers a case of fraud or plagiarism, the study programme’s Examination Committee may implement sanctions on the offender. The most serious sanction that the Examination Committee may implement is the submission of a request for expulsion to the Executive Board. Fraud Fraud may include: Copying answers from another person during an exam. The person providing the opportunity to copy is considered an accomplice to fraud; Being in possession of (i.e. having/carrying) tools and resources during examinations, such as pre-programmed calculators, mobile phones, smartwatch, smartglasses, books, course readers, notes, etc., consultation of which is not explicitly permitted; Allowing others to complete all or part of an assignment, and passing it off as your own work; Acquisition of the questions or answers of an exam prior to the time the exam is to take place; Fabrication of survey- or interview answers or research data. Plagiarism Plagiarism is the appropriation of another author’s works, thoughts, or ideas and the representation of such as one’s own work. The following are some examples of what may be considered plagiarism: Copying and pasting text from digital sources, such as encyclopaedias or digital periodicals, without using quotation marks and referring to the source; Copying and pasting text from the Internet without using quotation marks and referring to the source; Copying information from printed materials, such as books, periodicals or encyclopaedias, without using quotation marks and referring to the source; Using a translation of the texts listed above in one’s own work, without using quotation marks and referring to the source; Paraphrasing from the texts listed above without a (clear) reference: paraphrasing must be marked as such (by explicity linking the text with the original author, either in text or a footnote), ensuring that the impression is not created that the ideas expressed are those of the student; Using another person’s imagery, video, audio or test materials without reference and in so doing representing them as one’s own work; Resubmission of the student’s own earlier work without source references, and allowing this to pass for work originally produced for the purpose of the course, unless this is expressly permitted in the course or by the lecturer; Using other students’ work and representing it as one’s own work. If this occurs with the other student’s permission, then he or she may be considered an accomplice to the plagiarism; When one author of a joint paper commits plagiarism, then all authors involved in that work are accomplices to the plagiarism if they could have known or should have known that the other was committing plagiarism; Submitting papers provided by a commercial institution, such as an internet site with summaries or papers, or which have been written by others, regardless of whether the text was provided in exchange for payment.

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For more information: http://students.uu.nl/en/practical-information/policies-and-procedures/fraud-andplagiarism COMPLAINTS If you feel you have not been treated properly by someone employed by Utrecht University, or if you disagree with a decision that affects you personally, you can respond in a number of ways. A complaint relates to conduct towards you. You cannot submit a complaint about a general rule or scheme. For more information: https://students.uu.nl/en/practical-information/policies-andprocedures/complaints-objections-and-appeals APPEALS Every university has an Examination Appeals Board to which students can appeal. This Board is an independent appeals board established in accordance with the Higher Education and Research Act [Wet op het Hoger Onderwijs en Wetenschappelijk onderzoek]. It includes members from various different faculties. The chair and the deputy chair are both lawyers. Students also serve on the Examination Appeals Board. You can appeal decisions relating to: • Satisfying the requirements of the final academic review in connection with the performancelinked grant • Examination eligibility • A colloquium doctum (entrance examination) and addressing any deficiencies • Admission to the university teacher training programmes that qualify graduates to teach all classes at senior general secondary education (havo) and university preparatory education (vwo) level • Negative binding recommendation concerning the continuation of studies • Admission to a Master’s degree programme • Admission to a degree programme for which selection criteria are applied • Decisions made by Boards of Examiners and examiners. For more information: https://students.uu.nl/en/practical-information/academic-policies-andprocedures/complaints-objections-and-appeals/examination-appeals-board

5.7. General information new Research Master students This information sheet gives you an overview of the facilities organized for all Research Master students of the Faculty of Humanities. HUMANITIES GRADUATE SCHOOL CONFERENCE The Humanities Graduate School Conference is a conference by and for PhDs and Research Master students at the Faculty of Humanities. It aims to provide an interdisciplinary conference to strengthen the academic community within the Graduate School. Furthermore, the conference allows students and PhDs to obtain valuable experience in presenting and discussing their own work. The Graduate School has made a sum of €10.000 Euro available for the organization of the conference. The format of the Humanities Graduate School Conference is not determined yet, but one could consider for example: Keynote speeches Parallel sessions Workshops Poster presentations Prices for best RMA- & PhD-paper

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The organization of the conference will be done by RMA-students and PhDs. A steering committee of academics from the Departments will support the organizing committee. Moreover, collaboration can be sought with the journal Junctions of the Humanities Graduate School. Take a look at: https://hgsc.sites.uu.nl/ for last year’s program. RMA CONFERENCE GRANTS Research Master students are encouraged to participate in international conferences. To stimulate this participation, the Graduate School of Humanities awards several Conference Grants over the year. Students who wish to be considered for such a grant are asked to submit a proposal. Deadlines for applications are usually on 1 May https://students.uu.nl/en/events/deadline-conference-grants (s.c.a.hermans@uu.nl) for more information.

and 1 or

December. Please contact Sven

refer to Hermans

SUBSCRIPTION TO NATIONAL RESEARCH SCHOOL The Faculty of Humanities believes it is important for you as a Research Master student to participate in a National Research School relevant to your programme and research interests. In our Research Master programmes it is mandatory to gain 10 ECTS from courses by a National Research School of your own choosing. For some fields, the relevant Research School might be evident, but to others there are several National Research Schools to choose from. Orientate before making a choice and do contact your programme coordinator if you have further questions.

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6. Practical information 6.1. Study delay Study delay can be caused by different circumstances and situations and can have serious consequences. If you are a full-time student and your studies have been delayed as a result of circumstances beyond your control, you may be able to receive (financial) compensation or other facilities. Always contact your Study Advisor if you are expecting a delay in your studies for over one month. Study delay can be caused by study-related problems such as ineffective study methods, stress or procrastination. If necessary, you can schedule an appointment with a Student Psychologist or Student Counsellor (via Student services) for guidance and advice. UNEXPECTED CIRCUMSTANCES Your studies can be delayed due to circumstances beyond your control, such as illness, psychological problems, family circumstances or other situations. If you are a full-time student and your studies have been delayed as a result of circumstances beyond your control, you may be able to receive financial compensation from Utrecht University. For further information about conditions and the procedure: please schedule an appointment with a Student Counsellor (via Student services). FORESEEN STUDY DELAY In other situations your study delay can be foreseen: • Pregnancy • Waiting time internships • Board activities in a student organisation • Disabilities or (chronic) illness • Student athletes For more information: https://students.uu.nl/en/practical-information/advising-and-counselling/studydelay/

6.2. Workshops SKILLS LAB

The Skills Lab is an accessible service desk where you can get a clear idea of what extracurricular courses, workshops, individual tutoring, electronic tools, etc. are available within this University. Much is available, but this wealth of resources can be hard to find and access for students with specific questions. We can show students where to go to improve any skill, be it writing, presenting, studying, or job-hunting. There is a physical desk at the second floor of the University Library Uithof. For more information, see https://students.uu.nl/en/student-life-and-career-orientation/workshops LANGUAGES

Moreover, there are also language courses on offer by Babel. They offer Dutch and English courses and several foreign language courses in Dutch and/or the target language. For the language courses by Babel: www.babel.nl

6.3. Graduation Your faculty’s Board of Examiners determines when you graduate and what your final examination date (the date on your diploma) will be. You will have graduated when you meet all examination requirements. The Board of Examiners will inform you by email as soon as you meet (nearly) all examination requirements.

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Please note that graduating does not always mean your enrolment will end automatically! If you wish to terminate your enrolment before the end of the academic year, you have to do so yourself. Do you wish to postpone your graduation? File a request for postponement with the Board of Examiners within two weeks of their informing you of your imminent graduation. So keep a close eye on your UU email account! CUM LAUDE As it is written in article 6.2 of the faculty part of the EER 2019-2020: a)

The Master's Degree may be awarded 'cum laude' if each of the following conditions has been met: a weighted average mark of at least 8.0 has been earned for the components of the study programme; the mark for all components is 7.0 or higher; the credit load of exemptions that do not count does not exceed 15 EC; the Board of Examiners has not taken any decision as referred to in Clause 5.15, Subclause 4 under b; the mark for the final thesis is 8.5 or higher; has passed the final examination of the Master’s Degree Programme within two years. b) Results that have not been expressed in a mark will not be counted in the assessment of the degree classification. c) The Board of Examiners may, on its own initiative or the initiative of a teacher, in individual cases make an exception to this rule, to the advantage of the student. d) The cum laude classification will be stated on the degree certificate. TERMINATION OF ENROLMENT Your enrolment can be terminated as of the 1st of the month following your request for termination of enrolment, no sooner. This means that if you submit a request for termination in the month of September, your enrolment will be terminated as of 1 October. You cannot terminate your enrolment retroactively. When you graduate, you may choose to terminate your enrolment as of the 1st of the month following your graduation date. You may also stay enrolled for the rest of the academic year, in which case your enrolment automatically ends as of 1 September. Do you want your enrolment to end as of 1 September? Or do you decide to stop in the month June, July or August? Then there is no need to request termination of enrolment. Your current enrolment will automatically end as of 1 September. For more information: https://students.uu.nl/en/practical-information/enrolment/termination-ofenrolment VALIDITY RESIDENCE PERMIT If you are a non-EU/EEA student and hold a residence permit for study purposes, your residence permit is only valid as long as you are enrolled as a student at Utrecht University. From the date you are no longer enrolled, your residence permit becomes void and you will be required to leave the country within 28 days. For more information please contact the visa department: visa@qdesk.uu.nl

6.4. Solis-id Your Solis-id is your user name for most university services. Used in combination with your Solis password, it gives you access to services such as OSIRIS, Blackboard and Surfspot. You should also sign in using your Solis-id at the university computers. You will have been sent your Solis-id and password in two separate emails when you enrolled at the university or took part in the matching programme. If you have not received these emails, please take your student card or proof of enrolment to UU for U Student Services.

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If you have received your Solis-id but not your password, go to the password self-service to change your password. AFTER DEREGISTRATION Once you are no longer enrolled at Utrecht University you will be sent an email warning you that your Solis-id and password are only valid for another 180 days. After this six-month period you will no longer be able to use the IT services associated with your Solis-id. Your email address will also be terminated. So it is important that you save and secure any files and emails that you want to keep before then. Do you want to back up your e-mails? You can easily do this by making a copy of the data from your account via Google takeout. PASSWORD SELF-SERVICE In the Solis-id password self-service (www.uu.nl/password) you can change your Solis-id password yourself. Here you can also create a new password if you have forgotten your password or if you never received one. For more information: www.students.uu.nl/en/solis-id

6.5. Osiris Osiris Student is the internet portal to the Osiris study information system. Here you can register for course offerings and tests and review your results and course schedule. Access Osiris Student with your Solis-id via www.uu.nl/osirisstudent or click the Osiris-icon you find below every page on this website.

6.6. UU Gmail Every student has access to his/her own UU Gmail account. A lot of communication, from the UU or your teachers, goes to this address. Moreover, it is possible to save, edit and share files in the Google Drive. You log in with your UU Gmail email address (for example: j.smith@students.uu.nl) and the password associated with your Solis-ID. Link: http://gmail.students.uu.nl

6.7. Blackboard All Utrecht University students and staff use the digital learning environment Blackboard. You can use the Blackboard Mobile Learn app to access Blackboard information on your mobile devices. This app is suitable for Android, Blackberry, iPhone, iPod Touch and iPad. In Blackboard, under ‘Support’ > ‘Support students’, you will find a Quick Start Guide to help you get started.

6.8. MyUU app and MyTimetable In the MyUU app for students you will find your grades from Osiris, your student card and your personal timetable. Download the app from the app stores of Android and Apple. Once installed you log in with your Solis-id and password. MyTimetable is the timetable website of Utrecht University. Log on using your Solis-id and password. More information on https://students.uu.nl/en/node/6/mytimetable. In due time the timetables in OSIRIS Student and on https://students.uu.nl will no longer be available. We advise you, therefore, to use MyTimetable or the MyUU app from now on. Timetable changes may not appear real-time on the old websites.

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6.9. WiFi Utrecht University has a wireless network in most of its university buildings, named Eduroam. Log in using your Solis-id and add @soliscom.uu.nl (for example 1234567@soliscom.uu.nl) and your password. You can find help setting up this network on your device on https://students.uu.nl/wifi-eduroam. Eduroam is also available at other educational institutions, both nationally as well as internationally. You can log in on the Eduroam network at any location using your UU Solis-id and password.

6.10. Library Utrecht University has multiple libraries, but the most important ones for Humanities are the one in the city centre and in the Utrecht Science Park (sometimes referred to as ‘de Uithof’). Both locations have a large collection of not only books but also manuscripts, journals, films and audio files. It is also possible to make use of the computers and printers and study in the designated study areas. BORROWING BOOKS You must have a library card to be able to borrow books. This card is available for free for UU students and can be created for you at the library desk. The standard loan period of books is 28 days, although you can borrow some books and journals for a shorter period. Using the website, you can extend your loan multiple times, unless someone else has reserved the book. You can borrow up to 15 books at the same time. Should you need more books at once due to exceptional circumstances, permission may be granted to raise the amount of books you are allowed to borrow at the same time. Using the catalogue, you can make a reservation on books. Once you have done that (and if the book is available/not on loan at that time) the university library team will collect the book and place it on a bookshelf at the entrance of the library (‘de afhaalkast’). Books that are not stored in the depot are easily accessible, as they are on their shelves. Look the shelf number up in the catalogue or browse through the bookcases until you find what you are looking for. If you do not return your books in time, you will receive a reminder and a 7 days extension to return them. If the books are not returned by the end of the seventh day, you will be fined. The height of the fine will depend on the amount of books and the amount of days they are due. You can pay your fine at the desk or the designated pay machine. You will also be fined for damaged books, so make sure you look after them! ‘COLLEGEPLANKEN’ Teachers can choose to reserve certain books and have them placed on a specific shelf for the duration of their course. These shelves are called ‘collegeplanken’ and cannot be borrowed for the duration of the course. This way students can all take a look at the books and make copies if necessary. The collegeplanken can be found in the city centre library and are labelled after the title of the course. PRACTICAL INFORMATION Universiteitsbibliotheek Binnenstad Universiteitsbibliotheek Utrecht Science Park

Drift 27, 3512 BR Utrecht Heidelberglaan 3, 3584 CS Utrecht

For more information and the library catalogue: http://www.uu.nl/en/university-library

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6.11. Course evaluations Good quality education is important to you and also to the Faculty of Humanities. In order to guarantee the quality of education, the faculty and programme would like to know your opinion on the courses you have attended. At the end of each block, you will receive an invitation via email to fill in a questionnaire and to provide feedback for each course. The digital evaluation system Caracal (caracal.science.uu.nl) is used for the course evaluations. You can log in to Caracal using your Solis-id and password. You will then see the course evaluations that apply to you. By answering a couple of open and closed questions you evaluate the courses you have attended. All of the answers will be processed anonymously. After the deadline you will be able to see the results for evaluated courses in Caracal. All the answers to the open and closed questions are visible for students who attended the course and the lecturer(s) of the course. The lecturer(s) can also post a reaction to the course evaluation. Students who did not attend the course only see the answers to the closed questions and not the reaction of the lecturer(s). The Curriculum Committee will carefully review the results of the course evaluations and address potential problems or compliment good initiatives. They will publish their advice as a result of the course evaluations in Caracal for all students to see. This will occur twice each year, prior to the course registration period. It is therefore advisable to log in now and again to see if the Curriculum Committee has already posted their advice, or the lecturer has responded to your course evaluations.

6.12. Locations Here you can find an overview of Humanities buildings used for classes and their opening hours. You can also refer to https://students.uu.nl/en/hum/linguistics/contact/buildings. Drift 21

Drift 23

Drift 25

KNG 80

Trans 10

Address

3512 BR Utrecht

3512 BR Utrecht

3512 BR Utrecht

Kromme Nieuwegracht 80, 3512 HM Utrecht

3512 JK Utrecht

Tel.

+31 30 253 6180 (reception)

+31 30 253 6005

Opening hours Mon

8:00-22:00

8:00-22:00

8:00-22:00

8:00-19:00

8:00-22:00

Tue

8:00-22:00

8:00-22:00

8:00-22:00

8:00-19:00

8:00-22:00

Wed

8:00-22:00

8:00-22:00

8:00-22:00

8:00-19:00

8:00-22:00

Thu

8:00-22:00

8:00-22:00

8:00-22:00

8:00-19:00

8:00-22:00

Fri

8:00-17:30

8:00-17:30

8:00-17:30

8:00-17:30

8:00-22:00

Sat

Closed

Closed

Closed

Closed

Closed

Sun

Closed

Closed

Closed

Closed

Closed

Remarks

Entrance through Drift 27

Entrance through Drift 27

Entrance through Drift 27

Offices and pigeonholes teachers and academic staff

After 5 p.m. and on weekends, Trans 10 is only accessible with an XS-card. The labs are located at Janskerkhof 13: http://www.uu.nl/en/janskerkhof-13

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7. Getting Around 7.1. Utrecht Utrecht is an amazing city with old canals, a lot of sights and nice bars and restaurants. The old city centre can easily be crossed on foot, while the rest of Utrecht is best visited using a bike or the public transport. On the visitor website of Utrecht (www.visit-utrecht.com) you can find interesting historical locations, museums, festivals, shops and group activities in the city. And not only does Utrecht have a beautiful old core, a lively student community traverses its streets. Before and during your stay in Utrecht this website may be very useful to you for all the questions you might have and more: www.uu.nl/welcometoutrecht. Make sure to check it out!

7.2. Housing Finding an accommodation in Utrecht can be quite a challenge. Utrecht is one of the most popular university towns in the Netherlands, and the demand for student housing is very high. It is therefore absolutely necessary to start looking for accommodation as soon as possible (if you are not already). You may find accommodation via Dutch housing websites such as Kamernet (www.kamernet.nl) and SHH (www.sshxl.nl), which are both accessible in English as well as in Dutch. The latter reserves completely furnished rooms for international students (limited availability, so on first come, first serve basis!), so you might give that a shot if you are still looking for an accommodation. Searching for a room online may or may not prove successful for you, so it may be advisable to ask the International Office of the UU for help. Usually, Dutch accommodation websites offer housing to the person with the ‘oldest’ registration number. Some of the accommodation is available immediately, for other you need to be registered for a longer period (between 4-18 months). In case of a room: you are usually invited to a Present Yourself Night. You visit the floor or house in which a room will be vacated, in order to both view the room and meet your prospective co-tenants.

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8. Links • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

http://students.uu.nl/en/hum/linguistics https://osiris.uu.nl/osiris_student_uuprd/StartPagina.do http://gmail.students.uu.nl http://uu.blackboard.com http://caracal.science.uu.nl http://uu.nl/universiteitsbibliotheek https://utrechtuniversity.on.worldcat.org/discovery?lang=en (library catalogue) http://dub.uu.nl (university newsletter) http://lotschool.nl http://linguistlist.org http://www.uu.nl/careerservices (Career Services) www.carrierenachtgw.nl/en (Humanities CareerNight) http://uu.jobteaser.com (exclusive internships and vacancies for UU students)

For international students: • https://www.studyinholland.nl/education-system/dutch-grading-system

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Š Faculty of Humanities, Utrecht University, 2019

Profile for HumanitiesUU

Programme book Research Master Linguistics 2019-2020  

The master of Linguistics' programme book contains information about the structure of the programme, staff members, important dates and dea...

Programme book Research Master Linguistics 2019-2020  

The master of Linguistics' programme book contains information about the structure of the programme, staff members, important dates and dea...