Page 1

Faculty of Humanities

Programme book 2019

History of Politics and Society Geschiedenis van politiek en maatschappij


Table of Contents 1. WELCOME

2

2. INTRODUCTION TO THE PROGRAMME

3

3. WHO IS WHO? Coordinator Teachers Coordinator internships, alumni and labour market Curriculum committee Board of Examiners Study Advisors Study association and alumni network Career Services International Office Student Desk Student Services Student psychologist

4 4 4 5 5 5 6 6 6 7 7 7 8

4. IMPORTANT DATES AND DEADLINES Academic calendar Dates and deadlines programme Registration deadlines Graduation ceremony

9 9 9 9 10

5. PROGRAMME INFORMATION Programme outline Courses Career orientation Internship and Politics & society lab Thesis Policies en Procedures

11 11 12 14 15 16 17

6. PRACTICAL INFORMATION Study delay Workshops Graduation Solis-id Osiris UU Gmail Blackboard MyUU app and MyTimetable WiFi Library Course evaluations

20 20 20 20 21 22 22 22 22 22 23 24

7. GETTING AROUND Utrecht Housing Locations

25 25 25 25

8. LINKS

26


PROGRAMME BOOK HISTORY OF POLITICS AND SOCIETY

2


1. Welcome The Department of History and Art History, as well as the groups Political History and Social and Economic History are delighted to welcome you as a Master’s student! You will encounter a group of lecturers who are eager to share their knowledge of political, social and economic history with you and to provide you with the skills and knowledge to become a well-rounded historian with a good starting position on the labour market. This programme book gives you an overview of the Master’s programme’s aims, modules and lecturers, and also provides all kinds of practical information. We will do our utmost to make your year in Utrecht as worthwhile as possible, not only by offering excellent teaching, but also by providing a number of extra-curricular events, such as a meeting with alumni and workshops on career orientation. We hope you will have a fabulous Master’s year in Utrecht!

Jessica Dijkman, coordinator of the Master’s programme Pepijn Corduwener, core teacher of the Master’s programme

PROGRAMME BOOK HISTORY OF POLITICS AND SOCIETY

3


2. Introduction to the programme Do referenda endanger democracy? Why is it so difficult to combat global economic inequality? What will the future of the welfare state look like? The Master’s programme History of Politics and Society provides you with a thorough understanding of the historical roots of the most important political and societal issues that politicians, journalists and policy makers are concerned with today. You will study the historical development of democracy, civil society, citizenship, and economic inequality in an international comparative perspective. The programme focuses largely on the 19th and 20th centuries and has an interdisciplinary approach: you will combine historical research with concepts and explanations derived from the social sciences, in particular about the role of institutions. Institutions (not just organisations but also rules, customs and practices) form ‘the rules of the game’: they give our present society its form, but they are also the result of a historical process. Think, for instance, of the rules and practices that make our democracy work, or of the way in which health care systems or educational systems are organized. The programme will provide you with insight into the way in which such institutions have developed, and into their functions and consequences. As a student you will develop new academic skills and perspectives: you will learn how to use comparative research methods and how to analyze long-term developments. Through internships, trainings and engaged supervision, the Master’s programme also offers a good preparation for the labour market. In this way we train you as a historian able to use knowledge of the past to help explain and solve current-day issues. The programme is composed of two semesters which are both dedicated to the acquisition of specific skills and knowledge. In the first semester, you study in seminar groups with a maximum size of twenty students. Together, you discuss essential concepts from political science, sociology and economics and you learn how to do comparative and long-term historical research. You also take two electives which centre on a historical issue with present-day relevance, and which allow you to specialise in a specific area. In the second semester you will put the acquired knowledge and skills into practice in writing your thesis, but also in an internship or in the form of the Politics and society lab. Both the internship and the lab are designed to allow you to perform as an individual within a collective that works towards a specific objective. You will write your thesis individually, but will stay in close contact with your supervisor and peer group. During the Master’s programme History of Politics and Society you will obtain the knowledge and tools to thoughtfully interpret the past in order to benefit the present. The programme thereby offers a solid preparation for the labour market, and prepares you for careers in public administration, NGOs, journalism, politics, and socioeconomic organisations.

PROGRAMME BOOK HISTORY OF POLITICS AND SOCIETY

4


3. Who is who? This section provides an overview of the contact details of the members of staff, and other important persons who are there for you to assist your study progress throughout the programme.

Coordinator of the programme Jessica Dijkman (j.dijkman@uu.nl)

Teachers dr. Sarah Carmichael Drift 6 Room 1.23

Assistant professor

Economic and social history Agency, gender, family history, economic development

s.g.carmichael@uu.nl

dr. Pepijn Corduwener Drift 6 Room 2.01

Assistant professor

Democracy; political thought; populism; comparative history; postwar Western Europe;

p.corduwener@uu.nl

dr. Jessica Dijkman Drift 6 Room 1.16

Assistant professor

Economic and social history Markets before 1800, disaster history, famines and food crises, guilds, Islamic world

j.dijkman@uu.nl

prof. dr. Lex Heerma van Voss Drift 6 Room 1.16

Political History

Professor

Economic and social history History of occupations, North Sea area in the Early Modern Period

l.heermavanvoss@uu.nl

prof. dr. Maarten Prak Drift 6 Room 1.18

Professor

Economic and social history Citizenship, guilds, institutions, cultural industry, human capital

m.prak@uu.nl

PROGRAMME BOOK HISTORY OF POLITICS AND SOCIETY

5


Dr. Christian Wicke Drift 6 Room 2.05

Assistant professor

Nationalism, urban movements, civil society, identity, memory and heritage, modern German history

c.wicke@uu.nl

Dr. Kenan Van De Mieroop Drift 6 Room 2.05

Political history

Teacher

Political history Multiculturalism, memory studies, historiography, philosophy of science

k.j.vandemieroop@uu.nl

Please note that this list of teachers is provisional; for updated information check the website of the Master’s programme

Coordinator internships, alumni and labour market The coordinator internships, alumni and labour market of the department of History and Art History takes care of a huge network of alumni who work in interesting organisations. With her colleagues in the other departments and the alumni she organises a series of evenings on Your Perspective: Career Opportunities for Humanities Graduates. We hope we can welcome you in our alumni network after graduation as well! If you wish to use our network to find an internship or gather information about your possibilities on the labour market, please contact Josi Smit. Josi Smit Drift 6 Room 0.11 3512 BS UTRECHT 030 253 4213 t.j.smit@uu.nl

Curriculum committee The Curriculum Committee consists of students and staff members who jointly discuss and assess the quality of the education in the Master’s programme. Every year, the committee is looking for new student members. If you are interested in becoming a member, or if you want to contact the committee about the standard of education, please contact the president of the committee, dr. Marloes Beers. Koch. Contact details: m.c.beers@uu.nl

Board of Examiners The Board of Examiners is the body that assesses, in an objective and expert manner, whether a student satisfies the requirements set in the teaching and examinations regulations in relation to the knowledge,

PROGRAMME BOOK HISTORY OF POLITICS AND SOCIETY

6


insight and skills necessary to obtain a degree. The Board of Examiners has the task and authority to ensure the quality of the examinations, without prejudice. Contact details: studiepunt.gw@uu.nl or studentdesk.hum@uu.nl

Study Advisors If you have questions concerning the choice and planning of your study, about the academic skills, about the rules and regulations of the study or if you have other issues (be they private or not), you can contact the study advisors. They can guide and advise you on your studies and help you to set up an academic plan. If you encounter a delay in your academic progress, through e.g. illness, special circumstances or family circumstances, you are to report this as soon as possible, because in these situations the academic counsellor can be of help.

The Study Advisors for History of Politics and Society are Evelien Hazewinkel, Laurens Meindertsma en Stefan Vuurens. More information on their office hours is available on the website: https://students.uu.nl/en/hum/history-of-politics-and-society/practical-information/advising-andcounselling

Study association and alumni network The study association for all History students (BA and MA) is the UHSK. This association organises all kinds of activities that you might be interested in, for instance debates, excursions, and lectures (and parties!). Check out the website of the UHSK at www.uhsk.nl We invite you, our students, to set up your own digital network: a Facebook-page or LinkedIn-group will help you to share information. The alumni network of the History department has its own LinkedIn group at http://tinyurl.com/AlumniGS , which you can also join: this is a great way to find out more about the careers of our graduates.

Career Services During the Master’s programme attention will be paid to career orientation. The programme and the department work together with study associations and Career Services to make career orientation an integrated part of your programme. See the detailed overview on page 13 for more information and keep an eye out for announcements of career orientation events during the year. The Faculty of Humanities has its own Career Officer: Sjoer Bergervoet. You can contact her for questions regarding your future, for practicing a job interview, or go over your resume. An appointment can be scheduled at the Student Information Desk. Career Services also offers help on the road to the job market through workshops and tests.

PROGRAMME BOOK HISTORY OF POLITICS AND SOCIETY

7


Sjoer Bergervoet Drift 10 Room 0.05 E-mail: s.a.bergervoet@uu.nl appointments can be scheduled at the Student Information Desk

International Office If you are considering to go abroad during your Master’s programme, you will find more information regarding exchange programmes, regulations and preparation at the International office. It is important to start the process of orientation at the start of your programme, as the application deadlines are early on and a lot of paperwork is needed to complete your application. You can find more information on studying abroad on: http://students.uu.nl/en/academics/study-abroad

Student Information Desk At the Student Information Desk you can address all kinds of study related issues, such as course enrolment, time schedules, registration of course results and graduation. You can also make appointments with the academic counsellor and Career Officer, have your diploma and study results authenticated, and apply for exemptions there. The Student Information Desk can be reached by phone from Monday till Friday from 11.00-12.30 and 13.00-15.00 and the desk is open from Monday through Friday from 11.00-15.00. The Student desk is also available on WhatsApp for simple questions from Monday through Friday from 9.00-17.00 at the following number: 06 4108 4538 (please note: this number is only available for WhatsApp). Address Drift 10, 3512 BS Utrecht Phone number (030) 253 6285 E-mail address studiepunt.gw@uu.nl or studentdesk.hum@uu.nl Always state your student number and course with correspondence.

Student Services You can contact Student Services for information and advice. This includes for example issues regarding admission, application and enrolment, tuition fees, financial assistance, having a paid job during your programme, insurance, schemes and facilities for outstanding student athletes, student housing, student organisations and information about studying with a disability or chronic illness. Address: Opening hours: E-mail: Phone number:

Bestuursgebouw, Heidelberglaan 6 (De Uithof) Mo to Fr 10.00-16.00 studentservices@uu.nl (mention your student number!) (030) 253 7000 Monday through Friday 10.00-12.00 and 13.00-15.00

PROGRAMME BOOK HISTORY OF POLITICS AND SOCIETY

8


Student psychologist Utrecht University has two student psychologists: Fokke Dijkstra and Renske Marechal. If you are a Dutch student, you can schedule an appointment yourself (www.students.uu.nl/afspraakmaken-met-een-studentenpsycholoog, information in Dutch). If you are an international student, please contact Student Services either by phone or by coming to the desk – not by e-mail - to schedule an introductory meeting. During the introductory meeting, the student psychologist will investigate your problem. This will involve focusing on your personal background. Sometimes this initial meeting will be sufficient to assist you with your problem, sometimes more meetings will be required. Either way, the student psychologists are happy to help.

PROGRAMME BOOK HISTORY OF POLITICS AND SOCIETY

9


4. Important dates and deadlines Academic calendar SEMESTER I start 1st period: Monday 2 September 2019 (week 36) start 2nd period: Monday 11 November 2019 (week 46) Christmas vacation: 21 December 2019 - 5 January 2020 (week 52 and week 1) SEMESTER II start 3rd period: Monday 3 February 2020 (week 6) start 4th period: Monday 20 April 2020 (week 17) Non-teaching Days: 14-17 April and 22 Maye 2020 Reflection Weeks: 4-8 November 2019, 27-31 January and 6-9 April 2020 HOLIDAYS Christmas & Boxing Day: 25 and 26 December 2019 New Year’s Day: 01 January 2020 Good Friday: 10 April 2020 Easter: 12 and 13 April 2020

King’s Day: 27 April 2020 Liberation Day: 05 May 2020 Ascension Day: 21 May 2020 Whitsun: 31 May and 1 June 2019

Registration deadlines Utrecht University requires you to register for courses every semester, through Osiris. The deadline for registration for the courses in periods 3 and 4 will be 24 November 2019.

Dates and deadlines programme Introduction to Master’s programme: Tuesday 3 September 2019 Seminar: • Tuesday 17 September 2019: Career orientiation I: Self-analysis (Sjoer Bergervoet, Career Services) • Tuesday 1 October 2019: Career orientation II: (Online) networking and orientation (Sjoer Bergervoet, Career Services) • Tuesday 22 October 2019: Meeting with alumni (and pizza party!) • Tuesday 29 October 2019: Career orientation II: Interview training (Sjoer Bergervoet, Career Services) • Thursday 14 November 2019: Training Coping with stress (Laurens Meindertsma, study counsellor) All meetings take place at Drift 21, Sweelinckzaal (room 0.06) from 6 pm to 8 pm. The seminar will not appear in MyTimetable so please date, time and locationin your agenda. Deadline thesis submission: 22 June 2020 Deadline submission internship report and internship product: directly after completion of the internship.

Registration deadlines Utrecht University normally requires you to register for courses every semester, through Osiris. Periods 1 and 2 of your master’s programme are an exception, but for the thesis and the Politics and Society lab in periods 3 and 4 you will have to register yourself. The deadline for registration will be 24 November

PROGRAMME BOOK HISTORY OF POLITICS AND SOCIETY

10


2019. Registration for an internship is done in another way: you will be registered by the Student Information Desk after you have submitted an internship agreement and an internship workplan.

Graduation Ceremony The Master’s Programme History of Politics and Society organises a graduation ceremony in October or November 2020 to celebrate your successful completion of the programme. Further details will be provided in due time.

PROGRAMME BOOK HISTORY OF POLITICS AND SOCIETY

11


5. Programme information Programme outline FULL-TIME PROGRAMME OUTLINE PERIOD 1 (SEPT – MID NOV)

PERIOD 2 (MID NOV – JAN)

PERIODS 3 AND 4 (FEB – JUNE)

Cities, States, and Citizenship (5 EC, Eng)

Challenges of the Welfare State (5 EC, Eng)

Thesis (15 EC, Eng/Nl) and

Toolbox for Comparative Historical Research (5 EC, Eng)

Themes in the History of Politics and Society (5 EC, Eng/Nl)

Elective (5 EC):

Elective (5 EC):

A. Growth and Inequality (Eng) or B. Omgaan met voedselcrises (Nl)

C. Democratie en democratisering (Nl) or D. Civil society in the 19th and 20th century (Eng)

Internship (15 EC, Eng/Nl) or Politics and Society Lab (15 EC, Eng/Nl)

Career orientation Please note that in order to start with the thesis, successful completion of the courses Cities, States and Citizenship, Toolbox for Comparative Historical Research, and Themes in the History of Politics and Society is required. Likewise, in order to start with the internship or the lab, successful completion of the courses Cities, States and Citizenship and Challenges of the Welfare State is required. PART-TIME PROGRAMME OUTLINE YEAR 1 PERIOD 1 (SEPT – MID NOV)

PERIOD 2 (MID NOV – JAN)

PERIODS 3 AND 4 (FEB – JUNE)

Cities, States, and Citizenship (5 EC, Eng)

Challenges of the Welfare State (5 EC, Eng)

Internship (15 EC, Eng/Nl) or Politics and Society Lab (15 EC, Eng/Nl)

Choose an elective (period 1 or period 2): Elective (5 EC): A. Growth and Inequality (Eng) or B. Omgaan met voedselcrises (Nl)

Elective (5 EC): C. Democratie en democratisering (Nl) or D. Civil society in the 19th and 20th century (Eng)

Seminar

PROGRAMME BOOK HISTORY OF POLITICS AND SOCIETY

12


YEAR 2 PERIOD 1 (SEPT – MID NOV)

PERIOD 2 (MID NOV – JAN)

PERIODS 3 AND 4 (FEB – JUNE)

Toolbox for Comparative Historical Research (5 EC, Eng)

Themes in the History of Politics and Society (5 EC, Eng/Nl)

Thesis (15 EC, Eng/Nl)

Choose an elective (period 1 or period 2): Elective (5 EC): A. Growth and Inequality (Eng) or B. Omgaan met voedselcrises (Nl)

Elective (5 EC): C. Democratie en democratisering (Nl) or D. Civil society in the 19th and 20th centuries (Eng)

Courses CITIES, STATES, AND CITIZENSHIP Institutions shape human lives and human history. Without rules and organisations, societies disintegrate and the results are usually terrifying (think of Iraq or Syria today). One type of institutions that is seen as crucial for the well-being of societies, is civic organisations, with citizenship sitting in the middle. Citizenship has a long history in Europe, where it originated in cities and then shifted to the level of the state after the French Revolution (citoyen). Other civilizations did not use the concept, but did have similar citizenship ‘practices’. This course investigates this very long-term history, focusing on a series of episodes in the institutional history of citizenship, starting with Europe’s late medieval cities. TOOLBOX FOR COMPARATIVE HISTORICAL RESEARCH This course trains students to develop relevant and precise research questions and to choose and apply relevant methods and techniques for addressing these questions. The course builds on the general foundation laid in the BA programme: existing research skills are honed and deepened. Besides the development of a research question firmly embedded in the academic debate and a systematic operationalisation of that question, the course mainly focuses on the acquisition of skills in comparative and long-term historical research. Students are familiarised with the methods for this type of research, learn to apply these methods and also learn to critically reflect on their limitations. This is done through assignments in which insights from the methodological literature are applied to concrete examples of historical research on various political and societal issues. CHALLENGES OF THE WELFARE STATE The welfare state is perhaps the greatest achievement of the industrialised world. By providing a series of welfare schemes, governments have seriously reduced a host of risks that used to make the lives of all but the wealthiest classes miserable. In this course, students will learn about the various shapes of the welfare state in a range of industrialised European countries. The purpose of this exercise in comparative history is, however, not only to learn more about the history of the welfare state, but also to prepare for a career in one of its institutions, or some other public institution. Students will familiarise themselves with policies, and policy-making instruments, and be asked to write two policy documents for such institutions.

PROGRAMME BOOK HISTORY OF POLITICS AND SOCIETY

13


THEMES IN THE HISTORY OF POLITICS AND SOCIETY In this course students develop their own research design. To this purpose, students are assigned to one of a series of small groups that each focus on a (broad) theme in the history of politics and society (such as democracy, civil society, the welfare state, nationalism, and capitalism/the market). Within that theme, students choose the topic of their thesis, which should include a comparative historical analysis or long-term analysis. On the basis of a thorough study of secondary literature on the theme and on their own topic within it, students formulate a feasible research question. They identify relevant methods, cases and sources, as well as techniques to analyse these sources, and develop a realistic time schedule for their research. In doing so, they use the skills acquired during the course Toolbox for Comparative Historical Research. ELECTIVE A: GROWTH AND INEQUALITY This course presents an overview of the global processes which have occurred over the past millennium culminating in the distribution of unequal economic prosperity found today. Already before 1800 several predominantly rural regions experienced a transition to a highly urbanised society where benevolent polities, market institutions, and new technologies facilitated economic growth and development. The course sketches these developments, and links them to the genesis of the Industrial Revolution, while highlighting different measures of growth and inequality. The second part of the course focuses on the diffusion of modern economic growth and institutional constellations to other parts of the world. The main aim of this course is to analyse this long-term process of economic and institutional change by distinguishing multiple theoretical perspectives on its ultimate and proximate causes, as well as the vast global inequalities that came with it. ELECTIVE B: OMGAAN MET VOEDSELCRISES (ONLY IN DUTCH) De kwetsbaarheid van samenlevingen voor crises van allerlei aard (van natuurramp tot financiële ineenstorting) staat momenteel volop in de belangstelling. Waarom lukt het sommige samenlevingen om problemen op te vangen en snel te herstellen, terwijl elders een vergelijkbare situatie leidt tot een neerwaartse spiraal? Het antwoord ligt voor een belangrijk deel in de wijze waarop de samenleving is ingericht. In deze cursus wordt de aandacht gericht op een specifiek type crises: voedselcrises. Er komen verschillende theorieën en modellen aan de orde die gebruikt worden om de kwetsbaarheid van samenlevingen voor dergelijke crises te analyseren. Aan de hand daarvan bestuderen we diverse voedselcrises, vooral in de 19e en 20e eeuw maar soms ook eerder, in Europa en daarbuiten. Dat gebeurt vanuit een vergelijkend perspectief, waarbij zowel gebieden als perioden met elkaar vergeleken worden. Gekeken wordt naar de inrichting en het functioneren van de markt, maar ook naar de rol van nietcommerciële instituties: de overheid, hulporganisaties, informele lokale netwerken en familierelaties. Welke factoren maakten dat samenlevingen in staat waren om te voorkomen dat voedseltekorten uitgroeiden tot dramatische hongersnoden? De lijn wordt doorgetrokken naar het heden: welke lessen zijn hieruit te leren voor de wijze waarop we heden ten dage omgaan met voedselcrises, en met crises in het algemeen? ELECTIVE C: DEMOCRATIE EN DEMOCRATISERING (ONLY IN DUTCH) De staat van de democratie bevindt zich in een paradoxale situatie. Enerzijds lijkt er sinds 1989 geen alternatief als regeringsvorm meer over en claimen politieke regimes over de hele wereld democratisch te zijn. Anderzijds lijkt de democratie, met name in Europa, zich in een diepe crisis te bevinden waarin het vertrouwen van burgers in vertegenwoordigende instituties snel afneemt. Kortom: het vertrouwen in de democratie is groot, maar partijen, parlementen en politici worden gewantrouwd. Deze cursus geeft een overzicht van de historische ontwikkeling van democratie en theorieën van democratisering en draagt zo bij aan een beter begrip van de huidige democratische crisis. In deze cursus richten we ons op twee aspecten van dit debat over de staat en kenmerken van de democratie: de intellectuele wortels van ons modern democratiebegrip vanuit het perspectief van de politieke ideeëngeschiedenis; en theorieën over democratie en democratisering vanuit het perspectief van de politieke wetenschappen. Op deze manier traceren we de conceptuele ontwikkeling van democratie over een lange termijn; analyseren we de belangrijkste politieke instituties van democratie in het heden; en vergelijken we verschillende wetenschappelijke verklaringen voor democratisering. We

PROGRAMME BOOK HISTORY OF POLITICS AND SOCIETY

14


doen dit steeds vanuit een internationaal vergelijkend perspectief, waarbij we voortdurend het verband opzoeken tussen geschiedenis en actuele ontwikkelingen zoals de diplomademocratie; referenda en directe democratie; de opkomst van het populisme; en recente democratiseringsgolven binnen en buiten Europa. ELECTIVE D: CIVIL SOCIETY IN THE 19TH AND 20TH CENTURIES What is civil society? Is it a myth; or does it really exist? Is it an ideologically normative or an analytically descriptive category? This course shall provide students with a critical and historical perspective on the concept and evolvement of ‘civil society’, which is often thought of as the 'ham in the sandwich' between the public and private spheres. The aim of this course is to discuss ‘civil society’ in a historical context and to get a better understanding of the ways historians and social scientists have historicized its transformations over time. Students will become familiar with some theories of ‘civil society’ and explore some closely related social and political categories (such as public sphere and counter public-sphere; nationalism, liberalism and democracy; middle class and Bürgertum, social movements and participation). The course concludes with a contemporary and global perspective: to what extent is (the concept of) civil society still relevant in today’s global, urban and digital societies, and how does it differ from its past appearances? SEMINAR The seminar consists of a series of meetings which focus on bridging the gap between the Master’s programme and the first steps on the labour market. Although they are not rewarded with EC, attendance of all students is expected. The seminar takes place during the first semester and consists of five meetings. Together with Career Services of Utrecht University, we have developed a coherent series of three workshops during which students work on skills such as self-analysis, job and internship applications and networking. The seminar also includes an opportunity to meet with and talk to alumni of the programme and a training ‘Coping with stress’ The dates and times can be found on p. 8 of this programme book. They will not appear in MyTimetable so please note them in your agenda.

Career orientation During the programme you will improve your knowledge, but you will also work on academic and professional skills. It is not always clear when you are dealing with career orientation during your Master’s programme, apart from the events and workshops explicitly dedicated to career orientation. However, it is advisable to prepare yourself for your future career during your Master’s year by going through – as research shows - the following phases: reflecting on your motivation and work values, researching your opportunities on the job market, creating ties with potential employers and practising skills as needed for your job application and the following interview. This way, you will establish yourself as a professional. The Faculty of Humanities has its own Career Officer: Sjoer Bergervoet (see p. 6). You can contact her for questions regarding your future, for practicing a job interview, or go over your resume. An appointment can be scheduled at the Student Desk. Career Services also offers help on the road to the job market through workshops and tests. Career Services workshops might be incorporated in your master programme (ask your coordinator) but you are also welcome to join (other) workshops as an individual, on the following topics: LinkedIn, writing a curriculum and cover letter, transferable skills, and working consciously & effectively. Career Services also offers several online tests: the career check, work values test, career choice test, personality test, and competence test, hosts an online vacancy site; and organizes events such as the Humanities Career Night, the UU CareersDay , monthly evenings on Your Perspective: Career Opportunities for Humanities Graduates and twice a year a Curriculum checks and LinkedIn photo shoots. Visit www.uu.nl/en/careerservices for more information and check your email, blackboard or Facebookand LinkedIn-groups for announcements.

PROGRAMME BOOK HISTORY OF POLITICS AND SOCIETY

15


Internship and Politics & society lab The internship offers you the opportunity to learn how to apply academic skills and knowledge in real-life situations and to gain practical experience in your field, in order to prepare you for employment after graduation. The internship should be related to the core themes of the Master's programme: it should deal with a societal or political issue at a local, national or supra-national level. During your internship, you should fulfil a specific, individual assignment at an academic level. The assignment can involve a research project, the writing of a policy document, advice or evaluation report, but also, for instance, the organisation of a conference or exhibition. Internships come in two kinds. One option is an internship offered by the university. Please note that the university will offer only a limited number of internships: not necessarily enough for all students. Also note that there will be a competitive application procedure: the organisations looking for interns want to be able to select the student that fits the profile best. The second option is to search for a suitable internship yourself and submit if for approval. Options are (semi-)governmental organisations, business companies, NGOs, advisory boards or research agencies, political parties or large companies. Such an individual internship allows you considerable freedom to decide on the details of the assignment, of course together with the organisation offering the internship and your supervisor at the university. Finding a suitable internship takes time, so it is important to start early. In September you will be invited to a meeting where you will be provided with more information on the requirements for the internship but also with examples of internships by students of last year and the year before, a list of organisations that you may contact, and advice on how to go about it. During the internship you will be supervised by one of the teachers; you will also have a daily supervisor at the internship organisation. POLITICS & SOCIETY LAB Students who do not want to do an internship, or are unable to find a suitable internship position before the middle of January 2020, can replace it by the Politics and society lab. This is a group project at an academic level. Together with two or three other students you will, supervised by one of the teachers, dig into a recent social or political debate that is connected with the core themes of the Master's program. You are to decide on the topic yourself, together with the other students in your group. You are expected not just to analyse this debate from various angles—political, social, financial, juridical—but also to contribute to it. In order to do this, you can employ a variety of means that help you to gain insight and develop ideas. To give some examples: tracing and analysing existing (research) reports, doing interviews or working with questionnaires, attending debates in parliament or any other relevant arena, identifying and consulting experts on the topic and/or drawing an international comparison. The contribution to the debate may also take a variety of forms: for instance a website developed by yourselves on which you publish the results of (parts of) your work, one or more publications in an existing medium (such as Socialevraagstukken.nl), or an advice that you present to a public body or a company. The Politics & society lab requires you to cooperate as a group, which also means that you will have to divide the work. The end result will consist of a part that is the result of a joint effort and plus the subproducts that will be delivered by each of the group members individually. TIME SCHEDULE Both the internship and the Politics & society lab should cover c. 400 hours, or 10 full workings weeks; this is the equivalent of 15 EC. Please note that we will not approve internships that take up more than c. 400 hours as this would not leave you sufficient time to also write your thesis. One option is to write your thesis in period 3 and do the internship or lab in period 4, or vice versa. The other option is to divide your time in periods 3 and 4 equally between the internship or lab and the thesis. Which option is best will also depend on your own wishes and those of the internship organisation. MASTER’S INTERNSHIP / LAB GUIDE More information the requirements for the internship and the Politics & society lab, the preparations, the assessment, the role of the internship/lab supervisor and your own responsibilities will be in the Master’s internship/lab guide which you will receive in September. PREPARATIONS Before the start of the internship or the Politics and society lab, you write a work plan which states what the assignment entails (type of product, activities, time schedule) and what your learning goals are. In

PROGRAMME BOOK HISTORY OF POLITICS AND SOCIETY

16


addition, for students doing an internship an internship contract is required. This is an official document that states the rights and duties of the intern, the internship organisation and the university. The contract should be handed in at the Student Desk before the internship starts. Please note that once you have handed in the internship contract at the Student Desk you will be enrolled for the internship: you cannot do this through Osiris! During the internship or lab you submit weekly logs reporting your activities to the supervising teacher. ASSESSMENT

The assessment of the internship or Politics and society lab will be based on the following two elements: The product. If you did an internship, this is the product that you made for the internship organisation: the result of your internship assignment. If you did the Politics and society lab, this is the final product of that lab: as such, it will consist of an individual part and a collective part. The product can be a research report or a policy document, an advisory report or an evaluation report, but it can also include non-written products such as an exhibition, a website or a conference. In these cases you should hand in documentation such as the brochure of the exhibition, a print of the pages of the website, the programme of the conference, etc. in order to illustrate the results of the internship or lab. The report. You are expected to hand in a report of c. 10 pages in which they describe your activities but also reflect on the experiences you gained and on the relationship between the internship or lab and the knowledge acquired during the rest of your university education. To this report you should add the weekly logs. The supervising teacher assesses these documents. If you have done an internship: the evaluation of your performance at the internship workplace. The supervising teacher will ask your supervisor at the internship organisation to fill in a form reporting on your performance as an intern.

Thesis The thesis is comparable to a final exam that every student must pass in order to graduate with a Master’s degree. In all probability it will be the most extensive research report that you will write during your graduate studies, and in general you will be given a considerable amount of freedom to choose a topic and formulate a specific research question. In that sense the thesis is truly the culmination of your entire Master’s education: with it you demonstrate your ability to formulate research questions, conduct independent research, and present your results in written form according to the highest academic standards. You are of course not alone in this process; your thesis supervisor will be there to help guide your research and offer constructive feedback. However, the final responsibility for formulating a central research question, finding and processing relevant literature and source material, and applying concepts and methodologies that you have learned during your academic education, lies with the student. The thesis is a large project that often takes months to complete. The basis of every thesis is an academic research question: a question or issue that is the subject of scholarly debate but has yet to be fully resolved or adequately answered. The idea is to contribute to a current academic discussion or debate by way of a systematic analysis of both primary and secondary source material, an analysis which ultimately guides your arguments and leads to (new) conclusions. THEMES For the thesis a limited number of broad themes will be offered, such as democracy, civil society, the welfare state, nationalism, and capitalism/the market. For each of these themes groups of around six students will be formed; to each group a supervisor will be assigned. In October you will be asked to indicate your preference for one or two of these themes. In study period 2 you will, in the course Themes in the History of Politics and Society, write a research design for your thesis. In study period 3 and/or 4 you will do the research and write the thesis. MASTER’S THESIS GUIDE More information on issues such as how to find a good topic, length, deadlines, the role of your thesis supervisor and your own responsibilities, will be in the Master’s thesis guide which you will receive in October.

PROGRAMME BOOK HISTORY OF POLITICS AND SOCIETY

17


EVALUATION FORM The assessment of the thesis will be done by two evaluators who each fill out a standard evaluation form. This form can be found under https://students.uu.nl/en/hum/history-of-politics-and-society/studyprogramme/masters-thesis Aspects 1 up to and including 6 must be assessed satisfactory to be able to pass the Master’s thesis. In other words: one or more fails on these aspects will lead to a failed thesis. Moreover, the thesis must fulfil the formal preconditions, which are also mentioned on the evaluation form. If these preconditions are not fulfilled, the thesis may not be evaluated. PROCEDURES AND GRADING Your supervisor will be your first evaluator. Your thesis will be also be graded by second evaluator, who will fill out the evaluation form separately. First and second evaluator come to a final grade after joint consultation. Once the student has handed in the final version of the thesis, the evaluators have 10 working days to evaluate the thesis and inform the student of the final grade. If the first and second evaluator request assistance, and in cases in which the first and second evaluator cannot agree on the final grade for a thesis, a third evaluator will be approached and consulted by the first evaluator. The student will be given notice by the first evaluator that a third evaluator has been employed and that the grading period of 10 working days will be extended by another 10 working days. The third evaluator evaluates the grade of the first and second evaluator by examining their provisional grades and argumentation. The judgement of the third evaluator is binding. If the third evaluator agrees with the other two evaluators on the proposed grade (if all evaluators agree), no further argumentation is needed. A brief explanation will otherwise suffice. Eventually the Master’s thesis should be uploaded in the digital thesis archive of the University Library. This is a compulsory part of graduating. It is also possible to view the work of other students in the thesis archive, sorted by faculty. PLAGIARISM Utrecht University considers any form of academic dishonesty to be a very serious offense. Utrecht University expects each student to be familiar with and to observe the norms and values that ensure academic integrity. Therefore, when you start writing your thesis you will have to hand in the Plagiarism rules awareness statement, to be found at https://students.uu.nl/en/hum/history-of-politics-and-society/studyprogramme/masters-thesis. With this, you declare to know about and abide by the norms and rules on fraud and plagiarism of Utrecht University.

5.6. Policies and Procedures EDUCATION AND EXAMINATION REGULATIONS Every programme has its own Education and Examination Regulations (EER), in which the specific rules and regulations of that programme are described. There are also general Education and Examination Regulations that all Humanity programmes have to adhere to. The EER of your programme can be found by going through https://students.uu.nl/en/hum/history-ofpolitics-and-society/practical-information/academic-policies-and-procedures/education-and-examinationregulations FRAUD AND PLAGIARISM The most serious forms of deception that can impair integrity are fraud and plagiarism. Plagiarism is a form of fraud and is defined as the wrongful appropriation of another author’s work without proper citation. The text below provides further elaboration on what may be considered fraud or plagiarism, along with a number of concrete examples. Please note that this is not a comprehensive list!

PROGRAMME BOOK HISTORY OF POLITICS AND SOCIETY

18


If the university discovers a case of fraud or plagiarism, the study programme’s Board of Examiners may implement sanctions on the offender. The most serious sanction that the Board of Examiners may implement is the submission of a request for expulsion to the Executive Board of the university. Fraud Fraud may include: Copying answers from another person during an exam. The person providing the opportunity to copy is considered an accomplice to fraud; Being in possession of (i.e. having/carrying) tools and resources during examinations, such as pre-programmed calculators, mobile phones, smartwatch, smartglasses, books, course readers, notes, etc., consultation of which is not explicitly permitted; Allowing others to complete all or part of an assignment, and passing it off as your own work; Acquisition of the questions or answers of an exam prior to the time the exam is to take place; Fabrication of survey- or interview answers or research data. Plagiarism Plagiarism is the appropriation of another author’s works, thoughts, or ideas and the representation of such as one’s own work. The following are some examples of what may be considered plagiarism: Copying and pasting text from digital sources, such as encyclopaedias or digital periodicals, without using quotation marks and referring to the source; Copying and pasting text from the Internet without using quotation marks and referring to the source; Copying information from printed materials, such as books, periodicals or encyclopaedias, without using quotation marks and referring to the source; Using a translation of the texts listed above in one’s own work, without using quotation marks and referring to the source; Paraphrasing from the texts listed above without a (clear) reference: paraphrasing must be marked as such (by explicitly linking the text with the original author, either in text or a footnote), ensuring that the impression is not created that the ideas expressed are those of the student; Using another person’s imagery, video, audio or test materials without reference and in so doing representing them as one’s own work; Resubmission of the student’s own earlier work without source references, and allowing this to pass for work originally produced for the purpose of the course, unless this is expressly permitted in the course or by the lecturer; Using other students’ work and representing it as one’s own work. If this occurs with the other student’s permission, then he or she may be considered an accomplice to the plagiarism; When one author of a joint paper commits plagiarism, then all authors involved in that work are accomplices to the plagiarism if they could have known or should have known that the other was committing plagiarism; Submitting papers provided by a commercial institution, such as an internet site with summaries or papers, or which have been written by others, regardless of whether the text was provided in exchange for payment. For more information: http://students.uu.nl/en/practical-information/policies-and-procedures/fraud-andplagiarism COMPLAINTS If you feel you have not been treated properly by someone employed by Utrecht University, or if you disagree with a decision that affects you personally, you can respond in a number of ways. A complaint relates to conduct towards you. You cannot submit a complaint about a general rule or scheme. For more information: https://students.uu.nl/en/practical-information/policies-andprocedures/complaints-objections-and-appeals

PROGRAMME BOOK HISTORY OF POLITICS AND SOCIETY

19


APPEALS Every university has an Examination Appeals Board to which students can appeal. This Board is an independent appeals board established in accordance with the Higher Education and Research Act [Wet op het Hoger Onderwijs en Wetenschappelijk onderzoek]. It includes members from various different faculties. The chair and the deputy chair are both lawyers. Students also serve on the Examination Appeals Board. You can appeal decisions relating to: • Satisfying the requirements of the final academic review in connection with the performancelinked grant • Examination eligibility • A colloquium doctum (entrance examination) and addressing any deficiencies • Admission to the university teacher training programmes that qualify graduates to teach all classes at senior general secondary education (havo) and university preparatory education (vwo) level • Negative binding recommendation concerning the continuation of studies • Admission to a Master’s degree programme • Admission to a degree programme for which selection criteria are applied • Decisions made by Boards of Examiners and examiners. For more information: https://students.uu.nl/en/practical-information/academic-policies-andprocedures/complaints-objections-and-appeals/examination-appeals-board

PROGRAMME BOOK HISTORY OF POLITICS AND SOCIETY

20


6. Practical information Study delay Study delay can be caused by different circumstances and situations and can have serious consequences. Study delay can be caused by study-related problems such as ineffective study methods, stress or procrastination. If necessary, you can schedule an appointment with a Student Psychologist or Student Counsellor (via Student services) for guidance and advice. UNEXPECTED CIRCUMSTANCES Your studies can be delayed due to circumstances beyond your control, such as illness, psychological problems, family circumstances or other situations. If you are a full-time student and your studies have been delayed as a result of circumstances beyond your control, you may be able to receive financial compensation from Utrecht University. For further information about conditions and the procedure: please schedule an appointment with an academic counsellor. FORESEEN STUDY DELAY In other situations your study delay can be foreseen: • Pregnancy • Waiting time internships • Board activities in a student organisation • Disabilities or (chronic) illness • Student athletes For more information: https://students.uu.nl/en/practical-information/advising-and-counselling/studydelay

Workshops SKILLS LAB The Skills Lab is an accessible service desk where you can get a clear idea of what extracurricular courses, workshops, individual tutoring, electronic tools, etc. are available within this University. Much is available, but this wealth of resources can be hard to find and access for students with specific questions. We can show students where to go to improve any skill, be it writing, presenting, studying, or jobhunting. There is a physical desk at the second floor of the University Library Uithof. For more information, see https://students.uu.nl/en/student-life-and-career-orientation/workshops LANGUAGES Moreover, there are also language courses on offer by Babel. They offer Dutch and English courses and several foreign language courses in Dutch and/or the target language. For the language courses by Babel: www.babel.nl

Graduation Your faculty’s Board of Examiners determines when you graduate and what your final examination date (the date on your diploma) will be. You will have graduated when you meet all examination requirements. The Board of Examiners will inform you by email as soon as you meet (nearly) all examination requirements. Please note that graduating does not always mean your enrolment will end automatically! If you wish to terminate your enrolment before the end of the academic year, you have to do so yourself. Do you wish to postpone your graduation? File a request for postponement with the Board of Examiners within two weeks of their informing you of your imminent graduation. So keep a close eye on your UU email account!

PROGRAMME BOOK HISTORY OF POLITICS AND SOCIETY

21


TERMINATION OF ENROLMENT Your enrolment can be terminated as of the 1st of the month following your request for termination of enrolment, no sooner. This means that if you submit a request for termination in the month of September, your enrolment will be terminated as of 1 October. You cannot terminate your enrolment retroactively. When you graduate, you may choose to terminate your enrolment as of the 1st of the month following your graduation date. You may also stay enrolled for the rest of the academic year, in which case your enrolment automatically ends as of 1 September. Do you want your enrolment to end as of 1 September? Or do you decide to stop in the month June, July or August? Then there is no need to request termination of enrolment. Your current enrolment will automatically end as of 1 September. For more information: https://students.uu.nl/en/practical-information/enrolment/termination-ofenrolment VALIDITY RESIDENCE PERMIT If you are a non-EU/EEA student and hold a residence permit for study purposes, your residence permit is only valid as long as you are enrolled as a student at Utrecht University. From the date you are no longer enrolled, your residence permit becomes void and you will be required to leave the country within 28 days. For more information please contact the visa department: visa@qdesk.uu.nl.

Solis-id Your Solis-id is your user name for most university services. Used in combination with your Solis password, it gives you access to services such as OSIRIS, Blackboard and Surfspot. You should also sign in using your Solis-id at the university computers. You will have been sent your Solis-id and password in two separate emails when you enrolled at the university or took part in the matching programme. If you have not received these emails, please take your student card or proof of enrolment to UU for U Student Services. If you have received your Solis-id but not your password, go to the password self-service to change your password. AFTER DEREGISTRATION Once you are no longer enrolled at Utrecht University you will be sent an email warning you that your Solis-id and password are only valid for another 180 days. After this six-month period you will no longer be able to use the IT services associated with your Solis-id. Your email address will also be terminated. So it is important that you save and secure any files and emails that you want to keep before then. Do you want to back up your e-mails? You can easily do this by making a copy of the data from your account via Google takeout. PASSWORD SELF-SERVICE In the Solis-id password self-service (www.uu.nl/password) you can change your Solis-id password yourself. Here you can also create a new password if you have forgotten your password or if you never received one. For more information: www.students.uu.nl/en/solis-id

Osiris Osiris Student is the internet portal to the Osiris study information system. Here you can register for course offerings and tests and review your results and course schedule. Access Osiris Student with your Solis-id via www.uu.nl/osirisstudent or click the Osiris-icon you find below every page on this website.

PROGRAMME BOOK HISTORY OF POLITICS AND SOCIETY

22


UU Gmail Every student has access to his/her own UU Gmail account. A lot of communication, from the UU or your teachers, goes to this address. Moreover, it is possible to save, edit and share files in the Google Drive. You log in with your UU Gmail email address (for example: j.smith@students.uu.nl) and your password (your UU Gmail password is not by definition the same as your Solis password!). Link: http://gmail.students.uu.nl

Blackboard All Utrecht University students and staff use the digital learning environment Blackboard. You can use the Blackboard Mobile Learn app to access Blackboard information on your mobile devices. This app is suitable for Android, Blackberry, iPhone, iPod Touch and iPad. In Blackboard, under ‘Support’ > ‘Support students’, you will find a Quick Start Guide to help you get started.

MyUU app and MyTimetable In the MyUU app for students you will find your grades from Osiris, your student card and your personal timetable. Download the app from the app stores of Android and Apple. Once installed you log in with your Solis-id and password. MyTimetable is the timetable website of Utrecht University. Log on using your Solis-id and password. More information on https://students.uu.nl/en/node/6/mytimetable. In due time the timetables in OSIRIS Student and on https://students.uu.nl will no longer be available. We advise you, therefore, to use MyTimetable or the MyUU app from now on. Timetable changes may not appear real-time on the old websites.

WiFi Utrecht University has a wireless network in most of its university buildings, named Eduroam. Log in using your Solis-id and add @soliscom.uu.nl (for example 1234567@soliscom.uu.nl) and your password. You can find help setting up this network on your device on https://www.uu.nl/en/universitylibrary/practical-information/facilities/wi-fi Eduroam is also available at other educational institutions, both nationally as well as internationally. You can log in on the Eduroam network at any location using your UU Solis-id and password.

Library Utrecht University has multiple libraries, but the most important ones for Humanities are the one in the city centre and in the Utrecht Science Park (sometimes referred to as ‘de Uithof’). Both locations have a large collection of not only books but also manuscripts, journals, films and audio files. It is also possible to make use of the computers and printers and study in the designated study areas. BORROWING BOOKS You must have a library card to be able to borrow books. This card is available for free for UU students and can be created for you at the library desk. The standard loan period of books is 28 days, although you can borrow some books and journals for a shorter period. Using the website, you can extend your loan multiple times, unless someone else has reserved the book. You can borrow up to 15 books at the same time. Should you need more books at once due to exceptional circumstances, permission may be granted to raise the amount of books you are allowed to borrow at the same time. Using the catalogue, you can make a reservation on books. Once you have done that (and if the book is available/not on loan at that time) the university library team will collect the book and place it on a bookshelf at the entrance of the library (‘de afhaalkast’). Books that are not stored in the depot are easily accessible, as they are on their shelves. Look the shelf number up in the catalogue or browse through the bookcases until you find what you are looking for.

PROGRAMME BOOK HISTORY OF POLITICS AND SOCIETY

23


If you do not return your books in time, you will receive a reminder and a 7 days extension to return them. If the books are not returned by the end of the seventh day, you will be fined. The height of the fine will depend on the amount of books and the amount of days they are due. You can pay your fine at the desk or the designated pay machine. You will also be fined for damaged books, so make sure you look after them! ‘COLLEGEPLANKEN’ Teachers can choose to reserve certain books and have them placed on a specific shelf for the duration of their course. These shelves are called ‘collegeplanken’; books placed here cannot be borrowed for the duration of the course. This way students can all take a look at the books and make copies if necessary. The collegeplanken can be found in the city centre library and are labelled after the title of the course. PRACTICAL INFORMATION The opening hours of the University Library in the Uithof and city centre are: Mon-Fri: 8 am- 10.30 pm Sat-Sun: 10 am- 10.30 pm The visiting hours are extended in the exam periods. The opening hours of the University Library are the following: Mon-Thu: 8 am- 1 am Fri & Sat: 8 am- 10.30 pm Sun: 8 am- 1 am The library applies different opening hours on public holidays and holiday periods. These can be found on the website of the University Library. Universiteitsbibliotheek Binnenstad Universiteitsbibliotheek Utrecht Science Park

Drift 27, 3512 BR Utrecht Heidelberglaan 3, 3584 CS Utrecht

For more information and the library catalogue: www.students.uu.nl/universiteitsbibliotheek or http://www.uu.nl/en/university-library

Course evaluations Good quality education is important to you and also to the Faculty of Humanities. In order to guarantee the quality of education, the faculty and programme would like to know your opinion on the courses you have attended. At the end of each block, you will receive an invitation via email to fill in a questionnaire and to provide feedback for each course. The digital evaluation system Caracal (caracal.science.uu.nl) is used for the course evaluations. You can log in to Caracal using your Solis-id and password. You will then see the course evaluations that apply to you. By answering a couple of open and closed questions you evaluate the courses you have attended. All of the answers will be processed anonymously. After the deadline you will be able to see the results for evaluated courses in Caracal. All the answers to the open and closed questions are visible for students who attended the course and the lecturer(s) of the course. The lecturer(s) can also post a reaction to the course evaluation. Students who did not attend the course only see the answers to the closed questions and not the reaction of the lecturer(s). The Curriculum Committee will carefully review the results of the course evaluations and address potential problems or compliment good initiatives. They will publish their advice as a result of the course evaluations in Caracal for all students to see. This will occur twice each year, prior to the course registration period. It is therefore advisable to log in now and again to see if the Curriculum Committee has already posted their advice, or the lecturer has responded to your course evaluations.

PROGRAMME BOOK HISTORY OF POLITICS AND SOCIETY

24


7. Getting Around Utrecht Utrecht is an amazing city with old canals, a lot of sights and nice bars and restaurants. The old city centre can easily be crossed on foot, while the rest of Utrecht is best visited using a bike or the public transport. On the visitor website of Utrecht (www.visit-utrecht.com) you can find interesting historical locations, museums, festivals, shops and group activities in the city. And not only does Utrecht have a beautiful old core, a lively student community traverses its streets. Before and during your stay in Utrecht this website may be very useful to you for all the questions you might have and more: www.uu.nl/welcometoutrecht. Make sure to check it out!

Housing Finding an accommodation in Utrecht can be quite a challenge. Utrecht is one of the most popular university towns in the Netherlands, and the demand for student housing is very high. It is therefore absolutely necessary to start looking for accommodation as soon as possible (if you are not already). You may find accommodation via Dutch housing websites such as Kamernet (www.kamernet.nl) and SHH (www.sshxl.nl), which are both accessible in English as well as in Dutch. SSH reserves completely furnished rooms for international students (limited availability, so on first come, first serve basis!). Our Admissions Office can provide you with more information or can assist you in finding housing elsewhere. Usually, Dutch accommodation websites offer housing to the person with the ‘oldest’ registration number. Some of the accommodation is available immediately, for other you need to be registered for a longer period (between 4-18 months). In case of a room: you are usually invited to a Present Yourself Night. You visit the floor or house in which a room will be vacated, in order to both view the room and meet your prospective co-tenants.

Locations You will find the addresses of all University buildings (with links to maps showing their location) on https://students.uu.nl/en/contact/buildings

PROGRAMME BOOK HISTORY OF POLITICS AND SOCIETY

25


8. Links •

• • • • • •

http://students.uu.nl/en/hum/history-of-politics-and-society or http://students.uu.nl/gw/geschiedenis-van-politiek-en-maatschappij (website Master’s programme) http://www.uu.nl/universiteitsbibliotheek or http://www.uu.nl/en/university-library (University Library) http://ong.wp.hum.uu.nl/en/ or http://ong.wp.hum.uu.nl (history research guide, including writing tips and requirements for citations) https://www.osiris.universiteitutrecht.nl https://uu.blackboard.com www.dub.uu.nl (university newsletter) http://www.uu.nl/careerservices (career services)

For international students: • www.uu.nl/welcometoutrecht (for international students) • https://www.studyinholland.nl/education-system/dutch-grading-system (Dutch grading system)

PROGRAMME BOOK HISTORY OF POLITICS AND SOCIETY

26


Š Faculty of Humanities, Utrecht University, 2019

Profile for HumanitiesUU

Programme book Master History of Politics and Society 2019-2020  

The master of History of Politics and Society's programme book contains all the relevant information on the programme itself (courses, inte...

Programme book Master History of Politics and Society 2019-2020  

The master of History of Politics and Society's programme book contains all the relevant information on the programme itself (courses, inte...