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Undergraduate study 2011

Nursing, midwifery and ODP


Key facts

Welcome | 1

Nursing – BSc (Hons) / RN (branch-specific)

Pre-qualifying courses | 4

Branch

UCAS code

Adult

B740

3 years full-time

Partnership working | 5

Child

B730

3 years full-time

Nursing | 6

Learning Disability

B761

3 years full-time

Midwifery | 13

Mental Health

B760

3 years full-time

Operating department practice | 17

Graduate entry

Applications and contacts | inner back cover

Duration

Branch

UCAS code

Adult

3010

2 years full-time

Duration

Child

3310

2 years full-time

Learning Disability

3210

2 years full-time

Mental Health

3110

2 years full-time

Midwifery Branch

UCAS code

BSc (Hons)

No course code †

3 years full-time

Duration

Graduate Diploma in Midwifery

No course code †

3 years full-time

BSc (Hons)

No course code † 85 weeks full-time*

PGDip in Midwifery

No course code †

85 weeks fulltime*

Operating Department Practice (ODP) Branch

UCAS code

DipHE

B990

Duration 2 years full-time

† Apply directly to the University, not through UCAS. * Only for adult nurses on the NMC Register at Level 1.

For all application routes and contact details, see the inner back cover.

Dates of semesters Semester 1 27 Sep – 16 Dec 2011

Semester 2 30 Jan – 11 May 2012


Welcome Welcome to the Faculty of Health and Social Care at the University of Hull. The faculty is situated within the dynamic new Health development on the western side of the Hull Campus, which includes a state-of-the-art clinical skills facility. The faculty attracts more than 2,000 students each year. They undertake a variety of educational courses and research from our comprehensive portfolio for prequalifying, post-registration and postgraduate nurses, midwives and other health care professionals. All courses are developed in partnership with health and social care colleagues, both nationally and internationally. Our learning and teaching strategies include inter-professional learning with students from the Hull York Medical School and other departments within the University. The use of e-learning complements traditional lectures and seminar presentations. Students are able to practise clinical skills in the safe environment of the clinical skills facility. Placement learning takes place in a range of health and social care environments in East Yorkshire and North and North East Lincolnshire. The quality of our learning and teaching has won excellent feedback from the QAA Health Care (2004, 2006) and HLSP (2007) reviews, as well as the professional statutory bodies that monitor and conjointly validate our portfolio of professional courses. Committed and dedicated sta are here to support you in your personal development, and I extend a warm invitation to you to join us in the Faculty of Health and Social Care at Hull.

Christine English Dean of the Faculty of Health and Social Care

www.hull.ac.uk

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Baby blues Ten percent of expectant mothers suer from antenatal or postnatal depression: that’s around 70,000 women each year. Innovative research carried out at the University recommended that midwives should be trained in diagnosing depression during pregnancy too – and Hull is leading this new strategy for tackling maternal mental health.


A recent review by the Nursing and Midwifery Council found that we provided a high-quality learning experience for students. And we know that our students agree because our results in the National Student Survey have improved every year.


Pre-qualifying courses Here at the University of Hull we offer the following professional courses that lead not only to an academic award but also to a registered nursing, midwifery or operating department practice (ODP) qualification: • • • •

BSc (Hons) Nursing / Registered Nurse (branch) Postgraduate Diploma in Midwifery Graduate Diploma in Midwifery DipHE / Registered Operating Department Practitioner

Qualifications may be obtained at degree level in midwifery and all specialist branches of nursing and at diploma level for ODP. A degree course will equip you with the skills to become a safe and competent practitioner with a sound understanding of the theoretical basis of clinical practice. Staff within the Faculty of Health and Social Care believe that this is most effectively achieved by closely integrating your clinical and theoretical experience. Our close working relationships with health and social care providers enhance the whole student experience. Such partnerships ensure that our students’ practice experience is commensurate with their level of training and the modules currently being studied. Non-school-leavers are encouraged to undertake health care programmes as they bring with them many valuable skills and experiences. In formulating our entry criteria for non-school-leavers, we embrace and support the widening-participation agenda. Ours is a learning environment which is responsive to change, and which contributes to the development and expansion of knowledge through the research activities of staff. We use a variety of teaching and assessment methods which engage you in the development of cognitive, psychomotor and affective skills and attributes. These include lectures, tutorials, group work, seminars, workshops, problem-based learning, practical demonstrations and virtual learning environments (VLE). Some teaching takes place in our highly advanced centre for clinical skills, which enables you to learn, practise and rehearse many clinical skills under direct supervision and in small groups. All of our pre-qualifying courses consist of compulsory modules, and you will study six modules per year (two per semester). Each module is assessed, and successful completion of all modules is necessary to attain the professional award.

Our courses will equip you with the skills to become a safe and competent practitioner with a sound understanding of the theoretical basis of clinical practice.

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Practice is an integral and important part of the courses and is assessed in placement. Clinical placements are undertaken within local NHS trusts, both north and south of the River Humber. While on clinical placement, students are taught and supported by experienced practitioners with a wealth of knowledge and clinical skills. The courses involve attendance on block release and individual study days as well as rostered time within varied clinical environments. Owing to the various and complex demands of these courses, all students are required to be computer-literate before commencing their studies.


Partnership working Partnership working with NHS and other health and social care agencies is an essential feature of the Faculty of Health and Social Care. From our close working relationship with health care providers the whole student experience develops. At all stages of the courses, staff from the NHS and other health and social care agencies participate in the education and training of our students, which can be in the clinical areas or in a classroom setting. During clinical placements, students are allocated mentors who oversee and assess their clinical practice.

Our close working relationships with health and social care providers enhance the whole student experience.

The Faculty of Health and Social Care works with its partners in several ways. • The Strategic Health Forum offers an opportunity for the faculty and its partners to meet and ensure that we are keeping up to date with national and local health and social care activities. • The Partnership Advisory Group brings together directors of the faculty, directors of nursing and other senior people to discuss and to monitor quality and partnership issues. • Programme Management Groups bring together staff from practice and the faculty to manage the continuing development of the programmes. • Practice Learning Facilitators (PLFs) support mentors and students in practice. Members of the faculty staff are also involved in a variety of groups and working parties right across the spectrum of health and social care. This means that our lecturers are able to stay in touch with the rapidly changing world of health care. By working in partnership we are also able to ensure that new developments in health and social care policy and practice are reflected within new and existing courses.

www.hull.ac.uk

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Nursing What nurses do For the nurse, the central focus is always the individual patient or client and the provision of holistic care. To ensure that this occurs, you will also be involved in supporting the family and friends of the patient or client. This requires a full assessment of the patient or client and his or her needs, utilising many differing skills ranging from listening to technical skills. As a key member of a multidisciplinary team, you will be required to work with other health professionals. Nursing covers a range of activities and skills that few other professions can match. For example, it can involve helping someone to recover from an operation, encouraging someone to live life independently in the community or enabling someone with a mental illness to come to terms with the voices in their head. Nurses can be equally diverse in character and temperament – extroverted, shy, ambitious, idealistic, funny, serious … Whichever you are, if you have the drive to attain the necessary professional standards for nursing, you will be very welcome because you are very likely to have the capacity to make a difference. And there are so many reasons to become a nurse: the variety, the teamwork, the skills and self-confidence that you will acquire, the sense of achievement and doing something worthwhile, as well as great prospects for career development, are all there to be had. To prepare yourself for this exciting career, you will need to develop relevant skills and acquire an appropriate recordable qualification.

The branches Adult branch (B740 / 3010) Hull has a culturally and socially diverse population situated within both urban and rural communities. In order to meet the health needs of the population, care takes place in a range of acute hospital and community settings. Students may also work alongside medical students in several placement areas or on our dedicated interprofessional training ward. Your education will equip you with the necessary skills and knowledge to deliver high-quality evidence-based health care. You will also develop an understanding of the health care environment and your role within a multidisciplinary team.

There are so many reasons to become a nurse: the variety, the teamwork, the skills and self-confidence that you will acquire, the sense of achievement and doing something worthwhile, as well as great prospects for career development.

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You will develop invaluable skills including communication skills, verbal and nonverbal; reflection skills, used in order to develop self-awareness; clinical skills such as hand washing, moving and handling patients, and monitoring vital signs; and record-keeping skills. The course is both challenging and rewarding. You will need to develop time management and problem-solving skills, and you will need to be adaptable in order to work within a constantly changing health care environment. In return you will have the satisfaction of knowing that you can make a difference to people’s lives. You need to be trustworthy and have a caring and nonjudgmental attitude.


Child branch (B730 / 3310) The course in children’s nursing equips you with the knowledge and skills required to provide professional care to sick children nursed in hospital or in the community. It should be noted that this course is both academically and emotionally challenging. Applicants should consider whether they have the necessary aptitude to undertake an academic programme while at the same time working with children who often have significant health care needs. Clinical experience is undertaken in a range of health care settings throughout the Humberside area. Students have to be willing to undertaken placements in both North and South Humberside. While challenging, working with sick children can be hugely rewarding. There can be few areas of work which enable practitioners to make a greater and more significant contribution to people’s lives. You learn to work with both children and their families. You must learn to communicate and interact with parents and other family members in situations that are often difficult. However, children’s nursing can also be fun and incredibly enjoyable. Above all else, those who seek to work with sick children must have a real love for children and both a deep respect for and a keen interest in the study of childhood.

While challenging, working with sick children can be hugely rewarding. There can be few areas of work which enable practitioners to make a greater and more significant contribution to people’s lives.

The course is designed to be both inspiring and visionary. You are encouraged to find appropriate evidence but also to employ analytical skills and use your imagination in order to fully understand how the sick child can be nursed effectively and empathically. You are also encouraged to look at ways in which the care of the sick child can be improved and developed. Students are encouraged to develop the skills that will be needed for tomorrow’s nursing as well as the skills needed today. The children’s nursing courses share some core modules with the mental health, learning disability and adult nursing courses. Modules specific to child nursing include • • • • •

Clinical Skills in Children’s Nursing Chronic and Acute Illness in Children Children with Learning Disabilities and/or Mental Health Needs Multidisciplinary Perspectives on Child Harm Care of the Critically Ill Child

Applications are welcomed from individuals who consider that they to have the very special range of skills needed for these courses.

www.hull.ac.uk

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Learning Disability branch (B761 / 3210)

Mental Health branch (B760 / 3110)

At the University of Hull we provide a pre-registration course that offers our students the opportunity to experience diversity of need, age range and service provider. People with a learning disability often live in poverty and socially deprived areas and do not have the opportunity to work, and as a student nurse you will develop an understanding of how this can impact on their health and wellbeing.

Where else might you come across a rap artist in your classroom or a stimulating discussion about the nature of empathy on a visit to a sculpture park? We want you to be fully prepared for the vast range of people and settings that you will undoubtedly come across in a career in mental health nursing, so we try hard to give you the broadest possible experience.

You will work with people with a learning disability in practice areas including their own homes, local communities, schools, residential services, assessment and treatment units and day services. In Hull and surrounding areas we have strong links with a variety of services to enable students to experience working with many care providers in all areas of life. Within the small specialty of learning disability, you will benefit from strong supervision and support from a team of lecturers and mentors in practice. Our students regularly have the opportunity to attend local, regional and national learning disability events. Each semester we invite all learning disability nursing students to come together in a fun event and gain valuable peer support. Service users and carers regularly contribute to our teaching, and we promote branch trips to other areas and services.

Becoming a mental health nurse is both a personal and a professional journey that involves the acquisition and development of special skills and qualities, which is why we offer a strongly experiential course with a clear focus on service user and practitioner involvement. You will learn and develop through working with people with a fascinating range of views and insights. Our student groups are small, so we can offer support and encouragement both in practice and in study. We also have dedicated practice placement facilitators and experienced practitioners working closely with you, your lecturers and your mentors. As a society we find it much easier to talk about being physically well or unwell than about mental health problems. The one-to-one personal relationships that mental health nurses form with people are at the heart of the care process. Your education and training is structured to help build these therapeutic relationships. The key challenge for mental health nurses is to use their specialist skills, together with their own personal strengths, to help people come to terms with their problems. Mental health nurses are also the most likely to be responsible for coordinating a patient’s care in the community. You will therefore find yourself liaising professionally with a wide range of other services, including social workers, police, charities, and local government and housing officials.

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Entry criteria for BSc (Hons) Nursing

International applicants

Minimum of 200 points on the UCAS tariff scale.

International applicants are welcome. The application process must be complete by 30 June, and we strongly suggest that the process is initiated as soon as possible in the preceding year. You are welcome to email us for a copy of our international student guidelines – fhsc.admiss@hull.ac.uk or – to contact the International Coordinator – jeremy.jolley@hull.ac.uk.

GCSE English, Mathematics and Science at grade C or above, or an agreed alternative (e.g. Certificate of Adult Numeracy at Level 2, which must have been completed within two years of commencing the course), are mandatory. If these subjects are inherent in other courses, then those may be taken into consideration.

Key course information

Some examples:

Applications

• two GCE A levels – minimum of CC grades • two GCE A levels and GCE or VCE A level – minimum of CC grade in two subjects • GCE/VCE A level and AS levels or equivalent – minimum of CC grade in two A2 subjects • five Scottish Highers • five Irish Leaving Certificate subjects (Highers) • BTEC National Diploma – MMP • Access to Higher Education Certificate – 48 credits at Level 3 • Access to Higher Education Diploma – 60 credits at Level 3 (some units will be mandatory and will require specific grades, depending on the programme offered by your FE college) • University Certificate in Clinical Skills Other qualifications, including the International Baccalaureate, will be considered. Students who are currently completing a Foundation degree may be eligible to enter directly into Year 2 of a course, but must have achieved an acceptable numeracy unit within their course to a minimum of GCSE Mathematics grade C. They must also have achieved the NMC standards for entry into branch.

Graduate entry If you are a graduate with a 2.2 classification in a subject that has at least a 50% link with health care, you may be able to undertake a two-year shortened course. Your previous degree will be assessed for content and learning outcomes against our course requirements. Only first-round applications will be accepted and, if invited for interview, applicants will be required to provide details of their degree course (including individual module content) before the interview.

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Applications for all branches of BSc (Hons) Nursing are made online via UCAS between 1 September and 30 June of each year (see the inner back cover). Foundation degree students should apply via UCAS but must note on their application that they wish to be considered for entry into Year 2. Please be advised that we only accept applications for Child branch courses between 1 September and 15 January.

Course timetable All courses commence in September of each year. There is also an intake for the Adult and Mental Health branches in January 2012.

Course structure It is a three-year full-time course which involves spending 50% of your time at the University and 50% in clinical practice. There are 12 teaching weeks (six weeks of theory and six weeks of practice). Theory and practice are each covered in block periods.

Working hours While on clinical practice, you will be required to work a total of 37.5 hours each working week. These hours will include shifts of early mornings, late evenings, and weekends and night duty as directed by your clinical mentor.


Clinical placements

Tuition fees

Placements are undertaken throughout North Lincolnshire, North East Lincolnshire, and Hull and East Yorkshire NHS Trusts and are determined by your home address. They could be undertaken in acute hospitals, the community, the private sector, the prison service, nursing and residential homes, nurseries and schools, social services or anywhere where care is provided, and they are linked to the course of study. Excess travelling expenses are available.

These are currently paid by the NHS Business Services Authority; EU/EEA students may be eligible for tuition fees only. International tuition fee rates will be applicable for all non-EU students.

Annual leave There is nine weeks’ holiday per year – three weeks at Christmas, three at Easter and three in the summer. All leave is preset by the course and is non-negotiable.

Attendance All courses lead to professional registration as well as an academic award and are made up of a specified number of theory and practice hours. Students are required to attend all lectures and clinical placement duties. All hours missed must be made up or professional registration will be delayed.

Funding Students on NHS programmes may be eligible to be considered for an NHS bursary. Students will be considered for a bursary in line with the guidelines issued by the NHS Business Services Authority. Full information about bursaries can be obtained at www.nhbsa.nhs.uk/students. You are strongly advised to make use of this website to ensure that you know the bursary entitlement before the start of a course. From September 2011 we expect changes to the NHS bursary, and students are strongly advised to make use of the NHS website for further information – www.nhsbsa.nhs.uk/students. International students will not receive any funding.

Secondment

Course places Places on all NHS programmes of study are conditional on the following for all applicants: • satisfactory interview • achieving the required academic credits • references (academic/work or character – references from friends or relatives are not accepted) • Criminal Records Bureau checks • registration on the ISA register • availability of NHS funding and clinical placements Applicants must also have reached the age of 18 by the start of the course.

Academic ability All students are required to have completed some kind of formal academic study in the preceding three years in preparation for such a demanding course. You might, for example, have completed a study skills course to update your skills in self-directed study, essay writing, word processing and advanced study.

Proficiency in English and numeracy All students are required to meet the University and professional requirement of proficiency in the English language and mathematics, either in the form of GCSE grade C or above or an alternative qualification such as IELTS with a minimum score of 6 in reading, writing, listening and speaking if from the EU, or a minimum of 7 if from a non-English speaking country outside the EU. Please note that the Certificate of Adult Numeracy at Level 2 is accepted, but the Certificate of Adult Literacy at Level 2 or an ESOL certificate is not accepted, as an alternative.

If students are employed by the local trusts or PCTs, they may be eligible for a secondment. This needs to be discussed with the training and development department of the employing trust or PCT. You are expected to have secured a place at university before making an application for a secondment.

www.hull.ac.uk

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Students with/declaring a disability We welcome applications from people with a disability. Applicants who wish to consider pursuing a professional course in nursing or midwifery are reminded, however, that questions of fitness for the particular profession will have to be taken into account. Where appropriate, the University will offer disabled applicants the opportunity to make use of alternative means of meeting course requirements. All students being admitted to the Nursing course will be required to undergo a medical check to assess their professional suitability prior to admission. Applicants who declare a disability will be consulted on their needs and provided with advice about appropriate support on an individual basis. Further advice can be obtained from Disability Services on 01482 466833.

In-depth course details These can be accessed via our faculty website: www.hull.ac.uk/fhsc. Click on ‘Programmes’ and select the relevant course.

Branch Course Leaders • Adult: Christine Howe – c.m.howe@hull.ac.uk; Joanne Hatfield – j.hatfield@hull.ac.uk • Child: Jeremy Jolley – jeremy.jolley@hull.ac.uk • Learning Disability: Mary Dearing – m.m.dearing@hull.ac.uk • Mental Health: Ian Barkley – i.h.barkley@hull.ac.uk

Placements are undertaken throughout North Lincolnshire, North East Lincolnshire, and Hull and East Yorkshire NHS Trusts and are determined by your home address.

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Midwifery

What midwives do The central focus is always on the woman. That means listening to women, recognising their needs and responding appropriately. You will be involved in supporting families and friends of the pregnant woman. As a key member of a multidisciplinary team you will be required to liaise with other health professionals and with emergency and social services to ensure continuity of support for people who need it. Midwifery covers a range of activities that few other professions can match: for example, helping to promote good health in pregnancy or helping a new mother to cope after the birth.

Midwifery covers a range of activities that few other professions can match: for example, helping to promote good health in pregnancy or helping a new mother to cope after the birth.

Midwives can be equally diverse in character and temperament – extroverted, shy, ambitious, idealistic, funny, serious … Whichever you are, if you have the drive to attain the necessary professional standards for nursing, you will be very welcome because you are very likely to have the capacity to make a difference. And there are so many reasons to become a midwife: the variety, the teamwork, the skills and self-confidence that you will acquire, the sense of achievement and doing something worthwhile, as well as great potential for career development. To prepare yourself for this exciting career, you will need to develop relevant skills and acquire an appropriate recordable qualification.

Entry criteria for three-year BSc (Hons) Midwifery programme Minimum of 280 points on the UCAS tariff scale. GCSE English, Mathematics and Science at grade C or above, or an agreed alternative (e.g. Certificate of Adult Numeracy at Level 2, which must have been completed within two years of commencing the course), are mandatory. If these subjects are inherent in other courses, then theose may be taken into account. For example: • three GCE A levels – minimum of BBC grades • two GCE A levels and GCE or VCE A level – minimum of B/C grade in two subjects • GCE or VCE A level and AS levels or equivalent – minimum of B/C grade in two A2 subjects • five Scottish Highers • five Irish Leaving Certificate subjects (Highers) • BTEC National Diploma – DMM • Access to Higher Education Certificate – 72 credits at Level 3 • Access to Higher Education Diploma – 60 credits at Level 3 (some units will be mandatory and will require specific grades, depending on the programme offered by your FE college) Other qualifications, including the International Baccalaureate, will be considered.

Entry criteria for 85-week Midwifery programme It is possible to undertake BSc (Hons) Midwifery in 85 weeks if you already hold a recordable qualification with the NMC at Level 1 as an RN (Adult). If you have previously completed a BSc (Hons) Adult programme, you are eligible to undertake the 85-week Postgraduate Diploma in Midwifery.

www.hull.ac.uk

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Key course information Applications Applications for both the three-year and the 85-week course are made directly to the University and not via UCAS.

Course timetable The three-year course commences in September and the 85-week course in January (subject to confirmation).

Course structure The three-year full-time course involves spending 50% of your time at the University and 50% in clinical practice. There are 12 teaching weeks (six weeks of theory and six weeks of practice). Theory and practice are each covered in block periods.

Working hours While on clinical practice, you will be required to work a total of 37.5 hours each working week. These hours will include shifts of early mornings, late evenings, and weekends and night duty as directed by your clinical mentor.

Clinical placements Placements are undertaken throughout North Lincolnshire, North East Lincolnshire and Hull and East Yorkshire NHS Trusts and are determined by your home address. They are undertaken in maternity hospitals and the community.

Annual leave There is nine weeks’ holiday per year. Leave periods are preset by the course and are non-negotiable.

Attendance All courses lead to professional registration as well as an academic award and are made up of specified numbers of theory and practice hours. You are required to attend all lectures and clinical placement duties. All hours missed must be made up or professional registration will be delayed.

Funding Students on NHS programmes may be eligible to be considered for an NHS bursary. Students will be considered for a bursary in line with the guidelines issued by the NHS Business Services Authority. Full information about bursaries can be obtained at www.nhsbsa.nhs.uk/students. You are strongly advised to make use of this website to ensure that you know your bursary entitlement before the start of a course. From September 2011 we expect changes to the NHS bursary, and students are strongly advised to make use of the NHS website for further information – www.nhsbsa.nhs.uk/students.

Midwifery is about listening to women, recognising their needs and responding appropriately.

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For the 85-week midwifery programmes, students are salaried providing they have previously been employed by the NHS.


‘It’s a great course in a great university! We’re taught by midwives who share their practice experiences – so we have an understanding of what to expect. ‘Clinical placements are a great way to learn, and our trusts are always very welcoming to student midwives.’ Helen Smales BSc (Hons) Midwifery

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Secondment

Proficiency in English and numeracy

If students are employed by the local trusts or PCTs, they may be eligible for a secondment. This needs to be discussed with the training and development department of the employing trust or PCT.

All students are required to meet the University and professional requirement of proficiency in the English language and mathematics, either in the form of GCSE grade C or above or an alternative qualification such as IELTS with a minimum score of 6 in reading, writing, listening and speaking if from the EU, or a minimum of 7 if from a non-English speaking country outside the EU.

You are expected to have secured a place at university before making an application for a secondment.

Tuition fees These are currently paid by the NHS Business Services Authority; EU/EEA students may be eligible for tuition fees only. International tuition fee rates will be applicable for all non-EU students.

Please note that the Certificate of Adult Numeracy at Level 2 is accepted, but the Certificate of Adult Literacy at Level 2 or an ESOL certificate is not accepted, as an alternative.

Students with/declaring a disability Course places Places on all NHS programmes of study are conditional on the following for all applicants: • satisfactory interview • achieving the required academic credits • references (academic/work or character – references from friends or relatives are not accepted) • Criminal Records Bureau checks • registration on the ISA register • availability of NHS funding and clinical placements Applicants must also have reached the age of 18 by the start of the course. References will be requested at the time of shortlisting applications and before interviews are offered. Should students ask to defer their studies, then references, the CRB checks and the medical assessment will be repeated and could result in the offer being withdrawn if any of these are not considered satisfactory.

Academic ability All students are required to have completed some kind of formal academic study in the preceding three years in preparation for such a demanding course. You might, for example, have completed a study skills course to update your skills in self-directed study, essay writing, word processing and advanced study.

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We welcome applications from people with a disability. Applicants who wish to consider pursuing a professional course in nursing or midwifery are reminded, however, that questions of fitness for the particular profession will have to be taken into account. Where appropriate, the University will offer disabled applicants the opportunity to make use of alternative means of meeting course requirements. All students being admitted to the Midwifery course will be required to undergo a medical check to assess their professional suitability prior to admission. Applicants who declare a disability will be consulted on their needs and provided with advice about appropriate support on an individual basis. Further advice can be obtained from Disability Services on 01482 466833.

In-depth course details These can be accessed via our faculty website at www.hull.ac.uk/fhsc. Click on ‘Programmes’ and select the relevant course.

Admissions Tutor Nicky Clark – n.j.clark@hull.ac.uk


Operating department practice The DipHE Operating Department Practice is a two-year full-time course. Successful completion provides eligibility to apply for professional registration with the Health Professions Council (HPC) as a Registered Operating Department Practitioner.

What ODPs do Operating Department Practitioners (ODPs) work alongside doctors, nurses and other health care staff within the perioperative environment, providing multidisciplinary team care for patients before, during and after surgery. The term ‘perioperative’ is used because it represents theatre care in its broadest sense and supports the more holistic approach which characterises contemporary practice.

A career in operating department practice is exciting, rewarding, challenging and demanding, with many varied opportunities for personal development and role diversity.

ODPs predominantly work in the operating theatre environment, but their technical skills, knowledge base and expertise are utilised in a broad range of critical care areas within the hospital setting. For example, some ODPs work in ICUs on resuscitation teams and in other areas of the hospital. The role involves communicating with patients and their carers to make an assessment, plan care and provide a high standard of care and intervention for patients before, during and after their surgical event. Good communication skills and an ability to work as part of a dedicated team are essential components of the job. A career in operating department practice is exciting, rewarding, challenging and demanding, with many varied opportunities for personal development and role diversity. Operating Department Practitioners have the opportunity, after registration, to develop their careers in specialist clinical settings. There are also opportunities for work within the independent health care sector or overseas. The perioperative environment is dynamic and, in line with the Government agenda New Ways of Working, once you have gained sufficient education and clinical experience you may wish to consider the extended role of Physician Assistant (Anaesthesia) or Surgical Care Practitioner.

Entry criteria for DipHE ODP Minimum 160 points on the UCAS tariff. GCSE English, Mathematics and Science at grade C or above, or an agreed alternative (e.g. Certificate of Adult Numeracy at Level 2, which must have been completed within two years of commencing the course, are mandatory. If these subjects are inherent in other courses, then those may be taken into account. For example: • GCE A level, minimum of DD • Access to Higher Education Certificate – 48 credits at Level 3 • Access to Higher Education Diploma – 60 credits at Level 3 (some units will be mandatory and will require specific grades, depending on the programme offered by your FE college) • BTEC National Diploma – MM • those already holding diploma or graduate status • NVQ Level 3 in Health and Social Care, plus University Study Skills programme or two modules from the University Certificate in Clinical Skills (one of which must be a study skills module)

www.hull.ac.uk

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Key course information Course structure This two-year full-time course comprises 40% theory and 60% practice. It involves a combination of ‘block’ and ‘study day’ teaching sessions of theory and practice.

Working hours While on clinical practice, you will be required to work a total of 37.5 hours across a five-day working week. These hours will include shifts of early mornings, late evenings, and weekends and night duty as directed by your clinical mentor. (The first-year shifts predominantly require a 7.30 or 8 am start and finish around 5.30 or 6 pm.)

Clinical placements All students are allocated a base hospital. Hospital placements are undertaken throughout North Lincolnshire, North East Lincolnshire, Hull and East Yorkshire, York and Scarborough NHS Trusts. Some placements could be undertaken in hospitals other than the base hospital, depending on service demands and availability. These might include a placement at an independent (private) hospital.

Annual leave There is six weeks’ holiday per year. This is preset by the course and is nonnegotiable.

Attendance Successful completion of the course leads to an academic award as well as the right to apply for regulation with the Health Professions Council (HPC) as a Registered Operating Department Practitioner, and it comprises a specified number of theory and practice hours. Students are required to attend all lectures and clinical placement duties. All hours missed must be made up or the application for professional registration will be delayed.

Funding Students on NHS programmes may be eligible to be considered for an NHS bursary. Students will be considered for a bursary in line with the guidelines issued by the NHS Business Services Authority. Full information about bursaries can be obtained at www.nhsbsa.nhs.uk/students. You are strongly advised to make use of this website to ensure that you know your bursary entitlement before the start of a course.

Hospital placements are undertaken throughout North Lincolnshire, North East Lincolnshire, Hull and East Yorkshire, York and Scarborough NHS Trusts.

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Nursing, midwifery and ODP

From September 2011 we expect changes to the NHS bursary, and students are strongly advised to make use of the NHS website for further information – www.nhsbsa.nhs.uk/students. International students will not receive any funding.


Secondment If students are employed by the local trusts or PCTs, they may be eligible for a secondment. This needs to be discussed with the training and development department of the employing trust or PCT. You are expected to have secured a place at university before making an application for a secondment.

Tuition fees These are currently paid by the NHS Business Services Authority; EU/EEA students may be eligible for tuition fees only. International tuition fee rates will be applicable for all non-EU students.

ODPs predominantly work in the operating theatre environment, but their technical skills, knowledge base and expertise are utilised in a broad range of critical care areas within the hospital setting.

Course places Places on all NHS programmes of study are conditional on the following for all applicants: • interview • medical • references (academic/work or character – references from friends or relatives are not accepted) • achieving the required academic credits • Criminal Records Bureau checks • registration on the ISA register • availability of NHS funding and clinical placements Applicants must also have reached the age of 18 by the start of the course.

Academic ability All students should ideally have completed some kind of formal academic study in the preceding three years in preparation for such a demanding course. You might, for example, have completed a study skills course to update your skills in selfdirected study, essay writing, word processing and advanced study.

Proficiency in English and numeracy All students are required to meet the University and professional requirement of proficiency in the English language and mathematics, either in the form of GCSE grade C or above or an alternative qualification such as IELTS with a minimum score of 6 in reading, writing, listening and speaking if from the EU, or a minimum of 7 if from a non-English speaking country outside the EU. Please note that the Certificate of Adult Numeracy at Level 2 is accepted, but the Certificate of Adult Literacy at Level 2 or an ESOL certificate is not accepted, as an alternative.

www.hull.ac.uk

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Students with/declaring a disability We welcome applications from people with a disability. Applicants who wish to consider pursuing a professional course in operating department practice are reminded, however, that questions of fitness for the particular profession will have to be taken into account. Guidance from the HPC can be found at www.hpcuk.org/aboutregistration/healthanddisability. Where appropriate, the University will offer disabled applicants the opportunity to make use of alternative means of meeting course requirements. All students being admitted to the ODP course will be required to undergo a medical check to assess their professional suitability prior to admission. Applicants who declare a disability will be consulted on their needs and provided with advice about appropriate support on an individual basis. Further advice can be obtained from Disability Services on 01482 466833.

In-depth course details These can be accessed via our faculty website at www.hull.ac.uk/fhsc/odp. Click on ‘Programmes’ and select the relevant course.

Course Leader / Admissions Tutor Deborah Robinson – 01482 464698 or deborah.robinson@hull.ac.uk.

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Applications and contacts Application routes All applications are made via UCAS. UCAS Rosehill New Barn Lane Cheltenham Gloucestershire, GL52 3LZ www.ucas.ac.uk

Faculty of Health and Social Care Admissions Tutor Sheila Wright sheila.wright@hull.ac.uk

International enquiries Jeremy Jolley jeremy.jolley@hull.ac.uk Helpdesk – 01482 463342

General enquiries T 0870 112 2211 F 01242 544961 enq@ucas.ac.uk

Useful contacts University Admissions Health and Social Care Admissions Team University of Hull Hull, HU6 7RX 01482 466740 fhsc.admiss@hull.ac.uk

Website – www.hull.ac.uk/fhsc

Nursing branches • Adult: Christine Howe – c.m.howe@hull.ac.uk • Child: Jeremy Jolley – jeremy.jolley@hull.ac.uk • Learning Disability: Mary Dearing – m.m.dearing@hull.ac.uk • Mental Health: Ian Barkley – i.h.barkley@hull.ac.uk

Midwifery Admissions Tutor

Admissions policy Admissions information provided in this pamphlet is intended as a general guide and cannot cover all possibilities. Entry requirements are generally stated in terms of A level grades and/or UCAS points, but we encourage applications from people with a wide range of other qualifications and/or experience. Some further details of the various entry routes are included in our general prospectus. Please contact the Admissions Service (see below) with any specific queries about admissions.

Disclaimer This publication is intended principally as a guide for prospective students. The matters covered by it – academic and otherwise – are subject to change from time to time, both before and

Nicky Clark n.j.clark@hull.ac.uk

after students are admitted, and

ODP Course Leader / Admissions Tutor

While every reasonable precaution

Deborah Robinson deborah.robinson@hull.ac.uk 01482 464698

Bursary information NHS Business Services Authority www.nhsbsa.nhs.uk/students

the information contained in it does not form part of any contract.

was taken in the production of this brochure, the University does not accept liability for any inaccuracies.

Address For general enquiries, please write to Admissions Service University of Hull Hull, HU6 7RX T 01482 466100 F 01482 442290 E admissions@hull.ac.uk


With at least half of the course unfolding in a clinical practice environment (within a local NHS trust or with other care providers, mentored by experienced practitioners) plus a dedicated on-campus training facility, it’s no miracle that 99% of our students ďŹ nd a graduate-level position inside six months of qualifying.

Change the way you think.

www.hull.ac.uk


Nursing - University of Hull Undergraduate Subject Brochure 2011