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Media, culture and society

Undergraduate study

Entry 2012


Media, culture and society at Hull How is the social world shaped by cultural and communicative processes? If you are interested in this question, you will be interested in the University of Hull’s innovative BA course in Media, Culture and Society. Exploring the question within a distinctively interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary context, this course cultivates the skills that you need to interpret the crucial role of the media in contemporary society; to analyse the ways in which cultural institutions and practices inform the world around us; and to evaluate the influence of such social processes on collective and individual identities.

Course content and structure The course encourages a creative and flexible approach to study. Through a range of core modules across the three years, you develop an interdisciplinary understanding of key issues in the analysis of media, culture and society. Building on your learning in these core modules, you are also able to choose from a range of options which allow you to explore further your particular interests within the field of study. The course draws on a diverse range of teaching expertise from across the University as well as the specialist skills of the core Media, Culture and Society staff in the Department of Humanities, where the course is based. While the course will appeal to students whose interest in the interrelationship of media, culture and society is centred primarily on academic analysis rather than practical training, the Media, Culture and Society degree does offer an element of applied study. At Level 5 all students take the core module Media Theory, Analysis and Research Techniques, which involves critical analysis but also allows you to acquire some hands-on familiarity with various forms of new media research. Elsewhere in the course you can opt to study other more practically based modules (Digital Media Production) or to gain experience in an area of media- or culturerelated employment through the Level 6 Work-Based Learning module. Furthermore, students are encouraged to use their skills in digital media to research and produce their final-year dissertation. The structure of the degree course is represented diagrammatically on the facing page. Please note that, throughout the degree, options may vary from year to year. A free elective is a module taken from outside your main course of study; a ‘long-thin’ module is one that is taught over two semesters.

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Media, culture and society


Semester 2

Semester 1

Certificate stage (Level 4) Core

Core

Option

Free elective

Introduction to Anthropology

Introduction to Cultural Theory

You choose one of

(such as Introduction to Linguistics or Contemporary Popular Music Cultures)

Core

Core

Media and Society

Gender and Culture

• Gender and Society • Introduction to Digital Media in Production • Social Institutions in Everyday Life • Interpreting American Culture

Or any other departmental non-core module in ‘long-thin’ format

Semester 1

Core

Option

Option

Free elective

Media Theory, Analysis and Research Techniques

You choose one of

You choose one of

• Sociolinguistics • American Art, 1900–1940 • Magic, Myth and Ritual • Theorising Gender

• Cyberculture and Its Discontents • Televisual Narrative

Or any other departmental non-core module in ‘long-thin’ format

Semester 2

Intermediate stage (Level 5)

Option There are no core modules. You choose two of • • • • •

Race and Social Justice Television Production and Analysis Power and Resistance in the Globalising World Sociology of Popular Culture Media Ethics

Semester 1

Core

Option

Option

Free elective

Dissertation

You choose one of

You choose one of

Or any other departmental non-core module in ‘long-thin’ format

Semester 2

Honours stage (Level 6)

Core

• Global Communications and International Politics • Poverty, Gender and Development • Television Aesthetics • Reporting War and Security • Social Bodies

Dissertation

www.hull.ac.uk

• Television and the Everyday • Digital Media Production Project • Media Movements and Radical Politics

Option You choose one of • Community and Conflict • Work-Based Learning • Media Convergence: Political Economy and Social Networking • Environment, Culture and Society • Hate, Violence and Pornography in the Media

Media, culture and society




Key facts Course title: Media, Culture and Society Award: BA (Honours) UCAS code: L900 BA/MCS

Teaching We use a variety of teaching methods, including 50-minute lectures as well as student-led seminars, tutorials, project work and independent learning. Reading lists accompany each module, and students are expected to do a substantial amount of studying outside designated teaching times. Every student is assigned a supervisor who can offer help and advice in case of problems, academic or otherwise.

Duration:  years Estimated places: 20 Typical offer: 280–00 points Admissions tutor: Dr James Zborowski (j.zborowski @hull.ac.uk)

Contact Media, Culture and Society Secretary Department of Humanities University of Hull Hull, HU6 7RX 01482 466620

Note The University also offers BA Media, Culture and Society (including Foundation English Language) (UCAS code L9Q), a four-year variant incorporating a foundation year of English language tuition and cultural orientation which is designed specifically for international students. For more details, see page 206 of the 2012 Undergraduate Prospectus. And there are two Joint Honours degree courses that may interest you: • Creative Writing and Media, Culture and Society (WP8) • Sociology and Media Studies (LPH) Again, see the 2012 Undergraduate Prospectus for details.

Picture credits Front cover image © iStockphoto.com/setixela Page 2 © Fotolia.com/Cybrain © Fotolia.com/HaywireMedia

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Media, culture and society

Assessment Assessment methods vary, depending on the module. In addition to written examinations and coursework essays, they include case-study assignments, learning portfolios, work portfolios and oral presentations. Individual module outlines (see www.courses.hull.ac.uk) provide information on the particular assessment methods for each module. Results in the first year of study (Level 4) do not count towards the final degree assessment but serve to gauge progress and provide feedback to students and tutors. Assessments at Levels 5 and 6 do count towards the final degree classification.

Admissions The course does not require prior knowledge of the subject areas, though such knowledge is by no means unwelcome or disadvantageous. (The first year of study is tailored to offer something new to students who have previously studied media, culture or society, as well as to those who have not.) Normally we would expect 280–00 points, but each case is considered on its merits. Applications from people without the usual academic qualifications but with other relevant knowledge and skills are very welcome, as are applications from people wishing to study part-time.

Open days If you apply, you will be invited to attend an open day at the University. This will give you an opportunity to see the campus and to meet with staff and current students.

Core staff Dr Athina Karatzogianni teaches Media Convergence: Political Economy and Social Networking; Media Movements and Radical Politics; Reporting the War and Security; and Cyberculture and Its Discontents. Interested in new media technologies and their impact on global politics, society and culture, she is the author of The Politics of Cyberconflict (2006) and Power, Conflict and Resistance in the Contemporary World: Social Movements, Networks and Hierarchies (2010), and she edited Cyber Conflict and Global Politics (2009). Charlie Cordeaux teaches An Introduction to Digital Media in Production, Television Production and Analysis, and Digital Media Production Project. His current interests include television production and analysis, and the development of a new media facility within the University. Charlie is the UK project leader for the EU-funded Simsafety Project, which is researching into intercultural attitudes to internet safety. Dr James Zborowski is Lecturer in Film and Television and teaches Media and Society, Televisual Narrative, Television Aesthetics and Television and the Everyday. His research interests include film and television aesthetics, and narration and point of view in television, film and literature. He is the author of The Camera’s Character: Point of View in Studio Era Hollywood (forthcoming).


Media, Culture, and Society 2012