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Undergraduate study

History


Key facts

History at Hull | 1

Degree course

Hull and history | 4

History

Our degrees | 7

History (including Foundation English Language)

Course synopsis | 11

History with History of Art

20th-Century History | 12

History with Maritime History

V1VA BA/HMA

History with Social History

V1VH BA/HSH

Tracks through history | 13 Admissions and after | 15 Careers and further study | 16

UCAS code V100 BA/H V1Q3 BA/HFEL V1VJ BA/HHA

History with Economics

V1L1 BA/HE

History and Archaeology

VV14 BA/HA

20th-Century History

V140 BA/20H

Archaeology and Medieval History

VV41 BA/AMH

Art History and Archaeology

VV34 BA/AHA

Joint Honours American Studies and History

TV71 BA/ASH

English and History

QV31 BA/EH

Geography and History

LV71 BA/GeH

History and Film Studies

VP13 BA/HisFilm

History and French (4 years)

VR11 BA/HFr

History and German (4 years)

VR12 BA/HGer

History and Italian (4 years)

VR13 BA/HIt

History and Politics

LV21 BA/HP

History and Spanish (4 years)

VR14 BA/HSp

Other Honours

Contact Kay Nock Admissions Coordinator Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences University of Hull Hull, HU6 7RX T 01482 466191 F 01482 466122 admissions@hull.ac.uk www.hull.ac.uk

Dates of semesters Semester 1 27 Sep – 16 Dec 2011

Semester 2 30 Jan – 11 May 2012

Drama with History of Art

W4V3 BA/DHA

English with History of Art

Q3V3 BA/EHA

Estimated places, entry 2011

160

Current offer

300–320 points

Please visit the Department of History’s website: www.hull.ac.uk/history.


History at Hull If you are reading this, you may be considering an application to study history at Hull. This pamphlet aims to tell you a little more about the University and, in particular, its History Department.

Excellence in teaching and research • The most recent National Student Survey shows that the overall satisfaction rate among our students is 94%. • The department has a long-established reputation for outstanding teaching and has been rated ‘excellent’ by the Higher Education Funding Council for England. • In the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise (RAE), History at Hull had 65% of its research assessed as either world-leading or internationally excellent. We have been the University’s highest-rated department in the last three RAEs. This is one of the very few university history departments to have achieved such high ratings for teaching and research as well as student satisfaction.

Distinctive degree courses • The department’s degree courses are structured so that students can follow their interests in the history of particular areas (Britain, Europe, Asia or America), particular periods (medieval, early modern or contemporary) or particular themes (economic and social history, art history, archaeology, military and imperial history or maritime history). Alternatively, students can select a mix of modules relating to different eras, regions or topics. • Students wishing to specialise in certain fields can take a degree in 20th-Century History, History and Archaeology, Archaeology and Medieval History, Art History and Archaeology, History with History of Art, History with Social History or History with Maritime History. • Choice is one of the key attributes of the department’s courses. While a variety of innovative, challenging modules are offered to first-year students, the range of options is more extensive in Years 2 and 3. This facilitates small-group teaching, an effective means of learning for which the department has been commended. • All the department’s degree courses may be taken on a part-time basis (that is, over six years instead of three).

A friendly department and a vibrant city • The department has a deserved reputation for being friendly and helpful. We welcome mature and international students as warmly as those coming straight from UK schools or colleges. • Our students are among the happiest in the country: in the most recent National Student Survey, a resounding 94% of them expressed satisfaction with their experiences in the department. • Our students are fortunate in that the city possesses an abundance of relatively inexpensive accommodation. With a range of residences, this university is one of only a handful in Britain that can guarantee housing to all of its first years. • Hull is a vibrant city with an active social scene. It offers good sports facilities, an array of pubs, clubs and eateries, art galleries, theatres, cinemas and concert halls, The Deep – a world-class aquarium and research centre – and the new state-of-the-art KC Stadium for sporting and musical events. We look forward to meeting you at one of our open days and hope that you will become a member of the History Department at Hull.

www.hull.ac.uk

History

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Given Hull’s seafaring heritage and the region’s status as Britain’s largest port complex, it’s no surprise that the University is a national leader in the study of maritime history. But our flexible courses also provide a fresh, fascinating take on history from the Middle Ages to the 20th century – allowing you to specialise or simply dip your toe in the water.


Triple crown Our Department of History’s research has been graded as either ‘worldleading’ or ‘of international excellence’ in the last three national Research Assessment Exercises. We’re one of a select group of departments around the country to have been recognised three times in this way.


Hull and history

The city Edward I founded Kingston upon Hull in the late 13th century. Through the centuries it grew into a major port and a centre of political importance. If you study in Hull, you cannot fail to become aware of the region’s rich history. To the north, south and west of the city are buildings reflecting 2,000 years of development and change: Roman villas and mosaics; renowned cathedrals and minsters at Beverley, York and Lincoln; and wonderful abbeys at Selby, Rievaulx and Fountains. The area is peppered with castles, deserted villages, landscaped parks and beautiful country houses, including Burton Agnes and Sir John Vanbrugh’s Castle Howard. The host of historic buildings of great architectural value in Hull’s Old Town includes Blaydes House, an 18th-century merchant’s residence which now houses the department’s Maritime Historical Studies Centre. Traditionally a gateway to Europe, the Humber has witnessed the arrival – and departure – of all manner of travellers, from the invading Vikings to exiled monarchs. The city takes pride in its history and maintains a number of museums, including Wilberforce House (commemorating William Wilberforce’s anti-slavery campaign) and the Maritime Museum, which celebrates Hull’s notable seafaring past. Even the names of Hull’s streets are evocative – Land of Green Ginger, Rottenherring Row, Wincolmlee – while many a tall tale is to be heard in the Plotting Parlour (where, it is claimed, the Civil War began), the Whalebone, Spiders and dozens more pubs and clubs which enliven the city by night.

The department History at Hull has a long and distinguished reputation. It has been the home of a number of scholars who have achieved international renown. A G Dickens wrote his classic book on the English Reformation while a professor here. John Kenyon was celebrated for his authoritative and entertaining works on the Stuarts. Other notable historians previously on our staff include John Saville, Richard Vaughan, Ralph Davis, K R Andrews and K T Hoppen. The present staff maintain the traditions of scholarship established by these esteemed historians. Their research interests are immensely varied: from the wars of Edward III to the British Empire; from medieval religion to modern art; from 16thcentury France to contemporary diplomatic and maritime history; from the slave trade to the history of women and gender; and from Venice to Vietnam.

Besides a strong tradition of research and scholarship, the department has a reputation for providing an excellent education in history.

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History


Why should you choose Hull? The most recent National Student Survey shows that the overall satisfaction rate among our students is 94%. Besides a strong tradition of research and scholarship, the department has established a reputation for providing an excellent education in history. Hull is a less expensive place to live than most cities with comparable departments, and we think this offers an unbeatable combination. But don’t take our word for it – come and meet us for a look at the department and the University.

Computers and history The History Department has long been a pioneer in the use of computers in historical research and teaching. A team led by Professor John Palmer has published a fully searchable digitised version of The Greater Domesday Book on CDROM, while Professor David Richardson led a research group that produced a CD-ROM assembling data on the Atlantic slave trade. These landmark achievements are proving to be an outstanding resource for historians in general as well as for our students. The department is well equipped with computing facilities, with a microlab of its own for student use.

Travel The department is able to provide a number of grants to support overseas travel in the vacation. These include the Kingsley Travel Fund, the Italian Art Travel Fund and the Basil and Ann Greenhill Travel Bursaries, in connection with maritime history.

‘I was attracted initially to the History Department at Hull because of the variety of module choice on offer. The Single Honours History course gave me the chance to follow interests that I already had, as well as giving me the opportunity to undertake themes and subjects I hadn’t previously considered – including intellectual history, maritime history and historiography. This has led to the development of a much greater enthusiasm for history and, more importantly, a greater understanding of the discipline and its attributes. The staff within the department are very friendly and their positive outlook and support throughout the course have ensured that I felt welcome and part of the department. I would recommend Hull wholeheartedly to anyone who wishes to study history at university.’ Luke Kelly BA History

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History


Our degrees Our various degree courses are listed on the inner front cover of this pamphlet. Most of our students study for a Single Honours History degree, but Joint Honours degrees with politics, English, geography, American studies, film studies and other subjects are also popular. All of the Department of History’s degree courses may be taken full-time or part-time. The range of options is too wide for detailed descriptions here, but the chart on page 11 and the grouping by themes on pages 13–14 will give you a good idea of the choice available. For details of individual modules please visit our website at www.hull.ac.uk/history. As well as those taught by members of the department, modules are provided by other departments in the University – particularly American Studies, English and Modern Languages. You are also encouraged to take free electives in subjects other than history if you wish (see the inner back cover).

Our courses are structured so that you can follow an interest in the history of particular areas, periods or themes, or select a mix of modules relating to different eras, regions or topics.

Single Honours History The pattern for students following the general Single Honours History degree (V100), 20th Century History (V140), Archaeology and Medieval History (VV41), Art History and Archaeology (VV34) or any of the History ‘with’ degrees is broadly the same. Students take all or most of their six first-year modules in history: two in each of the two semesters and two ‘long thin’ modules that run through both semesters. The choice of modules covers medieval Europe, early modern Europe, the modern world, economic and social history, art history, archaeology and American history – while you can take one of a range of free elective modules from outside the department. Second-year Single Honours students follow a similar pattern. The choice is varied and may include British, European, Russian, American, South-East Asian and Indian history as well as economic and social, imperial, military, maritime, regional and art history. There is the opportunity to take a free elective outside the department, and there is a core module entitled Thinking About the Past. In Year 3, Single Honours students take the Special Subject module, which stretches across both semesters. This gives direct experience of working in a small group and with an expert on detailed primary sources to produce an extended piece of individual work in the form of a dissertation. Most of our students find this one of the most rewarding aspects of their degree. Third-year students also choose one optional module in each semester.

History (including Foundation English Language) This distinctive BA course combines study in history with a foundation year of English language tuition and cultural orientation, and is specifically designed for international students.

www.hull.ac.uk

History

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Single Honours 20th-Century History

History with History of Art

Contemporary and 20th-century history have proved so popular in recent years that we launched a pioneering degree course focusing on the period 1900–2000. This offers a range of modules in political, socioeconomic, international, imperial, maritime, military, cultural and gender history (see page 12).

Hull has the great advantage of including History of Art within the History Department. This teaching is supported by the University’s renowned Art Collection, which also hosts regular loan exhibitions. An annual series of History of Art Public Lectures brings distinguished visiting speakers to the campus.

The degree is global in scope, embracing Europe, Africa, Asia and the United States. You can study general themes or specific countries, or a combination of both. Hull has one of the best university libraries in the country for the study of 20th-century history, and students benefit from the expertise of our department’s leading modern historians, who have been rated ‘excellent’ for their teaching and research.

The History with History of Art degree combines history as the major subject (accounting for 60% of the programme) with history of art as a minor subject (40%), but because they are within the same department it is possible to increase the proportion of art history if you wish – up to 100% in the final year.

In Years 1 and 2, you take two special core modules: The Making of the Contemporary World and Thinking About the Past. In the third year, you write a dissertation related to the special subject of your choice. This exciting degree course offers exceptional depth and variety and provides a stimulating basis for understanding the contemporary world.

Maritime history The department is one of the country’s leading centres for maritime history. The Maritime Historical Studies Centre is located in Blaydes House, which originally belonged to the merchant who commissioned the Bounty (of Mutiny on the Bounty fame). Blaydes House provides office space as well as research and conference facilities for the department’s maritime historians and researchers. It also provides the base for our involvement in the History of Marine Animal Populations Project, funded by the Alfred P Sloan Foundation. Two Lectureships in Maritime History have been established through generous benefactions, and it is possible to take maritime history options in all three years of our degrees. Single Honours students with a particular interest in the area can opt to pursue a specially designated degree, History with Maritime History.

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History

Students have the full choice of the range of history modules. In terms of the history of art, a year-long core module in the first year introduces you to the practice of art history and archaeology by examining five cities at key moments in history: classical Athens, ancient Rome and its provinces, medieval York, Renaissance Florence and High Renaissance Rome. Another module, Making and Meaning, provides an introduction to art history and artistic techniques. In the second year you explore the intriguing relationship between art and society in Baroque Rome, 17th-century Amsterdam, Augustan London, the Paris of the Impressionists and 20th-century New York. Optional art history modules include Leonardo, Michelangelo and Raphael; Art and Life in Renaissance Venice; 19th-Century French Art; Modern Art and the Modernist Debate; and a range of modules on archaeology. In your final year you can also take a Special Subject with Dissertation, which involves research from primary sources. Teaching involves conducted visits to local and national art collections and to historical buildings and sites. There have been regular visits to Paris for those studying French art, and an Italian Art Travel Fund has helped more than 100 of our students visit Italy in connection with their studies. Degrees in Drama with History of Art (W4V3) and English with History of Art (Q3V3) are also available.


History with Social History This course offers a degree with a distinctive social history pathway for those who wish to specialise within the broader context of historical studies. It draws upon the expertise of internationally recognised social history scholars. Scholars at Hull founded the internationally renowned journal Social History in 1976, and it continues to be edited within the department. Core modules in Years 1 and 2 introduce you to the social history approach through the study of Britain from 1660 to the present day. Aspects of social and cultural history – both in Britain and overseas – are then available for optional study in Years 2 and 3, as well as through a freestanding dissertation.

History and Archaeology This course has proved popular since its launch in 2002. It builds on the success of the archaeology modules, already an established part of our history degrees. There are few better regions in Britain in which to study archaeology, as the countryside of the East Riding of Yorkshire and North Lincolnshire contains a wealth of archaeological remains, and its historic centres – such as Hull and Beverley – provide well-preserved evidence for the development of medieval townscapes. The degree is taught in collaboration with the Department of Geography and draws on our close links with Hull Museums, whose internationally important collections include Iron Age chariot burials, prehistoric boats, Roman mosaics and remains from Anglo-Saxon burials. A range of core modules in Years 1 and 2 introduce practical skills in archaeology. You must undertake at least three weeks on an excavation at the end of the first year.

‘Archaeology was a new subject to many of us, but it’s been introduced in a way that eased us all into the discipline. The staff have all been very helpful and approachable, and the way the course has been taught has enabled long-lasting friendships to develop between all the students. This especially happened during the summer excavations, where students and staff members took part, and we now feel like we are part of one big family. The support given by all members of staff is really appreciated by all the students.’ Johanna Greaves BA History and Archaeology

www.hull.ac.uk

History

9


Archaeology and Medieval History This course allows you to specialise in a particular type of history associated with the material remains of past cultures, with particular focus on the medieval period. It enables you to adapt and engage with a variety of source material, from documentary evidence to physical remains. Within the History Department there are several links between the medieval historians and the archaeologists, including a common interest in the interpretation of the Battle of Crécy in 1346 and the investigation of the Templars in East Yorkshire. These synergies are present through combined research and teaching activities and help students gain a holistic view of the past.

Art History and Archaeology This course takes advantage of the fact that the History Department embraces both art history and archaeology. It allows you to specialise in a particular type of history associated with the material remains of past cultures – whether they are the works of great artists, the remains of buildings or archaeological features of past settlements. Art history and archaeology have many shared qualities and adopt complementary approaches to the analysis of such remains. Within the History Department there are close links between the art historians and the archaeologists, reflected in combined research and teaching activities, which can help you gain a holistic view of the past.

Joint degrees Our Joint Honours degrees involve studying history and one other subject in equal proportions. The list of available joint degrees, from American Studies and History to History and Spanish, can be found on the inner front cover of this pamphlet. Joint Honours students take three history modules per year, including the core module in Year 1. They do not take the Special Subject module.

Major/minor degrees History can also be taken in a major/minor combination (in which history is the major subject) with economics.

We offer a wide choice of degree courses to suit every type of historical interest.

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History


Course synopsis This table outlines the Single Honours History course (V100), but it also conveys the range of choices available to Joint Honours students (who take up to three history modules each year). For details of individual modules please visit www.hull.ac.uk/history. Course details are subject to change. Either Representing the Past in Film or Exploring the Past

YEAR 1

Four of the following (two in each semester) • • • • •

The Making of Europe, 1050–1250 Raiders, Traders and Crusaders Being Human Elizabeth I Asia and the World since the Late 19th Century

One of the following • Cities and Civilisations: Art and Archaeology in Context • World Archaeology

• Consumer Cultures: Britain and America in the 1950s • Making and Meaning: An Introduction to the History of Art • Class, Status and Culture in Britain since 1870 • Europe, 1789–1914 • Global History • Fear, Faith and Family • 20th-Century Dictators • A free elective from outside the department

Thinking About the Past (core module)

YEAR 2

Four of the following (two in each semester) • • • • • • • • • • •

The Archaeology of Roman Britain Mayans, Aztecs and Incas The Age of Discovery Leonardo, Michelangelo and Raphael The Reformation in Germany Ruling England, 1066–1217 Britain, France and Decolonisation Military History of India since 1740 The Impact of the First World War in Britain America’s Wars in Asia Imperialism, Nationalism and Decolonisation: Britain in South-East Asia • The Three Kingdoms • Europe at War with Itself: Ideologies in Conflict, 1914–45 • Germany between Revolutions, 1790–1850

• Britons, Angles, Saxons and Vikings: The Archaeology of Early Medieval England • Emperors, Vikings and Scholars • The Age of the Crusades • Art and Life in Renaissance Venice, c1560–1856 • Piracy, Privateering and the Atlantic Economy • Dying and Death in Western Europe • The British Empire, c1840–1922 • Economic and Social History of Germany, 1850–1914 • East and West Germany from ‘Zero Hour’ to Reunification • The Victorians • British Identity, 1870–2000 • From Slavery to Freedom: The Caribbean, 1763–1838

One of the following • Art and the City: Rome, Amsterdam, London, Paris and New York • The First Global Economy: Britain, 1688–1914

• Innovation: A Cultural History • A free elective from outside the department

One of the following special subjects with associated dissertation (not Joint Honours students)

YEAR 3

• The Wars of Edward III • Dynasty and Nation: France, 1060–1220 • Heresy, Monasticism and Religious Revolution in the Central Middle Ages • In Search of the Templars • The Pre-Raphaelites and Pre-Raphaelitism • ‘The Whore’s Complaint’: Sex, Lies and Politics, 1650–1750 • Popular Protest in Britain and Ireland, 1790–1835 • Leisure, Sport and Culture in the 19th Century

• • • • • • • • •

Slavery in the Americas Seafaring in War and Peace, 1850–1918 The Third Reich, 1933–1945 The Thirty Years War Britain’s Asian Cold War: Malaya and the End of Empire, 1942–63 From Beveridge to Benetton: A Socio-Political Analysis of Post-War Britain The First World War History and Hazards The World of Kipling and Gandhi

Two of the following (one in each Semester) • The Parisi: Iron Age and Roman East Yorkshire • Medieval Yorkshire: From Norman Conquest to the Wars of the Roses • Gender and Culture in Early Modern England • After Nelson: Navy and Society, 1815–1914 • Command! The Rise and Fall of the Soviet Economy, 1917–1985 • Occupation, Collaboration and Resistance in Western Europe • From Revolution and Romanticism to Sex and the City: 19thCentury French Art

• The Archaeology of the Castle • War in European History • Sea Change: Britain’s Maritime Interests since 1890 • Britain, the US and the Middle East, 1945–1962 • The Foundation of the British Empire • War and Memory in 20th-Century Australia, 1940–45

Joint students take one of the following (Single Honours students may take one of these instead of one of the options from the section above) • The Anatomy of Military Disaster • Modern Art and the Modernist Debate

www.hull.ac.uk

• A free elective from outside the department

History

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20th-Century History The following list contains the current range of modules which make up the degree in 20th-Century History. For details of individual modules please visit www.hull.ac.uk/history.

Year 1 • • • • • • • •

Representing the Past in Film or Exploring the Past The Making of the Contemporary World (core module) Asia and the World since the Late 19th Century The Era of Total War: 1914–39 Cold War and After 20th-Century Dictators Class, Status and Culture in Britain since 1870 Europe, 1789–1914

Year 2 • • • • • • • • • • •

Thinking About the Past (core module) Art and the City: Rome, Amsterdam, London, Paris and New York Europe at War with Itself: Ideologies in Conflict, 1914–45 The Impact of the First World War in Britain The British Empire Imperialism, Nationalism and Decolonisation: Britain in South-East Asia, c1850–1950 America’s Wars in Asia Britain, France and Decolonisation Indian Society and the Rise and Fall of British Dominion East and West Germany from ‘Zero Hour’ to Reunification British Identity

Year 3 • • • • • • •

The Anatomy of Military Disaster Modern Art and the Modernist Debate, 1890–1939 Sea Change: Britain’s Maritime Interests since 1890 Occupation, Collaboration and Resistance in Western Europe, 1940–45 War and Memory in 20th-Century Australia US Cold War Foreign Policy Britain, the United States and the Middle East, 1945–1962

Special subjects with dissertation • • • • • •

Hull has one of the country’s best university libraries for the study of 20thcentury history.

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History

The First World War The Third Reich, 1933–1945 The World of Kipling and Gandhi Britain’s Asian Cold War: Malaya and the End of Empire, 1942–63 From Beveridge to Benetton: A Socio-Political Analysis of Post-War Britain History and Hazards


Tracks through history Our syllabus is designed so that, besides following specific periods or geographical areas of history through your three years, you can also follow certain themes. For more details about these modules and of modules under development, visit www.hull.ac.uk/history. Please note that modules may be subject to change.

Archaeology • • • • • • • •

The Archaeology of Roman Britain The Parisi Britons, Angles, Saxons and Vikings: The Archaeology of Early Medieval England The Archaeology of the Castle Cities and Civilisations: Art and Archaeology in Context Mayans, Aztecs and Incas World Archaeology Research Design and Geographic Information Systems for Archaeologists

Gender, Culture and Religion • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Dying and Death in Western Europe Emperors, Vikings and Scholars ‘The Whore’s Complaint’: Sex, Lies and Politics, 1650–1750 Heresy, Monasticism and Religious Revolution Medieval Yorkshire Elizabeth I Fear, Faith and Family The Victorians Gender and Culture in Early Modern England The Reformation in Germany Leisure, Sport and Culture in the 19th Century Class, Status and Culture in Britain since 1870 British Identity

Warfare and Society • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Ruling England The Wars of Edward III The Age of the Crusades In Search of the Templars Piracy, Privateering and the Atlantic Economy The Anatomy of Military Disaster Europe, 1789–1914 The First World War Europe at War with Itself: Ideologies in Conflict, 1914–1945 Sea Change: Britain’s Maritime Interests since c1890 The Impact of the First World War in Britain War and Memory in 20th-Century Australia America’s Wars in Asia

www.hull.ac.uk

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The Rise and Fall of Empires: Imperialism and Decolonisation • • • • • • • • • • • •

The Age of Discovery The Three Kingdoms Indian Society and the Rise and Fall of British Dominion, 1600–1947 The Victorians Asia and the World since the Late 19th Century The Foundations of the British Empire The British Empire, c1840–1914 Britain, France and Decolonisation The World of Kipling and Gandhi Britain, the US and the Middle East, 1945–1962 Imperialism, Nationalism and Decolonisation: Britain in South-East Asia War and Political Crisis in India, 1939–1947

Seas and Oceans in the Historical Process: Maritime History • • • • • •

Raiders, Traders and Crusaders The Age of Discovery Piracy, Privateering and the Atlantic Economy After Nelson: Navy and Society, 1815–1914 Sea Change: Britain’s Maritime Interests since c1890 Seafaring in War and Peace, 1850–1914

Painters, Patrons and Cultures: Art History • • • • • • • •

Cities and Civilisations: Art and Archaeology in Context Art and the City: Rome, Amsterdam, London, Paris and New York, 1600–2000 Making and Meaning: An Introduction to the History of Art Leonardo, Michelangelo and Raphael Art and Life in Renaissance Venice, c1560–1856 The Pre-Raphaelites and Pre-Raphaelitism From Revolution and Romanticism to Sex and the City: 19th-Century French Art Modern Art and the Modernist Debate

Society, Economic Development and Globalisation • • • • • •

The First Global Economy: Britain, 1688–1914 Germany between Revolutions 1790–1850 Command! The Rise and Fall of the Soviet Economy, 1917–85 Economic and Social History of Germany, 1850–1914 Class, Status and Culture in Britain since 1870 Emancipation to Revolution: The Modernisation of the Russian Economy, 1861–1917 • Popular Protest in Britain and Ireland, 1790–1835 • Consumer Cultures: Britain and America • Global History

With its own Maritime Historical Studies Centre, the department is one of the UK’s leaders in the study of maritime history.

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History

Politics and Nations • • • • • •

The Making of Europe, 1050–1250 Dynasty and Nation: France, 1060–1225 Ruling England Europe, 1789–1914 Europe at War with Itself: Ideologies in Conflict East and West Germany from ‘Zero Hour’ to Reunification


Admissions and after

What do we look for?

Outside the lecture theatre

We normally ask for three full A levels, one of which should be History, but we do consider applicants who have omitted history from their sixth-form studies. We are also happy to receive applications from those holding equivalent qualifications other than A levels (e.g. the International Baccalaureate Diploma) and are very flexible about these. We would normally expect three A levels but will consider two levels with two ASs or other combinations. Applications from those with life experience but who may lack formal qualifications are welcomed, as are applications for deferred entry.

We recognise that academic issues are only one part of your life when you come to university. Social life, accommodation and general survival are equally important.

If you receive an offer, you will be invited to an open day when you can look around the University and the department and meet staff and students. Joint applicants may be invited to their other department, but there is always an opportunity to meet staff from History.

How do we work? All learning and teaching in the department is based on close personal contact between staff and students. Teaching methods vary. Lectures bring students together to identify major areas of interest and analysis and to offer a starting point from which students can move on to their own work. Small seminar groups meet regularly, often with students leading the discussion or giving presentations. There are also individual tutorials where students meet with tutors to discuss written assignments and general progress.

Throughout your time at Hull, one member of staff acts as your supervisor to help you with any academic or personal problems. General concerns or worries can be raised through the departmental Staff–Student Committee, which meets at least once each semester and on which there are elected student representatives. You will find more information about the University’s facilities in the current Undergraduate Prospectus and at www.hull.ac.uk. As anyone who has been here will tell you, Hull is fun. Besides the attractions of the city and the students’ union (with its award-winning Asylum nightclub), the department has its own social life. History students run a History Society. Visits by outside speakers, film shows, balloon debates and excursions to local places of interest all feature in its programme – as well as wine and cheese parties. The art historians have their own parties, which include an annual Venetian Carnevale masked ball. At the beginning of the academic year an open night is held by all the University societies, giving you a chance to choose from a vast range of activities.

Students’ work is assessed through coursework and examinations. Single Honours students write a dissertation in Year 3.

The library Because the University was founded 80 years ago, it has been able to build up extensive holdings of source material. The Brynmor Jones Library is one of the best in the country, holding more than a million books and subscribing to many thousands of periodicals (including some 15,000 electronic journals). There are also extensive manuscript, microfilm and audiotape collections. Computer networks connect the Brynmor Jones with other libraries and databases all over the world. The library’s catalogue and information services can be accessed from terminals in the History Department and halls of residence.

www.hull.ac.uk

History

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Careers and further study Hull has been ranked in the top 10 universities nationally for graduate employment since records were first published. The latest Higher Education Statistics Agency figures report that 94% of full-time students obtaining a degree from the University either find employment or progress to further study within six months of graduation. Employers value the training provided by a degree in history. The ability to analyse complex and often conflicting information and to present clear and coherent conclusions in writing or in seminar presentations and discussions involves skills that are readily transferable to most areas of work. These are skills that do not lose their value with changes in fashion and technology.

What our graduates do Graduates from the History Department at Hull can be found in • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

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accounting advertising archive work the armed forces art galleries, dealers and auction houses auditing banking bookselling broadcasting and television the Civil Service commerce computer programming and data processing the Health Service hotel management insurance broking and underwriting journalism law librarianship local government management marketing museums nursing police public relations publishing retailing social services teaching theatrical management

History

Postgraduate opportunities You can also continue your studies in history with a taught MA and with an MPhil or PhD. Current taught MA provision includes • • • • • • • • • •

Medieval History German History Early-Modern History European History Imperial History Military History Women’s History Modern Slavery Studies Historical Studies Archaeology and Regional and Local History


Free Elective Scheme Studying for a degree at the University of Hull is a unique experience. We aim to provide you with an education that offers both depth and breadth of knowledge. To meet these ends the University has developed an optional Free Elective Scheme. This scheme enables the majority of undergraduate students to take one module a year from outside their main course of study. Please note, however, that students on a Joint Honours degree which includes history cannot take a free elective in their first year unless it replaces a module from the other subject.

Admissions policy Admissions information provided in this pamphlet is intended as a general guide and cannot cover all possibilities. Entry requirements are generally stated in terms of A level grades and/or UCAS points, but we encourage applications from people with a wide range of

So, how does it work?

other qualifications and/or

Each year you take 120 credits’ worth of modules.

experience. Some further details of the various entry routes are

SEMESTER 1

SEMESTER 2

20 credits

20 credits

included in our general prospectus. Please contact the Admissions Service (see below) with any specific queries about admissions.

20 credits

20 credits Disclaimer 20 credits

This publication is intended principally as a guide for

20 credits Here you take modules from your main course of study.

prospective students. The matters

Here you have the option to take a free elective or another module from your main course of study.

covered by it – academic and otherwise – are subject to change from time to time, both before and after students are admitted, and the information contained in it

What sort of subjects can I take? You can take almost any free elective module from outside your main course of study, usually at your home campus. You can even take a module from another faculty. The catalogue of free electives might include • Critical Approaches (literature module) • Politics and International Studies • Space Science: Fact and Fiction • Anarchism and Contemporary Global Protest • The Middle Ages Go to the Movies • Women and Politics • The Politics of the European Union

• Passport modules in foreign languages • Science and Society • Screening Europe’s Past • Introduction to Medieval Culture • The Idea of Europe • Field Studies in Marine Biology • Introduction to Psychology

does not form part of any contract. While every reasonable precaution was taken in the production of this brochure, the University does not accept liability for any inaccuracies.

Address For general enquiries, please write to Admissions Service University of Hull Hull, HU6 7RX T 01482 466100

What are the main reasons for participating? • The scheme gives you the opportunity to study a subject without having to commit yourself to taking further modules in that subject area. • By taking a free elective you are able to follow up your interests as part of your degree. • With a broader education you may acquire extra skills that will help you when you enter the employment market.

F 01482 442290 E admissions@hull.ac.uk


A well-made suit of plate armour was up to 15 kg lighter than the Kevlar armour worn by modern combat infantry. Warfare and society is just one of the specialist themes that our history degrees oer.

Change the way you think.

www.hull.ac.uk


History - University of Hull Undergraduate Subject Brochure 2011