Issuu on Google+

Undergraduate study 2011

Creative and digital technologies


Key facts

Creative and digital technologies | 1 Facilities | 6 Creative Music Technology | 8 Popular Music | 10 Design for Digital Media | 11 Digital Arts | 12 Digital Media Studies | 14 Media Performance | 15 Web Design and Development | 16 Computer Science with Games Development | 18

Course

UCAS code

Standard offer

Creative Music Technology

J931 S BA/CMT

Creative Music Technology with Business Management

W3N2 S BA/CMTBM

Design for Digital Media

W212 S BA/DDM

200–240 points

Digital Arts

W280 S BA/DA

200–240 points

Digital Media Studies

W214 S BA/DMS

200–240 points

Media Performance

W490 S BA/MP

240 points

Popular Music

W341 S BA/PM

240–300 points

Web Design and Development

G451 S BSc/WDD

200–240 points

Web Design and Development with Industrial Experience

G452 S BSc/WDDwIE

200–240 points

240–300 points

240 points

All of these courses are taught at the Scarborough Campus. At the Hull Campus, the University also offers Computer Science with Games Development, full details of which can be found on page 18.

Modules | 20 Staff and their research and teaching interests | 28 Further information Creative Music Technology Rowan Oliver 01723 357125 r.a.oliver@hull.ac.uk Or Rob Mackay 01723 357390 r.a.mackay@hull.ac.uk Digital Media Robert Consoli r.consoli@hull.ac.uk 01723 357374 Or write to

Dates of semesters Semester 1 27 Sep – 16 Dec 2011

Semester 2 30 Jan – 11 May 2012

School of Arts and New Media University of Hull Scarborough Campus Scarborough, YO11 3AZ Alternatively, for urgent enquiries, you can call Student Services at Scarborough on 01723 357243 or the University’s Admissions Service at Hull on 01482 466100. If you have a UCAS number, please quote it in all correspondence.


Creative and digital technologies This is an exciting time to be a student at the Scarborough Campus. We are bringing together creative and digital technologies in new and stimulating ways. The School of Arts and New Media builds on the legacy of the Centre for Internet Computing, the first of its kind in the UK, and the Scarborough School of Arts, notable for its history of practice-based teaching. There are many opportunities for crossover between creative music technology, performance, digital media and computing. Our degree courses will broaden your understanding and skills and open up your future employment prospects in this growing sector.

The right mix Our staff are committed to researching, developing and exploiting the creative opportunities offered by new and emerging digital technologies. There is close collaboration between our computer specialists, artists, designers, composers, dancers, choreographers, performers and musicians. Their enthusiasm for combining the potential of new technologies with artistic creativity is evident in the course structures and the opportunities for collaboration between subject areas. The friendly, compact campus at Scarborough, with its creative environment, means that it is easy for you to mix with students from different departments. Our creative music technology degrees mix the practical and the theoretical aspects of both ‘popular’ and ‘art’ music. A true blend of creativity and technology, these courses encourage you to make music in new ways. The degrees in digital media and design allow you to explore all aspects of new media, bringing your creative flair to digital video production, web design or interactive multimedia. Our leading web design and development degrees provide students with ‘hands-on’ practical experience of modern computing, encouraging our graduates to push the boundaries of what is possible with the web. There are fantastic opportunities for working on ‘real-life’ projects in all areas of the creative and digital technologies. Our students are regularly involved in screenings, performances and installations for public arts events in and around Scarborough, and there are opportunities for work placements with industry.

Collaborative culture We are also committed to integrating digital media into the artistic life of the campus. We encourage our students to work on projects with colleagues from other disciplines, including theatre and performance studies and dance. As well as having close links with Scarborough’s famous Stephen Joseph Theatre, the campus is a regional touring venue for music, theatre and dance. ‘On the Edge’, which encourages the work of innovative young companies, has been based here since 1980. Scarborough itself has a thriving arts scene and hosts the annual National Student Drama Festival and the Scarborough Jazz Festival. You will also have opportunities to travel to venues around the UK to see exhibitions, performances and concerts. We place great emphasis on academic rigour and structured tuition, with timetabled lectures, workshops and regular assignments. You will be able to study, experience, experiment with and explore your chosen degree subject using professional, state-of-the-art facilities. You will also be positively encouraged to produce work that is innovative and individual.

www.hull.ac.uk

Creative and digital technologies

1


Our students come to Scarborough with differing levels of experience. You may play in a band and want to increase your musical knowledge and experience in a supportive environment; you may be interested in computer programming and want to explore the creative possibilities of the technology; you may be intrigued by design for the web and want to become skilled in using industry-standard software; you may be a performance artist who is stimulated by the opportunities offered by digital media; or indeed you may have little experience in this field but be excited by the possibilities. Whatever your background, we are sure that you will find the right mix of subjects at the Scarborough Campus to allow you to explore the potential of the creative and digital technologies.

Careers The creative and digital technologies offer exciting employment prospects for people who want to work with new media. The mix of modules offered in our degrees ensures that you can tailor your studies to match your career choice and that you will stand out from the crowd when it comes to applying for jobs. The University’s Careers Service is well known for its effectiveness in helping our students make the right decisions about their futures. Our degrees in creative music technology and popular music provide the perfect grounding for people who want to become successful performers, composers, songwriters or sound engineers. They also provide a suitable pathway for entering teacher training or research. Graduates have gone on to various careers in the music industry, working as engineers at studios such as Abbey Road and at the BBC, enjoying success as recording artists in a wide range of genres, and touring internationally in bands such as Gallows. Our degrees in digital media and design prepare our graduates for careers in the creative digital industries – graphic design, video production and interactive multimedia. The web design and development degrees are for people who want to work as modern computing professionals, in roles such as web designer, computer programmer, web security analyst, e-commerce developer or web solutions developer. The Digital Media Studies course not only develops technical knowledge but also gives a deeper understanding of the impact that digital technologies are having on society, a critical factor for those initiating and managing change in an organisation, whether in the context of government, business, education or entertainment. Media Performance is both for those who want to practise in this contemporary field and for those who wish to adapt their technical skills to areas such as heritage interpretation or the tourism industry.

There are fantastic opportunities for working on ‘real-life’ projects in all areas of the creative and digital technologies.

2

Creative and digital technologies


www.hull.ac.uk

Creative and digital technologies

3


Recent projects in Scarborough’s continuing development include the harbour’s transformation into a stylish marina (including Britain’s first Wi-Fi seafront) and the installation of one of Europe’s fastest broadband connections (100Mb).


File sharing Our exible, interdisciplinary intro italic approach produces fascinating crossovers between digital media, music, performance and computing – combining new technologies with artistic creativity to broaden your skills and experience.


Facilities The University of Hull has made a large financial investment in the Scarborough Campus in recent years, and the creative and digital technologies now boast an impressive array of industry-standard facilities and equipment. In keeping with the spirit of our pioneering degree courses, the campus is also fully wireless, so our students can access the web from anywhere on site. Of course, we also have dedicated members of staff who can teach you how to exploit all this state-of-the-art technology. The Digital Media studios are equipped with dual-boot Apple iMacs and an industry-standard software suite including Photoshop, Flash, Director, Final Cut Pro, Maya and Arkaos. The studios offer a dedicated working environment for students and are accessible from 8.30 am through to 10 pm on a swipe-card system. We also operate a priority system for students engaged in largescale editing or production work. A wide selection of audio and video recording and lighting equipment is also available. The four performance studios have equipment ranging from digital lighting and sound facilities to dance floor and digital projectors. Creative Music Technology currently has 14 music technology suites and studios. Resources include

Studios • three recording studios including Pro Tools Control 24 and two 40-track systems along with ATC, Genelec and Mackie monitoring • three mixing studios with Genelec 5:1 surround sound monitoring, Pro Tools Control 24 systems and overdub facility, also including Drawmer and TC Electronic outboard effects units • 16:4 ambisonic surround studio with 3-D sound encoding and Lemur control surface • an electronica room including Technics vinyl and Pioneer CD decks, Pioneer mixer, Ableton Live, VCS3 synthesiser, Roland MIDI drum kit, Soundbeam and a range of other outboard effects and alternative MIDI controllers, along with film and TV editing software • a sequencing lab equipped with synthesisers, MIDI controller keyboards and mixers

6

Creative and digital technologies

Additional equipment • a selection of recording equipment, including top-ofthe-range Neumann and Soundfield microphones • portable recorders for location recording (stereo, binaural and four-channel surround combinations available) • computers equipped with Pro Tools, Cubase SX, Adobe Audition, Max/MSP/Jitter, Ableton Live, Nuendo, Csound, Soundhack, HALion, Kontact, GRM Tools and TC Native plug-ins

Performance resources • two sound-proofed rehearsal studios, each with full backline and vocal PA • individual practice rooms • band equipment: guitar/bass/keyboard amps, turntables, stage pianos, acoustic pianos, drum kits and samba percussion • three multidisciplinary performance spaces with quadraphonic PA, MIDI lighting desk, digital video projector, I-Cube controller and sound beam ultrasound sensing kit Each studio provides hard-disk recording, using Apple Macintosh computer resources as well as digital multitrack facilities. All computers are equipped with CD and DVD writers, allowing easy transfer of work from one studio to another. Students are expected to spend up to 16 hours a week in the studios. A swipe card system allows access from 6 am till midnight seven days a week. The Keith Donaldson Library supports the courses studied at the Scarborough Campus, with many sections relevant to the interdisciplinary nature of the School of Arts and New Media. In 2010, the library is undergoing substantial expansion, creating a modern social learning environment as well as private study areas and rooms for group study. The library will also be the focal point of student support services. You will also have access to the Brynmor Jones Library on the Hull Campus. Scarborough is also an exciting place in which to study: we have close links with the £4.8 million Creative Industries Centre, which houses the University’s Creative Enterprise Lab. There is ample opportunity to get involved with multimedia events and to network with the growing number of creative and digital practitioners who are relocating their businesses to the town.


www.hull.ac.uk

Creative and Digital Technologies

7


BA Creative Music Technology

Scarborough Campus

Creative music technology (CMT) is one of the most innovative and popular subject areas on offer in the UK. Unlike some of the more engineeringoriented courses on offer elsewhere, CMT at the Scarborough Campus is a course designed for creative musicians. There is plenty of flexibility in the degree, allowing you to realise your creative potential in various fields, including songwriting, contemporary composition, film music, jazz, electronica, sonic arts, experimentalism and pop/rock musicology. At each stage of the course you will be encouraged to make creative use of the latest technologies in sound recording, mixing, sound design, live electronics and multimedia, and by the end of it you will be fully versed in the use of industrystandard hardware and software. As a student at the Scarborough Campus, you will not only be able to realise your creative ambitions with expert supervision; you will also meet other students from all areas of musical life, and work with other enthusiasts on collaborative projects. There is much emphasis on academic rigour and structured tuition, with timetabled lectures, workshops and regular assignments, but there is also plenty of opportunity to work independently in any of our newly equipped studios. You will be positively encouraged to produce work that is innovative and individual. By the third year you will be able to concentrate on an extended piece of work, the Long Study: this may be an extended dissertation, a portfolio of compositions (electroacoustic, acoustic or audiovisual) or an original album of commercial standard.

BA Creative Music Technology with Business Management This degree builds a broad foundation in management through the first two years, and then gives you the opportunity to follow more specialised options – such as Arts Management – in the final year. You can thus combine the practical, studiobased elements of CMT with modules that aim to equip you with the skills and knowledge to manage business activities within the spectrum of careers in music technology. Students on this course also benefit from our links with local small and medium-sized businesses.

Admissions The normal entry requirements are two or three A levels, usually including Music or Music Technology. Appropriate BTEC qualifications, including the National Diploma in Music Technology, Popular Music, Performing Arts and Media Studies, are equally acceptable. We also consider direct entry to Year 2 of the course for students who have successfully completed a BTEC Higher National Diploma in a relevant subject.

There is plenty of flexibility in the degree, allowing you to realise your creative potential in various fields.

8

Creative and digital technologies

Our typical offer is currently around 240–300 points at A level or a pass at BTEC ND with a minimum of three merits overall. However, offers vary depending on musical expertise, and any relevant experience in sound recording, composition and/or songwriting will be taken into consideration. Applicants with an Associated Board qualification at Grades 7/8 (theory or practice) may have this taken into consideration.


Modules First year • • • •

Sonic Arts 1 Studio Production 1 Studio Production 2 Popular Music, Criticism and Culture

Plus optional modules: • • • •

Elements of Popular Songwriting Live Electronica Performance 1 Free elective

Second year • History, Criticism and Analysis of Popular Music since 1960 • Avant-Garde and Experimental Music Plus optional modules: • • • • • • • • • •

Synthesis and Sound Design Sound for Picture Sonic Arts 2 Game Audio Performance 2 Songwriting and Arranging Advanced Production Psychoacoustics and Studio Design Interactive Technology 1 Free elective

Third year • Creative Music Technology Long Study (on a topic of your choice) Plus optional modules: • • • • • •

Creative Music Technology Independent Study Composing for Film and Television Global Pop: Transcending Musical Borders Interactive Technology 2 Live Sound Performance and Creative Technologies Collaboration 2 • Radio Production • Sonic Arts 3

‘The course offers a wide variety of modules with great resources to suit. The staff support for the course is also excellent, and they are always able to offer individual tutorials. Scarborough is a perfect and inspiring environment in which to express your musical creativity.’ Stephen Shine BA Creative Music Technology

For the BA Creative Music Technology with Business Management, you will study four CMT modules a year plus a further two modules in Business Management. There are outline descriptions of all the above modules on pages 20–26.

www.hull.ac.uk

Creative and digital technologies

9


BA Popular Music Scarborough Campus

This course provides a comprehensive grounding in contemporary popular musicology, analysis and performance practice. First-year modules cover the basics of songwriting, performance and studio production and provide a theoretical foundation for later work. The course develops these key themes, and in Years 2 and 3 you have the option to specialise. Your skills as a performer and music practitioner are developed, and you work on supported and supervised projects including lyric writing, other forms of popular music composition, arranging, recording, production and critique. There are opportunities to engage in performance throughout the course. This will incorporate live performances (such as our annual ‘Soundfest’) as well as learning skills related to session playing in the studio (both for pre-recorded projects and live radio broadcasts). You also get the chance to work with mixed media and consider various applications, including live sound, film and TV, radio and game audio. There is much emphasis on academic rigour and structured tuition, with timetabled lectures, workshops and regular assignments, but there is also plenty of opportunity to work independently in any of our newly equipped studios. You will be positively encouraged to produce work that is innovative and individual. By the third year you will be able to concentrate on an extended piece of work, the Long Study: this may take the form of a dissertation, a portfolio of compositions or an original album of commercial standard.

Admissions The normal entry requirements are two or three A levels, usually including Music or Music Technology. Appropriate BTEC qualifications, including the National Diploma in Music Technology, Popular Music, Performing Arts and Media Studies, are equally acceptable. We also consider direct entry to Year 2 of the course for students who have successfully completed a BTEC Higher National Diploma in a relevant subject. Our typical offer is currently around 240–300 points at A level or a pass at BTEC ND with a minimum of three merits overall. However, offers vary depending on musical expertise, and any relevant experience in sound recording, composition and/or songwriting will be taken into consideration. Applicants with an Associated Board qualification at Grades 7/8 (theory or practice) may have this taken into consideration.

10

Creative and digital technologies

Modules First year • • • • •

Studio Production 1 Studio Production 2 Popular Music, Criticism and Culture Words and Music from Dowland to Dylan Performance 1

Plus optional modules: • Elements of Popular Songwriting • Free elective

Second year • History, Criticism and Analysis of Popular Music since 1960 • Avant-Garde and Experimental Music • Performance 2 Plus optional modules: • • • • • • •

Sound for Picture Game Audio Music Industry Studies Psychoacoustics and Studio Design Songwriting and Arranging Advanced Production Free elective

Third year • Creative Music Technology Long Study (on a topic of your choice) Plus optional modules: • • • • •

Creative Music Technology Independent Study Composing for Film and Television Global Pop: Transcending Musical Borders Live Sound Performance and Creative Technologies Collaboration 2 • Performance 3 • Radio Production There are outline descriptions of all the above modules on pages 20–26.


BA Design for Digital Media Scarborough Campus

This course will teach you how to express your creative ideas using advanced digital technologies. Whether you already know a lot about computers or very little, it will take you from the fundamentals of digital graphic design through to the creation of sophisticated digital design projects. You will have the opportunity to apply your creative thoughts and ideas with a solid technical understanding of digital production processes, built on a firm understanding of visual problem-solving techniques. The course will prepare you for entry into the field of digital design and technology, providing you with the skills and experiences to excel in a rapidly changing and dynamic industry. You will learn about graphic design, composition and layout, photography and typography, as well as web design, video design and production, art direction, animation and 3D design. More importantly, we will teach you how to use these tools to effectively communicate your ideas to the world. If you take this degree, you will be studying within the Digital Media subject area, itself part of the School of Arts and New Media, on the University of Hull’s Scarborough Campus. Creative Music Technology, Theatre and Performance Studies, and English are other subject areas within the school, and students are encouraged to collaborate with their colleagues. The Scarborough Campus has excellent facilities for producing digital graphic art and design, and our recently commissioned Apple Mac design studios are equipped with all the software and hardware you will need to execute your projects to advanced industry standards. A wide range of video editing and recording equipment is also available. Studying for this degree is an excellent way to prepare for a career in the digital design industry. You will learn how to think like a designer and how to apply your ideas using the latest technologies. You will learn design principles and theory, and you will develop the necessary skills to enter into professional practice.

Admissions We look for bright people who have clear potential to succeed in university-level studies, with creative vision and an ability to think logically and methodically. Our best students often do not conform to standardised profiles or circumstances, so we review and consider each application on an individual basis. We require a minimum of 200 UCAS points, and at least one of your A levels should be a creative or numerate subject. Equivalent attainment in other awards is acceptable.

www.hull.ac.uk

We may consider making an offer based on work or practical experience in lieu of A levels, and indeed we encourage applications from prospective mature students. Applicants are invited to contact the School of Arts and New Media’s Digital Media team for more information. We encourage all to attend an open day if possible. This gives you the chance to see Scarborough, tour our facilities and meet staff and students. You’ll see what the University of Hull’s Scarborough Campus is all about, and why it would be an excellent place to study Design for Digital Media.

Modules First year • • • • •

Principles of Visual Design Video Design and Production Interaction and Design Web Authoring Media, Culture and Society

Plus an optional module: • Multimedia or free elective

Second year • • • •

Art Direction and Animation Audience Research Methods Performance and Creative Technologies Collaboration 1

Plus two optional modules from • Interaction, Experience and Engagement • Programming for Interactive Media • Web Design, Work Placement or free elective

Third year • • • •

3D Design Independent Study Psychology of Internet Behaviour Performance and Creative Technologies Collaboration 2

Plus an optional module from • Game Art and Design • E-Business There are outline descriptions of all these modules on pages 20–26.

Creative and digital technologies

11


BA Digital Arts

Scarborough Campus

New media and digital technologies provide a blank canvas for a whole new range of artistic expression. Realising the full potential of this space requires an understanding of the principles of art and design, an aesthetic eye, a rich imagination and a desire to use digital technologies to produce innovative artefacts. This course provides you with the opportunity to explore these artistic possibilities and develop your own digital talents in a range of different art forms. Digital technology is at the leading edge of art and design today. Whether you already know a lot or a little about computers, this course will take you from the fundamentals of digital arts through to the creation of substantial media projects. From gallery installations to projected backdrops for performances, from transmissions over the internet to DVD productions, you will acquire a solid technical understanding and apply it to the creative production process. Although the course has been developed to give you hands-on training in all aspects of new media, we will encourage you to be an innovative and individual digital artist. The Scarborough Campus has excellent facilities for digital art. The studios are equipped with Apple iMacs and a software suite including Photoshop, Flash, Director, Final Cut Pro, Maya and Arkaos. A wide selection of audio and video recording and lighting equipment is also available. BA Digital Arts allows you to concentrate on the experimental and progressive aspects of the subject by offering a thorough grounding in both creative and technical disciplines. Past students have utilised their knowledge and skills to create • music video for their own (or other) bands • interactive animated websites • theatre performances and installations with digital artefacts • VJ performances with live media feeds If you are excited by new technologies, enjoy creating images or video, have a wide range of interests in new media and are prepared to experiment and challenge conventional arts practice, the Digital Arts course may be the right choice for you. For students interested in performance, either backstage or onstage, the University also offers an undergraduate course in Media Performance (see page 15). This degree offers opportunities for additional interdisciplinary study and is particularly suited to those with a background or interest in the performing arts.

12

Creative and digital technologies

Admissions As a general rule we look for bright people who have clear potential to succeed in university-level studies, with both creative vision and an ability to think and work in a logical, methodical manner. Offers are made on an individual basis, often following a personal interview, but a typical offer will be around 200–240 points. At least one numerate or creative subject studied at A level will normally be expected. Equivalent attainment in other awards is acceptable. We may, however, consider making an offer based on work or practical experience in lieu of A levels, and indeed we encourage applicants from prospective mature students. Applicants invited for interview will be given the opportunity to tour our facilities and to meet staff and current students.

First year • • • • •

Principles of Visual Design Video Design and Production Interaction and Design Web Authoring Media, Culture and Society

Plus an optional module: • Multimedia or free elective

Second year • • • •

Art Direction and Animation Audience Research Methods Performance and Creative Technologies Collaboration 1 • Interaction, Experience and Engagement Plus an optional module: • Web Design, Work Placement or free elective

Third year • • • •

3D Design Independent Study Psychology of Internet Behaviour Performance and Creative Technologies Collaboration 2 • Game Art and Design There are outline descriptions of all these modules on pages 20–26.


www.hull.ac.uk

Creative and Digital Technologies

13


BA Digital Media Studies Scarborough Campus

The rapid evolution of digital media devices and production tools is enabling people to become media producers as well as consumers. Podcasting, mobile blogging, music production, VJing and the next generation of the web are becoming lifestyle components in the networked, digital world. To be a practising graduate in the expanding creative industries sector, a balance between the artistic process and the technical constraints of media access and delivery is required. Equally important is the ability to reflect critically on how these developments are affecting the way we live, work and play. If you want to go beyond training in the use of existing tools, and to strike a balance between media criticism and practical awareness, you will need a skill set focused on three different core areas – • creative: our modules focus on the knowledge, understanding and skills needed for the creation of aesthetically pleasing and engaging media artefacts • technical: you will gain a detailed understanding of the technologies that you are using to create media and the professional skills required to produce advanced digital media • critical: topics will enable you to demonstrate a critical understanding of the technologies and media that you are using and producing, and to critique, express and evaluate issues related to digital media You will also gain focused key skills throughout the course, including team working, presentation delivery and the development of a professional portfolio. Our various assessment methods – from practical exercises and lab demonstrations to individual and group projects – will encourage you to demonstrate the range of your intellectual and practical learning. The complementary aspects of your learning really come together in the third-year Individual Project, a substantial supervised piece of work on a topic of your own choice. The School of Arts and New Media has dedicated lab space with top-quality computing systems, and our team of staff provide plenty of practical support. Wherever you wish to work within the media industries, this course gives you the opportunity to gain a deep understanding and appreciation of the role of digital media in everyday life. It also provides practical experience that will enable you to explore and comment on future media technologies. Overall, the skill set that it cultivates should give you the platform on which to build your career as an adaptive professional.

14

Creative and digital technologies

Modules First year • • • •

Interaction and Design Principles of Visual Design Web Authoring Media, Culture and Society

Plus one optional module from each of these two groups: • Multimedia • Free elective • Programming for Interactive Media • Video Design and Production

Second year • Audience • Research Methods • Performance and Creative Technologies Collaboration 1 Plus one optional module from each of these three groups: • Programming for the Web • Web Systems Management • Art Direction and Animation • Interaction, Experience and Engagement • Information Management • Web Design • Work placement

Third year • Independent Study • Psychology of Internet Behaviour Plus three optional modules – two from the first of these groups and one from the second: • • • •

3D Design Advanced Interfaces Web Security Performance and Creative Technologies Collaboration 2

• Game Art and Design • E-Business There are outline descriptions of all these modules on pages 20–26.


BA Media Performance Scarborough Campus

This course is aimed at students who are looking for a Single Honours degree that combines the best resources that the School of Arts and New Media (SANM) has to offer. The typical student is one who is interested in theatre, dance, music and/or live art but wants a degree course that offers a rich mix relating to contemporary practice involving new media technologies. The hybridisation of art forms is supported by recent software developments and an increase in collaborative practice in the creative industries. Media Performance allows you to concentrate on the commercial or the experimental aspects of the subject. In either case you get a thorough grounding in both creative and technical disciplines. Students with a particular interest in music, theatre or dance will follow a pathway within their chosen performance discipline.

If you want to combine your interest in digital media and the internet, as well as performance technology like lighting and sound, with a passion for music, theatre, dance or some other form of performance, and you have not yet made up your mind on your precise choice of career, please contact us to find out more.

Admissions As a general rule we look for bright people who have clear potential to succeed in university-level studies, with both creative vision and an ability to think and work in a logical, methodical manner. Offers are made on an individual basis, often following a personal interview, but a typical offer will be around 240 points. At least one numerate or creative subject studied at A level will normally be expected. Equivalent attainment in other awards is acceptable. We may, however, consider making an offer based on work or practical experience in lieu of A levels, and indeed we encourage applications from prospective mature students.

Optional modules may be drawn from a subset of the modules offered across the SANM. Examples include Production Skills; Performance Practice; Key Practitioners in Theatre and Performance; Directing; Design for Contemporary Performance; and Radical Performance. (See the Drama, Theatre and Performance pamphlet for more information.)

Applicants invited for interview will be given the opportunity to tour our facilities, meet staff and current students, and look at the course content in detail.

This course is designed to produce two types of graduate:

For more details of this course please contact the School of Arts and New Media.

• a performance artist who is fully aware of the current trends in the use of digital technology for making contemporary performance works • a performance technologist who is fully aware of the role of digital technology in the world of contemporary performance art All our graduates will also be able to adapt their technical skills to some areas beyond the culture industry, since the same skills are required within several non-artistic fields such as heritage interpretation and the tourism industry. Past students who have undertaken interdisciplinary studies within the SANM have utilised their knowledge and skills in music and theatre to create • music videos for their own bands • theatre performances and art installations with digital artefacts • websites promoting theatre shows, music recordings, live bands, or DJ and VJ activities • lighting and sound design for all sorts of live performances and events • digital video performances

www.hull.ac.uk

Modules First year • Interdisciplinary Studies in Creativity • Performance and Documentation • Media, Culture and Society Plus optional modules drawn from across the school

Second year • Audience • Research Methods • Performance and Creative Technologies Collaboration 1 Plus optional modules drawn from across the school

Third year • Independent Interdisciplinary Project • Performance and Creative Technologies Collaboration 2 Plus optional modules drawn from across the school

Creative and digital technologies

15


BSc Web Design and Development

Scarborough Campus

The past decade has seen an ever-increasing number of people become webenabled, from reading news through purchasing their shopping to building their own web presence. Over this time the web itself has evolved from a purely static medium, where simple pages were displayed and consumed, to today’s web, where we can now access a range of increasingly dynamic resources such as wikis, blogs and community-driven data repositories (e.g. for video and photographs). The services on offer are becoming richer, and as a society we require dedicated web professionals with the skills to further advance what is possible on the web. At Scarborough’s School of Arts and New Media (SANM) we have pioneered innovative degree courses to ensure that our graduates are able not only to apply themselves in the current web industries sector but also to anticipate future developments and the impact that these will have on society as a whole. You will investigate the applied use of the web, from how it provides support for large software systems to the next generation of human–computer interfaces. Cutting-edge developments are examined not only at a technical level but also in terms of their social and business impact. All subject areas are underpinned by relevant web engineering and design principles to give you the opportunity to gain significant standards-based expertise. The dissertation is an important part of the final year and provides you with an opportunity to specialise. It has also enabled our students to have a real impact in the positions that they obtain when they graduate. The SANM houses dedicated laboratories with top-quality computing systems and a software suite comprising a range of development tools such as Photoshop, Dreamweaver and Flash. Our team of staff supports your practical work; our virtual learning environment provides course information and access to online discussion forums; and an enviable staff–student ratio also contributes to a quality learning experience. The high quality of that learning has been recognised by the Quality Assurance Agency.

Admissions We generally look for clear evidence of potential to succeed in university-level studies, with particular regard to the intellectual qualities of logical thinking, methodical working and breadth of vision which are needed for success in software design and development work. These qualities are typically evidenced through an applicant’s choice of relevant A level subjects, or equivalent background or experience, with established or expected achievement equivalent to the following grades. Offers are made on an individual basis, but we normally require 200–240 points from at least two full A levels (or equivalent). Alternative and international qualifications are also considered. If you meet our academic requirements, previous computing/IT or artistic/multimedia experience is not essential.

You will examine cutting-edge developments – not only at a technical level but also in terms of their social and commercial impact.

16

Creative and digital technologies

We will, however, consider applications from candidates who cannot offer the standard academic qualifications but may have relevant career experience or other suitable credentials, and we encourage applications from mature candidates. If we are considering making you an offer, you will be invited for a tour of the campus and its facilities. This open day allows you to meet some of the staff and students of the School of Arts and New Media.


The four-year option Web Design and Development is also available in a four-year variant, with a year of industrial experience between the second and final years: Our students take up placements in large international companies and smaller enterprises (examples range from new media development for Sky TV to working with Microsoft on the next generation of Microsoft Messenger). Such ‘industrial placement’ years are not available in most courses offered elsewhere, but feedback from companies is uniformly positive. As important, placements positively enhance the career prospects of our graduates.

The dissertation, which provides you with an opportunity to specialise, has enabled our students to have a real impact in the positions that they have obtained after graduating.

Modules First year • • • • •

Media, Culture and Society Principles of Visual Design Web Authoring Interaction and Design Programming for Interactive Media

Plus an optional module: • Multimedia or free elective

Second year • • • • •

Collaborative Development Programming for the Web Web Systems Management Research Methods Information Management

Plus an optional module from • Web Design • Work placement

Third year • • • • •

Independent Project Psychology of Internet Behaviour Web Security E-Business Advanced Interfaces

There are outline descriptions of all these modules on pages 20–26.

www.hull.ac.uk

Creative and digital technologies

17


Computer Science with Games Development Hull Campus

The computer games industry represents the most dynamic, fast-moving and creative digital entertainment market in the world. The industry has always used the most advanced and exciting technology available. Recent advances in graphics hardware have not only improved the graphical content of games but also released resources that have enabled more realistic physics and AI to be used in games for the first time. Our courses in Computer Science with Games Development, offered by the Department of Computer Science on the Hull Campus, take in a detailed consideration of the industry-critical areas of programming, software engineering, computer graphics and simulation, and they include a significant element of practical and industrially relevant project work. Module content is the same in Year 1 as for the other computer science courses offered on the Hull Campus, enabling you to transfer between degrees up to the end of that year. In later years you are introduced to specialist modules on games- and graphics-oriented topics, including multimedia architectures, simulation and rendering, digital audio and video techniques, and advanced games programming. Although the skills fostered by these courses are directly relevant to the computer games industry, they are also applicable to a wide range of careers which require knowledge of graphics, simulation and visualisation. In financial computing, for example, your experience of visualising and displaying data can be applied to predicting fluctuations in the market; in medical computing, graphics programming is used to display medical images to help in diagnosis and treatment; in military simulation, your expertise in AI, physics modelling and the design of large, complex programs will help with the simulation of battle environments and the analysis of military data. Your solid knowledge and understanding of computer science would also enable you to pursue a career in a wide variety of other areas of computing unrelated to games and graphics.

From applicants we typically require 200–280 UCAS points (except for the foundation route), including two subjects at A level, or equivalent. A minimum grade C in GCSE Mathematics, or equivalent, is required; and GCSE English at grade C, or equivalent, is preferred. Requirements for entry via the foundation year are lower. We will also consider applicants with relevant experience rather than academic qualifications. Further details of the Computer Science with Games Development courses, and other computing-related degrees, can be found in the Computer Science subject pamphlet. You can download a copy of the pamphlet from the University’s website at www.hull.ac.uk/ prospectus. Alternatively, you can call 0870 126 2000.

MEng Computer Science with Games Development Code Short form Duration

G492 MEng/CSGD 4 years

BSc Computer Science with Games Development Code Short form Duration

G490 BSc/CSGD 3 years

BSc Computer Science with Games Development with Industrial Experience Code Short form Duration

G493 BSc/CSGDIE 4 years

Computer Science with Games Development is offered in the three pathways shown in the table. In addition to these courses, the Department of Computer Science offers BSc and MEng degrees in Computer Science, Computer and Business Informatics, Computer Software Development and Computer Systems Engineering. The critically acclaimed racing game Split Second, developed by Black Rock for Disney Interactive, featured seven University of Hull graduates on its programming team. (Image courtesy of Disney Interactive Studios)

18

Creative and digital technologies


www.hull.ac.uk

Creative and digital technologies

19


Modules The following list gives you an overview of many of the modules that make up our degree courses. 3D Design introduces you to the fundamental technical and aesthetic concepts of 3D design and professional 3D design practice. Supported by a series of lectures, demonstrations and workshops, you will conceptualise, plan, design and assemble a 3D design portfolio. You will also analyse, compare and criticise examples of 3D design, and undertake research into current developments in 3D design and technology. Advanced Interfaces views the web as a visual platform to a variety of networked data sources and web application functions. The module applies the principles of information visualisation to cutting-edge web technology and mash-up culture. You will research advanced human–computer interaction methods and design and develop an advanced interface which brings together multiple data sources and presents them through an interactive and communicative interface. Advanced Production normally requires a prior high grade in Studio Production 1 and 2. Students use cutting-edge hardware and software (on an Apple Macintosh platform) to learn advanced sound production and editing techniques, and they have a chance to work in a 5:1 surround sound format. Art Direction and Animation introduces you to both traditional and digital animation production techniques through lectures, workshops and demonstrations. Students produce practice-based exercises and a final project portfolio which explores the conventions and language of animation, focusing on animation’s unique ability to communicate powerful ideas. You will design animated artefacts with a specific and functional purpose while minimising the use of purely aesthetic or entertaining animated content. Audience seeks to promote your critical understanding of media audiences from traditional through to new media. Lectures and seminars will provide you with knowledge about the requirements of different audiences and how to develop your multimedia artefacts to cater for them. Avant-Garde and Experimental Music surveys music from the last 100 years that has exhibited a particularly radical or experimental bent, and thus has challenged compositional, aesthetic and/or social norms. The module explores a wide range of musical styles and genres, in part as a means of critiquing the conventional distinction, often still made, between popular and art music. Collaborative Development focuses on the development of teamwork and on systemic project development. You will work in a team on a substantive group project. This will allow you to experience different aspects of the life cycle and apply appropriate methods, software and techniques at each stage. Further professional skills of project management and techniques for analysis and design will be introduced, along with appropriate supporting methods and software.

We will show you how the basic elements of a computer language can be combined to build a softwareenhanced website with online games.

20

Creative and digital technologies

Composing for Film and Television examines the history and aesthetics of film music. Students explore the creative and technical challenges of creating music for the screen and gain some insight into production processes. The module is supported by weekly composition workshops in which students compose music for specific dramatic contexts and discuss their work. The assessments include a short essay and an underscore for a film clip.


Creative Music Technology Independent Study gives you the opportunity to produce work in a different format from that adopted in your Long Study. (For example: if the Long Study topic is composition, this module could cover aspects of musicology.) The module allows you to develop a particular area of interest by engaging in a sustained period of research with tutor support and supervision. Its outcome can take a variety of forms and is to be agreed through negotiation. Creative Music Technology Long Study involves work on an approved extended project throughout your final year with tutorial support from your supervisor. The projects available cover all aspects of composition, audio recording and sound-forpicture covered on the course. You may also opt to submit a dissertation on a topic related to composition, popular music analysis/history or music technology.

Lectures and seminars will provide you with knowledge about the requirements of different audiences and how to develop your multimedia artefacts to cater for them.

E-Business imparts an understanding of the application of internet technologies in business environments. It introduces business concepts, strategies and models and considers how internet development architectures, techniques and technologies are used in developing electronic business systems. It covers knowledge and skills that can be applied to the design and implementation of a typical secure electronic business application. Elements of Popular Songwriting considers aspects of popular song including genre, lyrics, form, harmony, melody, tonality, instrumentation and production technique. While there will still be opportunities for group discussion, the emphasis will be on your own compositional creativity, and you will produce a portfolio of your own songs. Film and the Moving Image takes you through some of the highlights of the most important artistic medium to be developed in the 20th century. From early European cinema, through the work of Hitchcock, the golden ages of Hollywood, and Japanese cinema, to experimental creative video and digital production, this module will provide you with the means to analyse and discuss this most popular art form. Game Art and Design allows you to explore the processes and practices involved in conceptual and contemporary game design. You will examine a range of knowledge areas and apply your practical skills in developing concept art and design materials for a creative game concept. Game Audio provides you with the opportunity to explore the technical and creative challenges of creating audio content for games. The module explores the ways in which sound is implemented in dynamic game play and also considers the use of linear audio in games. There are two practical assignments, which are assessed according to industry standards. Game audio specialists are usually involved in the delivery of this module. Global Pop: Transcending Musical Borders introduces you to a range of nonWestern music systems and the influence that they continue to exert on contemporary Western pop music. You will examine the historical development and cultural contexts of these systems, engage practically with performance and compositional aspects of selected styles, and analyse the two-way cultural exchange which has resulted in hybrid popular music styles worldwide. History, Criticism and Analysis of Popular Music Since 1960 gives a historical overview of various strands in the development of popular music since 1960, as well as a review of recent writings in critical and analytical musicology.

www.hull.ac.uk

Creative and digital technologies

21


Independent Interdisciplinary Project is a double module which allows students to develop a particular area of interest in the field of interdisciplinary studies by engaging in supported and supervised research for the duration of the academic year. Independent Project tasks you with investigating an agreed area of study. Areas can be selected from lists provided by Digital Media staff members or developed individually by students and agreed by potential supervisors. The module allows you to develop a particular area of interest by engaging in sustained research with tutor support and supervision. Its outcome takes the form of an initial literature review and a final dissertation. Independent Study allows you to develop a particular area of interest by engaging in sustained research with tutor support and supervision. The outcome of the module can take a variety of forms and is to be agreed through negotiation. Information Management introduces you to the fundamentals of data representation and of database design and development, then elaborates upon these principles using relevant techniques and applications. Interaction and Design imparts an understanding of the key principles and practices underlying interaction, design and usability. You will develop a range of knowledge and skills to allow you to design and critically evaluate interactive technologies, as well as an awareness of the creative process and the issues involved in creating well-designed technologies. The emphasis is on applying theoretical constructs to practical activities, and you will be encouraged to work independently and creatively. Interaction, Experience and Engagement introduces you to the advanced technical and aesthetic concepts of interactive design and interactive design practice, building on skills developed in Multimedia. Working to a creative brief of your own devising, you will conceptualise, plan, design and assemble a screenbased interactive art application. You will also analyse, compare and criticise examples of screen-based interactive art applications and look for creative ways of recording and documenting the creative process. Interactive Technology 1 allows you to design your own interactive technologies through the use of the software environment Max/MSP. These might take the form of an interface which controls musical parameters, or an interactive installation. Expanded MIDI and OSC control is covered, including the application of movement

22

Creative and digital technologies

sensing as well as the appropriation of devices such as games controllers. Interactive Technology 2 builds on work done in Interactive Technology 1 and introduces you to live video manipulation through Max/MSP/Jitter as well as the programming of advanced interfaces such as the Lemur touch-screen controller. You will work in a group to produce an audiovisual installation for public engagement as well as working independently on your own creative projects. Interdisciplinary Studies in Creativity introduces a range of critical perspectives on the nature of media in relation to theatre, dance, music, live art, and media arts. It also deals with the basics of the creative process and the issues involved in creating well-designed performance environments in the context of contemporary technology. Live Electronica provides both a performance base and a set of programming skills that can be tapped for either performance or interactive-technology modules. You will consider historical and aesthetic perspectives as well as practical applications. The aim is to develop an awareness of the creative use of music technology in a live-performance context. Live Sound covers the theory and practice of engineering for amplified instruments in a liveperformance situation. You will develop practical skills through weekly workshops, and your understanding will be enhanced through theoretical instruction in lectures. Media, Culture and Society imparts a fundamental understanding not only of ethical and professional issues in the field of digital media but also of personal skill development, with an emphasis on reading, listening and communication skills. You will produce reports in various forms about issues affecting particular areas of digital media. Multimedia introduces you to the fundamental technical and aesthetic concepts of multimedia design and multimedia design practice. Supported by lectures, demonstrations and workshops, you will conceptualise, plan, design and assemble a basic multimedia application. You will analyse, compare and criticise examples of commercial multimedia applications and multimedia art. You will consider issues relating to the technical and aesthetic integration of diverse media types and how those issues map onto human cognitive capabilities. You will also research current developments in multimedia design and technology.


Music Industry Studies puts students in control of a ‘record label’, encouraging them to assume various relevant roles in order to promote and release new music. In doing so, you learn aspects of industry practice through first-hand experience, and are supported via additional input from music industry professionals at key points during the semester. Performance 1, 2 and 3 develop performing skills in terms of technique and musicianship. Each module involves working in a group throughout the year, rehearsing regularly and performing in workshops with course tutors. The culmination of each module is an assessed public performance by the group. Performance and Creative Technologies Collaboration 1 and 2 have an interdisciplinary focus and provide the opportunity for self-directed group exploration in the creation of collaborative performance work for public presentation, achieved through a system of mentoring, negotiation and tutor supervision. Popular Music, Criticism and Culture introduces you to a variety of critical and theoretical writings from the burgeoning field of popular music studies, tackling the ideas of thinkers as diverse as Adorno, Scruton, Frith and McClary. You will consider (among other things) definitions of musical art, issues of musical value, the idea of music as commodity, the relationship between music and other arts, concepts of musical influence, and the relationships between music and politics, gender, sexuality, ideology and religion. The music studied varies from year to year, but tends to be drawn from the field of rock and pop. Principles of Visual Design imparts a range of software and design skills through a series of lectures, demonstrations and workshops. Students explore examples of contemporary digital arts practice and present their findings in student-led seminars; they also carry out practical computer-based exercises. You will develop a portfolio of personal digital graphic art and design practice. Programming for Interactive Media introduces the craft of website programming using JavaScript. Beginning from scratch, the module shows how the basic elements of a computer language can be combined to build a software-enhanced website with online games. It also introduces debugging, documentation, primitive animation and anti-hacking precautions. Teaching is by means of theoretical lectures and practical lab-based exercises.

24

Creative and digital technologies

Programming for the Web extends the programming skills developed in the Programming for Interactive Media module, focusing on object orientation and programming for web-based applications. You will learn more structured data representation and manipulation techniques to allow programs to deal with more complex information, and you will learn to design and develop client/server programs. Psychoacoustics and Studio Design is concerned with how we perceive sound. Looking at various aspects of psychoacoustics, such as sound localisation, masking, speech perception, and music and emotion, you will learn how to relate these to audio recording and mixing as well as composition. Psychology of Internet Behaviour describes and critiques theories of individual and group behaviour in an internet-enabled context. Various aspects of life online will be examined, together with an assessment of whether the changes brought about in individual behaviour and psychology should be considered as positive consequences of the internet or as symptoms of an internet malaise. Radio Production examines the skills and techniques required to produce live and pre-recorded programmes for radio, enabling you to develop both your technical and your creative skills. Various programme types and broadcasting styles are covered, as well as some basic aspects of radio transmission. Research Methods introduces you to the essentials of conducting research. You will be required to demonstrate understanding through the application of selected research processes to a variety of different research problems. By the end of this module you should be well equipped to choose between different research methods when planning your final-year project. Songwriting and Arranging invites those who gained good grades in Elements of Popular Songwriting to pursue the subject further. The emphasis will be on your own independent projects, and we will discuss the work of contemporary songwriters in a critical forum. You will bring your own music and lyrics to our peer-review workshops, and produce an EP to a professional standard at the end of the course. This is an optional module, but it is highly recommended if you plan to offer an album of original songs in your final year.


‘Studying digital arts has given me the chance to broaden my horizons in terms of what’s possible for the future, including further learning and career prospects. The eclectic mix of course content, structured as well as open-ended modules, approachable lecturers and likeminded students all encourage creativity. ‘The course has also given me complete artistic freedom while utilising new software and techniques in areas such as animation, graphics and web design. I’ve felt that being taught by people who have had industry experience gives the course authenticity and offers insight into the subject.’ Sam Howle BA Digital Media Studies

www.hull.ac.uk

Creative and digital technologies

25


Sonic Arts 1 introduces the practical study of composition through a variety of creative projects. All work is developed and evaluated through seminar-based ‘composition clinics’. There are also opportunities for workshop performances of live and recorded material. Sonic Arts 2 develops the skills and techniques acquired in the first year through the completion of an extended electroacoustic composition involving live performance and multi-channel sound diffusion. Sonic Arts 3 develops the skills acquired in Sonic Arts 2, exploring more advanced compositional techniques such as 3D sound, and culminates in a large-scale compositional project. Sound for Picture provides you with the opportunity to create audiovisual compositions and to explore audiovisual mapping. Graphics software is taught as part of the module, providing a strong foundation for interdisciplinary modules and also for those interested in multimedia. You will be required to submit two audiovisual compositions for assessment. Studio Production 1 introduces you, through a series of theoretical lectures, practical workshops and seminars, to the techniques and equipment required for studiobased audio and MIDI recording, including the mixing desk, microphones, computer sequencing, sampling and digital hard-disk recording. Studio Production 2 enables you to apply the theoretical and practical understanding of the recording process acquired in Studio Production 1 through a range of additional practical recording projects supplemented by theoretical lectures, with specific reference to sound synthesis, sampling and mixing. Consideration will also be given to songwriting skills, production and arrangement. Synthesis and Sound Design explores the scientific concepts governing synthesis and sound design processes. You have the opportunity to explore these concepts by implementing your own synthesis and DSP instruments using Max/Msp. To choose this module, you must have registered on Interactive Technology 1. The assessments include an exemplified essay and a sound design portfolio. Video Design and Production introduces you to video design and production techniques through lectures, workshops and demonstrations. Students collaboratively produce practice-based exercises and a final video project which explore the conventions and language of digital video production, focusing on video’s unique

26

Creative and digital technologies

ability to communicate powerful ideas. You will design video artefacts with a specific and functional purpose while minimising the use of purely aesthetic or entertaining video content. Web Authoring equips you with the knowledge and skills needed to build effective web pages and sites. The focus is on contemporary web development technologies and the creation of sites that are accessible, usable and easy to maintain. Contextual material will help you understand modern web development best practice and enable you to adapt to changes in web development practices in the future. Web Design further develops your knowledge, skills and understanding in the area of professional web design, focusing on the use of professional web development technologies to create sites that are accessible, usable and easy to maintain. Students demonstrate the abilities that they have developed throughout this module by creating a portfolio of design materials and associated web interfaces. You will be encouraged to think ‘outside the box’ in creating your web portfolio. Web Security imparts a detailed understanding of the principles and nature of security in digital, and principally web, environments. You will gain knowledge of security threats and their mitigation through contextual lectures and practical workshops/seminars. Web Systems Management explains the different layers of the network model, from the underlying network infrastructure up to the application layers, with a focus on web server management. You will have the opportunity to gain both technical and applicationsbased knowledge related to the administration and configuration of network systems. Words and Music from Dowland to Dylan is a brief history of song (in its broadest sense) from the 16th century to the 1960s. Each week you will get a chance to discuss music that may be unfamiliar: Italian madrigals, fado, Schubert lieder, opera, Delta blues, murder ballads, Broadway shows, protest songs, comedy songs and avant-garde vocal music. The aim is not to study history as such but to introduce you to a variety of ways in which a songwriter can approach the craft. There is also the option of setting a piece of modern poetry to music in your own style.


Staff and their research and teaching interests Our staff have a wide range of research and teaching interests, all of which contribute to degree content and inform their teaching. We also host regular visits by practising musicians, artists, designers, computing specialists and industry professionals. Jo Anderson, BMus (Austin, USA), MMus, PhD (Birmingham), has research interests in ambisonics and electroacoustic composition.

Our staff have a wide range of research and teaching interests, all of which contribute to degree content and inform their teaching.

Robert Consoli, BA (Penn State, USA), has been a practising graphic designer for over 20 years. He teaches multimedia design and animation students to develop and recognise creative ideas, and then to express their ideas using digital technologies. Linda Hockley, MA (Teesside), MSc (York), BEd (London Met), CertEd (Durham), has research interests in e-learning and in user interfaces and higher education. Tanko Ishaya, BSc, PhD (UMIST), is currently supervising PhD students in areas including the application of semantic web and multi-agent technologies for personalised e-learning support and semantic multimedia annotation and organisation for effective retrieval. His other research areas include trust and security of internet systems. Chris Jones, BA, MRes (Hull), is a Computer Lab Officer for Creative Music Technology. Andrew King, BMus, PhD (Northumbria), CEng, MIET, LTCM, has research interests in learning technology and educational psychology. Rob Mackay, BSc (Keele), MMus, PhD (Bangor), has interests in electroacoustic composition, including fixed media, instruments, live electronics, image, movement and theatre. He has played in a range of groups, collaborating with John Cale and supporting P J Harvey. Helen R Mitchell, BMus (Edinburgh), MMus (Liverpool), MSc (York), LGSM, HETC, FHEA; her current research interests focus on film music/sound and composition. She is also interested in audiovisual interaction across a range of different applications. Darren Mundy, BSc, PhD (Salford), focused his PhD study on the secure electronic transfer of medical prescriptions within the NHS, and his current interests principally relate to internet security and secure medical informatics. He is supervising PhD students working on topics ranging from trust and context through intelligent e-learning to secure mobile area networks.

www.hull.ac.uk

Creative and digital technologies

27


Chris Newell, MSc (Huddersfield), PhD (York), is interested in interdisciplinary perspectives that combine performance and digital media, particularly in the field of synthetic speech production. He is an Honorary Research Fellow in the Department of Computer Science at the University of York. In his theatre career he assisted Trevor Nunn and Sir Peter Hall and has directed for many opera and theatre companies. Rowan Oliver, BA (York), is a professional musician, recording and performing internationally with such artists as Goldfrapp and Paul Oakenfold, as well as composing for film, producing and remixing. His research deals with African diasporic popular music, rhythm and groove. Jason Raven is our Digital Arts Technician. His specialism is the media of digital art, encompassing video production and the use of Photoshop. Toni Sant, BA Hons (Malta), MA, PhD (New York), has research interests in the use of the internet in/for performance, live art, applied theatre, interactive multimedia, and the socio-cultural aspects of new media, particularly in marginalised communities. Darren Stephens, BSc (Durham), MSc (Teeside), Computer Laboratory Officer, has research interests including the measurement of the quality of web-based systems (which he is investigating as part of his PhD research) and network and web application security. Paul Warren, BA, DipComp (Open University), has a wide range of interests, including the science of evolution, and human and computer languages, and he is currently engaged in doctoral research which brings these areas together. In his spare time, he works on open source software projects. Julia Wray, BA (Hull), specialises in performance, with a focus on jazz. As well as lecturing part-time, she works as a professional musician in a number of ensembles. John Whelan, BSc, PhD (Hull), has a research background in terrain visualisation, with an emphasis on the perception of form through sketch cues. His current interests are mobile computing, mixed media presentation and perceptual issues in computer graphics. He has recently supervised a PhD student investigating perceptual optimisation in internet-based virtual reality. Howard Wilde, BA (Oxford), MMus, PhD (London), has research interests in theory and analysis; 16th-century style study; analytical issues in early music; 19th-century German song; and popular songwriting. Alan Young, BA (Hull), is a Computer Lab Officer for Creative Music Technology and is studio manager.

28

Creative and digital technologies


Free Elective Scheme Studying for a degree at the University of Hull is a unique experience. We aim to provide you with an education that offers both depth and breadth of knowledge. To meet these ends the University has developed an optional Free Elective Scheme. This scheme enables the majority of undergraduate students to take one module a year from outside their main course of study.

Admissions policy Admissions information provided in this pamphlet is intended as a general guide and cannot cover all possibilities. Entry requirements are generally stated in terms of A

So, how does it work?

level grades and/or UCAS points,

Each year you take 120 credits’ worth of modules.

but we encourage applications from people with a wide range of

SEMESTER 1

SEMESTER 2

other qualifications and/or

20 credits

20 credits

the various entry routes are

20 credits

20 credits

experience. Some further details of

included in our general prospectus. Please contact the Admissions Service (see below) with any

20 credits

specific queries about admissions.

20 credits

Disclaimer

Here you take modules from your main course of study.

Here you have the option to take a free elective or another module from your main course of study.

This publication is intended principally as a guide for prospective students. The matters covered by it – academic and

What sort of subjects can I take? You can take almost any free elective module from outside your main course of study, usually at your home campus. You can even take a module from another faculty. The catalogue of free electives might include

Level 4 • • • • • •

English as a Foreign Language Dive Training Global Environmental Issues Outdoor Recreation and Education Management Introduction to Poetry Passport Spanish or French

Level 5 • • • •

Career Management Skills Starting a New Business Event Management Conservation Biology

otherwise – are subject to change from time to time, both before and after students are admitted, and the information contained in it does not form part of any contract. While every reasonable precaution was taken in the production of this brochure, the University does not accept liability for any inaccuracies.

Address For general enquiries, please write to Admissions Service University of Hull Hull, HU6 7RX T 01482 466100 F 01482 442290

Level 6 • Leisure, Tourism and the Environment

What are the main reasons for participating? • The scheme gives you the opportunity to study a subject without having to commit yourself to taking further modules in that subject area. • By taking a free elective you are able to follow up your interests as part of your degree. • With a broader education you may acquire extra skills that will help you when you enter the employment market.

E admissions@hull.ac.uk


Experienced, dedicated sta. Industry-standard software and hardware. A fully wireless campus. Welcome to your new playground.

Change the way you think.

www.hull.ac.uk


Creative and Digital Technologies - University of Hull Undergraduate subject brochure 2010