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Undergraduate study 2011

Geography


Key facts Geography at Hull | 1

Degree course

UCAS code

Typical offer

Your questions answered | 5

BA Geography

L700 BA/Ge

260–320 UCAS points

BSc Geography

F800 BSc/Ge

260–320 UCAS points

BA Human Geography

L720 BA/HG

260–320 UCAS points

BSc Physical Geography

F840 BSc/PhyGe

260–320 UCAS points

BA Environmental Management

F755 BA/EM

260–320 UCAS points

BSc Environmental Management

F756 BSc/EM

260–320 UCAS points

Master of Physical Geography

F841 MPhysG/G

340 UCAS points

BSc Geography and Archaeology

FF84 BSc/GeA

260–320 UCAS points

BA Geography and Archaeology

LV74 BA/GeA

260–320 UCAS points

BA Geography and History

LV71 BA/GeH

260–320 UCAS points

First-year modules | 22

BA Geography with Business

F8N1 BA/GBus

260–320 UCAS points

Learning and teaching | 23

BA Geography with Marketing

F8N5 BA/GMkg

260–320 UCAS points

BSc Geography with Sport Science

F8C6 BSc/GSpS

260–320 UCAS points

Our degree courses | 8 BSc Geography BSc Physical Geography BA Geography BA Human Geography BA/BSc Environmental Management Master of Physical Geography BA Geography and History BA/BSc Geography and Archaeology Major/minor degrees

Entry requirements

Further information Admissions Secretary Department of Geography University of Hull Hull, HU6 7Rx 01482 465575 geo@hull.ac.uk www.hull.ac.uk/geog If you have a UCAS number, please quote it in all correspondence.

Dates of semesters Semester 1 27 Sep – 16 Dec 2011

Semester 2 30 Jan – 11 May 2012

• Normally within the range of 260–320 points, including A level General Studies. • A mix of A and AS levels may also be acceptable. • Other qualifications, such as BTEC Nationals, OCR Nationals, Access to HE Diplomas, the International Baccalaureate Diploma, Scottish qualifications and Irish Leaving Certificates, are welcomed. Some qualifications may permit entry to the second or third year of our degree courses. • The University encourages applications from people of all backgrounds. We consider applicants on the basis of academic qualifications at Level 3 (A level or equivalent) and/or on the basis of other relevant knowledge and skills. Admissions tutors may interview some applicants. • Applications from mature and international candidates are always welcome, and these will be considered individually. Entry to the second or third year is possible for suitably qualified applicants.


Geography at Hull The Department of Geography is based in the attractive Cohen Building. We have a wide range of well-equipped teaching facilities, including lecture theatres and seminar rooms, with new laboratories and networked computer areas. The University Map Room, housed within the same building, provides excellent facilities for private study and a resources service for geography students, while the University’s main library, just a couple of minutes’ walk from the department, houses an extensive collection of geography books and periodicals along with those of allied subjects. Geography has been taught at Hull since the University’s foundation in 1928. Our 24 academic staff have a wide range of specialist interests and expertise, which enables us to provide a variety of courses and more than 40 different modules across the breadth of human and physical geography.

Attentive, friendly and supportive Our annual intake is around 130 students. This means that our staff–student ratio is 1:16, which is very favourable by national standards and of obvious benefit to our small-group teaching. We are very friendly and supportive towards our students. We are a top-20 department for our teaching and learning (National Student Survey, 2009) with extensive teaching, library and support facilities, offering a friendly and supportive environment. Our excellent return in the 2009 National Student Survey also showed that 96% of BA graduates and 92% of BSc graduates were satisfied with their course.

A wealth of options The modularised degree structure provides training in core areas of the subject while offering you a wide range of choice across physical and human geography; but whatever you decide to choose, our aim is the same – to provide a stimulating and supportive environment in which you can enhance your understanding of this fascinating subject, and equip you with both academic and practical skills that will be valued by potential employers. Hull’s Department of Geography is recognised for the international standard of its research. This expertise is captured to great effect in our teaching programmes, where staff are always ready to share their enthusiastic interest in their own specialist areas.

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Our physical and human geography subject areas scored an approval rating of 95%+ in the most recent National Student Survey – largely due to our committed, specialist staff and excellent facilities. The field trips to Tenerife, France, Italy, Spain and New York probably didn’t hurt either.


Deep science The Deep isn’t just a spectacular aquarium and tourist magnet – it also houses the department’s Total Environment Simulator. This cuttingedge experimental facility enables our researchers to study water and sediment transfer in pre-set conditions.


The Geography Society Geog Soc is the department’s student society, organised entirely by students. It is one of the largest student societies at Hull, bringing students and staff together and giving the department its renowned friendly atmosphere. The society also allows students to make a valuable contribution to decision making within Geography, with representatives serving on the department’s Student–Staff Committee.

Careers for geography graduates To help students plan their future after graduation, the University of Hull offers a first-class Careers Service, whose success is demonstrated in the employment success rate of our graduates. The University is consistently near the top of league tables in this important area. Our geography graduates in particular have an excellent employment record, not least because of the breadth of skills that they acquire during both our subjectspecific and our transferable skills modules. The choice of careers is wide-ranging, including some where the ‘geography’ is put to direct use, such as environmental agencies and consultancy, GIS applications, planning, conservation and teaching, but many more where our graduates’ flexible skills reap dividends in the wider job market – management, financial services, computing, marketing, public administration, transport, the media … For some careers, further qualifications are important, and an increasing proportion of our graduates go on to postgraduate study – for example, MA, MSc and PhD degrees, the PGCE teaching certificate, and various professional qualifications, especially in the financial services sector, business management, and town and country planning. The variety of possibilities is illustrated by the range of careers taken up by some of our recent graduates: • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

biodiversity officer for a city council scientist with the Environment Agency town planner secondary school teacher environmental consultant air traffic controller BBC news reporter landscape architect exploration geologist local government administrator primary school teacher management trainee with a water company journalist on a local newspaper countryside ranger commercial property salesperson GIS specialist

The views and experiences of some of our graduates are represented in this brochure.

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‘Hull University has a great campus, and Hull itself provides a great student nightlife and accommodation at affordable prices. ‘The BSc Geography course was really friendly, with loads of good times to be had on the numerous field trips, both local and overseas. As well as a good social atmosphere the course offered a sound academic footing. It was flexible, so I chose to focus mainly on the scientific aspects of geography, but it also allowed me to incorporate some human geography aspects. ‘The high quality of teaching and support offered by the staff helped me achieve a good degree and enabled me to move on to an MSc in European Environmental Policy and Regulation. ‘I now work for AEAT Environment, where my team provides an air quality consultancy service for local and national government, the private sector and the European Commission. I am in a position now where I can really make a contribution to solving environmental issues. It’s been a lot of hard work to get here, but a good start in the Geography Department at Hull University certainly helped!’ Kate Haigh BSc Geography – air quality consultant

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Applying for geography at Hull – your questions answered What geography degrees are offered at Hull? The Department of Geography offers seven single-subject degree courses: • • • • • • •

BA Geography BSc Geography BA Human Geography BSc Physical Geography BA Environmental Management BSc Environmental Management Master of Physical Geography

We also offer three joint degree courses: • BSc Geography and Archaeology • BA Geography and History • BA Geography and Archaeology And there are three major/minor combinations to choose from: • BA Geography with Business • BA Geography with Marketing • BSc Geography with Sport Science All the BA and BSc degree courses are three years full-time but can also be studied part-time over a longer period. The Master of Physical Geography is a four-year undergraduate course.

What qualifications will I need? Single Honours degree courses For entry to the BA and BSc Single Honours courses, our offers usually range between 260 and 320 UCAS points either from three A level subjects or from two A levels plus one or two AS subjects. We are also happy to consider other A and AS combinations and other types of qualification, and we welcome enquiries from mature and overseas students. Geography at A level is not a prerequisite for any of our courses, though we do prefer geography to at least AS level, and for the BSc Physical Geography course a science/technology subject to AS level is also preferred. For entry to the four-year Master of Physical Geography course we usually require 340 points, and applicants will normally be expected to have a stronger science background than for BSc entry. Joint and major/minor degree courses Our admissions policy for joint and major/minor degree courses is broadly similar to that for the Single Honours degrees.

Do you encourage applications from mature or overseas candidates and from those with qualifications other than A and AS levels? Yes, we are always pleased to receive applications from both mature and overseas candidates. Qualifications other than A and AS levels will also be considered. (Follow the link at www.hull.ac.uk/undergraduate for alternative entry requirements.) If you lack the usual entry qualifications, you are encouraged to contact the department for informal discussion before submitting an application.

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Will I be interviewed and may I visit the department? Decisions on most applicants are made without interview, on the basis of information shown on the UCAS application. Applicants are then invited to attend one of our regular open days, which are held on Wednesdays or Saturdays during the period from February to April. The open day allows applicants and their parents to meet and talk with staff and students informally and to tour the department and the University campus, and you will be able to talk individually with a member of staff whose interests are relevant to the course for which you have applied. Parents can also take part in a questionand-answer session with a member of Geography staff. If you are unable to attend an open day we will be happy to make alternative arrangements so that you can visit the department and speak to a member of staff.

How many places are available on the degree courses? We aim to admit a combined total of approximately 85 students to the BA and BSc Single Honours Geography courses. The BA Human Geography, BSc Physical Geography and Master of Physical Geography courses admit around 35 students. The joint and major/minor courses aim to admit collectively around 10 students. There are therefore expected to be about 130 new students next year in total, although the targets for individual courses can be varied.

What if I apply for a particular geography degree course but then wish to change to a different course? BA and BSc Geography have a common first year, so there are no problems in switching between the two courses at the end of the first year.

Where can I get further information about admissions? Admissions Secretary Department of Geography University of Hull Hull, HU6 7RX 01482 465575 geo@hull.ac.uk If you have a UCAS number, please quote it in all correspondence.

Our open days If you receive an offer, you will be invited to an open day – when you can look around the University and the department and meet staff and current students. Your open day will include • • • • • • •

tours of the campus and our student accommodation talks on accommodation and finance lunch in the department an introduction to Geography at the University of Hull a tour of the department demonstrations of teaching facilities individual meetings with teaching staff

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Our degree courses Below are summary outlines of the various choices available to you. Full descriptions of the degree courses can be found on pages 10-21.

BA and BSc Geography These courses begin with a common year of mostly compulsory modules, which include both human and physical geography. In the second and third years the BA focuses on human geography and the BSc on physical geography, but there is also the opportunity to maintain a broader mix if you wish, by taking some modules in the other ‘half’ of the subject. You can also choose a module offered by other departments. These courses therefore allow flexibility and are particularly suited to students who wish to keep their options as open as possible. In the second and third years most of the modules are options – in human geography these include historical and cultural geography, urban and rural regeneration, and globalisation and development, while in physical geography they include landforms and processes, ecological systems, and environmental change. Further options allow you to focus on environmental issues or on GIS (geographical information systems), remote sensing and geographical modelling. In the third year there is also an optional work placement module, as well as the opportunity to study for part of your course at a university in the USA or in Europe.

First year The first-year programme has a strong core element, which gives a basic grounding in the subject. All students take modules in geographical methods, which include a range of transferable skills such as written, oral and graphical presentation, computing, data handling and methods of geographical enquiry. First-year modules in human geography focus on the developed and developing world and issues of globalisation. Modules in physical geography focus on geomorphology, earth climate, biogeography and natural hazards. You have the option to take a module from outside the department in any subject, including modern languages.

Second year In the second year the core skills include field methods, project design, data collection, analysis and presentation. Second-year option modules in human geography concentrate on economic, social, historical, political and cultural geography. Physical geography modules examine earth surface processes and landforms, ecosystems, and environmental change. There are also more environmental-based modules relating to urban and rural regeneration, landscape history and geographies of consumption. A number of optional overseas field-study modules are available in the second year. Current locations for BSc student field trips are France and Tenerife, while destinations for BA students include Spain, Italy and New York.

The range of specialist interests and expertise among our staff allows us to offer more than 40 different modules across the breadth of human and physical geography.

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Third year In the third year you choose modules which lead on from your second-year programme, an arrangement which maintains progression by allowing subjects to be studied in greater depth. Human geography modules focus on the political, economic, social and cultural transformations that the world is experiencing. Topics in physical geography include rivers, biogeography, environmental change, and GIS and remote sensing. Environmental-based options include climate change, applied environmental management, renewable energy and water resources. A field-study module based in Iceland is available to all BSc and BA students. An


important and core part of the third year is the dissertation, a piece of individual research work on a topic devised by yourself and carried out under the guidance of a supervisor.

BA Human Geography This course is similar to BA Geography but allows you to specialise in human geography from the outset and to combine economic, social, cultural, political, historical and environmental geography with the study of particular world areas and/or a European language. The third year allows choice from a number of specialised options leading on from the topics studied in the first two years, and also includes the dissertation.

BSc Physical Geography This course is similar to BSc Geography but allows you to specialise in physical geography from the outset, along with related aspects of the earth and environmental sciences. The first two years provide training in many areas of physical geography, including geomorphology, biogeography, soils, hydrology, sedimentology, oceanography and environmental change, and in the third year there is a choice of specialised options building on these topics. Throughout the course there is an emphasis on project, field and laboratory work, and the dissertation is also a core part of the course.

Master of Physical Geography This four-year undergraduate course cultivates awareness of recent developments in physical geography and of the research skills relevant in problem solving. In the first two years it is similar to the BSc Geography and Physical Geography courses, but Years 3 and 4 involve a higher level of study, heavily weighted towards field and laboratory work. A major part of the fourth year also involves designing and executing a piece of original research to be presented as a dissertation. You may apply through UCAS for direct entry to this course or transfer to it during the first two years of the BSc Geography or Physical Geography course, subject to satisfactory progress.

Joint Honours degrees These courses are designed for students who have a strong interest in a discipline related to geography and wish to continue studying both subjects equally. In the degree that combines geography with history, the geography half focuses on human geography. All students can opt to complete a dissertation on a geographical topic of their own choice.

Major/minor combinations In these degrees about 75% of your time is devoted to geography – the major subject – and the other 25% to the second subject. We offer BA degree combinations with business and marketing, in both of which the geography element focuses on human geography. The business and marketing components of the degree are taught in the University’s Business School, and cater for geography students who may be interested in careers involving these skills. We also offer a BSc degree course with sport science. The sport science component is taught by the Department of Sport, Health and Exercise Science.

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BSc Geography

Year 2

UCAS code F800

Core modules • Core Skills in Geography • GIS

The BSc Geography degree course lets you explore the full range of human, physical and environmental geography through our wide range of modules. The key strength of the BSc degree is its flexibility. You can study complex dynamic processes such as rivers, glaciers, volcanoes, earthquakes, ecology, climate and climate change, landscape history, and environmental monitoring and modelling as well as the interrelationships, across space and time, between people and between humans and the environment. Students on the BSc degree mainly take physical geography modules, but they must take two human modules in the first year and may take human or environmental modules as options in the second and third years. The number of optional modules increases significantly in Year 3, allowing you to specialise according to your interests: geomorphology; ecology; environmental change; and environmental monitoring and modelling. All BSc Geography students acquire key skills, including GIS, data analysis, group work and report writing. They participate in field studies in the North York Moors National Park in the first year. A number of optional overseas modules are available in the second year. Current locations for BSc student field trips are Mediterranean France and Tenerife. Additional field studies may be associated with particular optional modules. There is also an optional third-year field course based in Iceland.

Degree structure Year 1 Core modules • Introduction to Geographical Methods • Global Environments • Introducing Human Geography • Landforms and Ecosystems • Geographies of Development Optional modules • Dangerous Planet • World Cities • A module outside the department

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Optional modules • Field study (e.g. France or Tenerife) • Geomorphology: Processes and Landforms • Economies, Politics and Space • Ecosystems • Cultural and Historical Geography • Applied Physical Geography • Urban and Rural Management • People, Land and Time • Shopping and Space • Past Environments • Atmosphere, Ocean, Biosphere • A module outside the department

Year 3 Core modules • Dissertation Optional modules • Applied Project (placement) • Water Resources • Fluvial Processes and Management • Renewable Energy • Geographical Ecology • Quaternary Environments • Geoprocess Modelling • Hunter-Gatherers to Farmers • Food, Space and Society • Geography and Empire • Spatial Analysis (GIS) • Geography of Travel • Children’s Geographies • Space and Power in the North American City • Wetland Archaeology • Sustainable Cities • Field study (Iceland) • A module outside the department


Photograph by Mike Park.

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BSc Physical Geography

Year 2

UCAS code F840

Core modules • Core Skills in Geography • Sedimentology • GIS

The Physical Geography degree offers the opportunity to explore both physical processes and environmental aspects of geography. This BSc course shows how environments have changed in the past, what controls the dynamics of environments in the present and how we can predict changes in the future. The major components of environmental variability are studied, and an important aspect of the course is hands-on training in practical analytical techniques. The course is built around a core of earth science modules. Options and field studies in Years 2 and 3 are similar to those for BSc Geography, with the addition of core modules in Sedimentology and Geoprocess Modelling. All students participate in a field trip to the North York Moors National Park in the first year. A number of optional overseas field-study modules are available in the second year. Current locations for field trips are France and Tenerife. Many optional modules also include a field-work element, and there is an optional third-year field course based in Iceland. The Physical Geography degree recruits 15–20 students each year. The provision of small-group teaching and the development of a wide range of field and laboratory skills are central to this programme.

Degree structure Year 1 Core modules • Introduction to Geographical Methods • Global Environments • Geoscience • Geobiology • Landforms and Ecosystems Optional modules • Dangerous Planet • A module outside the department

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Optional modules • Field study (e.g. France or Tenerife) • Processes and Landforms • Ecosystems • People, Land and Time • Past Environments • Atmosphere, Ocean, Biosphere • A module outside the department

Year 3 Core modules • Dissertation • Geoprocess Modelling Optional modules • Quaternary Environments • Applied Project (placement) • Water Resources • Spatial Analysis (GIS) • Fluvial Processes and Management • Renewable Energy • Wetland Archaeology • Hunter-Gatherers to Farmers • Geographical Ecology • Field study (Iceland) • A module outside the department


BA Geography

Year 2

UCAS code L700

Core modules • Core Skills in Geography • GIS

The BA Geography degree lets you explore in depth the interactions between society and environment. Students on this degree mainly take human geography modules, but they must take two physical modules in the first year and may take physical or environmental modules as options in the second and third years. The number of optional modules increases significantly in Year 3, allowing you to specialise according to your interests: urban and regional sustainability; geographies of political and economic change; and societies, cultures and landscape. Field trips are an important aspect of this course, giving you hands-on experience of using human geography field techniques. Students participate in a weekend field course in Whitby in the first year. A number of overseas field-study modules are available in the second year. Recent locations for BA student field trips have included Spain, Italy and New York. There is also an optional third-year field course in Iceland. All BA Geography students acquire key skills, including appreciation of places and their differences, awareness of spatial connections, an understanding of landscape change, and expertise in geographical information systems, data analysis, qualitative methods, group work and report writing. The BA course will encourage you to develop the ability to think geographically from different perspectives, which will help you both as a student and in your future career.

Degree structure Year 1 Core modules • Introduction to Geographical Methods • Global Environments • Introducing Human Geography • Landforms and Ecosystems • Geographies of Development

Optional modules • Field study (e.g. Italy, Spain, New York) • Processes and Landforms • Economies, Politics and Space • Ecosystems • Cultural and Historical Geography • Applied Physical Geography • Urban and Rural Management • People, Land and Time • Shopping and Space • Past Environments • Atmosphere, Ocean, Biosphere • A module outside the department

Year 3 Core modules • Dissertation Optional modules • Quaternary Environments • Applied Project (placement) • Water Resources • Fluvial Processes and Management • Renewable Energy • Geographical Ecology • Quaternary Environments • Hunter-Gatherers to Farmers • Food, Space and Society • Geography and Empire • Spatial Analysis (GIS) • Geography of Travel • Children’s Geographies • Space and Power in the North American City • Wetland Archaeology • Sustainable Cities • Field study (Iceland) • A module outside the department

Optional modules • Dangerous Planet • World Cities • A module outside the department

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BA Human Geography

Year 2

UCAS code L720

Core modules • Core Skills in Geography • GIS

The Human Geography degree lets you explore in depth the processes of social, political and economic change. A wide range of modules about cities, development, sustainability, economies, globalisation, resources, rural change, culture, identity, nationalism, social exclusion and historical landscapes are available. Students on this course take the same core human geography modules as those on the BA Geography course plus one additional specialised human geography module. You are not required to take any physical or environmental modules. Instead, you select an additional module from a range of social science and humanities options, or you can take a modern language. Field trips are an important aspect of this course, giving you hands-on experience of using human geography field techniques. All students participate in a weekend field course in Whitby in the first year. A number of overseas field-study modules are available in the second year. Recent locations for BA student field trips have included Spain, Italy and New York. There is also an optional third-year field course based in Iceland. All Human Geography students acquire key skills, including appreciation of places and their differences, awareness of spatial connections, and expertise in geographical information systems, data analysis, qualitative methods, group work and report writing.

Degree structure Year 1 Core modules • Introduction to Geographical Methods • Introducing Human Geography • Geographies of Development • Imagining Places Optional modules • Dangerous Planet • World Cities • A humanities or social science module or another module outside the department

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Optional modules • Field study (Spain, Italy or New York) • Economies, Politics and Space • Cultural and Historical Geography • Shopping and Space • Urban and Rural Management • A module outside the department

Year 3 Core modules • Dissertation Optional modules • Applied Project (placement) • Food, Space and Society • Geography and Empire • Spatial Analysis (GIS) • Geography of Travel • Children’s Geographies • Space and Power in the North American City • Wetland Archaeology • Sustainable Cities • Field study (Iceland) • A module outside the department


BA/BSc Environmental Management UCAS code F755/F756 The BA and BSc Environmental Management degree courses enable you to explore a wide range of environmental issues and processes that link together physical and human systems. The courses have a common first year, when students take both natural and social science modules. After the first year, you may specialise more in natural science (BSc) or social science (BA), depending on the options that you choose. In natural science you can study complex and dynamic physical environments and processes, such as rivers, glaciers, volcanoes, earthquakes, ecology, climate and climate change, as well as techniques for environmental monitoring and modelling. In social science, you can study complex human problems, organisations and activities, such as sustainable resource use, urban regeneration, rural management, environmental policy and sustainable consumption. Being based in a geography department means that the courses are diverse and emphasise interrelationships across space and time, and between humans and the environment, in considering the challenges for environmental management. All students acquire key skills, including GIS (geographical information systems), data analysis, group work and report writing, through core modules and through field work, which offers students hands-on experience of using environmental techniques. Field work is offered in the local region and overseas in various modules. All first-year students participate in field studies in the North York Moors National Park, and a number of optional overseas field-study modules are available in Year 2 – current locations are France, Tenerife, Spain and Italy. Additional field studies may also be associated with particular optional modules, and there is an optional third-year field course based in Iceland.

Degree structure Year 1 Core modules • Environmental Issues • Global Environments • Introduction to Geographical Methods

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Optional modules • Global Environments • Introducing Human Geography • Landforms and Ecosystems • Geographies of Development • Dangerous Planet • World Cities • A module outside the department

Year 2 Core modules • Environmental Management Principles • Core Skills in Geography • GIS Optional modules • Field study (e.g. France, Tenerife, Italy, Spain or New York) • Economies, Politics and Space • Ecosystems • Local Environments • Urban and Rural Management • Shopping and Space • Past Environments • Atmosphere, Ocean, Biosphere • A module outside the department

Year 3 Core modules • Dissertation Optional modules • Applied Project (placement) • Water Resources • Fluvial Processes and Management • Renewable Energy • Geographical Ecology • Quaternary Environments • Wetland Archaeology • Hunter-Gatherers to Farmers • Spatial Analysis (GIS) • Food, Space and Society • Geography and Empire • Geography of Travel • Children’s Geographies • Space and Power in the North American City • Sustainable Cities • Field study (Iceland) • A module outside the department

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Master of Physical Geography (4 years) UCAS code F841 The Master of Physical Geography degree course is the first of its type in the UK. Our high-calibre academic staff, which includes geologists, geochemists, botanists, atmospheric scientists and archaeologists as well as specialist physical geographers, enables a wide range of modules to be offered. These give you the opportunity to acquire key skills and knowledge which will enable you to understand and interpret how environments have changed in the past, what controls the dynamics of environments in the present and how changes in the future might be predicted. The emphasis is on small-group teaching and studentcentred learning. We attach considerable importance to practical and field-based teaching. Students taking the MPhysGeog degree study physical geography modules selected from our two BSc courses in Years 1 and 2, with specialist modules coming in the third year. The dissertation occupies about half of the final year and offers you the opportunity to undertake independent research closely related to your own interests. In Years 1 and 2, students participate in the same field studies as those taking the BSc courses. In Year 3, the field-study topics are determined by the choice of optional modules. In Year 4, there is an advanced fieldworkshop module which involves a week in the Maltese Islands.

Degree structure Year 1 Core modules • Introduction to Geographical Methods • Global Environments • Landforms and Ecosystems Optional modules • Geoscience • Geobiology • Dangerous Planet • A module outside the department

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Year 2 Core modules • Core Skills in Geography • GIS Optional modules • Field study (e.g. France or Tenerife) • Sedimentology • Processes and Landforms • Applied Physical Geography • Ecosystems • People, Land and Time • A module outside the department

Year 3 Core modules • Literature Review Dissertation • Problem Solving and Research Design Optional modules • Geoprocess Modelling • Quaternary Environments • Applied Project (placement) • Water Resources • Wetland Archaeology • Hunter-Gatherers to Farmers • Spatial Analysis (GIS) • Renewable Energy • Fluvial Processes and Management • Geographical Ecology • Field study (Iceland) • A module outside the department

Year 4 Core modules • Dissertation • Field study (Malta) Optional modules • Renewable Energy • Applied Environmental Change • Waste Science • Blue Planet • Green Planet


www.hull.ac.uk

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BA Geography and History

Year 2

UCAS code LV71

Core modules • Core Skills in Geography

History and human geography have many similarities, both in the intellectual questions that they seek to address and in the techniques that they employ in order to answer them. The relationships between humans, their environment and each other are questions which occupy researchers in both disciplines. Geographers can benefit from evidence derived from the historical record, and historians often draw upon geographical knowledge and concepts in interpreting the past. On this degree you will therefore be studying two disciplines which support and complement each other very well. Students gain the key skills and background knowledge to investigate the network of interconnected relationships that make up societies and cultures across time and space. Field trips are an important aspect of the course. All students participate in a weekend field course in Whitby in the first year. A number of optional field-study modules are available in the second year. Recent locations for field trips have included Spain, Italy and New York. There is also an optional third-year field course based in Iceland.

Degree structure Year 1 Core modules • Introduction to Geographical Methods • Introducing Human Geography • Geographies of Development Optional modules • Representing the Past in Film • Asia and the World since the late 19th Century • The Making of Europe, 1100–1300 • Making and Meaning: An Introduction to the History of Art • Reform and Reaction: The Reformation and English Society, 1529–1583 • Consumer Cultures • Dangerous Planet • World Cities • A module outside the Departments of Geography and History

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Optional modules • Field study (e.g. Spain, Italy or New York) • Economies, Politics and Space • Urban and Rural Management • People, Land and Time • Shopping and Space • Pre-Conquest Settlement of the Americas • The Age of Discovery • The Dutch in the Golden Age • The Archaeology of Roman Britain • The Impact of the First World War in Britain • An Enlightened Century: Britain, 1700–1800 • Imperialism, Nationalism and Decolonisation • Italian Renaissance Art: The High Renaissance in Rome • Indian Society and the Rise and Fall of British Dominion • Ruling England • Britain, France and Decolonisation • Venetian Renaissance Art • Britons, Angles, Saxons and the Vikings: The Archaeology of Early Medieval England • Disease, Sex and Medicine: The Body in Early Modern Europe • A Society in Transition: England, 1700–1815 • Emancipation to Revolution: The Modernisation of the Russian Economy, 1861–1917 • Dying and Death in Western Europe: From Rome to the Renaissance • Piracy, Privateering and the Atlantic Economy, 1560–1856 • The British Empire • East and West Germany from ‘Zero Hour’ to Reunification • The Victorians • A module outside the Departments of Geography and History


Year 3 Core modules • Dissertation Optional modules • Applied Project (placement) • Food, Space and Society • Geography and Empire • Geography of Travel • Children’s Geographies • Space and Power in the North American City • Environment and Development in Africa • Sustainable Cities • Field study (Iceland) • The Parisi: Iron Age and Roman East Yorkshire • From Revolution and Romanticism to Sex and the City: 19th-Century French Art • Britain and the Slave Trade • Occupation, Collaboration and Resistance in Western Europe • Command! • Medieval Yorkshire • Britain in Decline: Economic Performance in the 20th Century • Britain, the United States and the Middle East, 1945–1962 • Army, State and Society in France, 1740–1914 • Gender and Culture in Early Modern England • Sea Change: Britain’s Maritime Interests • A module outside the Departments of Geography and History

‘I chose Hull because of the reputation of the department, the modules on offer, and the attractiveness and good location of the campus. ‘The choice of modules allowed me to develop my interest in specific areas of environmental research while still keeping a general overview of the wider subject. ‘Through the Hull course I was able to gain a balanced appreciation of how the different fields of environmental research dovetail with each other. This was greatly aided by the many field trips, local and overseas, and by the approachability of staff. ‘The breadth of the course, as well as the opportunities for specialisation, made it the perfect springboard for Masterslevel study. With support from staff, I gained entry to an MSc in GIS at Edinburgh. ‘After the MSc I moved to Cambridgeshire to work as a GIS specialist at the Centre for Ecology and Hydrology at Monks Wood, where my projects include modelling acidity deposition, spatial analysis of pollution clusters, wetland management and species conservation.’ Richard Broughton BSc Physical Geography – GIS specialist

www.hull.ac.uk

Geography

19


BA/BSc Geography and Archaeology

Year 2

UCAS code LV74/FF84

Core modules • Core Skills in Geography • Archaeological Field Methods • Environmental Archaeology

These degrees offer a combination of theoretical and practical modules. They are novel courses which seek to combine the key aspects of geography and archaeology around the theme of the environment, past and present. The courses aim to foster the skills needed for the observation, analysis and evaluation of the relationships that have existed and exist today between people, environment and resources; to develop your understanding of past societies through the study of archaeological evidence; and to develop your understanding of the theory and practice of archaeology and geography, and their relationship to each other. These degrees cultivate a range of core skills that will be invaluable both before and after you graduate. You will develop the ability to work cooperatively with others as well as to organise your own work effectively. The courses emphasise independent thought, problem solving and the analysis of complex issues. Such skills are highly valued by employers. Our graduates go on to employment relating to archaeology and geography (in the UK there are jobs in universities, museums, archaeological units, planning departments and national parks), or within related areas such as publishing or the growing fields of heritage and environmental management.

Degree structure Year 1 Core modules • Introduction to Geographical Methods • British Archaeology • Global Environments • Archaeology: History, Theory and Method • Landforms and Ecosystems Optional modules • Dangerous Planet • World Cities • A module outside the department

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Geography

Optional modules • Field study (e.g. France, Tenerife, Spain, Italy or New York) • Applied Physical Geography • Ecosystems • Processes and Landforms • People, Land and Time • Shopping and Space • Past Environments • Atmosphere, Ocean, Biosphere • A module outside the department

Year 3 Core modules • Dissertation Optional modules • Applied Project (placement) • Spatial Analysis (GIS) • Fluvial Processes and Management • Quaternary Environments • Renewable Energy • Water Resources • Geographical Ecology • Wetland Archaeology • Hunter-Gatherers to Farmers • The Parisi: Iron Age and Roman East Yorkshire • Field study (Malawi) • A module outside the department


Major/minor degrees

BA Geography with Business UCAS code F8N1 This is the degree course for you if you want to combine your interest in geography with developing knowledge on a range of subjects relevant to the business world. It provides experience in business management and develops speciďŹ c business skills. The business component of the course involves taking two compulsory modules in Year 1 (Business Environments and Marketing), a further two in Year 2 (Business Functions and Business Law and Ethics) and one in Year 3 (International Business).

On these degrees, where geography is the major subject, 75% of your time is devoted to geography modules.

BA Geography with Marketing UCAS code F8N5 If you wish to gain experience in marketing alongside your studies in geography, this is the degree course for you. It involves a mixture of theoretical and vocationalbased subjects, which gives you an in-depth knowledge and understanding of the principles of marketing. You will develop a toolbox of marketing techniques and an appreciation of the role of marketing within a range of business environments. The marketing component of the course involves taking two compulsory modules in Year 1 (Business Environments and Marketing), two in Year 2 (Buyer Behaviour and Marketing Operations) and one in Year 3 (International Marketing).

BSc Geography with Sport Science UCAS code F8C6 If you are interested in sport or how exercise and nutrition can promote health, this degree course is for you. Tackling a variety of subjects, it gives you the opportunity to gain skills and background knowledge that are in increasing demand among a range of employers in the sports, health and lifestyle industries. The course combines geography with modules in physiology and training methodologies but also allows you to take modules in a wide range of other areas, including modern languages.

www.hull.ac.uk

Geography

21


First-year modules Global Environments

World Cities

examines how the complex interaction of earth surface, oceanic and atmospheric processes affects the distribution of different environments and species across the globe. The significant longer-term processes affecting the planet, from plate tectonics to climate change, are reviewed to identify current and future changes in the environments that we see around us today.

examines what makes some of the world’s most important urban centres distinctive, and the ways in which cities are represented and perceived. A range of cities including New York, Berlin, London and Los Angeles are studied to understand their role in a ‘globalising’ world.

Dangerous Planet Introducing Human Geography introduces the key ideas, concepts and debates of current human geography. The factors influencing the development of economies and cultures at a global level are examined.

studies the environmental hazards which have a catastrophic effect on landscapes and the people who live in them. The causes and impacts of floods, earthquakes, volcanoes, droughts and avalanches are analysed.

Landforms and Ecosystems

British Archaeology

studies the patterns of life at the landscape scale, from tropical rainforests through to arctic tundra, and examines the type and formation of landforms from deserts to glaciers.

studies the key chronological periods and cultural developments of British archaeology from early prehistory to the more recent historical era.

Archaeology: History, Theory and Method Imagining Places investigates the ways in which we know and interpret places and construct our understandings of the world. The module explores geographical imaginations through a series of case studies of different places and worldregions in the past and the present.

Geographies of Development introduces a range of themes covering our current understanding of development and how it is conceived in both the North and the South. Both historical and current perspectives on the development of countries in Africa and America are examined, with a focus on ethnicity, migration, equality and social dynamics.

introduces the methods of archaeological investigation in a variety of situations and reviews the means of analysis and interpretation.

Tutorials / Geographical Methods introduces the ideas and methods behind geographical research, using an integrated tutorial- and class-based approach.

Geobiology introduces the laboratory and field techniques required for the study of past environments.

Geoscience provides an introduction to laboratory and field techniques used in earth science, including geological map interpretation, rock and mineralogical identification, field logging and data gathering, and photogeology.

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Geography


Learning and teaching Some frequently asked questions What is the balance between formal examinations and other types of assessment? Assessment is usually through a mixture of coursework and examination. Some geography modules have a 50:50 split between coursework and examination, but others are 100% coursework. The type of coursework varies. The teaching is split into two semesters, and most modules are taught and examined within the same semester. So there are two exam periods: January and May/June.

What teaching methods are used, and how are students supported? We use a variety of teaching methods – lectures, tutorials, seminars, discussion classes, practical classes and field work. We place particular emphasis on the weekly first-year tutorial, helping you to develop learning skills as part of the transferable skills programme and to make a smooth transition to university study. Seminar and discussion classes are used in teaching, particularly in the second and third years, along with lectures, in all years. All students attend practical classes in computing as part of the transferable skills programme, while students taking physical geography modules also participate in laboratory classes. A range of field-work activities in the UK and overseas are offered across different modules, providing valuable opportunities to experience and study varied human and physical environments at first hand. In addition to support from tutorials, each student has a supervisor who looks after their academic and personal well-being throughout their degree course. Students also benefit from the support of technical staff and postgraduate teaching assistants in computing and laboratory classes, as well as assistance from the department’s Student Progress Officer. The department has its own teaching rooms, library, computer facilities and laboratories within the Cohen Building, all providing an excellent learning environment. The department has three computer rooms accessible to undergraduate students, a work area of 50 networked computers, a teaching resource area of 12 computers and a GIS laboratory with 30 computers. We also have a newly equipped large teaching laboratory as well as a range of smaller specialist laboratories for both teaching and research.

What areas of geography can be studied at Hull? The modules offered reflect the varied research interests of the department’s academic staff and cover the spectrum of geography. Most of these are available either as core or as option modules to students on the BA and BSc Geography courses. Our other degree courses consist of packages of modules tailored to meet their specialist requirements. We are continuously working to improve the range and scope of the modules that we offer, so the modules may change from time to time, but the lists within the course outlines on pages 10–20 give a flavour of the breadth of areas currently available for study.

www.hull.ac.uk

Geography

23


Field teaching For many students, field work is one of the highlights of their degree studies, and at Hull we regard field teaching as a vital part of our courses. ‘The field’ is the ultimate geographical laboratory, and learning to work in it is crucial to your development as a geographer. Field work involves the use of techniques of observation, information recording and interpretation, and provides a deeper understanding of what a particular area is like, how it was shaped and how it functions. Field work plays an important part in each year of our degree courses. In the first year, soon after arrival in Hull, all new Geography students attend a residential field weekend, usually in Whitby or Scarborough. This introduces the geography of the local area (especially the Yorkshire Wolds and the North York Moors National Park) and themes, concepts and techniques which are developed in the Geographical Methods module and tutorials. In the second year, students have the option to participate in an overseas field course – recent venues include Spain, Italy, New York, Mediterranean France and Tenerife. In the third year there is an optional fieldbased study module which involves travel to Iceland – this is open to students on all our courses. Local field work is integral to many modules in all three years, and Hull is well placed to explore the geographical diversity of its region – the North Sea coast, the Humber Estuary, the West and South Yorkshire industrial conurbations, the Peak District, the North York Moors and Northumbria are all within easy reach.

Field-work costs Many of our field excursions are subsidised by the University. There is no charge for day excursions, but students are asked to contribute to the costs of travel and accommodation for all residential field trips.

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Geography


Free Elective Scheme Studying for a degree at the University of Hull is a unique experience. We aim to provide you with an education that offers both depth and breadth of knowledge. To meet these ends the University has developed an optional Free Elective Scheme. This scheme enables the majority of undergraduate students to take one module a year from outside their main course of study.

Admissions policy Admissions information provided in this pamphlet is intended as a general guide and cannot cover all possibilities. Entry requirements are generally stated in terms of A

So, how does it work?

level grades and/or UCAS points,

Each year you take 120 credits’ worth of modules.

but we encourage applications from people with a wide range of

SEMESTER 1

SEMESTER 2

20 credits

20 credits

20 credits

20 credits

other qualifications and/or experience. Some further details of the various entry routes are included in our general prospectus. Please contact the Admissions Service (see below) with any

20 credits

specific queries about admissions.

20 credits

Disclaimer

Here you take modules from your main course of study.

Here you have the option to take a free elective or another module from your main course of study.

This publication is intended principally as a guide for prospective students. The matters covered by it – academic and

What sort of subjects can I take? You can take almost any free elective module from outside your main course of study, usually at your home campus. You can even take a module from another faculty. You should discuss your choice of free electives with your supervisor.

What are the main reasons for participating? • The scheme gives you the opportunity to study a subject without having to commit yourself to taking further modules in that subject area. • By taking a free elective you are able to follow up your interests as part of your degree. • With a broader education you may acquire extra skills that will help you when you enter the employment market.

otherwise – are subject to change from time to time, both before and after students are admitted, and the information contained in it does not form part of any contract. While every reasonable precaution was taken in the production of this brochure, the University does not accept liability for any inaccuracies.

Address For general enquiries, please write to Admissions Service University of Hull Hull, HU6 7RX T 01482 466100 F 01482 442290 E admissions@hull.ac.uk


Climate change. Globalisation. Geobiology. Social dynamics. Volcanoes. And that’s just the ďŹ rst year.

Change the way you think.

www.hull.ac.uk

UG Geography 2011  

Geography Undergraduate study 2011

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