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Undergraduate study 2011

Criminology, sociology and gender studies


Key facts Introduction | 1

Honours degree

Social Sciences at Hull | 4

Community and Youth Work Studies

L531 BA/CYWS

Criminology

M930 BA/Crim

Single Honours degree courses | 6 Major/minor degree courses | 12 Joint Honours degree courses | 22 General information | 26 Staff | 28 FAQs | 32

UCAS code

Criminology with Forensic Science

M9F4 BA/CrimwFS

Criminology with Law

M9M1 BA/CL

Criminology with Psychology

M9C8 BA/CPsy

Criminology and Sociology

LM39 BA/CrimSoc

Forensic Science with Criminology

F4M9 BSc/FSWC

Law with Criminology

M1M2 LLB/LCrim

Philosophy and Sociology

LV35 BA/PhS

Psychology with Criminology

C8M9 BSc/PsyC

Religion and Sociology

LV36 BA/ST

Sociology

L300 BA/S

Sociology and Anthropology with French Sociology and Anthropology with Gender Studies Sociology and Anthropology with Geography

Sociology and Anthropology with Italian

L3R3 BA/SAwItal

Sociology and Media Studies Length of degree courses

Entry requirements

Dates of semesters Semester 1 27 Sep – 16 Dec 2011

Semester 2 30 Jan – 11 May 2012

L3L7 BA/SAwGeog L3R2 BA/SAwGer

Sociology and Film Studies

Admissions Secretary Department of Social Sciences University of Hull Hull, HU6 7RX T (01482) 466215 or 465779 F (01482) 466088 socpol.crim@hull.ac.uk

L390 BA/SAWGS

Sociology and Anthropology with German

Sociology and Anthropology with Spanish

Admissions contact

L3R1 BA/SAwFr

L3R4 BA/SASp LP33 BA/SFS LP3H BA/SMS

3 years (except Sociology and Anthropology with French, German, Italian or Spanish, which takes 4 years) 240–300 points or equivalent

Mature/overseas students?

Yes

Non-A-level qualifications?

Yes

Direct entry to Year 2?

Yes

Part-time study?

Yes – contact Admissions Tutor


Introduction Criminology, sociology, social policy, anthropology and gender studies are taught within the Department of Social Sciences. It is a multidisciplinary department with a distinctive profile of learning and teaching. All of our degree courses are founded on a concern for contemporary issues, a comparative cross-cultural and historical approach and critical analysis at local, national and global levels. The department is committed to the development of social science knowledge and understanding that is both theoretically informed and empirically grounded in the everyday world. We have strong international links and a thriving research culture. Staff and research students are currently involved in research in countries all over the world. The modules that we teach draw particularly on staff research into • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

the history of crime and punishment community and crime prevention policing and surveillance human rights and criminal justice understanding offending behaviour peacemaking criminology evil biographical perspectives migration and social exclusion disability policy and politics cultural diversity and identity gender and sexuality gender and development gender theory ‘race’ and social justice globalisation and social divisions citizenship and the state the funding of public services the theory and practice of social research power and violence media and culture

This brochure contains information about course content, modules, learning and teaching, and individual members of staff. It also provides general information about the application process. We hope that you will be challenged and inspired by what you find here. We look forward to your application. Do visit us to see for yourself what we have to offer.

www.hull.ac.uk

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The National Student Survey also recorded that 91% of our sociology students expressed overall satisfaction with the quality of their course, while The Guardian’s University Guide 2011 placed us among the north of England’s top five universities for the quality of our sociology teaching.


Prime suspects We pioneered the study of criminology as a distinct subject more than 30 years ago. That forward thinking has given us a long-established record of excellence in the field – one of the key reasons that our criminology degrees were rated among the five best of their type in the country for teaching quality in the most recent National Student Survey.


Social Sciences at Hull Themes in the department Criminology Crime is seen as one of the principal social problems of our time. Criminology is concerned with understanding crime and how it is dealt with. It draws on a number of disciplines such as social policy, sociology, psychology and law. Criminology investigates a range of theoretical and policy issues relating to the extent, nature and distribution of crime; explanations of crime; the control of crime, including crime prevention, policing, the operation of the criminal justice process and methods of punishment; and the nature and extent of crime victimisation and the role of victims in the criminal justice system. Teaching and research in criminology have long traditions at the University of Hull. The discipline has been taught here for more than 30 years, and we have an excellent reputation. We are one of the longest-established departments for the study of criminology, in a market that has been rapidly expanding in recent years. Our criminology staff have a broad range of research interests and are currently involved in research both locally and nationally in the areas of surveillance and CCTV, burglary reduction, policing, racism and criminal justice, punishment in the 19th century and special units for long-term prisoners. We have particular expertise in punishment and imprisonment, offenders in the community, drugs and crime, CCTV and social control, the history of crime and theories of offending behaviour. We regularly receive research funding from the Home Office, the Prison Service, the Economic and Social Research Council and local agencies.

Sociology Sociology at Hull applies a range of approaches to the study of society as it is lived and experienced, in its complexity and cultural diversity. Social identities, power, the body, mass media, globalisation and social change are among the key features and issues of contemporary society that are studied in this way. Rather than accepting these features of society as simply natural, or given, the comparative approach enquires into the social and cultural processes behind them and attempts to understand how different cultures and social identities understand themselves and others. This general mode of social enquiry draws together a range of strengths in the department, including expertise in the sociological tradition, social theories of modernity and postmodernity, research methods, comparative historical and crosscultural studies and ethnographic approaches. This means that the scope of sociology at Hull is genuinely global and contemporary, engaging with the ‘cultural turn’ in recent sociology and the mediatisation of social life today, along with conventional sociological concerns such as social divisions of class, age, gender, ethnicity and inequality. We have particular expertise in the sociology of organised violence, the body, gender and culture; social theory; political sociology; mass media; popular culture and religion; and qualitative research methods.

Anthropology Anthropology is integrated into the department through its common theoretical approaches, its focus on comparative studies, the role of ethnographic enquiry in the contemporary social and cultural sciences, and as a way of exploring diversity in social and cultural context. Social anthropology is highly relevant in an increasingly globalised world and in multicultural societies such as Britain, as it plays a major part in combating forms of prejudice and intolerance like racism and ethnocentrism. The department has particular expertise in religion, nationalism, gender and sexuality.

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Gender studies

Degree courses

Gender studies is a rapidly developing field, concerned with the roles, identities and status of women and men in society and their variation through time and space. It pays attention to the ways in which gender structures different areas of knowledge and relates to other significant categories such as ethnicity, class, age and sexuality. A focus on the interrelationships between women and men, and between ‘femininity’ and ‘masculinity’, makes gender studies a development from the long-established field of women’s studies.

We offer three Single Honours courses:

In the 21st century an understanding of gender relations has never been more crucial. The past century has seen a fundamental transformation of gender relations, which has had a profound impact on economies and social relations worldwide. In response, gender issues have become a major focus within both academic and political spheres. They have not only had a profound theoretical impact across the social sciences, philosophy and literature; they have also influenced policy making in Europe, North America and other places, where equalopportunities policies have radically affected employment legislation.

Teaching and research All teaching in the Department of Social Sciences is research-led. This means that you are taught by staff who are at the forefront of research in their disciplines and who use their specialist knowledge to enrich their teaching. The staff are up to date with the latest research and pass this on to students. The department has a number of internationally recognised research centres: • Centre for Criminology and Criminal Justice • Centre for the Study of Social Justice and Social Inclusion • Centre for Gender Studies • Centre for the Study of Comparative Change and Development • Centre for Research into Embodied Subjectivity The department also has strong links with the Institute of Applied Ethics and the Wilberforce Institute for the study of Slavery and Emancipation. All these centres play a vital role in creating a vibrant research culture. The world-class research that staff undertake is reflected not only in the modules that students take but also in the seminar series, conferences and workshops that the department runs each year.

www.hull.ac.uk

• BA Criminology • BA Sociology • BA Criminology and Sociology We also offer nine major/minor Honours degrees: • • • •

BA Criminology with Forensic Science BA Criminology with Law BA Criminology with Psychology BA Sociology and Anthropology with French, German, Spanish or Italian • BA Sociology and Anthropology with Gender Studies • BA Sociology and Anthropology with Geography Sociology is additionally available in a Joint Honours combination with four other subject areas (where relevant, please also consult the lead department’s literature for more detailed information): • • • •

BA Sociology and Film Studies BA Sociology and Media Studies BA Philosophy and Sociology BA Religion and Sociology

Details of the current structure and content of each of these programmes are provided on pages 6–25. Note that criminology is also available as a minor subject in combination with forensic science, law or psychology.

Further information If after reading this pamphlet you have any further questions about our degrees or our entry requirements please refer to our website at www.hull.ac.uk/socsci or contact the Department of Social Sciences Admissions Secretary (call 01482 466215 or 465779; email socpol.crim@hull.ac.uk). We hold a number of open days throughout the year so that potential applicants can have a look around and meet with staff and current students.

Stop press – new course Please note that the Department of Social Sciences now also offers a BA in Community and Youth Work Studies, which provides both academic and professional training for existing and future practitioners in youth and community work. See page 25 for details.

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Single Honours degree courses BA Criminology This highly respected degree course offers you the opportunity to study criminology at one of the country’s most prestigious centres for the study of crime, criminality and criminal justice. Criminology is a dynamic and rapidly developing subject, and this university offers a stimulating and contemporary engagement with the ‘problem of crime’. It will provide you with a critical understanding of issues related to crime and criminal justice as well as a thorough grounding in the broader social science context. The degree also enables you to develop key transferable skills for the job market, especially in research methods. Criminology has rapidly expanded as an area in which to study at undergraduate level in higher education institutions, particularly in recent years. However, criminology has been taught at the University of Hull for more than 30 years. We are a leading department for teaching and research in this discipline, and we have a well-established reputation within the subject area. We believe that crime and criminal justice should be studied within a wider context, so Year 1 integrates detailed study of criminology with key foundations in the social sciences. This first year introduces the analysis of broader social processes and structures, equipping you to become highly skilled and knowledgeable in all aspects of the criminal process. Finally, you have the opportunity to choose one further module from within our department or from another department across the University. Years 2 and 3 of the course allow you to focus on more specific subjects within criminology. The second year includes a number of core modules which cover practical and theoretical approaches to understanding criminal behaviour. You also study the different ways in which societies punish offenders and the process by which crime is detected and prosecuted. The third and final year includes an individual project in criminology conducted under the guidance of a supervisor, and the opportunity to choose from a range of more specialised modules in criminology and criminal justice that focus, for example, on prejudice and discrimination in the criminal justice system. For students who wish to do so, opportunities are nevertheless available to study one module outside this specialism. The demand for criminology graduates has increased in recent years, and this degree equips students with knowledge and skills that will be invaluable for a career connected with crime and criminal justice. Common careers paths include the prison, police and probation services, the legal profession and academic or policy research. If you have an interest in criminology but seek a more varied range of module and career options, you may find that the BA Criminology and Sociology is more suited to your needs.

The first year

‘I don’t have a drug problem. I have a policeman problem’. Keith Richards The Rolling Stones

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You take five core modules and one optional module. The core modules introduce you to the major theories and perspectives which have been developed in order to enhance our understanding of crime, offending behaviour and the criminal justice system. One module focuses on the processes of the criminal justice system, examining, for example, arrest and detention at the police station. Another examines the development and use of various forms of information about crime and

Criminology, sociology and gender studies


how criminalisation varies according to age, ethnicity, gender and class. You also take modules that examine sociological approaches to issues and how researchers investigate the social world. The core modules are • • • • •

Criminal Justice Process Figuring Out Crime Sociological Analysis Development of Criminological Theory Introducing Social Research

One optional module is chosen from those available within Social Sciences or elsewhere in the University. Possible examples are • • • •

Gender and Society Legal Systems War and Politics various language modules

The second year You take six modules: four of these are in criminology and criminal justice, and one deals with the analysis and interpretation of research data. These modules allow students to understand the work of ‘key’ criminological thinkers, methods of crime prevention and urban regeneration, why we punish people and contemporary issues in the prison system. You can also select a criminology option which allows you to delve into an area of particular interest. The core modules are • • • •

Reading about Crime and Punishment Punishment and Society Criminal Investigations: Uncovering the Truth Interpreting Social Data

Second-year criminology options are • • • •

Prostitutes, Pickpockets and Peelers Introduction to Criminal Justice Ethics Feminist Research Methods Drugs and Drug Use

You choose one further module from options offered within our department or a free elective from elsewhere in the University. This may have close or fairly clear links with your main area of study, or it may be in an area which is unrelated to criminology, such as a foreign language.

www.hull.ac.uk

The final year This is again made up of six modules and is designed to allow you to delve deeper into particular areas of criminology. You work on a dissertation (equivalent to two modules) within the broad remit of criminology, criminal justice and punishment, and you follow one core module: • Policing You also choose two criminology modules from a list of options. These give you the opportunity for in-depth study in at least two areas of criminology: for example, • • • • • • • • • •

Evil Restorative Justice Histories of Punishment Surveillance and Social Control Contemporary Imprisonment Peacemaking Criminology Community and Conflict Race and Crime Poverty, Gender and Development Social Bodies

To complete your final year, you choose one further module from the range of options available in the department or elsewhere.

The dissertation Many students find this an exciting and challenging part of their degree. It enables you to enhance your skills of personal organisation, literature review, argumentation, analysis and presentation in an extended piece of work. These are transferable skills for careers and for life in general. Studying across the third year, under the guidance of a supervisor, you write a dissertation on a topic of your choice. Past dissertation topics have included • • • •

Drug Use Miscarriages of Justice: Causes and Prevention Order and Control in Prisons Police Powers: Investigating the Gap between Law and Practice • The Role of CCTV in Crime Prevention • The Treatment of Rape Victims by the Criminal Justice System • Understanding Violence

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BA Sociology Sociology at Hull offers a unique combination of expertise in research and experience in teaching that is relevant to our emergent ‘global’ world, using theoretical, historical and comparative frameworks of enquiry to illuminate the study of contemporary social issues. These approaches also raise common themes of identity, power, globalisation and social change which extend across teaching and research agendas. Modules in research methods enable students to develop relevant practical skills for social research. The teaching and research staff have expertise in social issues around ‘race’, ethnicity, sexuality, youth, gender, culture, mass media, disability, social justice, community development, religion, the family, the body, and power and violence. The BA course is designed to provide a thorough grounding in the sociological tradition and training in the skills and abilities necessary for a sociological understanding of the contemporary world, with opportunities for specialisation through optional modules. Throughout the course our aim is to provide opportunities for informed critical engagement with contemporary issues through enquiry which recognises the complexity of contemporary societies. Core modules provide the skills and knowledge necessary for understanding the contemporary social world, including introductions to sociological theory, global culture and diversity, social institutions, social inequalities and divisions, and social research methods. Optional modules provide the opportunity to investigate particular aspects of social life in more depth, using a range of approaches which further develop skills in critical analysis by engaging with classic and contemporary studies across a broad range of issues at local, national and global levels. The degree course enables students to gain familiarity with sociology, integrating contributions from anthropology, gender studies and social policy in a curriculum that is wide-ranging and innovative.

The first year An extensive grounding for future study is provided through the core modules: • • • • •

Inequalities, Social Divisions and Social Change Sociological Analysis Social Institutions and Everyday Life Introduction to Anthropology: Understanding World Cultures Introducing Social Research

You also take a free elective module drawn from the range offered across the University. This may have close or fairly clear links with your main area of study, or it may be in an area which is unrelated to sociology, such as a foreign language.

‘Neither the life of an individual nor the history of a society can be understood without understanding both.’ C Wright Mills

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The second year Opportunities for specialisation open up in the second year, underpinned by core modules which further develop core sociological knowledge and skills: • Interpreting Social Data • Theorising Society These are complemented by a wide range of options within the department, enabling you to build up your individual expertise according to your own interests: • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Social Bodies Organisations of Violence Sociology of Popular Culture Distant Sufferings Pornography and Society The Problem of Youth Magic, Ritual and Myth Power and Resistance in a Globalising World Globalsation and Poverty Globalisation and Human Rights Governance and Social Policy Race and Social Justice ‘Community’ and Conflict Anthropology of Gender and Sexual Diversity Gender and Social Policy Ethnographic Travels around the Mediterranean Comparative Social Policy Class and Stratification Disability Policy, Identity and Society Citizenship and Social Inclusion Feminist Research Methods Interpreting Social Data

The third year In the third year you take optional modules, including a free elective, and write an independent dissertation which has the weight of two modules. For this you undertake independent research on a topic of your own choice, guided by a supervisor who has expertise in that area. Your supervisor will be available for you to consult throughout the third year. The theme of the dissertation is your own choice, in so far as we can provide suitable supervision. This enables you to develop independent skills in research, analysis and organisation, preparing you for either advanced study or the graduate labour market.

‘Studying within the Social Sciences Department in Hull has been great. Sociology has opened my mind to many different concepts and ideas. I’ve been able to meet a wide range of people from all backgrounds and cultures, which has added to the overall experience. And the lecturers are always there to give you worthwhile help and guidance whenever you need it. Studying at Hull is one thing you won’t regret!’ Claire Swallow BA Sociology

www.hull.ac.uk

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BA Criminology and Sociology The study of crime and the study of society are inextricably linked. This degree course provides an extensive grounding both in criminology and in the sociological tradition, as well as training in the skills and abilities necessary for a sociological understanding of the contemporary world. It also offers opportunities to pursue specialist options in both sociology and criminology. Sociology at Hull offers a unique combination of expertise in research and experience in teaching that is relevant to our emergent ‘global’ world, using theoretical, historical and comparative frameworks of enquiry to illuminate the study of complex contemporary social issues. These approaches also raise common themes of identity, power, globalisation and social change which extend across teaching and research agendas. Modules in research methods enable students to develop relevant practical skills for social research. This combination enables enquiry which recognises the complexity of contemporary societies. This degree provides a systematic programme of study in criminology and sociology, examining crime, offending behaviour, the criminal justice system and the wider social world. Optional sociology modules provide the opportunity to investigate some of the major issues of contemporary society. There are modules covering themes such as social protest, the social organisation of violence, the body and sexuality, media and culture, and processes of social change. The course is designed to impart knowledge and skills which are invaluable for a variety of careers connected with crime and criminal justice such as teaching, research, and other jobs involving direct practical engagement with crime, offenders and victims. Similarly, theoretical perspectives within sociology on the nature and causes of social divisions such as gender, ethnicity and class provide a broad grounding for a range of employment areas. The first year of the course provides a grounding in the various social science disciplines and skills which underpin sociology and criminology. Second-year modules are designed to enhance your understanding of the key theoretical perspectives and your research skills, as well as providing core knowledge of the subject area of criminology. In the second and third years you have the opportunity to specialise by choosing from a wide range of optional modules. In Year 3 you also undertake a dissertation.

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The first year You take six modules. The core modules are designed to introduce you to sociological approaches to contemporary social life and to the principles and techniques of social research. Further modules examine the origins and development of criminological theory in explaining offending behaviour and understanding the key stages of the criminal justice system. The six modules are • • • • • •

Sociological Analysis Introduction to Anthropology: Understanding World Cultures Introducing Social Research Development of Criminological Theory Figuring Out Crime State, Society and Welfare or Social Institutions and Everyday Life or Gender and Society or free elective

The free elective may be chosen from options offered by other departments across the University.

The second year You take two core sociology modules and a core criminology module: • Theorising Society • Interpreting Social Data • Punishment and Society plus one sociology option (see BA Sociology) and one criminology option (see BA Criminology). You also take one further module from options offered within the department or by other departments across the University.

The final year This is designed to allow you to delve deeper into a particular area. You work on a dissertation (equivalent to two modules) within the broad remit of criminology, criminal justice and sociology. You follow one core criminology module entitled Policing, and choose one option in criminology and one in sociology. You also take one further module from options offered within the department or by other departments across the University.

‘The time spent at Hull has been a really worthwhile experience for me. The course is fascinating and has a wide range of modules to suit everyone. The lecturers are friendly and approachable too. I have had some great times and made some good friends at Hull. I certainly recommend it.’ Suzanne Gomerson

The dissertation Many students find this an exciting and challenging part of their degree. It enables you to enhance your skills of personal organisation, literature review, argumentation, analysis and presentation in an extended piece of work. These are transferable skills for careers and for life in general. Past dissertation topics have included • • • • •

BA Criminology and Sociology

Images of Disability in Newspaper Media Racism and Policing Subcultures of Violence Drugs and Crime Young People in Custody

www.hull.ac.uk

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Major/minor degree courses BA Criminology with Forensic Science This is a new and innovative course which aims to blend together classical criminological understandings of crime and offending with the science of gathering and testing physical evidence from crime scenes. The combination of criminology and forensic science represents a unique marriage of the social and natural sciences, which are brought together in order to investigate crime and punishment. Criminology is a dynamic and rapidly developing subject, and this university offers a stimulating and contemporary engagement with the ‘problem of crime’. The degree course will impart a critical understanding of issues related to crime and criminal justice as well as a thorough grounding in the broader social science context. It will also enable you to develop key transferable skills for the job market, especially in research methods. The degree provides the opportunity to combine these skills with the scientific study of criminal activity from a forensic perspective. This involves detection of trace amounts of explosives, poisons and drugs and the identification of fibres, paint, combustion residues, glass fragments, hair and a wide range of other materials. Forensic science is key to identification by DNA profiling and fingerprinting, document authentication and counterfeit currency identification. The curriculum aims to cultivate knowledge and understanding of criminological theory, the criminal justice process, research methods in both the natural and social sciences, the gathering and analysis of physical evidence from crime scenes, the principles and purposes of punishment, and body chemistry and DNA testing. It also aims to develop skills which will enable you to analyse and interrogate theories about offending and punishment; critically engage with practical, ethical and scientific debates relating to crime and punishment; and understand scientific knowledge related to the analysis and investigation of physical evidence. A key feature of this course is that it provides you with an understanding of the governing principles of forensic science and how it is employed within the criminal justice system. This degree is ideally suited to those who have a general interest in crime and criminology and a particular interest in the application of scientific methods to our understanding of crime and evidence-gathering.

The first year You take six modules, five of which are core modules: • • • • •

Development of Criminological Theory Criminal Justice Process Introducing Social Research Introduction to Forensics Biochemistry

You choose your sixth module from the range of free electives available across the University.

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The second year You take four core modules: • • • •

Punishment and Society Interpreting Social Data Crime Scene Investigations Toxicology, Forensic and Biomedical Science

You also choose two modules from a range of possible options, which might include • • • •

Drugs and Drug Use The History of Crime and Policing Reading about Crime and Punishment Prostitutes, Pickpockets and Peelers

The final year You take two core modules: • Surveillance and Social Control • Advanced Forensic Science You are also required to complete a dissertation based on an in-depth study of a topic of your choice within the broad area of criminology and forensic science, and you choose further modules from a range of options such as • • • • • • • •

Evil History of Crime Policing Gender, Ethnicity and Crime Social Analysis of Punishment Restorative Justice Victims, Rights and Justice Contemporary Imprisonment

The dissertation Many students find this an interesting and challenging part of their degree. It gives you the opportunity to undertake an in-depth piece of work on a topic of your own choosing and in which you have a particular interest. It enables students to develop and enhance their skills of personal organisation, literature review, argumentation, analysis and presentation in an extended piece of work. These are transferable skills for careers and for life in general. Applicants who wish to study forensic science as their main subject, but with some criminology featuring in each year, are likely to find that the BSc in Forensic Science with Criminology is more suitable. See the Chemistry brochure for details.

www.hull.ac.uk

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BA Criminology with Psychology This is a very popular and topical degree in which criminology is the major and psychology the minor subject. Recent years have seen increasing links between the two subjects and growing career opportunities. Crime is seen as a significant problem in contemporary societies, and attempts to respond to it have seen the development of a whole range of initiatives, including crime prevention, offender profiling, cognitive behaviour therapies and community policing. This degree therefore offers an excellent foundation for those who have interests in the field of crime, criminals, victims and criminal justice. Alongside these substantive topics, you will study a range of psychological approaches that are essential when explaining offending or abnormal behaviour. Crime and criminal justice are studied within a wide context which includes foundation-level knowledge of social structures, power relations and research methods. The second and third years allow you to specialise mainly in criminology, but with two modules in psychology taken in each year. The second year includes a number of core modules which cover ‘key’ criminological thinkers and the issue of punishment, as well as an optional module in an area of criminology that is of particular interest. The third year includes an individual project and a core module in criminology, as well as the opportunity to choose from a range of more specialised modules in criminology, criminal justice and psychology. The degree is ideally suited to those who have a general interest in crime and criminology and a particular interest in psychology. It equips students with knowledge and skills that will be invaluable for any career connected with crime and criminal justice but is especially useful for careers which also include an element of psychology.

The first year You take six modules. The criminology modules are designed to introduce you to the major theories and perspectives which have been developed in order to enhance our understanding of crime, offending behaviour and the criminal justice system. One module focuses on the overall framework and processes of the criminal justice system, while another examines the development and use of various forms of information about crime. You also take modules that examine sociological approaches to issues and how researchers investigate the social world, and you take a module which introduces the specialist study of psychology. The six modules are • • • • • •

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Criminal Justice Process Figuring Out Crime Sociological Analysis Development of Criminological Theory Introducing Social Research Introduction to Psychology


The second year You take six modules, three in criminology and criminal justice and three in psychology. These modules allow students to understand the work of key criminological thinkers, methods of crime prevention and urban regeneration, why we punish people and contemporary issues in the prison system. You also study advanced research methods and two specialised modules in psychology. The modules are • • • • • •

Reading about Crime and Punishment Punishment and Society Interpreting Social Data Biological Psychology: Personality and Individual Difference Abnormal and Applied Biological Psychology Social and Developmental Psychology

The final year This is designed to allow you to delve deeper into a particular area of criminology and psychology. You work on a dissertation within the broad remit of criminology, criminal justice and punishment, and you choose two optional modules in criminology from • • • • • •

Race and Crime Histories of Punishment Surveillance and Social Control Contemporary Imprisonment Peacemaking Criminology Policing

You also take one psychology module: • Forensic Psychology and a final module from within Social Sciences or from another department.

The dissertation The dissertation, which you undertake under the supervision of a member of staff, gives you the opportunity to examine and document an issue or topic of your own choosing and to acquire in-depth knowledge of a particular area. Many students find this an exciting and challenging part of their degree. It enables them to enhance their skills of personal organisation, literature review, argumentation, analysis and presentation in an extended piece of work. These are transferable skills for careers and for life in general. Topics for dissertations might include • • • • • •

arson mentally disordered offenders police interrogation of suspects the role of the prison psychologist the treatment of sex offenders understanding serial murder

A ‘sister’ degree, the BSc Psychology with Criminology, in which psychology is the main subject and which is designed to meet the requirements for membership of the British Psychological Society, is also available. See the Psychology pamphlet for further details.

www.hull.ac.uk

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BA Criminology with Law This is an ideal marriage of subjects if you want to acquire a critical understanding of offending behaviour and how it is dealt with. Criminology and Law enjoy excellent relations at the University of Hull, and both are considered centres of excellence in terms of teaching and research. This degree course, in which criminology is the major and law the minor subject, involves the specialist study of crime and criminology and enables you to study relevant areas of law, imparting a critical understanding of legal rules, principles and practices. It is therefore an excellent foundation for those who have interests in the field of crime, offenders, victims and criminal justice. The first-year curriculum reflects our belief that crime and criminal justice should be studied within a wide context. The second and third years allow you to specialise mainly in criminology, but with two law modules in each year. The second year includes a number of core modules which cover current criminological debate, contemporary issues in punishment and crime prevention. The third and final year includes an individual project in criminology and offers the opportunity to choose from a range of more specialised modules in criminology, criminal justice and law. The degree is ideally suited to students who have a general interest in crime and criminology and a particular interest in legal rules, principles and procedures in relation to crime. It equips students with knowledge and skills that will be invaluable for any career connected with crime and criminal justice but is especially useful for careers which also incorporate an element of law.

The first year You take five core modules and one option. The core modules are designed to introduce you to the major theories and perspectives which have been developed in order to enhance our understanding of crime, offending behaviour and the criminal justice system. One module focuses on the overall framework and processes of the criminal justice system, while another examines the development and use of various forms of information about crime. You also follow modules that examine sociological approaches to issues and how researchers investigate the social world, and you take a module that introduces the specialist study of law (or you can take an option from within the department or from another department). The modules are • • • • • •

Criminal Justice Process Figuring Out Crime Sociological Analysis Development of Criminological Theory Introducing Social Research Criminal Law or free elective

The second year You take six modules, four of them in criminology and criminal justice and two in law. The criminology modules enable you to understand the work of ‘key’ criminological thinkers, methods of crime prevention and urban regeneration, why we punish people and contemporary issues in the prison system. You also follow a specialist module on research data. These modules are

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• • • •

Reading about Crime and Punishment Punishment and Society Interpreting Social Data Criminal Investigations: Uncovering the Truth

A final list of law modules will be provided in your second year, but some examples are • Jurisprudence • Legal Issues in the Headlines • International Law

The final year This allows you to delve deeper into a particular area of criminology and law. You work on a dissertation (equivalent to two modules) within the broad remit of criminology, criminal justice and punishment, and you follow one core module in Critical Theorising about Crime and Society. You also have the opportunity to undertake in-depth study in one area of criminology, by choosing from a list of optional modules. Options available in recent years have included • • • •

Contemporary Imprisonment Policing Victims, Rights and Justice Race and Crime

Finally, you choose two law modules from a list of options. You can also select an option not taken in the second year. Examples include • Protecting Human Rights in the UK • International Human Rights Protection • Issues in Business/Trade Law

The dissertation The dissertation gives you the opportunity to examine and document an issue or topic of your own choosing, and to acquire in-depth knowledge of a particular area. Many students find this an exciting and challenging part of their degree. It enables them to enhance their skills of personal organisation, literature review, argumentation, analysis and presentation in an extended piece of work. These are transferable skills for careers and for life in general. Dissertation topics might include • • • • • •

disciplinary regimes in women’s prisons police powers and accountability young people and crime restorative justice miscarriages of justice critically understanding the policing of domestic violence

Applicants who wish to study law as their main subject, but with some criminology featuring in each year, are likely to find that the LLB in Law with Criminology – a qualifying law degree – is more suitable for their needs. See the Law School pamphlet for details.

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BA Sociology and Anthropology with Gender Studies The University of Hull was one of the first universities in the country to establish a gender studies programme. This major/minor course allows you to combine sociology and anthropology with the study of gender in an interdisciplinary context that draws on both the social sciences and the humanities. More specifically, in addition to providing you with knowledge and key skills in sociology, the course addresses fundamental questions about whether we are born, or become, women and men, how we think about differences between genders and the extent to which gender divisions continue to underpin key social processes and institutions. It is also concerned with the way in which gender differences are inflected in, and become part and parcel of, other forms of cultural difference such as ethnicity or class; and it examines the way in which gender is shaped historically through various forms of cultural representation, whether literature or film.

The first year • • • • • •

Sociological Analysis Gender and Society Gender and Culture Introduction to Anthropology: Understanding World Cultures Introduction to Social Research State, Society and Welfare or Social Institutions and Everyday Life or free elective

The second year • • • • •

Theorising Gender Theorising Society Interpreting Social Data Subject options (see list below) Free elective

The third year • Dissertation • Subject options (see list below) • Free elective

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Departmental options • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Anthropology of Gender and Sexual Diversity Feminist Research Methods Disability Policy, Identity and Society Gender and Social Policy Magic, Ritual and Myth Ethnographic Travels around the Mediterranean Nationalism, ‘Race’ and Ethnicity Social Bodies Power and Resistance in a Globalising World Comparative Social Policy Citizenship and Social Inclusion The Problem of Youth Race and Social Justice Community and Conflict Organisations of Violence Distant Sufferings Sociology of Popular Culture Pornography and Society

Gender studies options • • • • • • • • • •

Poverty, Gender and Development Gender, Power and Politics in the Americas Women in American Literature 20th-Century American Women’s Writing Suffragettes and Citizens Bodies and Selves Postmodernism and Gender Studies Modern Women Writers Gender, Science and Knowledge Language, Communication and Context

Exchange visits abroad Gender Studies currently has a student exchange link with Utrecht University in the Netherlands. You will have the opportunity to spend time studying abroad for the first semester of your final year, if you wish and places allow. Students who have previously taken part in the exchange have found the experience very rewarding, both academically and personally.

www.hull.ac.uk

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BA Sociology and Anthropology with French, German, Italian or Spanish These four-year major/minor degree courses provide students with the opportunity to combine sociology and social anthropology with the study of the language and culture of another country. In particular, you will have the opportunity to study at a university in the other country during your third year. The sociology and anthropology side of these degree courses draws on some of the major core components of the Single Honours Sociology degree, together with a range of sociological and anthropological options. This not only provides you with knowledge and key intellectual skills in sociology, but also provides important conceptual tools for thinking through issues of cultural diversity. The language component is combined with the study of the other country’s culture and society, which is further developed during the year abroad.

The first year • • • • • •

Introduction to Anthropology: Understanding World Cultures Social Institutions and Everyday Life Gender and Society Modern Language 1 and 2 Introducing Social Research Free elective

The second year • • • • •

Theorising Society Interpreting Social Data Modern Language 3 and 4 Sociology and anthropology options (see BA Sociology) Free elective

The third year • Study Abroad Programme

The fourth year • Dissertation • Modern Language 5 and 6 • Sociology and anthropology options

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BA Sociology and Anthropology with Geography This major/minor course allows you to combine sociology and anthropology with the study of human geography in an interdisciplinary context that draws on the social sciences and humanities.

First year • • • • • •

Introduction to Anthropology: Understanding World Cultures Introducing Social Research Introducing Human Geography Geographies of Development Gender and Society or Social Institutions and Everyday Life Free elective

Second year • • • • •

Theorising Society Interpreting Social Data Sociology and anthropology option (see BA Sociology) Geography options (see Geography pamphlet) Geographical Thought and Practice

Third year • • • •

Sociology and anthropology options Geography options Dissertation Free elective

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Joint Honours degree courses BA Sociology and Media Studies Media studies and sociology share many common themes as well as frameworks and methods of inquiry. This course reflects the cultural turn in sociology and the corresponding engagement of media studies with social context. The course provides students with a multidisciplinary framework for the analysis of our increasingly mediated social world. You will gain the knowledge and skills to apply sociological theories to explain social phenomena such as institutions, inequalities and gender formations, and will come to understand how they are reflected, transformed and intensified by our media. Shared themes include power and resistance, the self and society, identity and representation, morality and public culture, the role of social and cultural institutions, and reflexivity in analysis and research.

First year You take core modules in both subjects: • • • • • •

Sociological Analysis Media and Society Social Institutions in Everyday Life Introduction to Moving Image Media Introduction to Cultural Theory Introducing Social Research

Second year Core modules in both subjects: • • • •

Media Theory, Analysis and Research Techniques Interpreting Social Data Theorising Society Televisual Narrative

And options in both subjects, chosen from • • • •

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Power and Resistance in a Globalising World Sociology of Popular Culture Television Production and Analysis Freedom Dreams


Third year In the final year all students must take a 40-credit dissertation in either sociology or media studies, plus options to give a balance of the two subjects. The options are chosen from • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Social Bodies Poverty, Gender and Development Distant Suffering Reporting War and Security Black Movement Televisual Narrative II Black Power Media Convergence: Political Economy and Social Networking Work-Based Learning Environment, Culture and Society Ethnographic Travels around the Mediterranean ‘Race’ and Crime Reinventing Socialism: The Politics of Communist Asia ‘Community’ and Conflict Organisations of Violence Globalisation, Citizenship and Human Rights Race in the City Future Fear The Problem of Youth Sociology of Popular Culture Pornography and Society

www.hull.ac.uk

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BA Sociology and Film Studies This course aims to explore the relationship between sociology and aspects of film theory. The combination of sociology and film studies will enable you to understand the social and cultural effects of cinematic representation and the social and cultural context of film production and reception. The course is divided equally between the two subjects, and the sociology side is based on the BA Sociology Single Honours course. The film studies side aims to enable you to develop your intellectual capacities through the close study of film. The course introduces the critical discourse analysis and terminology of film studies, giving students a broad historical and critical knowledge of cinema’s development and encouraging confident assessment and appreciation of the content and style of film.

First year Core modules in both subjects: • • • •

Sociological Analysis Introduction to Film Analysis and Theory I and II Social Institutions and Everyday Life American Film and Society or Introduction to British Cinema • Introducing Social Research

Second year Core modules in sociology: • Interpreting Social Data • Theorising Society And options in both subjects, chosen from • • • • • • • •

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Imagining Reality: The Documentary Film Filming Literature Power and Resistance in a Globalising World Sociology of Popular Culture Movie Brats and Mavericks: Hollywood in the 1970s European Auteur Disability, Identity, Society and Media Citizenship and Social Inclusion

Criminology, sociology and gender studies

Third year Students undertake a dissertation in sociology, plus options from both subjects. The options are chosen from • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Histories of Punishment Comparative Social Policy Social Bodies Poverty, Gender and Development Distant Suffering Concepts of Genre in Classical Hollywood Cinema: The Western The Horror Film Reinventing Socialism: The Politics of Communist Asia ‘Race’ and Crime Community and Conflict Environment, Culture and Society Ethnographic Travels around the Mediterranean Organisations of Violence Globalisation, Citizenship and Human Rights Representations of the Past in European Film Modern Hollywood: 1970–1980 Sociology of Popular Culture Pornography and Society Film Dissertation


BA Philosophy and Sociology This course provides students with a firm grounding in both philosophy and sociology. The common ground between the two disciplines is extensive in terms of both the development of sociological thought and contemporary issues. It may be explored through specialist optional modules in the second and third years, for instance through social theory, methodological issues or the ethics of social distribution. Students may draw their studies together by undertaking a research dissertation of their choice across the range of the joint degree in the third year.

First-year modules • Sociological Analysis • Introducing Social Research Plus philosophy and sociology options

New course: BA Community and Youth Work Studies This course provides high-quality academic and professional training for existing and future practitioners in youth and community work. Students develop a critical understanding of youth and community issues through a range of social science perspectives, including sociology, social policy, cultural studies and youth studies. This is underpinned by the opportunity to undertake professional placements, where students can apply their learning to their own practice. The course structure enables students to demonstrate their competence in applying theories in practice to the standards for community and youth work required by the National Youth Agency (NYA) and by the National Occupational Standards for Youth Work for England (2008). It is accredited by the NYA as the professional qualification for youth work practitioners.

Second- and third-year modules • Theorising Society

The first year

Plus philosophy and sociology options

You take five core modules, as follows, and (in the second semester) a professional placement.

BA Religion and Sociology This degree course enables students to gain a firm grounding in both theology and sociology in the first year of study. The second and third years present opportunities to explore the relations between the two disciplines through specialist modules, for instance in the development of sociological thought, or the ethics of social welfare and globalisation, and students can undertake a research dissertation in the third year.

First-year modules • Sociological Analysis • Introducing Social Research Plus theology and sociology options

Second- and third-year modules • Theorising Society Plus theology and sociology options

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• Tools for Learning • Theory and Reflective Practice in Community and Youth Work • Understanding and Working with People • Working with Groups • Critical Health Issues in Community and Youth Work

The second year Professional placement is taken across two semesters, alongside five core modules: • • • • •

Managing Quality Youth Work Research Methodology and Methods Youth Culture, Youth Policy and Youth Work Practice Anti-Oppressive Practice Theory and Practice of ‘Community’ and Community Development

The third year You take four core modules, as follows, and (in the second semester) a professional placement. • Youth Work and Community Development in a Global Context • Ethics and Values in Community and Youth Work • Managing Interagency Working and Organisational Change • Youth Work and Youth Justice

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General information

Teaching and assessment methods We adopt a wide range of teaching and assessment methods to accommodate different students’ strengths and to foster a range of transferable skills. The first year of all our degree courses includes an unassessed study skills programme. Modules are variously delivered through lectures, small-group tutorials, seminars, practical classes and individual supervision of project work. Lectures and workshops are complemented by more informal small-group tutorials or seminars. We use a range of methods of assessment, reflecting the different academic tasks that your degree involves: written examinations, essays, oral presentations, project reports and a third-year dissertation. Your overall degree classification is based on the assessment of your work in Years 2 and 3.

Academic and pastoral support The Department of Social Sciences provides a supportive learning and pastoral-care environment for students. On arrival each student is allocated a personal supervisor. Students meet with their personal supervisor twice a semester, but are actively encouraged from the beginning to treat the supervisor as the first point of contact when any problem arises. Students enjoy a close relationship with all the staff in Social Sciences, which is promoted through the open-door policy of module coordinators and administrative staff.

Opportunities for study abroad There are now increasing opportunities to undertake part of your course of studies in Europe. The University of Hull is involved in a major Socrates programme coordinated by the University of Utrecht, and as part of that programme there are opportunities to study in most European countries. Students who wish to participate in the exchange programme will require basic skills in the relevant language. The Language Institute at the University can provide tuition, and some Continental universities teach some courses in English.

International students We welcome applications from continental Europe and beyond. Every year a significant number of our admissions are from overseas. We are aware of the particular needs of international students, and the type of support that may benefit them. Of course, we expect applicants to be reasonably proficient in English, and those in need of extra tuition are encouraged to contact the Department of Modern Languages at the University of Hull to discuss how their particular needs could be met through supplementary courses such as the Summer Study Programme, the Bridge Programme, Foundation English Language programmes or a pre-sessional course. These not only help with language competence but are also good introductions to campus life and local culture. At the start of your first semester you will be invited to attend the University’s programme of induction and some social events organised by staff and students. Should you have difficulties during your course, whether they be study-related or personal, you will always be able to turn to your personal supervisor or your module tutor for help and advice.

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Career prospects The University of Hull has one of the best records in the United Kingdom for employment of its graduates, and Hull’s social science graduates are no exception. There is an increasing market for graduates in social sciences and criminology. Graduates with our degrees have found employment in a wide variety of careers: as police and probation officers, academic and policy researchers, and community and voluntary sector workers, or in health service management, accountancy, recruitment consultancy and teaching, to name only a few career destinations. Further study is also an option for graduates with good degrees, and possible courses include teacher and social work training, Masters degrees in criminology, applied social research or gender studies, and doctoral research programmes. Your personal supervisor and the University’s Careers Service will encourage and help with career planning.

Admissions The Department of Social Sciences aims to widen access for potential students from all walks of life. Our current students come from a variety of backgrounds and bring with them a range of skills and experience. We believe strongly that the learning environment is enhanced by the participation of students from a diversity of educational backgrounds. We therefore adjust our ‘standard’ three-A-level offer according to the circumstances of each applicant and the degree course. We encourage applications from students of all ages and accept many people with two A levels, a mix of A and AS levels, and a wide range of other qualifications such as Access, BTEC, NVQ, VCE and RGN. We also take account of relevant occupational and/or voluntary experience. Everyone who receives an offer of a place is invited to visit us on our departmental open days. These offer the opportunity to talk with current students, meet with staff, and find out more about the teaching programme, the University and the city of Hull.

www.hull.ac.uk

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Staff Sue Adamson is a Research Fellow. Recent research projects have included assessment of racial violence and harassment and analysis of patterns in relation to migrant workers’ origin, location and employment. A third area has been work with the police, the Crown Prosecution Service and local criminal justice boards around confidence in the criminal justice system and community engagement. Rachel Alsop is Director of Undergraduate Gender Studies and teaches ‘Gender and Culture’ and ‘Gender and Society’. Her research interests include gender theories, gender and post-communism (with an area interest in Central and Eastern Europe), gender and reading groups, widening participation in higher education and social constructions of masculinities. Vassos Argyrou is Reader in Social Anthropology. His research interests include social and cultural theory, environmentalism, postcolonialism, and the ethnography of southern Europe and the Mediterranean. He teaches a range of undergraduate options in anthropology. Ruth Butler is Senior Lecturer in Applied Social Research. She teaches modules in research methods to Masters and PhD students from across the faculty, and a module on disability issues to second- and third-year undergraduates. She has research interests in social marginalisation and resistance processes (relative to disability and sexuality), social identities, disability politics and research methods. Adam Calverley is a Lecturer in Criminology and teaches both core undergraduate modules and postgraduate modules, including a specialist module on desistance from crime. His research interests include issues surrounding ‘life after punishment’ and stopping offending; emotions and crime; and ethnicity and criminal justice. Suzanne Clisby is a social anthropologist and Lecturer in Gender Studies. She teaches ‘Poverty, Gender and Development’ and ‘Gender, Power and Politics in the Americas’. She is Director of the MA in Gender and Development and Coordinator of the GEMMA Masters programme (a joint European Masters degree in Women’s and Gender Studies). Research interests include gender issues in development, qualitative/participative methodologies, democratisation, ethnicity and indigenous peoples, with an area focus on Latin America. Charlie Cooper is a Lecturer in Social Policy. He teaches on a variety of the core and optional modules on the undergraduate courses. His early career included social work and social housing. He has worked in academia for the last 15 years, teaching and researching on a range of housing and social policy themes. Melissa Dearey is a Lecturer in Criminology and Programme Director of the BA in Criminology. She teaches courses in criminological and social control theory, research methods, true crime, and evil. Her research interests are in political prisoner life writing, personal radicalisation narratives, and the role of gender, childhood, the family and sexuality in resistance cultures. Michael Drake is a Lecturer in Sociology and Programme Director of the BA in Sociology. His research applies social theory to the organisation of violence, power and resistance, the body in society and social identities. He is currently developing a book on political sociology for a globalising world. He teaches core sociology and a number of optional modules based on his research themes. Annette Fitzsimons is a Lecturer in Youth and Community Work. Her research interests are anti-oppressive practice, social theory with reference to youth work, and gender studies.

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Photograph by Mike Park.

www.hull.ac.uk

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Sheila Gaynard is a Lecturer and the Programme Director of the BA in Social and Behavioural Studies for part-time mature students. She teaches modules in psychology, lifespan development, mental health and dissertation preparation both on Social and Behavioural Studies and on Social and Community Studies. Her research is concerned with the influences of studying for a degree on women’s life-course development.

Helen Johnston is a Lecturer in Criminology. She coordinates and contributes to a variety of undergraduate and postgraduate modules in the subject. Her research and teaching interests include the history of crime and punishment, 1750–1900; contemporary imprisonment; and women, crime and the criminal justice system. Current research is concerned with local imprisonment in the 19th century.

Simon Green is Lecturer in Community Justice and Criminology and Director of Postgraduate Studies. He teaches trainee probation officers and undergraduates on the criminology degree programmes. He has research interests in restorative justice, communities and crime, crime prevention, victimology, community policing and criminological theory.

Majella Kilkey is a Lecturer in Social Policy. She teaches across the core social policy modules in Years 1, 2 and 3 as well as ‘Social Policy in Europe’. Her research interests include international comparative social policy, loneparent families and social policies, women and the labour market, and poverty and social exclusion.

Michael Hardey is Reader in Sociology. Primarily he is attached to Hull York Medical School, but through his interests in medical sociology he is affiliated to the Department of Social Sciences. He teaches courses on health, the internet, the social body and other aspects of sociology. Julia Holdsworth is Lecturer in Social and Community Studies. Her research interests include social change and development, migration, identity and gender, with a specific area interest in Central and Eastern Europe. She is also interested in issues of environment and sustainability. She is Programme Director for the parttime Social and Community Studies degree and teaches on a range of undergraduate and postgraduate modules. Gill Hughes is a Lecturer in Community Learning. She coordinates the BA in Social and Community Studies and the University Certificate in Neighbourhood Regeneration. Her teaching and research are in lifelonglearning styles and approaches, culture and the community, community participation, engagement and development. She is a member of a number of community organisation executive boards. Mark Johnson is Senior Lecturer in Social Anthropology. His research interests are in the areas of gender and sexuality, migration and diaspora, landscape and environment, and religion (Islam in particular). He has conducted ethnographic research in the Philippines, Vietnam and Costa Rica.

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Michael McCahill is a Lecturer in Criminology and Director of the MA in Criminology. His main teaching interests are surveillance and the sociology of deviance and social control. He has published widely on these subjects, including a book entitled The Surveillance Web for which he received the British Society of Criminology book prize in 2003. His current research addresses the social impact of surveillance. Lucy Michael is a Lecturer in Criminology and Programme Director of the BA Criminology in Hong Kong. She teaches courses in criminological and social control theory and research methods. Her research on moral ordering and social control processes addresses questions of contemporary leadership in communities facing problems of crime, conflict and cohesion, and its relationship to patterns of inter-generational conflict and the distribution of social resources. Maurice Mullard is Reader in Social Policy. He teaches core social policy modules to undergraduates. Research interests include comparative approaches on citizenship, public expenditure policies in the United Kingdom and internationally, and unemployment and social policy in Europe. He has spent time as a visiting professor at the University of Malta. Bev Orton is a Fellow in Community Justice and Criminology. Her area of research is women and political violence in South Africa. Previously, she has worked on outreach projects with probation services, women’s refuges and MENCAP. In South Africa, she wrote and directed drama productions for television.


Julie Seymour is Senior Lecturer in Social Research. She teaches research methods and quantitative research techniques to undergraduates. She also provides a module on ‘Feminist Perspectives in Social Research’. Her research interests are in the areas of gender and the household, disability and informal care, and issues of methodology.

Peter Young is Professor of Criminology. He teaches on undergraduate and postgraduate courses in criminal justice. He was formerly the Head of the School of Law at the University of Edinburgh and Director of the Institute of Criminology at the University College, Dublin. His research interests are in the comparative study of longterm crime rates and the sociology of punishment.

Louise Sturgeon-Adams is a Lecturer in Community Justice. She is involved in the teaching of trainee probation officers on the BA Community Justice course. Louise also teaches undergraduate criminology modules. She has worked on a variety of externally funded research projects, including projects on drug and alcohol misuse.

Margarita Zernova is a Lecturer in Criminology. Her research revolves around restorative justice and ethical issues in policing in Eastern Europe. The main modules she teaches to undergraduate students are ‘Criminal Justice Ethics’ and ‘Peacemaking Criminology’. She also teaches on the MA in Restorative Justice.

Laura Summers is a Lecturer in Comparative Politics. She teaches the free elective on ‘Women and Politics’ in addition to undergraduate and postgraduate modules focusing on crime and politics in the USA and on political and economic change in Asia. Her research interests include comparative studies of political elites and neo-authoritarianism, the political economy of change in colonial Indochina and cross-cultural legal conflict within the Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia. Keith Tester is Professor of Sociology. His main research interests are in the sociology of the media, film and religion and in social theory. He is an Honorary Member of the Thesis Eleven Centre for Cultural Sociology at Latrobe University in Melbourne, where he has been a Distinguished Visiting Fellow. His teaching focuses on the media and social theory. Mick Wilkinson is Programme Director for the MA in Development Studies and theme leader for NGOs and civil society in the Centre for the Study of Comparative Change and Development. He teaches across a range of modules. His research interests include slavery in the 21st century; NGOs and the political process; migration and exploitation; refugees and asylum seekers; and the causes and consequences of social exclusion. Majid Yar is Professor of Sociology. He teaches on firstand second-year core modules, as well as offering options around the sociology of culture. His research interests include the internet and new media, popular culture, criminology and social theory.

www.hull.ac.uk

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FAQs Why should I choose Hull? National surveys of UK universities have emphasised the excellent teaching, the high quality of research, the rigorous academic standards and the exceptional graduate employment record of the University of Hull. We offer a first-rate undergraduate experience. In terms of overall student satisfaction, the National Student Survey (NSS) has ranked Hull among the top 10 mainstream English higher education institutions for five years running – a consistently impressive position which shows that Hull students are among the happiest in the country.

What qualifications do I need? Normally, entrants will have achieved 240–300 points from A levels, AS levels or equivalent qualifications, or will have completed an Access course or similar. We do not specify particular subjects (and we recognise General Studies), but BA Criminology with Forensic Science also requires GCSE Chemistry at grade C and we prefer GCSE Mathematics at grade C for BA Criminology with Psychology.

Does it matter how old I am? We welcome applications from people with a wide range of professional or life experience, and we have standard procedures for assessing applications from those who do not have the conventional entry qualifications.

Can I enter directly into the second year of a degree course? We credit prior learning at higher education level where we can, but this has to be decided on the basis of individual applications and evidence.

Can I transfer between degrees? At the end of the first year, transferring from one course to another is possible but will depend on the availability of places and your ability to satisfy the requirements of the degree. Transfer at the end of the second year may also be possible.

What are the teaching contact hours? Teaching is delivered through lectures, workshops and small-group seminars. Fulltime contact hours will be around seven or eight per week, but this may be longer for some modules, especially any involving laboratory practice. These scheduled hours provide a framework for the private study which will take up most of a student’s time.

How long are the degree courses? Except for the four-year BA Sociology and Anthropology with French, German, Italian or Spanish, all courses run for three years.

What will I be qualified to do? There is a continuing demand from employers for criminology, sociology and gender studies graduates. The kinds of transferable skills – communication, interpersonal, research and analytical – developed by our graduates are highly valued by employers. The demand for criminology graduates has increased significantly in recent years. Common career paths include the police, prison and probation services, the legal profession and academic or civil service research. Opportunities for work within the field of sociology include roles in education, housing, care and support services, health services, information/advice work, policy and corporate planning, and research. Many of our graduates enter careers in management, marketing, public administration and teaching. There is also the option of postgraduate study for a Masters or doctorate.

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Free Elective Scheme Studying for a degree at the University of Hull is a unique experience. We aim to provide you with an education that offers both depth and breadth of knowledge. To meet these ends the University has developed an optional Free Elective Scheme. This scheme enables the majority of undergraduate students to take one module a year from outside their main course of study.

Admissions policy Admissions information provided in this pamphlet is intended as a general guide and cannot cover all possibilities. Entry requirements are generally stated in terms of A

So, how does it work?

level grades and/or UCAS points,

Each year you take 120 credits’ worth of modules.

but we encourage applications from people with a wide range of

SEMESTER 1

SEMESTER 2

20 credits

20 credits

20 credits

20 credits

other qualifications and/or experience. Some further details of the various entry routes are included in our general prospectus. Please contact the Admissions Service (see below) with any

20 credits

specific queries about admissions.

20 credits

Disclaimer

Here you take modules from your main course of study.

Here you have the option to take a free elective or another module from your main course of study.

This publication is intended principally as a guide for prospective students. The matters covered by it – academic and

What sort of subjects can I take? You can take almost any free elective module from outside your main course of study, usually at your home campus. You can even take a module from another faculty. You should discuss your choice of free electives with your supervisor. Options might include • • • • • • • • •

Evil Understanding Crime and Punishment War and Politics Jazz Twentieth-Century Dictators Gothic Vampires and ‘Others’ in European Literature and Film Dangerous Planet Introduction to Business Management various language courses

as well as a wide range of other modules from diverse subject areas.

otherwise – are subject to change from time to time, both before and after students are admitted, and the information contained in it does not form part of any contract. While every reasonable precaution was taken in the production of this brochure, the University does not accept liability for any inaccuracies.

Address For general enquiries, please write to Admissions Service University of Hull Hull, HU6 7RX

What are the main reasons for participating?

T 01482 466100

• The scheme gives you the opportunity to study a subject without having to commit yourself to taking further modules in that subject area. • By taking a free elective you are able to follow up your interests as part of your degree. • With a broader education you may acquire extra skills that will help you when you enter the employment market.

F 01482 442290 E admissions@hull.ac.uk


Fewer than 20% of crimes in this country are committed by women. But in one of every three cases of murder or attempted murder brought to trial, the accused is female.

Change the way you think.

www.hull.ac.uk

UG Crim,Soc,Gen 2011  

Criminology, sociology and gender studies Undergraduate study 2011

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