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THE UNIVERSITY OF HULL POSTGRADUATE CERTIFICATE IN EDUCATION Postgraduate study

PGCE ADMISSIONS OFFICE,THE UNIVERSITY OF HULL, HULL, HU6 7RX, UK T F E

01482 465406 01482 466133 ces@hull.ac.uk

www.hull.ac.uk


CONTENTS THE UNIVERSITY

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HULL AND REGION

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SCARBOROUGH

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INITIAL TEACHER TRAINING FACILITIES IN HULL AND SCARBOROUGH

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THE POSTGRADUATE CERTIFICATE IN EDUCATION

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EARLY YEARS PGCE PROGRAMME (SCARBOROUGH CAMPUS) Advanced Early Years specialist subject component Core subject components Foundation subject components Professional studies component School experience Programme assessment Year outline

7 8 8 10 11 11 11 12

PRIMARY PGCE PROGRAMME (HULL CAMPUS) Core subjects Foundation subjects Professional studies course Subject specialist course School experience Programme assessment Year outline

13 14 14 16 16 16 16 17

SECONDARY PGCE PROGRAMME Principles and contexts of teaching and learning Subject-based work Practical classroom experience Assessment Year outline

18 18 19 23 23 24

MEMBERS OF STAFF

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GENERAL INFORMATION Admission requirements Application procedure International students Financial incentives Qualified Teacher Status Skills Tests Protection of children Fees and grants Accommodation Advanced programmes The University session Changes to courses

26 26 27 27 27 27 27 27 27 28 28 28

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THE UNIVERSITY The University of Hull has two exceptionally congenial campuses: one in the leafy suburbs of its home city and one on the scenic North Yorkshire coast.

Our Hull Campus, less than three miles to the north of the city centre and surrounded by the majority of our student residences on adjacent streets, covers some 120 acres (48 hectares) and is spacious enough to accommodate, within a few minutes’ walk, not only all the main teaching buildings, library, Computer Centre and Language Institute, but also the main students’ union building, theatre, Sports and Fitness Centre and most of our playing fields.The Scarborough Campus is similarly integrated. Just over a mile from the centre of one of England’s most elegant resorts, and less than five minutes from coast and beach, it brings together all teaching buildings (including dedicated studio and dance spaces), a specialist library, a state-of-the-art IT Centre, further students’ union facilities and the Cayley Hall residences.

LIBRARIES The Brynmor Jones Library, at the centre of the Hull Campus, holds nearly a million volumes of books and periodicals, as well as important collections of maps, audiovisual material and archives. As one of the most highly automated university libraries in Europe, it is also an electronic gateway for students on our three campuses to worldwide information networks. But each of our libraries also caters for particular specialisms.The Brynmor Jones (pictured below) houses unique collections that support those degree programmes based in Hull (American Studies or History, for example); the Keith Donaldson Library on the Scarborough Campus offers other, specifically relevant holdings, such as its well-established Teaching Practice collection.

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COMPUTERS There are hundreds of PCs and workstations spread around the buildings and residences of our two campuses, all networked with our Hull-based Computer Centre’s systems, the composite catalogue for our libraries and, of course, the rest of the world. A wireless networking infrastructure covers the whole of the Scarborough Campus, including all teaching rooms, labs, studios and social and recreational spaces.This means that students can use laptops and other mobile devices to access the network anywhere on campus.

RECREATION There is a wealth of drama, film and music both on and off the Hull and Scarborough campuses, with museums and art galleries also on campus or close by, and students’ union societies to cater for all manner of persuasions and interests.Then there are the Wolds and Moors for walkers and climbers, or the east-coast resorts (with Scarborough itself prime among them), and historic East and North Yorkshire sites and sights. Hull, as England’s 10th-largest city, and Scarborough, as an all-year resort, also offer pubs, clubs and eating places of every description in the profusion that you might expect.

SPORT The students’ union manages a large, modern Sports and Fitness Centre on the Hull Campus, for recreational exercise or indoor sports, from five-aside football to fencing, surrounded by outdoor courts and playing fields; and there are discounted facilities in another modern sports centre five minutes from the Scarborough Campus, plus every kind of water sport, including the east coast’s best surfing.

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HULL AND REGION Hull, situated on the River Humber in the East Riding of Yorkshire, began to develop as Britain’s premier east-coast port in the 18th century and, historically, was well known only to those connected with the sea trade.

Today, with effective air, motorway and rail links to the rest of the UK, and its long-established connections with continental Europe, Hull is an attractive centre of commerce. It also offers all the amenities you would expect from England’s 10thlargest city. It has a wide variety of shops, many in spacious pedestrianised precincts.Three docks have been transformed: the first into Queens Gardens, a large park area; a second as the site for a shopping mall, Princes Quay; the third into a marina. There is plenty to do for entertainment in Hull. There are multiplex cinemas, art galleries, theatres with eclectic programmes, a tenpin bowling centre, an Olympic-standard ice arena, and many pubs, discos and restaurants.The City Hall acts as a venue for a wide variety of music, from classical to jazz and pop. For spectators there are the city’s two Super League rugby clubs, Hull City FC and the Hull Stingrays ice hockey, plus cricket, speedway, and events on the Humber Estuary. The Old Town of Hull is replete with museums and places of historical interest.The Maritime Museum holds many impressive relics of Hull’s seafaring past. Situated down the cobbled High Street are the East Riding Museum, the Transport Museum and Wilberforce House, birthplace of William Wilberforce, who led the successful campaign for the abolition of the slave trade. Hull’s newest and finest visitor attraction is The Deep, the world’s only ‘submarium’, housed in a spectacular riverside building close to the Old Town.

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Although a conurbation of some 250,000 people, Hull’s proximity to unspoiled countryside and the strikingly interesting coastline is one of its great natural attractions.To the north, the coastline culminates in the headlands at Flamborough, famous for their chalk cliffs, caves and rocky bays.To the east and in complete contrast, Spurn Point’s bird sanctuary fades into the Humber Estuary as a milelong spit of sand, rarely more than a few yards wide. Between these extremes lie three of the county’s main resorts: Withernsea, Hornsea and Bridlington, with its long sandy beaches and busy harbour. Stretching inland is the Plain of Holderness, rising gently to the North Wolds, characterised by rolling agricultural lands which shelter small villages and market towns. Five miles to the north of Hull is the market town of Beverley, with its beautiful 13th-century gothic Minster and its Westwood, a large area of ancient wood, pasture and common land which is the focus for more secular activities ranging from picnics to horse racing, from golf to winter sports. The nearby Humber Bridge is still arguably the world’s finest single-span suspension bridge and links the East Riding of Yorkshire with Lincolnshire. Forty miles south and down the A15 (still recognisably the route of Roman Ermine Street) is the equally historic city of Lincoln.

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SCARBOROUGH In a typical year the Borough of Scarborough, which includes the neighbouring resorts of Whitby and Filey, welcomes more than five million visitors. Only a minority of these are first-time visitors.

So what is it that brings so many people back to Scarborough year after year? When asked what they like about the place, tourists tend to cite the attractions of the seafront, the relaxing atmosphere, and the friendliness of the locals; but their loyalty may have something to do with the fact that Scarborough is, quite simply, one of the most beautiful seaside resorts in the country. Modern Scarborough is situated around the two magnificent bays whose sandy beaches are divided by a rocky headland. On this rugged promontory stand the remains of the formidable medieval castle; at its foot nestles an equally ancient harbour, where local fishermen still land their catch. Atop the cliffs which ring both bays are the decorous Georgian houses of the Old Town, the fine Victorian residences and the grand hotels. Ambitious Victorians were also responsible for the elegant Esplanade and the extravagant Spa Complex, not to mention the cliff lifts and the 400 acres of parks and gardens. While Scarborough is proud of its history and tradition – the famous Scarborough Fayre, for example, is still held annually – it has much more to offer. As well as the conventional pleasures of the seafront, locals and visitors alike enjoy an enormous range of social, cultural, sporting and leisure facilities.

You can see contemporary drama – including the premieres of Sir Alan Ayckbourn’s plays – at the Stephen Joseph Theatre.The prestigious National Student Drama Festival has its permanent home in Scarborough, so there is a whole week of fringe theatre every year.The town also offers plenty of opportunities to see the latest movie releases.You can sample the quieter pleasures offered by Scarborough’s various museums, galleries and workshops. On the other hand, you can avail yourself of some stimulating noise – in the form of pop, jazz, folk or country music – at one of the town’s discos, clubs and pubs. Musical and other entertainment is also on offer at the Spa Complex and at the Futurist Theatre (everything from pop music and ballet to alternative comedy). And if all these pleasures make you hungry, you can choose from a multitude of eateries and a cosmopolitan range of cuisines – including such truly exotic fare as fresh fish and chips and genuine Yorkshire puddings! Sporting and leisure opportunities are equally various.Things to do include surfing, fishing, water skiing, swimming, rowing, sailing, golf (sensible or crazy), bowling, tennis, and a choice of indoor sports, not to mention such tourist-oriented activities as pony or llama trekking and heritage walks.Things to watch include football, cricket (including the annual Cricket Festival) and motorcycle racing at Oliver’s Mount; Scarborough also hosts major hockey, yachting, bowls and golf events. If your idea of sport and leisure is shopping, you will not be disappointed by the town centre. Now largely pedestrianised, it accommodates all of the top high-street stores as well as a multitude of individual specialist shops. It is particularly well known for its second-hand bookshops.

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INITIAL TEACHER TRAINING FACILITIES IN HULL AND SCARBOROUGH The University’s Centre for Educational Studies conducts many of its activities in the Education Centre, which is physically part of the complex that also houses the Brynmor Jones Library. Staff and administrative rooms are located in the Wilberforce Building.

Facilities in the Education Centre include two laboratories and preparation rooms (constituting a Science Education Centre) and a Computer Suite specially equipped for the training of teachers. We also have an audiovisual room, a recording studio, a darkroom, and a variety of seminar rooms and classrooms. The Primary Centre is an area within the Education Centre set aside to simulate a primary school environment. Materials and resources, mainly for work in language and mathematics, are available here; but students also make use of other facilities within the building, such as the Primary Workshop, the Science Laboratory and the Computer Suite. The School of Education at Scarborough conducts its teaching in a variety of rooms. Some are equipped with the appropriate resources for numeracy, literacy, early years and practical workshops.There is a computer room specially equipped for the training of teachers. In addition, trainees have access to a well-resourced open-access IT area and another suite of computers which support the teaching of art. Science is taught mainly in special laboratories.

This pamphlet was written by staff involved in the University of Hull’s PGCE programmes. Another perspective is provided by the comments of students that you will find reproduced at various points through the following pages.The process begins here with the reflections of Alison Nash. After ten years of staying at home and being a mum, I decided that I needed to get back to work. However, I did not want to go back to working with the National Health Service and, having spent the last six years as a parent helper at my children’s primary school, I decided to train as a teacher.That decision instigated five long years of study which has almost ended: just nine weeks to the end of my PGCE at the University of Hull. Looking back, it has been a roller coaster ride, with many long nights hunched over books or the computer (and still a few more to come). Both the initial pre-course day and the first few weeks of term seem a very long time ago, and at the time were quite intimidating for someone who had been out of the workforce for a while. However, any fears dissipated once the timetable got into full swing, and I found that you could always turn to staff or students in times of need! The course has been intensive, but that’s because it has been so far-reaching and covered all aspects of the National Curriculum, including foundation subjects. Overall, the PGCE course at Hull has helped increase both my subject knowledge and my confidence in my own ability to teach. I look forward to my new career with enthusiasm, determination – and the knowledge that those long nights will continue for quite a while!

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THE POSTGRADUATE CERTIFICATE IN EDUCATION The Postgraduate Certificate in Education is an initial qualification in education for those who intend to make teaching a career. It is awarded to those graduates of an approved university (or those who hold an equivalent qualification) who satisfactorily complete the oneyear full-time programme.

The PGCE programme is available both at the main campus in Hull and at our campus in Scarborough, North Yorkshire. At the Scarborough Campus the programme is designed to prepare trainees to teach children aged 3–7.The Hull programme is designed to prepare trainees to teach children in either the 5–11 or the 11–18 age range.The PGCE is a broad programme, and has three main aims (the third of which underlies the other two): • to provide trainees with the information, knowledge and skills that will enable them to embark upon their teaching careers and take up their first teaching posts as effective teachers capable of teaching and assessing the National Curriculum • to develop professional interests in educational issues, as the basis for further thought or training • to aid the trainees’ own personal development in a critical year which bridges the gap between being a student, or doing some other form of work, and becoming a teacher

Carol Blake By a twist of fate I was accepted on the PGCE programme at Scarborough at the very last minute. Luckily for me, things could not have worked out better. I had just resigned from a career in IT in London at the tender age of twenty-five and a half, so coming to Scarborough could have been quite a wrench. However, thanks to the support of the staff and fellow PGCE trainees this year has flown by, and I can honestly say that I have thoroughly enjoyed it. Campus-based tutorials and lectures are always aimed at helping you to progress in your teaching style. In addition, there are plenty of practical activities to remind you what it is actually like to throw a clay pot or dress up as a singing flower. All of the staff are really friendly and approachable, offering assistance in matters ranging from lesson planning to providing that elusive golden egg for your classroom display. The first teaching practice is inevitably the most nerve-racking. However, you are paired with another trainee in the same class, so you can share the glory or embarrassment of any triumphs or mishaps. By the time the final teaching practice comes around, you are confident enough to relax and enjoy the experience. No matter what you have planned for the day, you can be sure that something or someone will surprise you. Rarely have I laughed as much as on this teaching practice. I did not realise that 8-year-old children have the capacity to be so unwittingly entertaining. I have now been offered a job in London and cannot believe that this course is nearly over. I now cannot imagine being in any other career than teaching. My only advice to people considering coming on this course is to buy a large jar of coffee, take out shares in a stationery company and go for it!

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EARLY YEARS PGCE PROGRAMME (Scarborough Campus) This is a 36-week programme focusing on the Foundation Stage and Key Stage 1 (3–7 years).The programme is designed so that trainees’ knowledge and understanding meet the standards set out in the Department for Children, Schools and Families document for the initial training of nursery and primary school teachers, Qualifying to Teach: Professional Standards for Qualified Teacher Status (2007).

All taught elements are planned to reflect the links between the University and schools.Teachers from partnership schools contribute to the planned and taught elements of the programme.They also act as Associate Tutors on the teaching practices and as mentors in schools.The build-up of responsibility in the classroom matches the staged University-based training, and there is continuous contact through the year with teachers and schools that are in partnership with the Scarborough School of Education. The integrated programme derives from the close study of the child as a developing individual and an interactive member of a group.There is considerable emphasis on developing skills in planning and assessing learning, and on the curriculum of the 3–7 age range. Emphasis is also placed on the quality of the classroom as a stimulating environment designed to accelerate learning and development. Trainees will encounter all areas of experience appropriate to Foundation Stage and Key Stage 1 curricula.There is a variety of teaching and learning strategies, including lectures, tutorials, practical workshops, group teaching experiences and staged teaching practices. Grounding is given in the full range of subjects comprising the Key Stage 1 Curriculum. Particular emphasis is placed on the core subjects, English, Mathematics, and Science plus ICT. Secondary courses in Art, Music and Religious Education are included in the programme. All other National Curriculum foundation subjects are provided as method courses and are also included as part of cross-curricular taught sessions, building on guidance in the Primary National Strategy and in ‘Excellence and Enjoyment’. The main components of the programme are • a subject specialist course in Advanced Early Years, including coverage of the Early Years Foundation Stage Curriculum, Every Child Matters, and Birth to 3 Matters

• core subjects: English (Communication, Language and Literacy), Mathematics, and Science plus ICT (Knowledge and Understanding of the World) • components covering the National Curriculum Programmes of Study for foundation subjects • an awareness-raising component detailing the expectations, typical curricula and teaching arrangements in the 0–3 age phase and Key Stage 2 • professional aspects of early years practice • child development and how young children learn • theory into practice, with core workshops focused on play or cross-curricular dimensions and themes • practical classroom experience, closely supervised by tutors and mentors Joanne Fisher I made a life-changing decision: I left my job to become a student once more. I was an economics graduate who after five years’ business experience felt there was something missing – job satisfaction! Previously when I had thought about teaching as a career, the idea of trying to interest unwilling teenagers in the subject of economics had been unappealing. However, I had always enjoyed teaching dance to young children, so I eventually decided that teaching this age group was the way to go. To gain relevant experience and qualifications I studied for a BTEC Diploma in Early Years, and was then accepted onto the PGCE Early Years course at Scarborough.There followed a year of intensive and incredibly hard work, including an exciting and challenging range of practical schoolbased experiences. A feature of the first term was a paired practice which allowed us to support each other through a somewhat daunting experience.The spring practice provided further valuable experience in a Hull nursery class, and the final ‘cherry on the cake’ was a wonderful placement with a Year 2 class in Scarborough. I still have fond memories of this, and it influenced my decision to apply for posts in Year 2. During the course I benefited from the support and encouragement of college tutors and experienced classroom practitioners. I have since returned twice to the Scarborough School of Education, to give presentations to current PGCE students about my NQT year and the joys, trials and tribulations of teaching in an inner-city school in Leeds.

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ADVANCED EARLY YEARS SPECIALIST SUBJECT COMPONENT All trainees are accepted onto the programme as Advanced Early Years specialists, which means that they must have had practical early years experience in nursery or primary schools and/or have completed an early childhood or similar degree. Taught aspects of the specialist subject component include such areas as child development, early years partnerships with health and social workers, working with parents and with teams of adults, debates around the importance of play, early years policies and practices (e.g. Sure Start), child profiling, establishing positive play environments and child inclusion/protection issues.

CORE SUBJECT COMPONENTS English The component equips trainees to show competence in teaching English (Communication, Language and Literacy) in the nursery, reception and Key Stage 1 in a variety of ways, taking into account different stages of children’s development and types of school. Particular emphasis is placed on the need to fulfil the requirements of the Foundation Stage Curriculum, the National Curriculum and the National Literacy Strategy (Primary National Strategy). The teaching and learning of reading skills is a central feature of the course.Trainees study strategies for developing children’s reading skills, and work with children in school under the direction of the class teacher, tutor or mentor.

Trainees examine methods relating to emergent reading and writing and to the teaching of spelling, grammar and punctuation, and look at ways of encouraging the development of children’s writing. Attention is also given to the essential area of speaking and listening. In their teaching practice schools, trainees undertake tasks related to reading, writing, and speaking and listening.They also undertake an in-depth study of approaches to teaching and assessing early literacy. It is a Training and Development Agency requirement that trainees should pass a national test in English during the PGCE year of study.This is independent of the programme assessments, although trainees are given some assistance in developing the knowledge and skills necessary to pass the test. Mathematics The component has two main aims: first, to increase trainees’ confidence with regard to their own mathematical ability, and, second, to provide trainees with the necessary knowledge, skills and understanding to teach mathematics effectively in the nursery and infant/primary school. Both of these aims are addressed by adopting a very practical ‘hands-on’ approach to mathematics: that is, trainees will spend much of their time engaged in a wide range of mathematical activities.These will cover all areas of the subject, but there will be a particular emphasis on numeracy.There will also be an examination of the theoretical basis upon which the various aspects of mathematics teaching are based, and there will be constant reference to research findings and recent HMI/Ofsted reports on the teaching of the subject. Contemporary developments, such as the use of computers and electronic calculators, will also be looked at in some detail. Trainees will be required to complete a number of coursework assignments, largely carried out in school.Trainees will also be continuously assessed throughout the course. It is a Training and Development Agency requirement that trainees should pass a national test in mathematics during the PGCE year of study.This is independent of the programme assessments, although trainees are given some assistance in developing the knowledge and skills necessary to pass the test.

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Science The main aim of the Science component is to produce teachers who are confident and competent in working with the Curriculum Guidance for the Foundation Stage (Knowledge and Understanding) and the National Curriculum in Science at Key Stage 1. The component seeks to develop trainees’ own knowledge and understanding of science through a study of the nature and processes of science as well as scientific concepts. In order to develop professional abilities within the classroom, there is an emphasis on the use of appropriate teaching strategies and styles as well as an introduction to a variety of resources, including ICT. Appropriate methods of classroom organisation are studied, along with how to provide for the individual needs of children. Practical investigations and discussions support more formal lectures. School-focused, directed tasks and associated wider reading are seen as important in structuring reflection on the nature of science and ways of teaching science in the nursery and infant school.

Mark Dyson An inspirational opening lecture to the Early Years PGCE course (Scarborough Campus) began, as all good lessons do, with a story! Here I was enthralled, listening to a children’s picture book appropriately entitled The Journey by Scott Mann and Neil Griffiths.The book provided the underlying theme for our first week of workshop activities and was carefully chosen as much for its content as for the hidden metaphor aptly summed up by the book’s blurb: ‘Follow the boat on its exciting voyage into the unknown and marvel at what lies at its journey’s end.’ From that moment, I realised that I too had embarked on a journey of self-discovery and wondered what lay ahead. Now I’ve been asked to say a few words about the course and myself, but with only 300 words available I can’t exactly do justice to the PGCE course.The Scarborough School of Education has a renowned reputation to uphold and in 2004 once again succeeded in impressing Ofsted. So what can I say? Well, as a former graphic designer I really do believe that pictures paint a thousand words, so I hope the photographs will serve to whet your appetite for the course; and as for me, well I’m delighted to be teaching in my NQT year with my Year 1 class in Beverley. I found the Early Years PGCE course extremely demanding of my ability and commitment, but with the infectious, enriching, friendly support of the tutors and partnership schools no stone is left unturned to equip you with the skills necessary to become a committed practitioner.Through a broad timetable, lecturers impart subject knowledge, lesson ideas and practical creative skills through workshops and field trips, together with theoretical lectures on the importance of learning thorough play, managing children’s behaviour and lesson planning.There are many laughs to be had along the way, from your first nerve-racking paired teaching practice in the autumn to the rapport of the children on your final practice. This course is demanding and may not be for the faint-hearted, but don’t be put off. My advice is: Go for it! Listen and react favourably to all advice given and don’t give up! You’ve chosen the right establishment: if the Early Years PGCE chooses you, they are going to make sure they do everything possible to provide you with every opportunity to succeed. My time was thoroughly enjoyable. I even bought the book, which I now read to my own class of Year 1 children as they embark on their own special journey.

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FOUNDATION SUBJECT COMPONENTS ICT This foundation subject, a key element of the National Curriculum, is afforded more time on the programme than other foundation subjects.The component has two main aims: first, to increase trainees’ confidence with regard to their own ICT ability, and, second, to provide trainees with the necessary knowledge, skills and understanding to teach ICT effectively in the nursery and infant/primary school. It is a Training and Development Agency requirement that trainees should pass a national test in ICT during the PGCE year of study.This is independent of the programme assessments, although trainees are given some assistance in developing the knowledge and skills necessary to pass this test successfully. Art The Art component aims to increase trainees’ confidence in teaching art across the Foundation Stage and Key Stage 1 age phases. Trainees are encouraged to explore the potential of a range of relevant media in both 2D and 3D (e.g. paint, pastels, chalk, inks, dyes, wax resist, ModRoc, textiles, clay and digital media).There are opportunities to learn about the visual language of art and to focus on art elements, such as colour, line, tone, texture, pattern, shape and form.Trainees are informed of the need to encourage young children to become avid noticers of such things as colour and pattern in the environment and of the importance of providing rich and stimulating experiences for young children.Trainees also study some well-known artists through the ages and from various cultures.

Music The component aims to involve all trainees in the musical activities that they can develop with young children.The underlying philosophy is that we, as adults, all use and need music from a variety of eras and cultures, and that music education should foster enjoyment and understanding in all of us.Trainees are encouraged to perceive sound as the start of music and to use it as a creative medium, developing skills and insights through a variety of activities and games. Songs and simple instruments also provide a foundation, and trainees should find opportunities to develop their enthusiasms and interests. Religious Education The RE component is designed to ensure that teachers can confidently deliver a modern religious education and considers both DCSF guidance and current legislation. The component gives trainees an outline of the major world faiths that they will encounter in schools and emphasises those aspects which are central to religious education.The component addresses methodological and resource matters, and the presentation of religious education in the classroom.There is a field trip to Bradford to visit places of worship, the Interfaith Centre and multicultural retail outlets. Physical Education This component examines all aspects of the National Curriculum PE Programmes of Study for Key Stage 1 and considers physical development as part of the Foundation Stage guidance. Trainees are taught skills and ideas for gymnastics, small apparatus, games, outdoor activities and dance work.They are expected to take part in the practical aspects of the course. History The aim is to enable trainees to understand the requirements of the Foundation Stage (Knowledge and Understanding) and Key Stage 1 curricula for History. The focus is on providing examples of activities and experience which will enhance children’s knowledge and understanding of chronology and of how history is represented and interpreted.Trainees are encouraged to find out about specific aspects of the past from a range of sources, such as clothing, toys, artefacts, pictures, photographs, buildings, historical sites and ICT.

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Geography The aim is to enable trainees to understand the requirements of the Foundation Stage (Knowledge and Understanding) and Key Stage 1 curricula for Geography. There is a focus on providing trainees with relevant practical and theoretical information that will support teaching within early years and Key Stage 1 settings. Safety factors to consider when organising and carrying out field trips and visits are also covered in this component. Design and Technology The aim is to provide trainees with the knowledge and skills necessary to ensure delivery of design and technology, as required by the Foundation Stage (Knowledge and Understanding) and the National Curriculum. The component is taught through practical workshops and guest speakers.Trainees are encouraged to develop their own skills through practical workshops concerned with construction, textiles and simple food preparation. Particular attention is paid to the need to ensure safe working conditions and the provision of appropriate resources.

PROFESSIONAL STUDIES COMPONENT Nursery, Reception and Key Stage 1 teachers need a knowledge and understanding of a wide range of general issues related to the profession, to children and to wider community concerns beyond the classroom.These are considered in professional studies lectures and individual tutorials and include areas such as classroom organisation and management; assessment; recording and reporting; Special Educational Needs; inclusion; and crosscurricular issues such as multicultural education. Many professional studies lectures are delivered by members of staff from partnership schools.

SCHOOL EXPERIENCE It is expected that trainees will have had at least two weeks’ school experience in the Foundation Stage or Key Stage 1 (or similar) prior to commencing the programme in September. From the third week of Phase I trainees start to make day visits (five in total) to their Autumn Attachment schools.This school experience will be in a nursery or Key Stage 1 classroom, and it is followed by a four-week block placement (Phase II) in the same school.Trainees carry out the planning and teaching in pairs, and the focus is on group teaching in the core subjects and ICT.

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In Phase III trainees carry out a teaching practice of six weeks in a Foundation Stage or Key Stage 1 classroom. In Phase V trainees carry out a final teaching practice of seven weeks. If they taught at the Foundation Stage in Phase III, they will now teach at Key Stage 1, and vice versa. All placements are carried out in different schools, and the aim is to provide a breadth of experience across the Foundation Stage and Key Stage 1. In all, some 18 weeks are spent in schools during the programme, and this work is supported by school mentors, class teachers and University-based Associate Tutors.

PROGRAMME ASSESSMENT The programme is assessed in both its theoretical and its practical aspects. Assessment of theory is based on a series of coursework assignments, and assessment of practice takes place in schools by means of a Teaching Development Profile. The first theoretical assignment is focused on early years practice and relates to the value of play in early education.The second relates to successful management of children’s behaviour and involves a synthesis of school experience and required reading. The third is a child study based on a child from the spring practice experience. From successful completion of the first three theoretical essays, 60 credits at Level 7 can be transferred towards the 180-credit Hull Masters programme (MEd).The fourth and final assignment (Level 6) is focused on the core subject areas of English, maths and science and is related to practical directed tasks carried out in school and at the University. Assessment of teaching ability is based on performance as a teacher in the classroom.Trainees should regard teaching practice as a period of professional development, but certain requirements must be satisfied for the award of Qualified Teacher Status. School mentors, University tutors and external examiners are involved in making this decision. A trainee who fails to satisfy the examiners in practical teaching may have to bear the cost of reexamination.

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EARLY YEARS PGCE OUTLINE Illustrative example

PHASE I

PHASE II

PHASE III

WEEKS 1–7 (AUTUMN TERM)

WEEKS 8–13 (AUTUMN TERM)

WEEKS 14–20 (SPRING TERM)

Phase contents An induction week followed by five one-day visits to School 1 and a focus on the Foundation Stage Curriculum.

Phase contents Four-week block in School 1. Two weeks in the University undertaking evaluation and preparation for medium-term planning.

Phase contents One-day visit to School 2 followed by a block of six weeks in School 2 and an evaluation period of one week in the University.

One-day visit to School 2.

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PHASE IV

PHASE V

PHASE VI

WEEKS 21–25 (SPRING TERM)

WEEKS 26–35 (SUMMER TERM)

WEEK 36 (SUMMER TERM)

Phase contents Focus on professional and cross-curricular issues in the University.

Phase contents One week’s preparation in School 3 followed by two weeks in the University, then a seven-week placement in school.

Phase contents Special programme preparing trainees for their first teaching posts.

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PRIMARY PGCE PROGRAMME (Hull Campus) This programme is designed to prepare trainees for teaching children in the 5–11 age range. Only about 80 places are available for this very popular programme, so you are advised to apply early and to put Hull first on the application form. Please see ‘Application Procedure’, page 27.

We are particularly interested in applicants who have good Honours degrees. Preference is given to applicants who can show experience of work with children, especially recent work in primary schools, and can demonstrate a commitment to primary education. All courses of initial teacher training for primary teachers are designed to enable trainees to meet the revised Professional Standards for Qualified Teacher Status. A close partnership with schools in the region is well established, and there is significant involvement of practising teachers in the training process.The programme involves an interplay of work in schools and at the University. A foundation is given in the full range of subjects comprising the primary school curriculum. Particular emphasis is placed on the core subjects – English, Mathematics and Science – but all National Curriculum foundation subjects and Religious Education are covered in separate method courses. The main components of the programme are • methodology courses in the subjects of the primary curriculum, emphasising particularly the core subjects – English, Mathematics and Science • a professional studies course concerned with general professional issues • tutorial studies related to the course • a subject specialist course – we are one of the few HEIs to offer French and German in addition to other National Curriculum subjects, and some trainees undertake a teaching practice in France and/or Germany • practical classroom experience, closely supervised by tutors and mentors • placements in three different schools These components are detailed on the following pages.

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Louise Tullock I started thinking about a change of career to teaching after 15 years in public libraries, where I had found working with children a very rewarding experience. When my daughter went to pre-school, I decided to work as a volunteer in a reception class and take a job in a local homework club, in order to help me make up my mind if teaching could be the new career I was looking for. As I loved both experiences, I took the plunge and applied for entry to the PGCE in Hull. As a mature student with a young child who needs my time and attention as well, I have found it a hard year, and have needed to be well organised and focused in order to keep on top of the very demanding workload. However, as I come to the end of the course, I am certain that I have made the right decision and that the hard work has all been worth it, as I look for my first teaching post. I have had a very positive and happy experience of the classroom environment on teaching practice, and have worked with wonderfully supportive classroom teachers who have motivated and inspired me.The taught element of the PGCE strikes a good balance between academic work, providing subject knowledge across the curriculum, and lots of practical advice on how to develop teaching skills. The teaching in the core subjects has been excellent. In Mathematics, in particular, I have developed the knowledge and confidence to enjoy teaching a subject which I have hardly thought about since leaving school over 25 years ago. The year has flown by incredibly quickly, and I have experienced a great deal in a very short time. I am now looking forward to moving on to the next stage!

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CORE SUBJECTS English The course equips trainees to show competence in teaching English in the nursery and primary school in a variety of ways, taking into account different stages of children’s development and types of school. Particular emphasis is placed on the need to fulfil the requirements of the Foundation Stage Curriculum, the National Curriculum and the Primary National Strategy. Some of the weekly English sessions take place in a local school and include small-group work with children which involves putting into practice the theoretical element of the course. The teaching and learning of reading is a central feature of the course.Trainees not only study strategies for developing children’s reading skills, but also work with children in school under the direction of the tutor. Trainees examine methods relating to emergent reading and writing and to the teaching of spelling, grammar and punctuation, and look at ways of encouraging the development of children’s writing. Attention is also given to the essential area of speaking and listening. In their teaching practice schools, trainees undertake tasks related to reading, writing, and speaking and listening.They also undertake an in-depth study of approaches to teaching and assessing reading and produce an assignment showing how they would like to organise reading in their classrooms. Mathematics The course has two main aims: first, to increase trainees’ levels of confidence with regard to their own mathematical ability, and, second, to provide trainees with the necessary knowledge, skills and understanding to teach mathematics effectively in the primary school. Both of these aims are addressed by adopting a very practical ‘hands-on’ approach to mathematics: that is, trainees will spend much of their time engaged in a wide range of mathematical activities.These will cover all areas of the subject, but there will be a particular emphasis on numeracy. There will also be an examination of the theoretical basis upon which the various aspects of mathematics teaching are based, and there will be constant reference to research findings and recent HMI/Ofsted reports on the teaching of the subject. Contemporary developments, such as the use of computers and electronic calculators, will also be looked at in some detail. 14

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Trainees will be required to complete a number of coursework assignments.These will be largely school-based and will involve the designing, planning, preparation and teaching of various mathematical activities as well as some reflection on and analysis of the adopted approaches. Some teaching sessions take place in local schools. Science The main aim is to produce teachers who are confident and competent in working with the Early Years Curriculum and the National Curriculum in Science at Key Stages 1 and 2.This is done in a number of ways. First, the course seeks to develop trainees’ own knowledge and understanding of science through a study of the nature and processes of science as well as scientific concepts. In order to develop professional abilities within the classroom, there is an emphasis on the use of appropriate teaching strategies and styles as well as an introduction to a variety of resources, including ICT. Appropriate methods of classroom organisation are studied, along with how to provide for the individual needs of children. Science is also studied in relation to other curriculum areas and to broader issues too, including monitoring and assessment. School-focused assignments and associated wider reading are seen as important in structuring reflection on the nature of science and ways of teaching science in the primary school. Trainees are treated as adult learners with welldeveloped study skills and with specialist knowledge in their own degree areas.This variety of skills, knowledge and experience is a strength and is used within the course to promote discussion and learning in small groups.

FOUNDATION SUBJECTS Art The purpose of the art methodology part of the 5–11 Primary programme is to increase awareness of, and response to, our own surroundings, the wider world, and all aspects of art, craft and design. By asking the basic question ‘Why Art?’, and through practical activities, participants explore the development of children’s and our own innate creative abilities.They also study some aspects of art and artists through the ages from various cultures.

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Kerry James I studied the Primary PGCE course at the University of Hull six years after graduating, and I wish I had done it sooner! The course at Hull was superb.The balance of academic research, practical-based workshops and various teaching practices fully equipped me for teaching. The PGCE has allowed me to go into the most wonderful career there is – teaching! Every day in teaching is challenging, rewarding and different, which I do not believe could be the case in any other job. I was so inspired by the University of Hull and the study I undertook that I am now studying for a Masters degree in Educational Studies.

By increasing our powers of observation, we can stimulate our curiosity, we can explore and learn the visual language, and we can express our feelings and emotions, thereby learning to value our own judgement and gaining in confidence. Opportunity is provided for experimentation with a wide range of techniques. A working environment is created where trainees feel free to try out ideas and methods and where they can enjoy participating in an activity which helps them to develop the skills and confidence needed to transfer this philosophy and methodology to the primary classroom. Design and Technology The aim is to provide participants with the skills, knowledge and understanding necessary to ensure delivery of design and technology, as required by the National Curriculum.The course is taught through practical workshops. Trainees are encouraged to develop their own skills through practical workshops concerned with construction, textiles and food. Attention is given to organisational issues particular to design and technology, such as the need to ensure safe working conditions and ways of providing suitable resources. The objectives of design and technology are considered in the context of developing suitable approaches to planning lessons, assessing pupils’ work and keeping appropriate records. Geography The course introduces National Curriculum requirements and offers suggestions for practical work in schools. Current primary practice usually places geography within broad-based approaches to curriculum, so there is some consideration of ‘topics’. Statutory Orders require pupils to be introduced to a range of themes and places. By means of first-hand experience and the use of secondary sources, the skills of field work and map understanding have to be integrated with these studies. The course consists of half-day sessions within which there is usually lecture input followed by practical work in groups. Practical work in schools varies considerably according to the school’s locality and its approach to curriculum. Immediately prior to teaching practices, therefore, consideration of trainees’ needs in relation to this area of the curriculum tends to be on an individual basis.

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History The aim of the course is to enable both history specialists and non-specialist primary trainees to understand the requirements of National Curriculum History at Key Stages 1 and 2. Statutory Orders require pupils to work on historical material drawn from a range of historical periods and to develop historical skills through the study of evidence, differing interpretations and major concepts such as similarity, continuity and difference.The course focuses on enhancing subject knowledge, developing teaching approaches and designing resources. Sessions are practically based and are complemented by speakers and visits to local resource centres. Information and Communication Technology ICT is one of the foundation subjects but, because of its importance across the primary curriculum, is afforded greater time on the course than history, geography, music, art, etc.Trainees are provided with sessions which focus on the development of their own ICT skills as well as the pedagogical issues associated with teaching of ICT in the primary school and the use of ICT by teachers and pupils across the curriculum.There is a strong emphasis on practical activities involving the use of computers, interactive whiteboards, data-logging equipment, and so on. Modern Foreign Languages Twenty places on the 5–11 programme are set aside for MFL specialists.These trainees will take an MFL course in addition to the PGCE, and this will involve attendance at workshops as well as a placement in a school in France or Germany. Applicants must have at least A level or equivalent in French or German or good experience of one of the languages. Music The course aims to involve all trainees in the musical activities that they can develop with children.The underlying philosophy is that we, as adults, all use and need music, and that music education should foster enjoyment and understanding in all of us, although some children will go further, learning to play instruments or even compose. Trainees are encouraged to perceive sound as the start of music and to use it as a creative medium, developing skills and insights through a variety of activities and games. Songs and simple instruments also provide a foundation, and trainees should find opportunities to develop their enthusiasms and interests.

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As trainees develop their practice in the classroom context, music from a range of cultures is used for performing and listening and as a stimulus for children’s compositions. Physical Education The course examines all aspects of the National Curriculum for PE. Activity areas include gymnastics, games, dance, athletic activities, outdoor and adventure activities, and swimming. During the course, teaching approaches, teaching skills and ideas for cross-curricular links are covered, particularly in the area of health and physical education.Trainees are expected to take part in the practical aspects of the course. Religious Education This course is designed to ensure that teachers can confidently deliver a modern religious education. It begins by analysing the recent legislation and DCSF guidance which governs this subject.The problems and opportunities arising from the legal framework are examined. Attention is given to collective worship in schools, and there is discussion of the ways in which it can be implemented.The spiritual dimension of education and its relation to the moral and religious development of children are important themes of the course. The course gives trainees an outline of the major world faiths that they will encounter in schools and emphasises those aspects which are central to religious education. It addresses methodological and resource matters, and the presentation of religious education in the classroom.The programme incorporates a field trip to Bradford to visit places of worship, the Interfaith Centre and places of cultural interest.

SUBJECT SPECIALIST COURSE French and German are offered as specialist subjects. Trainees who have at least A level or equivalent qualifications in French or German, or who have a degree in Modern Foreign Languages, undertake a course which develops their skills and their ability to teach French or German. Part of the course involves a four-week placement in a French or German school with a link to a French or German university. Travel and accommodation costs are met for the trainee, and a reciprocal arrangement exists for trainees in France or Germany.

SCHOOL EXPERIENCE The programme gives classroom experience throughout.The first block period in school takes place early in the programme, when all trainees are involved with Key Stage 1 children (5–7). Later, two further block periods in separate schools complement your initial classroom practice by enabling you to come into contact with the complete primary age range. Each of the main teaching practices is preceded by serial visits to schools on a weekly basis so that trainees become familiar with the classes they will teach and have the opportunity to be involved in core-subject lessons. In all, more than 100 days are spent in schools, and work is supported by both school mentors and University tutors.

PROGRAMME ASSESSMENT The programme is assessed in both its theoretical and its practical aspects. Assessment of theory is based on a series of coursework assignments.There are three separate methodology assignments, one for each core subject.The last piece of assessed work is related to themes presented in the professional studies course.Trainees are also assessed on their achievement of the standards for Qualified Teacher Status (QTS) provided by the Government.

PROFESSIONAL STUDIES COURSE Primary teachers need an understanding of a wide range of general issues related to the profession, to children and to the world beyond the classroom. These are considered in a lecture course and its associated tutorial sessions.Topics covered include child development; the school and the community; classroom organisation and management; assessment; researching and reporting; and cross-curricular issues such as multicultural education and environmental education.

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Assessment of teaching ability is based on the trainee’s performance as a teacher in the classroom. Trainees should regard teaching practice as a period of professional development rather than as a test to be passed, but certain requirements must be satisfied for the award of QTS. Schools, mentors, University tutors and an external examiner or assessor are involved in making this decision. A trainee who fails to satisfy the examiners in practical teaching may have to bear the cost of reexamination, including the cost of an additional school placement and supervision.

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PRIMARY PGCE YEAR OUTLINE Illustrative example

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PHASE I

PHASE II

PHASE III

WEEKS 1–8 (Beginning in September)

WEEKS 9–11 (Early November)

WEEKS 12–15 (Late November to early December)

Phase contents An induction week followed seven weeks in the University, including four days’ observation in School 1.

Phase contents Three weeks in school at Key Stage 1.

Phase contents Four weeks in the University with one day each week spent in School 2 undertaking schoolbased assignments and preparing for school practice.

PHASE IV

PHASE V

PHASE VI

WEEKS 16–22 (Beginning in January)

WEEKS 23–29 (End of February to April)

WEEK 30–38 (End of April to June)

Phase contents Seven weeks of school practice in School 2. For MFL specialists this will be in France or Germany.

Phase contents Seven weeks in the University with one day each week spent in School 3 preparing for school practice.

Phase contents Nine weeks of school practice in School 3.

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SECONDARY PGCE PROGRAMME The Secondary PGCE programme, based at the Hull Campus, is intended for those who will teach in the 11–18 age range and is delivered by the University together with a group of partner schools. At present there are more than 70 such schools.

Trainees spend one-third of their training time at the University and the other two-thirds in two partner schools. At Hull we have always worked with a group of schools spread over a wide geographical area and in several local authorities.This gives us considerable opportunities to make trainee placements in a wide variety of school types: urban or rural, large or small, comprehensive or selective, denominational, county, grant-maintained or independent. The training programme has been carefully constructed by tutors working in very close collaboration with colleagues in schools. In each partner school, trainees are supported by a senior member of the school staff, the ‘coordinator’, and in their subject work by a ‘mentor’, as well as being visited and supported by tutors from the University. Trainees are expected to consider carefully the links between the different elements of the course: • principles and contexts of teaching and learning • subject-based work • practical classroom experience These core components are detailed below.

PRINCIPLES AND CONTEXTS OF TEACHING AND LEARNING The Foundation in Professional Studies course is the core element of the PGCE programme, with a weekly focus on a theme which underpins the trainee’s work both in school and at the University. Each week the theme is introduced in a lecture attended by all trainees, and it is developed further in seminars facilitated by the PGCE tutors.The same theme is echoed in subject work and in school later the same week.Thus links are made between theory and practice throughout the programme.

Richard Turner The PGCE is like no other course at university. Gone are the late nights drinking, the waking up and contemplating whether to go to a lecture or not.You have no choice … This is real work! This is not designed to put you off – far from it. The PGCE at Hull is one of the most rewarding and challenging courses to undertake.The major appeal of the Hull course is that it offers a wide range of school experiences, something which I know is highly regarded by employers. During my year I attended some wonderful schools with teachers whose enthusiasm and dedication were infectious. I felt at ease in every school and was treated as a member of the team. The course combines practical and theoretical aspects of teaching, with various lecturers who are all experts in their fields.They impart knowledge, practical tips, lesson ideas, support (emotional as well as academic), management techniques – everything an ‘up-and-coming’ teacher would want. I gained a great deal from the Hull PGCE – a job, for a start! It presented opportunities to improve my teaching and organisational skills as well as develop confidence within the classroom and in my own abilities.

A significant strength of the FiPS course is the way it allows trainees with varying subject backgrounds to discuss their learning around these issues and relate it to their experiences in school.

This FiPS element of the programme assists trainees to develop their professional knowledge of key issues affecting pupils’ learning and the school, including cognition and learning, emotional and social development, communication and building relationships, and managing learning and behaviour.

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SUBJECT-BASED WORK Business Studies The course prepares trainees to become competent and confident practitioners, able to teach a range of business-related courses across the 14–18 age range. Competence and confidence are gained through a range of planned experiences both within the University and in two different school placements. These are designed to develop trainees’ ability to • extend and reinforce their own knowledge of business education so that they can use it effectively to develop pupils’ learning and achievement • plan lessons appropriate to the particular course or scheme of work and the individual pupils • deliver lessons which achieve an appropriate level of challenge and stimulation based on the setting of suitable learning outcomes and the selection and execution of a variety of teaching and learning strategies • understand and use a range of assessment strategies both to support and to monitor pupils’ achievements • achieve purposeful learning environments through the setting of high expectations, positive relationships and well-organised use of time and resources • make an effective contribution to the work of colleagues within school Successful trainees, therefore, show that they have achieved the professional standards which relate to • Professional Attributes and Skills • Subject and Curriculum Knowledge • Teaching and Learning The two placement schools ensure that trainees gain experience of teaching at Key Stages 3 and 4, as well as post-16 level. Although the outcome of the course is that trainees achieve competence in business education, timetables during school placements will usually involve the teaching of at least one other subject, usually at Key Stage 3.The most common additional subject is IT-related, and many Business Studies vacancies nowadays are combined with the teaching of IT or ICT. Assessment of trainees is mainly based on teaching performance in the two placement schools. Written assignments related to the professional standards and relevant to teacher understanding and practice are also included.

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Among other things, University and school subject method sessions will focus on • good practice in lesson planning • strategies for effective class management • awarding body subject specifications for business education courses at GCSE, AS, A2, Diploma and Advanced Vocational Certificate of Education levels • components of the National Curriculum in the context of the national qualifications framework • learning and teaching theories and strategies, including good practice in identifying and meeting the needs of individual pupils • use of audiovisual aids, including ICT, to promote learning and understanding • the contributions that business education can make to Education for Citizenship and Democracy • assessment strategies Where appropriate, these and other sessions will encourage trainees to enhance their subject-specific knowledge and their ability to teach the subject at different levels. Complementing the subject-specific sessions in the University, the generic Foundation sessions help trainees to achieve an understanding of the wider context within which their teaching takes place during their PGCE year and later. Trainees typically find the course hard work, with many demanding elements. However, with few exceptions, it is seen as a rewarding and – importantly – a successful experience which leads not only to personal fulfilment but to a new career. English The course prepares trainees to be English subject specialists across the 11–18 ability range and assumes that applicants have a high degree of vocational motivation as well as strengths in the academic fields of English language and literature. Trainees are given a thorough grounding in the requirements of the National Curriculum, and in the practical classroom strategies essential for turning it into a stimulating and developmental experience. There is a strong emphasis on trainees’ individual creativity in developing learning resources, and scope for additional specialisation in areas where trainees have personal interests, such as drama, media studies or teenage fiction.

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The two teaching practice placements offer experience of working in different kinds of schools, urban and rural, 11–16 and 11–18, mixed-ability and setted.Trainees are able at the end of the course to make informed judgements as a result of working to a distinct English department ethos in each of the schools.The schools themselves are enthusiastic about welcoming new colleagues, and committed to offering structured and supportive professional development to trainees. Assessment is mainly based on teaching performance in the placement schools. Written assignments are classroom-related tasks which are relevant to work on practice: for example, preparing learning materials and working with individuals to develop writing skills. The course places a heavy emphasis on the requirements of GCSE course planning and assessment, and on increasing trainees’ grammatical confidence and awareness. Work on Shakespeare involves collaborative practical sessions and an approach to playtexts as enjoyable, popular performance material needing interactive classroom activities. The record of employment from the course is excellent, locally and nationally.Typically, trainees find the PGCE year much more demanding than the degree finals year, but also more rewarding as knowledge, experience, energy, humour and sheer will power come together to make small parts of the world, for a short time at least, better places.

Geography The main aim of the course is to help prepare you to become a competent teacher of geography at secondary level.This is a process that began when you achieved graduate status in the subject and will continue throughout your career as a teacher. In short, the experiences of the year will help convert geographers into geography teachers.The course concentrates on the teaching of 11–16-year-olds, but part of it extends your studies/experience to cover preparation for post-16 teaching.The core areas of the course concentrate on • • • •

geography in the National Curriculum teaching children of all abilities assessment and examinations planning, preparing, delivering and evaluating geography lessons • field work, including visits • the use of ICT in the production of teaching materials, teaching and administration Most sessions involve practical work. A wide range of teaching methodologies are developed and evaluated during the course. Carefully developed over recent years, the geography course was described by our external examiner as providing a ‘first-rate experience’ for our students. History The aim of the history course is to provide a comprehensive and supportive programme of initial teacher training for the secondary phase as a sound basis for future career development.The intention is not to be prescriptive but rather to allow you to make informed judgments, and to develop your selfconfidence in approaching the teaching of history. Learning is by means of small informal groups, with an emphasis on teamwork and practical participation. The content of each session reflects the overall weekly theme of the PGCE programme, aspects of the teaching of history, and the needs of individual trainees. Session topics include • the National Curriculum, focusing on issues of historical knowledge, understanding and skills • assessment • examinations • teaching and learning styles • information technology • work on local history

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Mathematics enhancement course A six-month mathematics enhancement course, running from January to June, is available for graduates with a degree in a subject other than mathematics who wish to train as a secondary school mathematics teacher. Applicants should have an A level (or equivalent) in mathematics.This course is open to those wishing to apply for a place on our one-year PGCE course. It is also open to others who are accepted for an initial teacher training course elsewhere and who are referred to our enhancement course. Further details can be found on our website at ces.hull.ac.uk/courses/mat hematics.

Practical guidance is given in classroom management, the use of educational technology and resource selection. Site visits are made to explore educational opportunities in the local community and further afield.The course is further enriched by visiting speakers.

projector, DVD and satellite television, and reprographics.These tasks are followed up in schoolbased work under the direction of a mentor supported by the resources and facilities available in our modern languages studio and the Open Learning Centre in the University’s Language Institute.

Mathematics We aim to encourage trainees to reflect on the role of the mathematics teacher and the place of mathematics in the school curriculum by seeking to develop

Extensive MFL-specific interactive whiteboard training allows trainees to develop their skills and leads to an accredited award, which has helped trainees gain posts in school.

• confidence in their own mathematical powers, together with a good knowledge and understanding of school mathematics • an awareness of how children learn and the need for active involvement through discussion, practical work, problem solving and investigative approaches • familiarity with a wide range of resources, including calculators and computers • the ability to plan and use a variety of classroom approaches, taking into account the varying needs of different children, links with other subjects, and the importance of good classroom management • a knowledge of the requirements of the National Curriculum, the Key Stage 3 National Strategy, GCSE and A level, and familiarity with various modes of assessment Further details can be found on our website at www.hull.ac.uk/ces/courses/mathematics. Modern Foreign Languages We welcome both UK trainees and trainees from Europe and further afield. From the outset, work is centred on the practical skills and techniques necessary for successful language teaching.The course seeks to establish what is involved in secondlanguage learning and to review critically the various approaches, methods, techniques and materials used in the teaching of foreign languages within the context of secondary schools, curricula and examinations. Examples of methodology range from lively oral practice supported by interactive whiteboard, overhead projector, flashcards and games for beginners to the exploitation of topicbased and literary texts at sixth-form level. In a friendly and cooperative environment, we aim to provide a stimulating, practical preparation for trainee teachers wishing to become effective and reflective practitioners. Practical work in small groups equips trainees to prepare their own teaching materials and to use a variety of teaching aids, including the interactive whiteboard, computers, the overhead

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Trainee learning experiences, both in the University and in partnership schools, are planned to form a coherent whole, with University tutors and school mentors working in close liaison. We prepare trainees to teach their main language to A level and often a second language to a lower standard. We also have places for single linguists.

What Ofsted and external examiners say Ofsted reported that the MFL training ‘forms a coherent whole’ and found the University-based course to be ‘a very good example of what can be provided, in the time available, to turn foreign language graduates into teachers of modern foreign languages in schools’. Course documentation provided for trainees was found to be ‘particularly stimulating and informative’. School mentors, it was reported, ‘all feel very well supported by the University tutors, with whom they plainly enjoy an excellent professional relationship’. In 2003 the external examiner found the course ‘from all perspectives … well conceived and managed’. In 2006 the external examiner found the MFL PGCE to be a ‘very good course’ with the trainees ‘well taught and well supported’.The quality of student support was highlighted as a real strength, along with a very high-quality handbook. Feedback on written work was described as ‘a model of good practice’. Concerning the French Extension Course, the examiner commented: ‘Trainees who have taken part … continue to benefit from the positive impact that three months’ intensive language learning modelled on good practice in secondary education has on beginning teachers.Their peers also benefit via the sharing of their knowledge and experiences.’ The external examiner also noted ‘rave reviews’ from trainees from the extension course and remarked on its being ‘invaluable in relation to job opportunities’. Postgraduate Certificate in Education

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French, German and Spanish are offered as both main and subsidiary languages. Early application is advised for Spanish places, which are highly oversubscribed. For Spanish or German trainees unable to offer French to at least beginners, we offer a 15-week intensive French Extension Course prior to the PGCE on behalf of the Training and

For further information, visit www.hull.ac.uk/ces.

French Extension Course About the course The University of Hull was selected by the Teacher Training Agency to offer a French extension course for applicants to MFL teacher training based on our highly successful national pilot.This course provides an excellent opportunity for graduate linguists with little or no French to undertake a tailor-made intensive course in French before beginning initial teacher training.Those who complete it are able to teach French to children in the secondary phase to Key Stage 3 and beyond, which significantly increases employment potential.

the French Extension Course are interviewed for both courses at the same time. Places are limited to 20.

The course runs between June and the end of August, with a two-week ab initio course for those with no (or virtually no) French in May.

The following comments were made by participants after their return from La Rochelle:’Thanks for giving us the opportunity to study French in such a great and unique way’; ‘It was an amazing experience and we all gained so much’; ‘It was two of the best weeks of my life – we really appreciate it!’

There are four hours of taught sessions in the mornings, followed by directed and self-directed study with a high level of individual support.Tutors have experience of teaching French in secondary schools and utilise stimulating material written specifically for adult learners on this course. Participants are taught using an interactive whiteboard and have access to excellent facilities in the Open Learning Centre. Assessment Participants must complete the course satisfactorily before they can proceed to teacher training.This includes attendance at all sessions, the study visit, completion of work and a portfolio. Funding Participants will receive a bursary of £225 per week and funding for a compulsory two-week tailor-made study visit to France, hosted in July by the Tourist Office in La Rochelle with the assistance of a tutor from Hull. Applications Participants should first gain a place on an MFL teacher training course via the GTTR.They should indicate their request to be considered for the extension course in their supporting statement. Applicants for the Hull PGCE who are interested in 22

Development Agency.This enables single linguists in German and Spanish to learn French and is funded in terms of course fees and a weekly bursary of £225.

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What the students say ‘The course was well planned, well executed and brilliantly taught.The study visit was also invaluable to my learning and confidence.Thank you!’ ‘This course has opened my eyes to French culture and the French way of life.This is mainly thanks to the La Rochelle visit. I am confident that I can teach French to Key Stage 4.’

Comments from the course examiner ‘Whilst a lot of ground is covered in the lessons, and they are always purposeful in tone, it should be noted that they are also extremely enjoyable.The unthreatening, good-humoured atmosphere of the lessons encourages all participants to take part, whatever their prior level of attainment, and makes a significant contribution to the progress they make. ‘The course continues to be a successful, high-quality programme that is making an important contribution towards increasing the available pool of well-qualified modern language teachers. It is by now a smoothly organised programme that has developed well. Evidence gained from follow-up visits to see former participants teaching confirms the success of the course and the fact that even participants who had been virtually complete beginners can become successful and confident teachers of French to at least Key Stage 3 level, and in some cases to levels beyond this.’ Chris Clarke, External Examiner and former HMI For further information, visit www.hull.ac.uk/ces.

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Religious Education This course develops trainees’ understanding of religious education and supports their development as teachers. RE itself aims to develop a critical understanding of the religious and moral dimensions of human experience, and a deeper understanding of religion as opposed to uninformed bias and prejudice. A great deal of work focuses on Buddhism, Christianity, Hinduism, humanism, Islam, Judaism and Sikhism.Topics cover the whole world’s history and culture, ranging from issues of meaning (when does a mundane object become regarded as special or even sacred?), through issues of justice (why should teachers – or politicians – be fair?), to life and death issues (what do pupils think happens when they die?). RE is therefore a dynamic subject within the school curriculum, and it is taught with tremendous skill and enthusiasm in this region. Pupils encounter the beliefs and practices of individuals and communities, and they are challenged to reflect on moral issues and questions of meaning and purpose. Such encounters and challenges are crucial in a multi-faith and multicultural world, and are essential to the development of every individual person. RE does not seek to impose religious beliefs on pupils or compromise the integrity of their own beliefs by promoting one religion or world-view over another.The same goes for RE teachers.The subject is enjoyable and fulfilling, again for both pupils and teachers. The RE programme enables you to • consider the principles, issues and controversies related to RE in the school curriculum • relate RE to moral, personal and social education, and to spiritual development • become skilled in using a range of resources for good RE teaching (videos, books, artefacts, music, information technology) • develop the practice of planning, delivering and assessing RE lessons • explore the implications of recent legislation for RE teaching • investigate GCSE and A level teaching in the subject • visit and use religious centres (communities and sacred places) in the region and beyond • work closely in a supportive, friendly team with other trainee teachers, and past and future trainees

www.hull.ac.uk

Science (with Biology or Chemistry or Physics) The course equips trainees to teach science in the 11–16 age range and a science specialism post-16. During the autumn term, the focus is on the structure and content of science in the National Curriculum. Method work in the Science Education Centre deals with lesson planning; resourcing lessons; organising safe, investigative teaching; matching work to different abilities; and management and assessment of pupils. Experience in the principles and practice of science teaching is extended by exploring some of the main areas of the programmes of study of the National Curriculum. Workshop activities, seminars and laboratory practical work are designed to identify key ideas, to decide how these may be approached in school, and to consider some of the conceptual and organisational barriers which may be encountered. The programme also deals with teaching a specialist science post-16.There are opportunities to work with students in local sixth forms, though the nature of these contacts varies from subject to subject.

PRACTICAL CLASSROOM EXPERIENCE All trainees have two school placements and teach in two schools. Each teaching block is 8–9 weeks in length and is preceded by a developmental phase of structured preparation. In Phase II this involves observing experienced teachers working with individual pupils, working with groups of pupils, team teaching, and eventually taking responsibility for whole lessons.Trainees are advised and guided by their subject mentors in schools and observed teaching by University method tutors. Each trainee has a teaching profile document in which they and their mentors record their developing competencies. This document is formative in that trainees use it throughout their training. It also contains two summative sections for completion at the end of each major period of teaching.

ASSESSMENT To qualify for a Postgraduate Certificate, the candidate must satisfy the examiners in the practice of teaching and the professional elements of the course. Assessment of practical teaching is based on evaluations by University staff, by teachers in partner schools and, for a sample of trainees, by external examiners. As well as being required to demonstrate practical proficiency, trainees are assessed by essays, projects and the preparation of teaching materials. Candidates completing the programme successfully will be awarded 60 credits at Masters level.

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SECONDARY PGCE YEAR OUTLINE Illustrative example

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PHASE I

PHASE II

PHASE III

WEEKS 1–3

WEEKS 4–11

WEEKS 12–19

Phase contents Induction.Ten days in University plus five days in School 1.

Phase contents Eight weeks of joint preparation for teaching.Trainees spend three days per week in University plus two in schools. Each week activity is underpinned by a focus theme.

Phase contents Eight weeks of teaching experience in School 1, with two weeks’ break at Christmas.

PHASE IV

PHASE V

WEEKS 20–25

WEEKS 26–36

Phase contents Six weeks spent in University, with three days in School 2 in each of Weeks 23–26.

Phase contents Final teaching experience in School 2, with two weeks’ break at Easter.

Postgraduate Certificate in Education

www.hull.ac.uk


MEMBERS OF STAFF HULL CAMPUS

SCARBOROUGH CAMPUS

Head of the Centre for Educational Studies David G Waugh, BA (York), MA (Hull), DipMathsEd (ULH), PhD

Head of the School of Education Ruth James, BA (OU), BSc (Birmingham), MSc (Hull)

Programme Director, Secondary PGCE Anne Bore, BSc, PhD (Bristol), PGDip (Hull) Programme Director, Primary PGCE Richard English, BSc, MPhil (Hull)

Programme Director, Early Years PGCE Claire Head, BA (Leeds), MEd (Bradford) Lecturers Julie Brierley, BSc, PGCE David Coates, BEd, MA, EdD (Durham)

Lecturers Stewart Bennett, BEd (Nottingham), MA (Loughborough), PhD (CNAA) Christopher Botton, PhD (Bradford), GRIC, CChem, MRSC

Ian Cooper, BEd (Manchester), BA, ADipEd, MA (OU) David Cox, BA (OU), MA, AdvDAES (Leeds) Gillian Gresswell, NDD (Hull), ATC, MA (Leeds)

Kim Bower, BA (Nottingham), DipEd (Sheffield), MEd (Hull)

Peter Harrison, MA (York)

Sarah James, BSc (UCL), MA (Hull)

William P Holmes, BSc (Leicester)

Wendy Jolliffe, BA (OU)

Sue Rolfe, BEd (Liverpool)

Anne Owen-Walker, BA (Hull)

Gary Wilkinson, BA (Lancaster)

Keith Porteous, BA, MA (Cambridge), PhD (Newcastle)

Quality Administrator James Watts, BA (Cambridge)

Ian Shaw, BSc(Econ) (MMU)

Admissions (PGCE) Jennifer Schmuck Gaylyn Fox

John T Smith, BA (Nottingham), MPhil (Leeds), MEd, PhD (Hull), FRHistS Peter Thomas, BA (Cardiff), MA (Essex) Academic Admissions Tutor Programme Director: MA in Educational Studies Tina Page, BA(Hons)(RQC), PGCE(Hull), MA(Hull) Admissions (PGCE) Janet Cuthbertson Tracey Taylor

www.hull.ac.uk

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GENERAL INFORMATION ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS ‘The University is committed to ensuring equality of opportunity in every aspect of its provision and seeks to apply the principle of equality of opportunity in relation to all aspects of its admission process’ (University Code of Practice for the Admission of Students). We are part of a Northern Universities consortium whose members jointly and individually encourage applications from minority ethnic groups. Further details of our entry requirements and selection procedures, including what you may expect at interview, can be found in our profile on the Graduate Teacher Training Registry (GTTR) course search website: www.gttr.ac.uk. Early Years (3–7) programme Applicants must normally possess a recognised good Honours degree of a British university, or equivalent qualification, and meet the selection requirements laid out in Qualifying to Teach: Professional Standards for Qualified Teacher Status (DCSF). If you are in doubt about this please telephone the admissions secretary (01723 362392). Applicants should make clear their qualifications, competence and experience in their GTTR application.

Prior to interview, candidates must possess • GCSE passes at grade C or above, or equivalent qualifications, in English, mathematics and a science subject • a broad academic profile that reflects subject knowledge and competence in the foundation subjects of the primary curriculum and RE • a level of competence in, and familiarity with, ICT that can realistically ensure the trainee’s required development under the terms of DCSF regulations currently in force • relevant evidence of experience related to working with children and teachers During the interview process candidates will be required to demonstrate their suitability to meet the requirements laid down in Qualifying to Teach: Professional Standards for Qualified Teacher Status, and there will be a written element to the selection procedures to assess written standards in English. Primary (5–11) programme Applicants must normally possess a recognised good Honours degree of a British university, or equivalent qualification, and meet the selection requirements laid down by the DCSF. If you are in doubt about this please telephone the admissions secretary (01482 465406/465987) for advice. In addition, candidates must possess • GCSE passes at grade C or above, or equivalent qualifications, in English, mathematics and a science subject • relevant evidence of experience related to working with children and teachers Secondary (11–18) programme Applicants must possess an appropriate degree of a British university, or equivalent qualification, and meet the selection requirements laid out in Qualifying to Teach: Professional Standards for Qualified Teacher Status (DCSF). If you are in doubt about this please telephone the admissions secretary (01482 465406/465987) for advice. In addition, candidates must possess GCSE passes at grade C or above, or equivalent qualifications, in English and mathematics. We can consider you if you do not have these qualifications at the time you apply, but you must obtain them before the programme starts.

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Postgraduate Certificate in Education

www.hull.ac.uk


APPLICATION PROCEDURE

QUALIFIED TEACHER STATUS SKILLS TESTS

Applications to all university education programmes are made on a standard form through the Graduate Teacher Training Registry. Applications are made online via the GTTR website at www.gttr.ac.uk.

All teacher trainees will be required to take National Skills Tests in Literacy, Numeracy and ICT during the course and can be granted QTS only when they have passed the tests.

GTTR Rosehill New Barn Lane Cheltenham, GL52 3LZ, UK T 0870 112 2205

PROTECTION OF CHILDREN

Applications should be made as early as possible after 1 September of the academic year immediately preceding the proposed date of entry. Suitable applicants will be called for interview.Those who are offered places will be required by the Department for Children, Schools and Families to complete a medical questionnaire and may be required to undergo a medical examination.

INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS International students should apply via the GTTR.

FINANCIAL INCENTIVES The DCSF offers bursaries for priority and nonpriority and primary postgraduate trainees. For the most up-to-date information see www.dcsf.gov.uk/studentsupport. Up-to-date information about these incentives may be obtained from the Training and Development Agency website at www.tda.gov.uk.

Admission to all initial teacher training programmes will be subject to the relevant criminal record checks. Entrants to initial teacher training also have to show ‘physical and mental fitness’ to teach and will be asked to provide evidence in both respects. At present this means that you will have to complete a self-disclosure form if offered a place on the programme.This self-disclosure form is an interim measure – all successful candidates must obtain an Enhanced Disclosure from the Criminal Records Bureau (CRB). Details of how to apply will be given to you after the offer of a place has been accepted.

FEES AND GRANTS All PGCE trainees will be required to pay variable fees. If you are a permanent resident of the United Kingdom or an EU country, you may be entitled to assistance. Payment will not be ‘up front’: fees will be added to the trainee’s student loan. For further information on fees and financial support visit www.dcsf.gov.uk/studentsupport. If you are an international student from a non-EU country you will be charged the standard overseas student fee.You should also visit www.dcsf.gov.uk/studentsupport and follow the link for international students.

ACCOMMODATION The University does not provide accommodation for PGCE students, but some assistance will be given to students seeking private accommodation. The Accommodation Office at Scarborough offers assistance to PGCE students seeking private accommodation and can also help students who wish to share accommodation by putting them in touch with each other.

www.hull.ac.uk

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ADVANCED PROGRAMMES

THE UNIVERSITY SESSION

The MA in Educational studies is a programme for Newly Qualified Teachers which takes into account credits previously gained on the PGCE and has been designed to support progress towards achieving the Induction Standard.This means that teachers who sign up for this course will be granted 60 credits from the PGCE towards a Masters degree of 180 credits.They will then require a further 60 credits from taught modules, plus 60 credits from a dissertation, to gain a Masters degree. Feedback from our current students indicates a very high level of interest in this programme.

The dates of the terms for PGCE students depend largely on those for North Yorkshire and Humberside schools. At the time of writing not all the dates of terms had been decided, but it is anticipated that they will largely correspond to any dates given in the illustrative year outlines.

CHANGES TO COURSES The accreditation of all courses of initial teacher training is subject to review by the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families.The University therefore has the right to withdraw or amend parts of these courses.

We offer other advanced programmes, leading to the degrees of Master of Education, Master of Philosophy, Doctor of Education and Doctor of Philosophy.These programmes are open to trained graduates and, in some circumstances, to other, nongraduate qualified teachers.The Centre for Educational Studies also provides courses leading to Advanced Certificates and Diplomas.These are open to graduates and non-graduates. Further details of these programmes and their entry requirements may be obtained from Advanced Courses Admissions Centre for Educational Studies Wilberforce Building The University of Hull Hull, HU6 7RX, UK 01482 465031 or by visiting www.hull.ac.uk/ces.

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Postgraduate Certificate in Education

www.hull.ac.uk


MAPS DATES OF SEMESTERS For the current semester dates please visit our website at www.hull.ac.uk or call Admissions on 01482 466850.

ADDRESS For general enquiries, please write to Admissions Service The University of Hull Hull, HU6 7RX, UK 01482 466850 01482 442290 pgstudy@hull.ac.uk www.hull.ac.uk

DISCLAIMER The University of Hull will use all reasonable endeavours to deliver programmes in accordance with their descriptions in this publication. However, it reserves the right to make variations in the contents or methods of delivery or assessment, to discontinue programmes and to merge or combine them, if such action is considered necessary. If the University does discontinue any programme, it will use reasonable endeavours to provide a suitable alternative.

Our other postgraduate brochures are ‌ Business: Business; Economics; Financial Management; Logistics; Marketing; Tourism Management The Arts and Humanities: Drama and Performance; English and Creative Writing; Film Studies; History; Modern Languages; Music; Philosophy; Theology Science: Biological Sciences; Chemistry; Computer Science; Engineering; Geography; Physics; Psychology; Sport, Health and Exercise Science Politics and Social Sciences: Anthropology; Criminology; Gender Studies; Politics and International Studies; Social Policy; Social Work; Sociology Education Health and Social Care Law Medicine Postgraduate study guide


MAPS DATES OF SEMESTERS For the current semester dates please visit our website at www.hull.ac.uk or call Admissions on 01482 466850.

ADDRESS For general enquiries, please write to Admissions Service The University of Hull Hull, HU6 7RX, UK 01482 466850 01482 442290 pgstudy@hull.ac.uk www.hull.ac.uk

DISCLAIMER The University of Hull will use all reasonable endeavours to deliver programmes in accordance with their descriptions in this publication. However, it reserves the right to make variations in the contents or methods of delivery or assessment, to discontinue programmes and to merge or combine them, if such action is considered necessary. If the University does discontinue any programme, it will use reasonable endeavours to provide a suitable alternative.

Our other postgraduate brochures are ‌ Business: Business; Economics; Financial Management; Logistics; Marketing; Tourism Management The Arts and Humanities: Drama and Performance; English and Creative Writing; Film Studies; History; Modern Languages; Music; Philosophy; Theology Science: Biological Sciences; Chemistry; Computer Science; Engineering; Geography; Physics; Psychology; Sport, Health and Exercise Science Politics and Social Sciences: Anthropology; Criminology; Gender Studies; Politics and International Studies; Social Policy; Social Work; Sociology Education Health and Social Care Law Medicine Postgraduate study guide

PGCE Education - University of Hull Postgraduate Certificate Study Guide 2009  

The PGCE programme is available both at the main campus in Hull and at our campus in Scarborough, North Yorkshire. At the Scarborough Campus...

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