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Postgraduate study

Politics and social sciences


The Department of Politics and International Studies | 3 Sta and their research interests | 4 More about the department and its activities | 10 Postgraduate study opportunities | 14

Contents

Politics

Outlines of taught programmes | 16

Social sciences The Department of Social Sciences | 28 Research interests | 29 Postgraduate study opportunities | 30 Outlines of taught programmes | 33

This publication is intended principally as a guide for prospective students. The matters covered by it – academic and otherwise – are subject to change from time to time, both before and after students are admitted, and the information contained in it does not form part of any contract. While every reasonable precaution was taken in the production of this brochure, the University does not accept liability for any inaccuracies.

The contents of this publication are available online at www.hull.ac.uk/pgdocs or in other formats on request.

www.hull.ac.uk

With 24 taught Masters programmes to choose from, we can satisfy your interest in virtually any area of politics and social sciences. Politics and social sciences




Politics and international studies

Staff and their research interests | 4 More about the department | 10 Postgraduate study opportunities | 14 MA in Civilisation, Terrorism and Dissent | 16 MA in European Union Governance | 17 MA in Global Communications and International Politics | 18 MA in Globalisation and Governance | 19 MA in Global Political Economy | 20 MA in International Law and Politics | 21 MA in International Politics | 22 MA in International Studies and Security Online | 23 MA in Legislative Studies Online | 24 MA in Strategy and International Security | 25

Since its foundation in 1961, the Department of Politics and International Studies has earned an international reputation for the excellence of its research and its teaching in a wide variety of areas of political science, international relations and political philosophy. The department’s reputation for research excellence was reaffirmed in the most recent Research Assessment Exercise. Moreover, it was rated as ‘excellent’ in the most recent Quality Assurance Agency report, for its teaching provision and pastoral care at both undergraduate and postgraduate MA levels. As one would expect of a department of Hull’s standing, all our established MA programmes have been validated by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) and are therefore eligible for ESRC funding. We strongly encourage every postgraduate student to become an active member of Hull’s research community. The department draws together people from all over the UK, Europe and the rest of the world. In this vibrant and diverse environment, you can pursue your own special area(s) of interest and attend our various research seminars and colloquia. Programme coordinators have some discretion to permit variations in our normal attendance requirements for part-time students – so do not hesitate to get in touch, even if the information given in the brochure does not quite seem to fit your situation. We cannot promise to meet your needs, but we will do our best. Of course, you are always welcome to visit the department and to meet the members of staff whose interests are closest to your own. They will advise you not only on academic matters but also on practical aspects of postgraduate life such as applying for grants and getting accommodation in Hull. The University’s Codes of Practice for the supervision of both research and taught students can be obtained from the department and will give you an idea of the more formal relationship that you will have with your teachers, should you join the Postgraduate School. The following pages introduce the department’s postgraduate taught and research programmes, together with details of our research centres and the academic interests of staff. If you do not find the information that you require, please do not hesitate to get in touch with either the relevant programme coordinator or the Departmental Director of Postgraduate Studies, Dr Colin Tyler, at

The Department of Politics and International Studies

The Department of Politics and International Studies | 3

Department of Politics and International Studies University of Hull Hull, HU6 7RX, UK T +44 (0)48 465765 F +44 (0)48 46604 c.tyler@hull.ac.uk



Politics and social sciences

www.hull.ac.uk/pas

Politics and social sciences




Staff and their research interests

Head of Department

Caroline Kennedy-Pipe, BA (Cardiff), MSc(Econ) (Aberystwyth), DPhil (Oxford)

Justin Morris, LLB (CNAA), MA (Hull)

Research interests Security studies; war studies; terrorism; Cold War history; woman and war.

Research interests International organisations, particularly the United Nations Security Council; Great Power responsibility; the role of international law in international politics; international relations theory. Recent publications • (Ed with R Burchill and N D White) International Conflict and Security Law (005) • ‘Normative Innovation and the Great Powers’, in A Bellamy (ed), International Society and Its Critics (005) • ‘Law, Politics and the Use of Force’, in J Baylis et al (eds), Strategy in the Contemporary World (006) • (With N J Wheeler) ‘Justifying Iraq as a Humanitarian Intervention: The Cure is Worse than the Disease’, in W P S Sidhu and R Thakur (eds), The Iraq Crisis and World Order: Structural and Normative Challenges (006) • (With N J Wheeler) ‘The Security Council’s Crisis of Legitimacy and the Use of Force’, International Relations, Vol 44 (007)

Professors Raphael Cohen-Almagor, BA, MA (Tel Aviv), PhD (Oxford) Research interests Media ethics; medical ethics; political theory; political extremism; free speech; Israeli politics; cultural studies; legal theory and jurisprudence. Recent publications • ‘Hate in the Classroom: Free Expression, Holocaust Denial and Liberal Education’, American Journal of Education, Vol 4, No  (008) • ‘The Limits of Objective Reporting’, Journal of Language and Politics, Vol 7, No  (008) • (With S Haleva-Amir) ‘The Israel–Hezbollah War and the Winograd Committee’, Journal of Parliamentary and Political Law, Vol , No  (008) • ‘The Six-Day War: Interviews with Minister Ezer Weitzman and Abba Eban, MK – Lessons and Insights’, Social Issues in Israel, Vol 6 (008) (Hebrew) • ‘Dignity, Compassion, Care and Safety Valves at the End of Life’, Israel Law Review, Vol 4, Nos  &  (008) • ‘Reply to Rejoinder: Teaching in Class versus Free Expression’, American Journal of Education, Vol 5 (008) • (With S Haleva-Amir) ‘Bloody Wednesday in Dawson College: The Story of Kimveer Gill, or Why Should We Monitor Certain Websites to Prevent Murder?’, Studies in Ethics, Law and Technology, Vol , Issue , Article  (008) • ‘John Stuart Mill’, in C G Christians and J C Merrill (eds), Ethical Communication: Five Moral Stances in Human Dialogue (009)

James Connelly, Bsc, PhD (Southampton) Research interests Environmental politics and philosophy; philosophy of history; philosophy of R G Collingwood and British idealism; elections and electoral systems. Recent publications • Metaphysics, Method and Politics: The Political Philosophy of R G Collingwood (00) • (With G Smith) Politics and the Environment: From Theory to Practice, nd Edition (00) • (Ed with S Panagakou) Anglo-American Idealism: Thinkers and Ideas (009) • (Ed with R K Wurzel) The EU as a Leader in Climate Change Policy (009) • (Ed with P Robinson and D Carrick) Ethics Education for Irregular War (009) • Sustainability and the Virtues of Environmental Citizenship (forthcoming)

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Recent publications • (With N Rengger) ‘Apocalypse Now? Continuities or Disjunctions in World Politics after 9/’, International Affairs, Vol 8, No  (006) • (With R Vickers) ‘Blowback for Britain? Blair, Bush and the War in Iraq’, Review of International Studies, Vol  (007) • The Origins of the Cold War (007) • (With N Rengger) ‘The State of War’, International Affairs, Vol 84, No 5 (008)

Lord Norton of Louth, BA (Sheffield), MA (Pennsylvania), PhD (Sheffield), FRSA, AcSS Research interests Comparative legislatures; the British Parliament; the Constitution of the UK; the British Conservative Party. Recent publications • (Ed) Parliaments and Citizens in Western Europe (00) • Parliament in British Politics (005) • (With B Jones et al) Politics UK, 6th Edn (006) • ‘The Conservative Party: The Politics of Panic’, in J Bartle and A King (eds), Britain at the Polls 2005 (006) • (Ed with D M Olson) Post-Communist and Post Soviet Legislatures: The Initial Decade (007)

Research Professors Jack Hayward, BSc(Econ), PhD (London), FBA Research interests Comparative European politics, with a particular interest in France; policy coordination in European government. Recent publications • (Ed with A Menon) Governing Europe (00) • Fragmented France: Two Centuries of Disputed Identity (007) • (Ed) Leaderless Europe (008)

Noel K O’Sullivan, BSc(Econ), PhD (London) Research interests Contemporary European and American political philosophy; history of political thought; sources of political extremism in modern European politics, especially fascism and terrorism; conservative doctrine in Western Europe and the USA; postmodern political theory. Recent publications • ‘Philosophy, Politics and Conservatism in the Thought of Elie Kedourie (96– 99)’, Middle Eastern Studies, No 4 (005) • European Political Thought Since 1945 (004; Chinese trans, 006) • ‘Liberalism, Nihilism and Modernity in the Political Thought of John Gray’, Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy, Vol 9 (006) • ‘British Conservative Thought’, in A C Grayling and A Pile (eds), Encyclopaedia of British Philosophy (006) • ‘Is de Jouvenel Still Worth Reading?’, European Journal of Political Theory, Vol 6, No 4 (007) • ‘Visions of European Unity since 945’ (the Elie Kedourie Memorial Lecture delivered to the British Academy), Proceedings of the British Academy, Vol 54 (008) • ‘The Concept of the Public Realm’, a special issue of the Critical Review of International Political Philosophy (as guest editor), Vol 9, No  (009)

www.hull.ac.uk/pas

Our staff excel in both teaching and research. That’s why The Times ranked us as one of the six best politics departments in the UK. Politics and social sciences

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Readers Colin Tyler, BA (Reading), MA (York), MA (Hull), DPhil (York) Research interests Public reason under conditions of hermeneutic pluralism; British idealism; Hegel; democratic governance; modern political philosophy; theories of international relations; critical political economy. Recent publications • ‘“A Foundation of Chaff”? A Critique of Bentham’s Metaphysics’, British Journal for the History of Philosophy, Vol  (004) • Idealist Political Philosophy: Pluralism and Conflict in the Absolute Idealist Tradition (006) • ‘Contesting the Common Good: T H Green and Contemporary Republicanism’, in M Dimova-Cookson and W J Mander (eds), T H Green (006) • ‘Human Welfare and the Future of the WTO’, in S Lee and S McBride (eds), NeoLiberalism, State Power and Global Governance (007) • ‘A War on Terror? Insights from International Relations Theory’, in M Mullard et al, Globalisation, Citizenship and the War on Terror (007)

Thomas M Kane, BA (University of Maine in Farmington), MA (Claremont Graduate School), PhD (Hull) Research interests Strategic studies, international politics and the application of political thought. Recent publications • Military Logistics and Strategic Performance (00) • Chinese Grand Strategy and Maritime Power (00) • ‘Dragon or Dinosaur: China’s Nuclear Weapons Programme in the st Century’, Parameters, Vol  (00) • ‘Building Thrones: Political Effect as an Emerging Principle of War’, Comparative Strategy, Vol 4 (005) • Theoretical Roots of US Foreign Policy (006) • Ancient China on Postmodern War (007) • ‘Closer Ties Help Beijing Achieve Global Goals’, Defense News, 7 September 007 • ‘Hot Planet, Cold Wars: Climate Change and Ideological Conflict’, Energy and Environment, Vol 8, No 5 (007) • Emerging Conflicts of Principle: International Relations and the Clash between Cosmopolitanism and Republicanism (008)

Rüdiger Wurzel, MA (Augsburg), MA (Hull), PhD (London) Research interests Environmental policy and politics; European Union; German politics; West European politics; comparative public policies and politics. Recent publications • The Europeanisation of Air and Water Pollution Control (006) • ‘European Union Environmental Policy and Natura 000’, in J Keulartz and G Leistra (eds), Legitimacy in European Nature Conservation Policy: Case Studies in Multilevel Governance (007) • The Politics of Emissions Trading in Britain and Germany (008) • ‘Environmental Policy: EU Actors, Leader and Laggard States’, in J Hayward (ed), Leaderless Europe (008) • ‘Germany’, in A Jordan and A Lenschow (eds), Innovation in Environmental Policy? Integrating the Environment for Sustainability (008)

Simon Lee, BA (Hull) Research interests Political economy and comparative economic performance; the politics of New Labour and the Third Way; the politics of Gordon Brown and the British Way; the politics of England and English identity; Canadian politics and public policy; the politics of globalisation and governance. Recent publications • (Ed with M Beech) Ten Years of New Labour (008) • Boom and Bust: The Politics and Legacy of Gordon Brown (009) • (Ed with M Beech) The Conservatives under David Cameron: Built to Last? (009) • ‘The Rock of Stability? The Political Economy of the Brown Government’, Policy Studies, Vol 0, No  (009)

Cristina Leston-Bandeira, Licenciatura (Lisbon), PhD (Hull)

Senior Lecturers Xiudian Dai, BA, MA (Nankai), PhD (Sussex) Research interests Politics of the internet; political economy of the new media; EU–China relations; Chinese and European technology policy with particular reference to the information and communications technology sector; economic development in China and Southeast Asia; European governance and integration in the information age. Recent publications • The Digital Revolution and Governance (000) • ‘Google’, New Political Economy, Vol  (007) • ‘The Digital Revolution and Development: The Impact of Chinese Policy and Strategies’, Development (007) • (Ed with P Norton) The Internet and Parliamentary Democracy in Europe (008) • ‘Guiding the Digital Revolution: Is European Technology Policy Misguided?’, in J Hayward (ed), Leaderless Europe (008)

Research interests Comparative legislatures; parliament in new democracies, in particular the Portuguese Parliament; parliament and the internet; reform of parliament. Recent publications • From Legislation to Legitimation (004) • (Ed) Southern European Parliaments in Democracy (004) • ‘The Impact of the Internet on Parliaments: A Legislative Studies Framework’, Parliamentary Affairs, Vol 60 (007) • ‘Are ICTs Changing Parliamentary Activity in the Portuguese Parliament?’, Journal of Legislative Studies, Vol  (007) • ‘Dissent in a Party-Based Parliament: The Portuguese Case’, Party Politics (forthcoming)

Lecturers Matt Beech, Bsc(Econ), MSc (Aberystwyth), PhD (Southampton) Research interests British politics – ideologies, parties and their history; political thought – New Labour, social democracy, communitarianism and conservatism; Christianity and politics. Recent publications • (With K Hickson) Labour’s Thinkers: The Intellectual Roots of Labour from Tawney to Gordon Brown (007) • (Ed with S Lee) Ten Years of New Labour (008) • (Ed with S Lee) The Brown Government: A Policy Evaluation (009) • (Ed with S Lee) The Conservatives under David Cameron: Built to Last? (009)

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www.hull.ac.uk/pas

The 2008 Research Assessment Exercise found that our work is at the cutting edge of political scholarship, with much of it ‘worldleading’ and even ‘paradigmdefining’. Politics and social sciences

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Cornelia Beyer, Dip Pol (Free University of Berlin)

David J Lonsdale, MA (Aberdeen), MA, PhD (Hull)

Research interests Security studies; terrorism and counterterrorism; global governance; theories of international relations.

Research interests Strategic theory; strategic history; contemporary strategic issues.

Recent publications • Violent Globalisms: Conflict in Response to Empire (008) • Effectively Countering Terrorism: The Challenges of Prevention, Preparedness and Response (forthcoming) • Counterterrorism and International Power Relations: The EU, ASEAN and Hegemonic Global Governance (forthcoming) Alexander the Great – diplomacy by other means.

Bhumitra Chakma, BA (Dhaka), MA (International University of Japan), PhD (Queensland) Research interests Nuclear proliferation and non-proliferation; South Asian nuclear politics and security; security and strategic studies; ethnicity and nationalism; international relations theory. Recent publications • ‘Road to Chagai: Pakistan’s Nuclear Programme, Its Sources and Motivations’, Modern Asian Studies, Vol 6, No 4 (00) • (With I Ahmed and A Mohsin) ‘Administrative Reforms in the CHT: A Diagnostic Study of the Ministry of CHT Affairs’, Identity, Culture and Politics: An Afro-Asian Dialogue, Vol 4, No  (00) • Strategic Dynamics and Nuclear Weapons Proliferation in South Asia (004) • ‘The NPT, the CTBT and Pakistan: Explaining the Non-Adherence Posture of a de facto Nuclear State’, Asian Security, Vol , No  (005) • ‘Toward Pokhran II: Explaining India’s Nuclearisation Process’, Modern Asian Studies, Vol 9, No  (005) • ‘Pakistan’s Nuclear Doctrine, and Command and Control System: Dilemmas of Small Nuclear Forces in the Second Atomic Age’, Security Challenges, Vol , No  (006) • ‘Pakistani Missiles: Explaining Procurement and Strategic Implications,’ BIISS Journal (Bangladesh Institute of International and Strategic Studies), Vol 8, No  (007) • ‘Assessing the 997 Chittagong Hill Tracts Peace Accord’, Asian Profile, Vol 6, No  (008) • Pakistan’s Nuclear Weapons (009) • South Asia’s Nuclear Security (forthcoming)

Mahrukh Doctor, MA (SAIS, Johns Hopkins), DPhil (Oxford) Research interests Political economy of development, with special interest in business–state relations; industrial, trade and infrastructure investment policies of developing countries; foreign direct investment and regional integration in Latin America. Area focus: Brazil and Latin America; India. Recent publications • ‘Institutional Modernisation and the Legacy of Corporatism: The Case of Port Reform in Brazil’, Journal of Latin American Studies, Vol 5 (00) • (With T Power) ‘Beyond the Century of Corporatism? Continuity and Change in Brazil’, in H J Wiarda (ed), Authoritarianism and Corporatism in Latin America: Revisited (004) • (With S Rios) ‘Scenarios for Untying the Knots in Market Access for Goods’, in A Valladão, P Messerlin and F Peña (eds), Concluding the EU–Mercosur Agreement: Feasible Scenarios (004) • ‘Boosting Investment and Growth: The Role of Social Pacts in the Brazilian Automotive Industry’, Oxford Development Studies, Vol 5 (007) • ‘Why Bother with Inter-regionalism? Negotiations for a European Union–Mercosur Association Agreement’, Journal of Common Market Studies, Vol 45 (007)

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Recent publications • The Nature of War in the Information Age: Clausewitzian Future (00) • Alexander, Killer of Men: Alexander the Great and the Macedonian Art of War (004) • Alexander the Great: Lessons in Strategy (007) • (With D Jordan et al) Understanding Modern Warfare (008)

Chris Martin, BA (Wolverhampton), MA (Staffordshire), PhD (Salford) Research interests British maritime history; strategy, policy and development. Recent publications • ‘The Naval War Plans 907 and the Second Hague Peace Conference: A Case of Propaganda’, Journal of Strategic Studies, Vol 8 (005) • ‘Admiral Sir John Fisher and the Entente Cordiale’, Revue Historique des Armées (005) • ‘The Royal Navy and the Limits of Eurocentricity, 904–9’, in J Keiger and P Venier (eds), Refocusing on Europe? International Relations from the Entente Cordiale to the Outbreak of the First World War, 1904–1914 (008) • ‘Future Threats: Future Carriers’, Defence Management Journal, May 008 • ‘The Declaration of London: A Matter of Operational Capability’, Historical Journal (online 008, print 009) – paper awarded the 005 Julian Corbett Prize for Research in Modern Naval History by the Institute of Historical Research

Elizabeth Monaghan, BA, MA (Sheffield), PhD (Nottingham) Research interests Civil society in the European Union; democracy and legitimacy in the European Union; comparative territorial politics. Recent publications • ‘Communicating Europe: The Role of Organised Civil Society’, Journal of Contemporary European Research, Vol 4, No  (008)

Richard Woodward, BA, MA (Hull) Research interests Global political economy; theories of globalisation and governance; globalisation and governance of financial markets; offshore financial centres; the City of London; the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development; small states. Recent publications • ‘Global Monitor: The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development’, New Political Economy, Vol 9 (004) • (Ed with A Baker and D Hudson) Governing Financial Globalization: IPE and MultiLevel Governance (005) • ‘Offshore Strategies in Global Political Economy: Small Islands and the Case of the EU and OECD Harmful Tax Competition Initiatives’, Cambridge Review of International Affairs, Vol 9 (006) • ‘Age Concern: The Future of the OECD’, The World Today, Vol 6 (006) • The Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development (009)

www.hull.ac.uk/pas

Individual members of the department, such as Jack Hayward and Phillip Norton, have received national and international honours. Politics and social sciences

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More about the department and its activites

Research and scholarship

Links with other institutions

As befits our standing as one of the six best politics departments in the UK (The Times Good University Guide 008), the department has been recognised as excellent in the UK Government’s most recent assessments of its teaching and research. The most recent Research Assessment Exercise found that our work is at the cutting edge of contemporary scholarship in politics and international studies – being predominantly of international standing, with much of it not merely ‘internationally excellent’ but also ‘world-leading’ and even ‘paradigm-defining’.

The department has links with a number of other universities around the globe. In addition, there are departmental links with various European organisations such as the British Parliament, the United Nations, NATO, the EU Commission, the Council of Ministers, the European Parliament and the Commonwealth Secretariat in London. We are able to assist students with visits to these bodies and interviews with their personnel.

This latest impressive achievement confirms the department’s reputation for research excellence, which extends back over four decades. A number of independent studies of research and teaching quality carried out since the 980s reflect this standing: in 990, an independent academic survey of European universities ranked the Hull Politics Department as one of the top six in Europe, a judgement echoed on several occasions since. Our high standards of scholarship are also shown in many other ways. For example, in addition to the staff who have been awarded personal Chairs, individual members of the department have received national and international honours – with Professor Jack Hayward made Chevalier de la Légion d’Honneur in 996 for his contribution to French politics and Professor Phillip Norton made a peer in 998. Distinctions have not been confined to members of staff. One of the department’s most eminent past postgraduates, Professor Raymond Plant, for example, was created Lord Plant of Highfield in 99 and became Master of St Catherine’s College at Oxford University in 994. Departmental interests include political economy, European Union politics, strategic studies, international relations, political philosophy, British politics, European politics, Latin American politics and a number of other specialisms, reflecting the breadth of political science as a contemporary university discipline. There are also opportunities to pursue interdisciplinary research interests. Members of the department collaborate with colleagues in Law, Economics and the Centre for Comparative International Development, as well as with other departments in the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences. This brief portrait of the department would not be complete unless we mentioned two kinds of links fostered by its members. We also need to say something about the various research centres with which our staff and students are involved.

Links with professional associations Members of the department are very active in international research groups and a number of professional associations, including the UK Political Studies Association (PSA), the British International Studies Association (BISA), the International Political Science Association, the European Consortium for Political Research, the American Political Science Association, the University Association for Contemporary European Studies and the Royal United Services Institute for Strategic Studies. Members of the department with expertise in particular regions or individual countries also participate in the appropriate organisations, including those in Iberian and Latin American studies.

The University also has a number of exchange agreements with foreign universities. These include Leiden, Erasmus University Rotterdam, Free University of Brussels (French), Angers, Bordeaux I, Bordeaux III, Strasbourg, Braunschweig, Kiel, Osnabrück, Pavia, Bologna, Moscow, Vilnius and Novosibirsk.

Centres of research Centre for British Politics Director: Dr Matt Beech (m.beech@hull.ac.uk) The CBP promotes the study of British politics, with a particular focus on research into British political parties, their ideology and their public policy. It was designed to unify the research interests of Matt Beech, Simon Lee, Philip Norton and Richard Woodward, and it strives to produce internationally renowned work in the form of monographs, edited volumes, and articles in peer-reviewed journals. In June 007 the centre hosted its inaugural symposium, ‘Ten Years of New Labour’; in March 008 it held a symposium evaluating the first year of the Brown government; and its next project is a study of the Cameronite Conservatives.

Centre for Democratic Governance Director: Simon Lee (s.d.lee@hull.ac.uk) The CDG undertakes research into the effects of globalisation on the distribution and exercise of collective power and authority, particularly the conceptual and normative frameworks of global governance. It explores the democratic implications of globalisation, especially the increasing recourse to intergovernmental organisations (such as the UN, the WTO, the IMF, the OECD and the World Bank) and the growing significance of private actors in world affairs, including MNCs and NGOs. The CDG runs a seminar series, orientates its teaching around three MAs – Globalisation and Governance, Global Political Economy, and Global Communications and International Politics – and, among other projects, collaborates with the Centre for Global Political Economy at Simon Fraser University, Canada.

Centre for European Union Studies Director: Dr Rüdiger K Wurzel (r.k.wurzel@hull.ac.uk) CEUS promotes the study of and research on European Union governance and politics. In the UK it is one of the longest-established and most active research centres analysing European and European Union issues. In recognition of its research expertise, CEUS has been designated as a Jean Monnet Centre of Excellence by the European Commission since 999, and it hosts a Jean Monnet Chair in European Union Studies. The centre organises international conferences, a seminar series (which includes guest speakers, CEUS researchers and postgraduate students), an annual Jean Monnet Lecture and many other activities.

A strong postgraduate school can only exist in a department with a strong record of research. Ours is such a department.

There are opportunities for postgraduate students to participate in such organisations. Research students are encouraged to attend and present papers at the annual conferences of the PSA and BISA, as well as at the workshops of the annual joint sessions or the biennial conferences of the European Consortium for Political Research.

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www.hull.ac.uk/pas

Politics and social sciences




Centre for Legislative Studies Director: Professor the Lord Norton of Louth (p.norton@hull.ac.uk) The CLS was created to provide a catalyst for international research in the comparative study of legislatures. It brings together legislative specialists in Hull with a wide range of scholars from other countries. It publishes the internationally recognised Journal of Legislative Studies and is responsible for major research projects as well as organising seminars, international conferences and other publications. The centre has several PhD candidates and offers an online MA in Legislative Studies. Postgraduates are encouraged to participate in centre events, including presenting papers to the Graduate Workshop of Legislative Studies.

Centre for Security Studies Director: Professor Caroline Kennedy-Pipe (c.kennedy-pipe@hull.ac.uk) The CSS is an interdisciplinary centre, providing postgraduate training at MA, MPhil and PhD levels. Its particular strength is its research into the relationship between strategic theory and strategic practice. It combines intellectual training with up-tothe-minute analysis of changing international security issues. The centre has a large community of PhD candidates and offers popular MAs in International Politics, in Strategy and International Security and in International Law and Politics.

Centre for the Study of British Idealism Directors: Dr Colin Tyler (c.tyler@hull.ac.uk) and Professor James Connelly (j.connelly@hull.ac.uk) The focus of the CSBI is the work and influence of the social and political philosophers known as the British Idealists. The activities of the centre include research both on the work of these philosophers and on those associated with them and influenced by them, both theoretically and in the realm of practical politics. Historically, the department has built up a considerable body of expertise in the subject. Professor James Connelly and Dr Colin Tyler are both acknowledged as leading experts in the field. They are editors of Collingwood and British Idealism Studies (based at the Collingwood Centre, University of Wales at Cardiff). Emeritus Professor Noel O’Sullivan has made an unrivalled contribution to the study of the British idealists since the 960s. He is the general editor of the monograph series on the work of Michael Oakeshott published by Imprint Academic.

With its various research centres, the department draws together people from all over the UK and the rest of the world. This makes it a very stimulating environment for postgraduate study. 

Politics and social sciences

Jeremy Bentham – pioneer of utilitarianism, painted by Henry William Pickersgill.

www.hull.ac.uk/pas

Politics and social sciences




Postgraduate study opportunites

Research degrees

Taught MA programmes

For MPhil and PhD degrees by thesis, we offer supervision across the wide range of areas reflected in our various taught MA programmes. It thus covers a large part of the spectrum of political science, from British, European and American politics to political philosophy, strategic studies, international relations and political economy.

These normally comprise six modules and a dissertation. At least two modules are compulsory. Most programmes can be completed in  months of full-time study. Subject to availability, these are

A full-time PhD should last no longer than three years, a full-time MPhil no longer than two years, plus the automatic write-up period of three months, and any extension of time has to be applied for. A part-time PhD should not last more than five years, a part-time MPhil not more than three years, plus an automatic write-up period of three months. It is good practice to finish your research degree within the prescribed period, and you may be subject to faculty penalties if you do not. The department has invested heavily in new dedicated facilities for postgraduate research students. These offices, with computer access, are allocated to students in the final stages of their normal doctoral registration (subject to availability and other conditions).

Training programme The nature and extent of the formal training provided for PhD students depend on the individual requirements of the student as decided in consultation with his or her supervisor. But the University requires all doctoral students to complete at least 60 credits from a wide choice of modules available on the training programme. Students who complete the basic 60 credits will be awarded the Postgraduate Certificate in Research Training. Students are normally expected to complete the 60 training units during their first year. However, all ESRC-funded students must acquire 7 credits from a training programme to be taken during the first year. (This figure corresponds to the ESRC recommendation that up to 60% of the first year of research should be given over to training.) An exemption of up to 0 credits from the research training programme is possible for students who have completed the Hull Politics MA Training Programme or equivalent training at another university. Other training modules are on offer (language training, for instance) to supplement the basic programme where necessary. In addition, there is a compulsory university-level skills module.

• • • • • • • •

Civilisation, Terrorism and Dissent European Union Governance Global Communications and International Politics Globalisation and Governance Global Political Economy International Law and Politics International Politics Strategy and International Security

The Department also runs two purely part-time online MA degrees: • Legislative Studies • International Studies and Security All our MA programmes are outlined on pages 6–5, where we give the names and contact details of their coordinators. More detailed descriptions can also be obtained on request from www.hull.ac.uk/pas/postgraduate or from Gemma Brunsdon Admissions Secretary Department of Politics and International Studies University of Hull Hull, HU6 7RX, UK T +44 (0)48 465758 F +44 (0)48 46608 g.l.brunsdon@hull.ac.uk

For research students not funded by the ESRC there are only two compulsory training components: the research seminars and the short university-level skills module. Attendance at research seminars makes a vital contribution to the corporate intellectual life of the department, being the principal means by which colleagues and students get to know something about each other’s interests and current concerns. Obviously, we all find some meetings more relevant than others; but the willingness of everyone to contribute regularly is a condition for a lively and fruitful postgraduate school. Any queries about the training programme should initially be addressed to the department’s Director of Postgraduate Studies, Dr Colin Tyler, who will be delighted to answer your questions.

‘Hull impressed me months before I even got there, with their level of interest in my application and the support they gave. When I got to Hull, the reality was as good as the promise. The teaching was excellent, the environment was friendly and supportive, and the decision turned out to be one of my best: rather than interrupt my career I accelerated it and have grown in confidence, ability and satisfaction.’ Karl Royce MA in Global Political Economy

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MA in Civilisation, Terrorism and Dissent

MA in European Union Governance

fastFacts

fastFacts

Duration | Full-time  year; part-time  years Attendance | Full-time 6 hours a week of seminars; parttime –4 hours a week of seminars Entry requirements | BA equivalent to a British Honours degree of upper second class or higher, in most instances. Minimum IELTS score of 6.0 for non-native Englishspeakers Fees | www.hull.ac.uk/money Location | Hull Campus Contact | Dr Colin Tyler or Professor James Connelly: c.tyler@hull.ac.uk or j.connelly@hull.ac.uk Please note that the structure of this MA programme will change from the start of the 00/ session. For the revised structure, please see the relevant programme page at www.hull.ac.uk/pas

About the programme The aim of this new MA is to provoke intellectual work of the highest possible quality on the actions and ideologies of leading international players such as the US and UK administrations, the United Nations, the WTO (and other facets of the institutional architecture of the global economy) and groups using overt violence such as AlQaeda and Hezbollah. One recurring question is: in what ways do assumptions about civilisation, progress/development and barbarism underpin the actions of and conflicts between such actors?

• Strategic Studies and Security I • The International Politics of the Environment I: Comparative Perspective • The EU: Political Integration and Policy Analysis • IR Theory: Classical and Post-Classical Approaches • Political Economy in Perspective • The Political Economy of Development • The Environment in Theory and Practice • Capitalism, Alienation and Power • China and the New World Order • Global Communications, Globalisation and Development • Strategic Thinkers II: The Information Age • Governing Global Finance • Globalisation and Governance in Practice • Strategic Studies and Security II: Strategy Applied • The EU: National and International Perspectives • IR Theory: Practical Applications and Case Studies • Intelligence and Statecraft

Topics covered in the two core modules include discourses of civilisation and barbarism in history; contemporary political ideologies across the globe; different attitudes to rebellion and political conflict; and various justifications offered for terrorism, civil disobedience and dissent.

Core elements

Attendance | Full-time 6 hours a week of seminars; parttime –4 hours a week of seminars Entry requirements | BA equivalent to a British Honours degree of upper second class or higher, in most instances. Minimum IELTS score of 6.0 for non-native Englishspeakers Fees | www.hull.ac.uk/money Location | Hull Campus Contact | Dr Rudiger Wurzel: r.wurzel@hull.ac.uk Please note that the structure of this MA programme will change from the start of the 00/ session. For the revised structure, please see the relevant programme page at www.hull.ac.uk/pas

Assessment

About the programme

Two essays per module and one 5,000-word dissertation. A candidate who fails the dissertation but obtains 0 credits with an overall weighted average of 40% will be awarded a Postgraduate Diploma. Candidates who obtain at least 60 credits may be awarded a Postgraduate Certificate.

This MA allows you to develop an advanced understanding of European Union (EU) governance issues in a research-led teaching environment. Many former students now work for EU institutions (e.g. the Commission and the EP), non-governmental organisations, international businesses or the media.

Special features

Programme content

This innovative MA enables students to explore in depth some of the most pressing political phenomena of our time: terrorism, civil disobedience and the enforcement of ideas about ‘civilisation’.

Two core modules, four options and a 5,000-word dissertation on a relevant topic.

Programme content Two core modules, four options and a 5,000-word dissertation on a relevant topic.

Duration | Full-time  year; part-time  years

Research areas Political theory/philosophy of terrorism; theories of civilisation and barbarism; British idealism and associated movements; environmental philosophy; critical political economy; modern and contemporary political philosophy.

Topics covered in the two core modules include the history of European integration; theories of EU politics and integration; a wide range of EU policies (e.g. foreign and security policy, environmental policy, common agricultural policy and immigration policy); new modes of EU governance; and the Europeanisation of member states.

Core elements • The EU: Political Integration and Policy Analysis (Semester ) • The EU: National and International Perspectives (Semester )

These may include The Politics of New Labour The British Idealists: Community, the State and Time Communications and International Politics Political Economy of Global Communications Strategic Thinkers I: Precursors to the Information Age Frameworks of Global Governance: Freedom, Democracy and the New Imperialisms

Politics and social sciences

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Discourses of Civilisation and Barbarism Communications and International Politics Political Economy of Global Communications Frameworks of Global Governance: Freedom, Democracy and the New Imperialisms The International Politics of the Environment I: Comparative Perspective IR Theory: Classical and Post-Classical Approaches Political Economy in Perspective The Political Economy of Development The Environment in Theory and Practice Capitalism, Alienation and Power China and the New World Order Global Communications, Globalisation and Development Governing Global Finance Globalisation and Governance in Practice Germany in the European Union and the Wider Europe IR Theory: Practical Applications and Case Studies Research Methods in Political Science

Further module information Modules are delivered by seminar to small groups of students. Full-time students take two optional modules (in addition to one core module) per semester. Part-time students take a total of four optional modules (in addition to two core modules) over the course of their studies.

Assessment Two essays per module and one 5,000-word dissertation. A candidate who fails the dissertation but obtains 0 credits with an overall weighted average of 40% will be awarded a Postgraduate Diploma. Candidates who obtain at least 60 credits may be awarded a Postgraduate Certificate.

Students are encouraged to participate in the activities of the Centre for European Union Studies (CEUS). CEUS has been designated as a ‘Jean Monnet Centre of Excellence’ in teaching and research since 999. It runs a seminar series, organises conferences and hosts the annual Jean Monnet Lecture. It also publishes a research working paper series. For more details see www.hull.ac.uk/CEUS. The course director for the MA in European Union Governance is holder of the Jean Monnet Chair in European Union Studies.

Optional modules

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These may include

Special features

• Discourses of Civilisation and Barbarism (Semester ) • Terrorism, Civil Disobedience and Dissent (Semester )

• • • • • •

Optional modules

Research areas Recent grant-funded research has focused on the EU Presidency, the Europeanisation of member states, new modes of environmental governance, leaderless Europe, the use of the internet by the European Parliament, and EU foreign and security policy. For more details see www.hull.ac.uk/CEUS/research. www.hull.ac.uk/pas

Politics and social sciences

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MA in Global Communications and International Politics

MA in Globalisation and Governance

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Duration | Full-time  year; part-time  years Attendance | Full-time 6 hours a week of seminars; parttime –4 hours a week of seminars Entry requirements | BA equivalent to a British Honours degree of upper second class or higher, in most instances. Minimum IELTS score of 6.0 for non-native Englishspeakers Fees | www.hull.ac.uk/money Location | Hull Campus Contact | Dr Xiudian Dai: x.dai@hull.ac.uk Please note that the structure of this MA programme will change from the start of the 00/ session. For the revised structure, please see the relevant programme page at www.hull.ac.uk/pas

About the programme This MA gives you the opportunity to study the politics and political economy of global communications technologies, such as the internet, at an advanced level. It is aimed at individuals with a good degree and an interest in issues related to global communications and international politics in the digital age. Graduates from this programme are equipped for a wide range of careers in the public sector, the private sector and non-governmental organisations.

Programme content Two core modules, four options and a 5,000-word dissertation on a relevant topic. The main focus of the programme is the politics and political economy of new information and communications technologies, particularly the internet. You will study the reasons why the internet and other new media technologies influence general political and economic processes at local, national, regional and global levels. You will acquire knowledge and understanding in theories and analysis pertinent to the study of new media technologies and the new economy. You will have the opportunity to study the political economy of global communications; the relationship between global communications and international politics; and the implications of the global communications revolution for economic development.

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Politics and social sciences

Core elements • Communications and International Politics (Semester ) • Political Economy of Global Communications (Semester )

Optional modules • Discourses of Civilisation and Barbarism • Strategic Thinkers I: Precursors to the Information Age • Frameworks of Global Governance: Freedom, Democracy and the New Imperialisms • The International Politics of the Environment I: Comparative Perspective • The EU: Political Integration and Policy Analysis • IR Theory: Classical and Post-Classical Approaches • Political Economy in Perspective • The Political Economy of Development • Global Communications, Globalisation and Development • Strategic Thinkers II: The Information Age • Globalisation and Governance in Practice • The EU: National and International Perspectives • IR Theory: Practical Applications and Case Studies • Research Methods in Political Science

Further module information Modules are delivered by seminar to small groups of students. Full-time students choose one optional module in the first semester and three in the second. Part-time students choose two optional modules in the second semester of Year  and one optional module during each semester of Year .

Assessment Two essays per module and one 5,000-word dissertation. A candidate who fails the dissertation but obtains 0 credits with an overall weighted average of 40% will be awarded a Postgraduate Diploma. Candidates who obtain at least 60 credits may be awarded a Postgraduate Certificate.

Special features This MA is recognised by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Research areas New media and communications studies; global political economy; international relations; British politics; legislative studies; security studies; political theory; European Union politics.

Duration | Full-time  year; part-time  years Attendance | Full-time 6 hours a week of seminars; parttime –4 hours a week of seminars Entry requirements | BA equivalent to a British Honours degree of upper second class or higher, in most instances. Minimum IELTS score of 6.0 for non-native Englishspeakers Location | Hull Campus Contact | Dr Colin Tyler or Simon Lee: c.tyler@hull.ac.uk or s.d.lee@hull.ac.uk Please note that the structure of this MA programme will change from the start of the 00/ session. For the revised structure, please see the relevant programme page at www.hull.ac.uk/pas

About the programme This MA offers you a comprehensive, detailed and fully up-to-date postgraduate education in the relationship between politics and economics, the state and the market, in the contemporary global economy. It is aimed at those with an interest in developing a deeper knowledge and understanding of the major ideas, institutions, policies, interests and governance structures shaping the global economy. Particular attention is paid to the assumptions underlying and the values fostered by the dynamics of global and international capitalism. Graduates from the programme tend to pursue careers in commerce and the private sector, governmental organisations, higher education, and international and non-governmental organisations.

Programme content Two core modules, four options and a 5,000-word dissertation on a relevant topic. The themes of the programme are the key contemporary and historical debates and issues surrounding the nature and practice of globalisation and governance. You will study a wide range of ideas, institutions, policies and governance structures, on an individual-country and a comparative basis. You will acquire and develop specialised knowledge which will help you to pursue a career with an international organisation or a campaigning or developmental NGO, or to study for a higher degree.

www.hull.ac.uk/pas

Core elements • Frameworks of Global Governance: Freedom, Democracy and the New Imperialisms (Semester ) • Globalisation and Governance in Practice (Semester )

Optional modules • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

The Politics of New Labour Discourses of Civilisation and Barbarism The British Idealists: Community, the State and Time Communications and International Politics Political Economy of Global Communications The International Politics of the Environment I: Comparative Perspective The EU: Political Integration and Policy Analysis IR Theory: Classical and Post-Classical Approaches Political Economy in Perspective The Political Economy of Development The Environment in Theory and Practice Terrorism, Civil Disobedience and Dissent Capitalism, Alienation and Power China and the New World Order Global Communications, Globalisation and Development Governing Global Finance The EU: National and International Perspectives IR Theory: Practical Applications and Case Studies

Further module information Modules are delivered by seminar to small groups of students. Full-time students choose two optional modules per semester. Part-time students choose a total of four optional modules over the course of their studies.

Assessment Two essays per module and one 5,000-word dissertation. A candidate who fails the dissertation but obtains 0 credits with an overall weighted average of 40% will be awarded a Postgraduate Diploma. Candidates who obtain at least 60 credits may be awarded a Postgraduate Certificate.

Special features This MA is recognised by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Research areas Political economy; political theory; democratic governance and public policy; international relations; British politics; legislative studies; security studies; European Union politics; European politics.

Politics and social sciences

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MA in Global Political Economy

MA in International Law and Politics

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Core elements

fastFacts

Duration | Full-time  year; part-time  years

• Political Economy in Perspective (Semester ) • Governing Global Finance (Semester )

Duration | Full-time  year; part-time  years

Attendance | Full-time 6 hours a week of seminars; parttime –4 hours a week of seminars Entry requirements | BA equivalent to a British Honours degree of upper second class or higher, in most instances. Minimum IELTS score of 6.0 for non-native Englishspeakers

Optional modules • • • • •

Location | Hull Campus Contact | Simon Lee: s.d.lee@hull.ac.uk Please note that the structure of this MA programme will change from the start of the 00/ session. For the revised structure, please see the relevant programme page at www.hull.ac.uk/pas

About the programme This MA offers you a comprehensive, detailed and fully up-to-date postgraduate education in the relationship between politics and economics, the state and the market, in the contemporary global economy. It is aimed at those with an interest in developing a deeper knowledge and understanding of the major ideas, institutions, policies, interests and governance structures shaping the global economy.

• • • • • • • • • • • • •

The Politics of New Labour Discourses of Civilisation and Barbarism Communications and International Politics Political Economy of Global Communications Frameworks of Global Governance: Freedom, Democracy and the New Imperialisms The International Politics of the Environment I: Comparative Perspective The EU: Political Integration and Policy Analysis IR Theory: Classical and Post-Classical Approaches The Political Economy of Development The Environment in Theory and Practice Terrorism, Civil Disobedience and Dissent Capitalism, Alienation and Power China and the New World Order Global Communications, Globalisation and Development Globalisation and Governance in Practice Germany in the European Union and the Wider Europe The EU: National and International Perspectives IR Theory: Practical Applications and Case Studies

Further module information

Attendance | Full-time 6 hours a week of seminars; parttime –4 hours a week of seminars Entry requirements | BA equivalent to a British Honours degree of upper second class or higher, in most instances. Minimum IELTS score of 6.0 for non-native Englishspeakers Location | Hull Campus Contact | Bhumitra Chakma: b.chakma@hull.ac.uk Please note that the structure of this MA programme will change from the start of the 00/ session. For the revised structure, please see the relevant programme page at www.hull.ac.uk/pas

About the programme This MA offers you a comprehensive, detailed and fully up-to-date postgraduate education in the relationship between international politics and international law. It is aimed at those with an interest in developing a deeper knowledge and understanding of the major issues and debates in contemporary international affairs. It involves modules which draw together legal, political, strategic and ethical issues in order to help you develop a fuller understanding of the world in which we live.

Graduates from the programme tend to pursue careers in commerce and the private sector, governmental organisations, higher education, and international and non-governmental organisations.

Modules are delivered by seminar to small groups of students. Full-time students choose two optional modules per semester. Part-time students choose a total of four optional modules over the course of their studies.

Programme content

Assessment

Programme content

Two core modules, four options and a 5,000-word dissertation on a relevant topic.

Two essays per module and one 5,000-word dissertation. A candidate who fails the dissertation but obtains 0 credits with an overall weighted average of 40% will be awarded a Postgraduate Diploma. Candidates who obtain at least 60 credits may be awarded a Postgraduate Certificate.

Two core modules, four options and a 5,000-word dissertation on a relevant topic.

The themes of the programme are the relationship between politics and economics and their principal institutional forms – the state and the market. You will study a wide range of ideas, institutions, policies and governance structures, on an individual-country and a comparative basis, and you will acquire and develop skills in the analysis of states and markets. You will have the opportunity to study the political economy of the World Trade Organization, the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund; the political economy of competitiveness; the political economy of the transnational corporation; the governance of global financial markets; and the political economy of sustainable development and climate change.

Special features This MA is recognised by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Research areas Political economy; democratic governance and public policy; international relations; British politics; legislative studies; security studies; political theory; European Union politics; European politics.

Graduates from the programme tend to pursue careers in governmental, international and non-governmental organisations, the legal profession and higher education.

The main theme of the programme is the relationship between international politics and international law, but it also draws on areas such as strategic studies, political economy and ethics. You will learn how to identify and analyse the factors that motivate and constrain states and other key actors on the international stage. You will have the opportunity to study a wide range of topics and actors, including the balance of power, the role of military means, international organisations such as the UN, and specific state actors, ranging from the most to the least powerful.

Core elements • International Relations Theory: Classical and PostClassical Approaches • Public International Law

• International Relations Theory: Practical Applications and Case Studies

Politics and social sciences

The range of options currently includes • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Discourses of Civilisation and Barbarism Nuclear Proliferation and Non-Proliferation Communications and International Politics Political Economy of Global Communications Strategic Thinkers I & II Strategic Studies and Security I & II The International Politics of the Environment I The EU: Political Integration and Policy Analysis International Law and the Use of Force Democratic Values and International Law International Human Rights Protection International Commercial Arbitration The Political Economy of Development The Environment in Theory and Practice Terrorism, Civil Disobedience and Dissent Capitalism, Alienation and Power China and the New World Order Governing Global Finance Globalisation and Governance in Practice The EU: National and International Perspectives Research Methods in Political Science British Defence Policy Since 945 Intelligence and Statecraft Regional Trade Agreements: Theory and Practice The Laws of War Transnational Commercial Law World Trade Organisations Dispute Settlement Law of the Sea

Further module information Modules are delivered by seminar to small groups of students. Full-time students choose one optional module in Semester  and two optional modules in Semester . Part-time students choose a total of three optional modules over the course of their studies.

Assessment Two essays per module and one 5,000-word dissertation. A candidate who fails the dissertation but obtains 0 credits with an overall weighted average of 40% will be awarded a Postgraduate Diploma. Candidates who obtain at least 60 credits may be awarded a Postgraduate Certificate.

Special features This MA is recognised by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Semester 1

Semester 2

0

Optional modules

www.hull.ac.uk/pas

Research areas International relations theory; public international law; human rights law; law and politics of the European Community; military strategy; international political economy; world trade law.

Politics and social sciences




MA in International Politics fastFacts Duration | Full-time  year; part-time  years Attendance | Full-time 8 hours a week of seminars; parttime 4 hours a week of seminars Entry requirements | BA equivalent to a British Honours degree of upper second class or higher, in most instances. Minimum IELTS score of 6.0 for non-native Englishspeakers

MA in International Studies and Security Online Optional modules • • • • • • • •

Fees | www.hull.ac.uk/money Location | Hull Campus Contact | Dr Thomas Kane: t.m.kane@hull.ac.uk | T +44 (0)48 46650 | F +44 (0)48 46608 Please note that the structure of this MA programme will change from the start of the 00/ session. For the revised structure, please see the relevant programme page at www.hull.ac.uk/pas

About the programme Globalisation and recent wars dramatise the enduring importance of world affairs to government, economics and people’s lives. If you are interested in a career focusing on global politics in theory and practice, this programme is for you. It is aimed at degree-holders with an interest in the theory and practice of world politics. This MA equips graduates for careers in the media, nongovernmental organisations, international business, research think-tanks and government foreign service.

Programme content Two core modules, four options and a 5,000-word dissertation on a relevant topic. The degree aims to impart a broad and balanced knowledge of international relations theory at an advanced level. It provides core training in political analysis and methodology of the social sciences; examines contemporary global problems and rival approaches to their solution; and offers specialisation in particular areas such as foreign policy analysis, global society, regional integration, global environmental politics, and strategic and security studies. You will learn up-to-date approaches to international relations studies – through interactive seminars guided by experts in the subject – along with more general skills in writing, research, public speaking and logical analysis.

Core elements • International Relations Theory: Classical and PostClassical Approaches (Semester ) • International Relations Theory: Practical Applications and Case Studies (Semester )



Politics and social sciences

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Discourses of Civilisation and Barbarism Nuclear Proliferation and Non-Proliferation Communications and International Politics Political Economy of Global Communications Strategic Thinkers I: Precursors to the Information Age Frameworks of Global Governance: Freedom, Democracy and the New Imperialisms Strategic Studies and Security I The International Politics of the Environment I: Comparative Perspective The EU: Political Integration and Policy Analysis Maritime Strategy Political Economy in Perspective The Political Economy of Development The Environment in Theory and Practice Terrorism, Civil Disobedience and Dissent Capitalism, Alienation and Power China and the New World Order Global Communications, Globalisation and Development Strategic Thinkers II: The Information Age Governing Global Finance Globalisation and Governance in Practice Strategic Studies and Security II: Strategy Applied The EU: National and International Perspectives Research Methods in Political Science British Defence Policy Since 945 Intelligence and Statecraft

Further module information

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Assessment

Duration | Part-time  years

Two ,000-word essays for each taught module and a 5,000-word dissertation on a relevant topic.

Attendance | Flexible – average 5 hours a week (online teaching) Entry requirements | BA equivalent to a British Honours degree of upper second class or higher, in most instances. Minimum IELTS score of 6.0 for non-native Englishspeakers Fees | www.hull.ac.uk/money Location | n/a (taught entirely online) Contact | Dr Thomas Kane: t.m.kane@hull.ac.uk

About the programme The programme cultivates an advanced understanding of international affairs, with an emphasis on security matters. It addresses the needs of those seeking to develop careers in government, the armed forces, nongovernmental organisations and international business (e.g. risk assessment). Grounding students in theoretical study, it is also appropriate for those whose interest is primarily scholarly. You may choose to explore international studies and security at a general level or to specialise in a variety of sub-fields.

Assessment

In the second year, you will take at least two of the three core/optional modules:

Students of international politics at Hull have the opportunity to attend numerous guest lectures by academic experts and experienced practitioners. Students may also take part in interactive postgraduate workshops and in our many academic conferences.

Online delivery offers exceptional flexibility of access and flexibility of study.

Research areas Strategic studies; international relations theory; international organisations; political economy; democratic governance and public policy; comparative legislatures; the British Parliament; newly democratic parliaments.

In the first year of this two-year programme, you will take three core modules: • Introduction to Global Political Economy • Approaches to International Relations • Dimensions of Strategy

Special features

This MA draws on a wide array of internationally recognised expertise within the department. Staff from the Centres for Security Studies, Democratic Governance and Legislative Studies all contribute to teaching on the programme.

Programme content and structure

Full-time students normally take two optional modules per semester, which equates to four per year. Part-time students take half those numbers.

Two essays per module and one 5,000-word dissertation. A candidate who fails the dissertation but obtains 0 credits with an overall weighted average of 40% will be awarded a Postgraduate Diploma. Candidates who obtain at least 60 credits may be awarded a Postgraduate Certificate.

Special features

• Approaches to Globalisation and Governance • Case Studies in International Relations • Applied Strategy In Year  you may choose any one of the following optional modules as an alternative to any one of the core/optional modules listed above: • • • •

Parliaments in the Modern World Comparative Legislatures Parliament and Government Parliament and Citizens

All students must also write a 5,000-word dissertation.

Research areas Strategic studies; international relations theory; international law; foreign policy; political theory; European integration; the critique of violence.

www.hull.ac.uk/pas

Politics and social sciences




MA in Legislative Studies Online fastFacts Duration | Part-time  years Attendance | Flexible – average 5 hours a week (online teaching) Entry requirements | Typically a good Honours degree or equivalent in a relevant subject or appropriate experience in a professional environment relating to a parliamentary institution. IELTS score of 6.0 or equivalent for international students

MA in Strategy and International Security Core elements • Comparative Legislatures I: Systems and Cultures • Parliament in the Contemporary Political System: Parliament and Government • Parliaments in the Modern World • Comparative Legislatures II: Structures and Activity • Parliament in the Contemporary Political System: Parliament and Citizen • Research Sources and Techniques in Legislative Studies • Dissertation

Fees | www.hull.ac.uk/money Location | n/a (programme delivered entirely online) Contact | Dr Cristina Leston-Bandeira or Sophie Appleton: c.c.leston-bandeira@hull.ac.uk or s.appleton@hull.ac.uk

Optional modules Not applicable except in the Postgraduate Certificate in Legislative Studies Online – please contact us for more details.

Further module information About the programme This MA provides a unique insight into the theory and practice of parliamentary studies, with the added value of integrating a wide range of parliamentary experiences thanks to its online delivery mode. It is aimed at professionals who work in or with a parliamentary institution. Current students include officials of international organisations such as the UNDP, parliamentary clerks, journalists and professionals working in pressure groups and local government. The programme is taught entirely online through a highly personalised and interactive virtual learning environment. It follows a work-based-learning approach. We also offer two intermediate qualifications: the Postgraduate Certificate in Legislative Studies Online and the Postgraduate Diploma in Legislative Studies Online. These are taught within the same online platform, and students can progress through all three levels.

Programme content The programme focuses on the political science subdiscipline of legislative studies. It includes an in-depth insight into comparative legislative theories, whereby students acquire an understanding of what parliaments do and how external factors influence them. It also includes a detailed case study of the British parliament and an overview of different parliaments across the world, as well as encouraging students to develop research on their own parliament, in particular through a second-year module on research and the dissertation. You will be encouraged to develop your analytical, critical-thinking and primary-research skills.

4

Politics and social sciences

All of the taught modules are delivered online, and the dissertation is supervised online. Teaching is done by way of instructional tasks, readings and online discussion of set topics. Students take three modules in each of the two years of study. Each module comprises 0 seminars, and each seminar takes place online over a period of two weeks. Dissertations are concluded in the third period of Year .

Assessment Two ,000-word essays for each taught module, except for the research module (,00-word proposal with 4,800word report), plus a 5,000-word dissertation.

Special features The expertise of the staff of the Centre for Legislative Studies, where the Journal of Legislative Studies is edited, is internationally recognised. The MA is part of a wider programme of activities that specialises in the study of parliaments at both undergraduate and postgraduate level. Online delivery offers exceptional flexibility of access and flexibility of study. This is the only politics MA taught entirely online with ESRC recognition – a sign of its quality.

fastFacts

Core elements

Duration | Full-time  year; part-time  years

• Strategic Studies and Security I (Semester ) • Strategic Studies and Security II (Semester )

Attendance | Full-time 8 hours of seminars a week; parttime 4 hours of seminars a week Entry requirements | BA equivalent to a British Honours degree of upper second class or higher, in most instances. Minimum IELTS score of 6.0 for non-native Englishspeakers Fees | www.hull.ac.uk/money Location | Hull Campus Contact | Dr David Lonsdale: d.lonsdale@hull.ac.uk Please note that the structure of this MA programme will change from the start of the 00/ session. For the revised structure, please see the relevant programme page at www.hull.ac.uk/pas

About the programme War remains, as Sun Tzu observed, a matter of life and death. And war is only one of the phenomena that threaten people’s lives and ways of life. This degree offers students a background in the theory and practice of waging war, and facing other security threats, from the perspective of a defence professional. The programme equips graduates for careers in the media, the military, non-governmental organisations, international business, research think-tanks and government foreign service.

Programme content Two core modules, four options and a 5,000-word dissertation on a relevant topic. The programme covers the history and concepts of the strategic studies discipline. You will study strategic theory, using historical and contemporary case studies to clarify what theoretical concepts mean in practice. You will learn up-to-date approaches to strategic studies, along with more general skills in writing, research, public speaking and logical analysis. And you will have the opportunity to explore the field of strategic studies in interactive seminars guided by experts in the subject.

Optional modules • • • • • • • • • • •

Discourses of Civilisation and Barbarism Nuclear Proliferation and Non-Proliferation Strategic Thinkers I: Precursors to the Information Age IR Theory: Classical and Post-Classical Approaches Maritime Strategy Terrorism, Civil Disobedience and Dissent China and the New World Order Strategic Thinkers II: The Information Age IR Theory: Practical Applications and Case Studies British Defence Policy Since 945 Intelligence and Statecraft

Further module information Full-time students normally take two optional modules per semester, which equates to four per year. Part-time students take half those numbers.

Assessment Two essays for each module and one 5,000-word dissertation. A candidate who fails the dissertation but obtains 0 credits with an overall weighted average of 40% receives a Postgraduate Diploma. Candidates who obtain at least 60 credits may be awarded a Postgraduate Certificate.

Special features Senior military officers and civilian defence officials from around the world attend events at Hull’s Centre for Security Studies. Students have the opportunity to attend conferences, guest lectures and interactive workshops.

Research areas Strategic studies; international relations theory; international law; international organisations; foreign policy; political theory; European integration; the critique of violence.

Research areas Parliament and the internet; comparative legislatures; the British Parliament; newly democratic parliaments; southern European parliaments, in particular the Portuguese Parliament.

www.hull.ac.uk/pas

Politics and social sciences

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Research interests | 29 Postgraduate study opportunities | 30 MSc in Applied Social Research (Gender Studies) | 33 MSc in Applied Social Research (Social Policy) | 34 MSc in Applied Social Research (Social Work) | 35 MSc in Applied Social Research (Sociology and Anthropology) | 36 MA in Criminology | 38

Social sciences

The Department of Social Sciences | 28

MA in Criminology (Research Training Pathway) | 39 MA/LLM in Criminology and Human Rights | 40 MA in Development Studies | 41 MA in Diversity, Culture and Identity | 42 MA in Gender Studies | 43 MA in Gender and Development | 44 MA in Women’s and Gender Studies (GEMMA) | 45 MA in Social Work | 46 MA in Restorative Justice (online) | 47 MA in Spirituality Studies | 48

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Politics and social sciences

www.hull.ac.uk/socsci

Politics and social sciences

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The Department of Social Sciences Politics and social sciences

Criminology at Hull boasts one of the longest-established postgraduate programmes in the country, with a well-earned international reputation for its research. The University of Hull has also been a leader in the field of gender studies and is now part of a prestigious European-wide consortium of women’s and gender studies (GEMMA). Social Policy at Hull (ranked fourth nationally) has been in the vanguard of social justice initiatives, including research work and teaching programmes on slavery and diversity. Social Work provides one of the best programmes in the country (consistently ranked in the top 0), and the University’s own social work agency, FASU (Family Assessment and Support Unit), was awarded one of the Queen’s Anniversary Prizes for Higher and Further Education in 996 for its innovations in practice learning for social work. Finally, Sociology and Anthropology is well known for the success of its PhD students, with a recent Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) report placing Hull among the UK’s top 0 universities in terms of numbers of anthropology PhDs awarded. More than simply the sum of its disciplinary parts, what makes the Department of Social Sciences at the University of Hull unique is the interdisciplinary context of both our teaching and our research. The department is home to several of the University’s interdisciplinary research centres, including the Centre for the Study of Comparative Change and Development, the Centre for Social Justice, the Centre for Criminology and Criminal Justice, the Centre for the Social Study of Childhood and the Interdisciplinary Spirituality Group. Members of its staff are also actively involved in the Wilberforce Institute for the study of Slavery and Emancipation (WISE), the Centre for Gender Studies, the Centre for Regional Business Studies and the Hull Theory Network.

With an emphasis on major contemporary issues, our teaching and research is theoretically informed, empirically grounded and critically engaged in policy and practice, with strong links to academics, policy makers and practitioners at the local, national and international level. Staff and postgraduate students are currently involved in research in every region across the globe, covering a broad range of cutting-edge issues: • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

the body community and crime prevention comparative study of crime rates and criminal justice conflict management culture and identity death, dying and bereavement development and social change disability policy and politics education environmental cultures family structure and dynamics funding of public services gender and sexualities globalisation and citizenship history of crime and criminal justice housing policy human rights imprisonment and criminal justice migration and social exclusion power, politics and society ‘race’ and ethnicity religion and spirituality restorative justice sexual health (including HIV/AIDS) slavery and trafficking social work practice and education substance misuse surveillance

www.hull.ac.uk/socsci

Research interests

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Drawing on the strengths of a large multidisciplinary setting, with over 40 members of staff, the Department of Social Sciences offers a distinctive profile of postgraduate opportunities in criminology, gender studies, social policy, social work, and sociology and anthropology.

Politics and social sciences

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Postgraduate study opportunities

In addition to the MPhil/PhD research degree that may be pursued in any of our disciplinary areas, the Department of Social Sciences currently offers 14 taught Masters programmes. Our taught Masters programmes are as follows. Further details of these may be found on pages –47. Here we would simply note that the department holds ESRC recognition in each of our major disciplinary areas: anthropology (+/CASE), criminology (+/CASE), social policy (+/CASE), social work (+/CASE) and sociology, including gender studies (+/CASE). This means that our research and research training programmes have been approved for basic training as well as for supervised postgraduate research in specialised fields. The MA in Social Work is fully accredited by the General Social Care Council, and the department is a member of the International Association of Schools of Social Work.

Professional training • MA in Social Work ( years)

Discipline- and subject-specific MAs • • • • • • • •

MA in Criminology MA/LLM in Criminology and Human Rights MA in Development Studies MA in Diversity, Culture and Identity MA in Gender and Development MA in Gender Studies MA in Women and Gender Studies (GEMMA) ( years) MA in Restorative Justice (online)

Research training degrees • • • • •

MSc/Diploma in Applied Social Research (Gender Studies) MSc/Diploma in Applied Social Research (Social Policy) MSc/Diploma in Applied Social Research (Social Work) MSc/Diploma in Applied Social Research (Sociology and Anthropology) MA in Criminology (Research Training Pathway)

The University also offers a taught MA in Spirituality Studies which may be of interest to social workers and others. See page 48 for details. Other Masters programmes offered within the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences include an MA in Slavery Studies and an MA in Embodiment and Subjectivity. See the postgraduate Arts and Humanities brochure for details. Please note that all programmes and their constituent modules are kept under continuous review and are therefore subject to change and development in keeping with student feedback and pedagogical innovations.

Funding There are various funding sources for postgraduate studies in the Department of Social Sciences, including British Chevening Scholarships, the DfID Shared Scholarship Scheme, the ESRC (we have had six fully funded ESRC research students in the last six years), GEMMA MA Bursaries, Overseas Research Studentships, and scholarships and bursaries offered by the University, the faculty or the department. All such scholarships and bursaries are awarded on a competitive basis, and not all scholarship and bursary schemes are available every year. For further details, please consult the department’s website at www.hull.ac.uk/socsci.

Research degrees: MPhil/PhD If you have a passion for learning and would like to pursue advanced research, the Department of Social Sciences may be the place for you to study for an MPhil/PhD in anthropology, criminology, gender studies, social policy, social work or sociology. The department especially welcomes enquiries from excellent students in the fields of study in which staff have specialist knowledge and expertise (see the list on page 9).

Research supervision and training The department provides first-rate supervision and training for PhD students. We have an excellent track record of seeing our students through to successful completion (with some 50 PhDs awarded in the last six years), and our students have gone on to rewarding careers both within and beyond academia. Presently there are some 40 PhD students undertaking research on a range of topics. We regard our research students as key participants in our scholarly community, and they play an active role in fostering academic debate and developments in our fields of study. In addition to working alongside their supervisors, research students are given opportunities at each stage of the process to present and discuss their own and others’ work in a supportive and collegial environment through the weekly postgraduate workshop, the research luncheon and various senior research seminars and workshops. We provide a full range of research training opportunities within the department and through the University’s Postgraduate Training Scheme. Our research training and degree programmes are recognised and eligible for funding (on a competitive basis) by the ESRC under the Anthropology, Social Policy, Socio-Legal, Social Work and Sociology subject panels respectively. The department also offers a limited number of partial bursaries, and research students are able to apply for departmental funding to attend and host workshops and conferences. All of our research students have access to desk space, computers and other facilities in the department and through the Graduate School.

The MPhil/PhD programme Research students admitted to the MPhil/PhD programme are normally registered for an MPhil, with upgrading to PhD on the basis of written work submitted after the first 9– months. The full-time PhD requires three years of registration. The PhD is also available part-time to locally resident students over a four-year period. The following is a rough guide to the PhD process for the majority of students in anthropology, criminology, social policy, social work and sociology. Year 1 The first year of the MPhil/PhD is divided between research training and preparation of upgrading papers. The University requires that all research students should complete at least 60 credits of research training modules. These modules are agreed between students and their supervisors. You will also meet regularly with your supervisors and undertake a specialised scheme of independent preparation appropriate to your thesis topic. All research students (new and continuing) are strongly encouraged to attend both the departmental research seminar series and the postgraduate research workshop in which the plans, problems and experiences of individual students are discussed in a critical but cooperative atmosphere under the guidance of a senior staff member. At the end of the first year, research students submit a series of upgrading papers (approximately 5–0,000 words) and undergo an upgrading viva voce. Satisfactory completion of the upgrade papers and viva voce will enable you to register as a PhD student and proceed to research.

‘I am lucky that my place on the MA is funded by my employer, Goodwin Development Trust. They are keen to invest in the development of their staff in order to create a workforce that can respond flexibly to the needs of the communities they serve, a vital requirement in the voluntary and community sector. The knowledge that I gain from this degree will inform internal policy decisions and provide a backdrop for the trust’s educational programmes. Personally, the MA has enabled me to explore areas of particular interest and has presented me with a whole set of fresh challenges. Tracy Dearing MA Diversity, Culture and Identity (part-time)

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www.hull.ac.uk/socsci

Politics and social sciences




Year 2 The second year of the PhD is normally spent in data collection. Supervision continues throughout this period, though this will normally be done by regular email or telephone contact if you are conducting research outside the UK. Year 3 The third year of the PhD is spent writing the thesis. Students may also choose to undertake additional advanced research training modules, and are encouraged to participate in both departmental and postgraduate research seminars and to present papers at national and international conferences.

Admissions procedures for MPhil/PhD The first step in deciding whether the Department of Social Sciences at Hull is the right place for you to pursue your research degree is to review the current list of research areas and topics that staff members are willing and able to supervise, as posted on the departmental website (www.hull.ac.uk/socsci). If you think that your proposed research fits well with the research profile and supervision interests indicated by a member of staff, you should in the first instance contact that member of staff by email and provide them with a brief introduction of yourself and your proposed research. If the member of staff is interested in your research and is able and willing to consider you as a prospective research student, they will ask you to submit a formal application. Upon receipt, your application form will be reviewed both by the Director of Postgraduate Studies and by the member of staff that you have nominated as your prospective supervisor. Together, they will review your educational background, academic references and research proposal and decide whether or not to make you an offer of a place to study. It is important to note that the normal requirement for entry to a research degree programme is a first or good upper second class (.) degree or a good result in a Masters degree in anthropology, criminology, gender studies, social policy, social work, sociology and/or a subject closely related to your proposed disciplinary field of study. In addition, intending research students are expected to have some prior research training at postgraduate level or equivalent, and to be capable of writing a two- or three-page proposal setting out their research questions, the kind of empirical research that they envisage, the reasons why they wish to undertake the research and a general indication of the theoretical background and approach. For applicants whose backgrounds do not qualify them for direct entry, we may recommend a ‘conversion course’ in the form of one of our Masters programmes. Competence in the English language (IELTS 6.0 or equivalent) is required of international students beginning any of our programmes.



Politics and social sciences

MSc in Applied Social Research (Gender Studies) fastFacts

Core modules

Duration | Full-time  year; part-time  years

Semester 1

Attendance | Full-time up to 8 hours a week; part-time up to 4 hours a week Entry requirements | Applicants are normally expected to have an upper second class degree or equivalent in the social sciences or a cognate discipline, but applicants with other qualifications and relevant experience are carefully considered. Competence in the English language (IELTS 6.0 or equivalent) is required of international students Fees | www.hull.ac.uk/money Location | Hull Campus Contact | Judy Savage: j.savage@hull.ac.uk | +44 (0)48 4665

About the programme This MSc is built around an integrated social science training programme. It is designed both to provide a broad-based training in social research and to develop advanced subject-specific expertise in gender. It is intended both as a terminal qualification and as first-year training for those proceeding to PhD research at Hull or elsewhere. It is recognised by the Economic and Social Research Council as providing preparatory training for the research degree under the Sociology panel.

Programme content As a whole, the programme aims to develop in students • a general understanding of the research process in the social sciences • an awareness of the diversity of research styles, approaches or strategies • an ability to rigorously formulate informed questions about the structures, practices and processes relating to gender issues in a broad range of socio-economic, political and cultural contexts and to develop a critical and reflexive methodological approach to address those questions • more specific and practice-based knowledge of a number of quantitative and qualitative (feminist) research techniques, and an ability to evaluate their appropriateness to particular research settings and objectives • an appreciation of the linkages between empirical research and theoretical and substantive issues in gender studies, with particular reference to their main field of interest • an ability to complete successful applied research and to effectively and critically use their data and analysis to contribute both to social science knowledge and to applications of that knowledge within and outside academia

www.hull.ac.uk/pas

• • • •

Feminist Perspectives in Social Research Philosophical Issues in Applied Social Research The Research Interview or Ethnographic Practice Survey Questionnaire Design

Semester 2 • • • • •

Central Issues in Applied Social Research Quantitative Data Analysis Computing with SPSS Explorations of Qualitative Methods Gendered Bodies, Gendered Selves

Summer period • Dissertation

Optional modules • • • • • • • • •

Feminism, Politics and Power Feminism, Poststructuralism and Psychoanalysis Women, Literature and History in Interwar Britain Independent Gender Research Making a Seminar Presentation: Ideas into Practice The Social Context of Women’s Health I The Social Context of Women’s Reproductive Health II Encountering Development: Why Gender Matters Key Issues in Identity Politics and Policies

Further module information The core modules are organised in such a way that there is a logical progression from Semester  to Semester , from the more abstract to the more concrete and from specific research methodologies to their corresponding analytical issues and techniques. Optional modules (two 0-credit modules) reflect staff’s specialist expertise in gender studies and may be subject to change. All students undertake supervised empirical research and produce a dissertation of 5,000–0,000 words.

Assessment Assessment is by means of essays, examinations and other written and oral presentations, as well as the dissertation.

Special features This MSc is ideal for part-time students. As far as possible, all core research training modules are taught on Thursdays, enabling the part-timer to be seconded from paid work in a compressed time. During the summer period of Year , they commence their dissertation research. In Year , they complete the optional modules (with lectures and seminars scheduled as far as possible on one morning or afternoon a week) and, in the summer period, finalise their dissertation.

Research areas See the list of departmental research interests on page 9.

Politics and social sciences




MSc in Applied Social Research (Social Policy)

MSc in Applied Social Research (Social Work)

fastFacts

Core modules

fastFacts

plus two of the following:

Duration | Full-time  year; part-time  years

Semester 1

Duration | Full-time  year; part-time  years

• The Research Interview • Survey Questionnaire Design • Ethnographic Practice

Attendance | Full-time up to 8 hours a week; part-time up to 4 hours a week Entry requirements | Normally an upper second class degree or equivalent in the social sciences or a cognate discipline, but applicants with other qualifications and relevant experience are carefully considered. Competence in the English language (IELTS 6.0 or equivalent) is required of international students Fees | www.hull.ac.uk/money Location | Hull Campus Contact | Judy Savage: j.savage@hull.ac.uk | +44 (0)48 4665

About the programme This MSc is built around an integrated social science training programme. It is designed to help meet the anticipated shortage of well-trained social researchers with particular expertise in the field of social policy. It is intended both as a terminal qualification and as first-year training for those proceeding to PhD research at Hull or elsewhere. It is recognised by the Economic and Social Research Council as providing preparatory training for the research degree under the Social Policy panel.

Programme content As a whole, the programme aims to develop in students • a general understanding of the research process in the social sciences • an awareness of the diversity of research styles, approaches or strategies • an ability to rigorously formulate social-policyinformed questions and develop a critical and reflexive methodological approach to address those questions • more specific and practice-based knowledge of a number of quantitative and qualitative (ethnographic) research techniques, and an ability to evaluate their appropriateness to particular research settings and objectives • an appreciation of the linkages between empirical research and theoretical and substantive issues in social policy and related disciplines such as sociology • an ability to complete successful applied research and to effectively and critically use their data and analysis to contribute both to social science knowledge and to applications of that knowledge within and outside academia

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• • • •

Philosophical Issues in Applied Social Research The Research Interview Survey Questionnaire Design Comparative Social Policy

Semester 2 • • • •

Central Issues in Applied Social Research Quantitative Data Analysis Computing with SPSS Explorations of Qualitative Methods

Summer period • Dissertation

Optional modules • • • • • • • •

Crime, Deviance and Social Control Disability, Identity, Society and Media Encountering Development: Why Gender Matters Key Issues in Identity Politics and Policies Youth in Society Ethnographic Practice ‘Community’ Conflict and Social Policy The Policy Process

Further module information The core modules are organised in such a way that there is a logical progression from Semester  to Semester , from the more abstract to the more concrete and from specific research methodologies to their corresponding analytical issues and techniques. Optional modules reflect staff’s specialist expertise in social policy and in related disciplines such as sociology and anthropology, and they may be subject to change. All students undertake supervised empirical research and produce a dissertation of 5,000–0,000 words.

Assessment Assessment is by means of essays, examinations and other written and oral presentations, as well as the dissertation.

Special features This MSc is ideal for part-time students. As far as possible, all core research training modules are taught on Thursdays, enabling the part-timer to be seconded from paid work in a compressed time. During the summer period of Year , they commence their dissertation research. In Year , they complete the optional modules (with lectures and seminars scheduled as far as possible on one morning or afternoon a week) and, in the summer period, finalise their dissertation.

Attendance | Full-time up to 8 hours a week; part-time up to 4 hours a week Entry requirements | Normally an upper second class degree or equivalent in the social sciences or a cognate discipline, but applicants with other qualifications and relevant experience are carefully considered. Competence in the English language (IELTS 6.0 or equivalent) is required of international students Fees | www.hull.ac.uk/money

Semester 2 • • • •

Research in Social Work II Quantitative Data Analysis Computing with SPSS Explorations of Qualitative Methods

Summer period • Dissertation

Location | Hull Campus Contact | Judy Savage: j.savage@hull.ac.uk | +44 (0)48 4665

About the programme This MSc is built around an integrated social science training programme. It is designed to help meet the anticipated shortage of well-trained social researchers among social work professionals. It is intended both as a terminal qualification and as first-year training for those proceeding to PhD research at Hull or elsewhere. It draws on a well-established core research training programme in the social sciences.

Optional modules • • • • • • • • • •

Crime, Deviance and Social Control Disability: Identity, Society and Media Encountering Development: Why Gender Matters Key Issues in Identity Politics and Policies Gender Bodies, Gendered Selves Other(ed) Bodies: Anthropology of Gender and Sexual Diversity NGOs, Governance and the Development Process Perspectives on Childhood The Policy Process Youth in Society

Further module information Programme content As a whole, the programme aims to develop in students • a general understanding of the research process in the social sciences • an awareness of the diversity of research styles, approaches or strategies • an ability to rigorously formulate theoretically informed questions and develop a critical and reflexive methodological approach to address those questions • more specific and practice-based knowledge of a number of quantitative and qualitative (ethnographic) research techniques, and an ability to evaluate their appropriateness to the particular settings and objectives of social work research • an appreciation of the linkages between empirical research and theoretical and substantive issues in social work, with particular reference to their main field(s) of interest • an ability to complete successful applied research and to effectively and critically use their data and analysis to contribute both to social science knowledge and to applications of that knowledge in professional practice and policy development in social work and beyond

Core modules

Research areas

Semester 1

See the list of departmental research interests on page 9.

• Research in Social Work I • Philosophical Issues in Applied Social Research

www.hull.ac.uk/socsci

The core modules (eight 0-credit modules) are organised in such a way that there is a logical progression from Semester  to Semester , from the more abstract to the more concrete and from specific research methodologies to their corresponding analytical issues and techniques. Optional modules (two 0-credit modules) reflect staff’s specialist expertise across the department and may be subject to change. All students undertake supervised empirical research and produce a dissertation of 5,000– 0,000 words.

Assessment Assessment is by means of essays, examinations and other written and oral presentations, as well as the dissertation.

Special features This MSc is ideal for part-time students. As far as possible all core research training modules are taught on Thursdays, enabling the part-timer to be seconded from paid work in a compressed time. During the summer period of Year , they commence their dissertation research. In Year , they complete the optional modules (with lectures and seminars scheduled as far as possible on one morning or afternoon a week) and, in the summer period, finalise their dissertation.

Research areas See the list of departmental research interests on page 9.

Politics and social sciences

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MSc in Applied Social Research (Sociology and Anthropology) fastFacts

Core modules

Duration | Full-time  year; part-time  years

Semester 1

Attendance | Full-time up to 8 hours a week; part-time up to 4 hours a week Entry requirements | Normally an upper second class degree or equivalent in the social sciences or a cognate discipline, but applicants with other qualifications and relevant experience are carefully considered. Competence in the English language (IELTS 6.0 or equivalent) is required of international students Fees | www.hull.ac.uk/money Location | Hull Campus Contact | Judy Savage: j.savage@hull.ac.uk | +44 (0)48 4665

About the programme This MSc is built around an integrated social science training programme. It is designed to help meet the anticipated shortage of well-trained social researchers with particular expertise in anthropological and sociological work of a broadly applied kind. It is intended both as a terminal qualification and as first-year training for those proceeding to PhD research at Hull or elsewhere. It is recognised by the Economic and Social Research Council as providing preparatory training for the research degree under both the Sociology and the Anthropology panel.

Programme content As a whole, the programme aims to develop in students • a general understanding of the research process in the social sciences • an awareness of the diversity of research styles, approaches or strategies • an ability to rigorously formulate sociologically and anthropologically informed questions and develop a critical and reflexive methodological approach to address those questions • more specific and practice-based knowledge of a number of quantitative and qualitative (ethnographic) research techniques, and an ability to evaluate their appropriateness to particular research settings and objectives • an appreciation of the linkages between empirical research and theoretical and substantive issues in sociology and social anthropology, with particular reference to their main field of interest • an ability to complete successful applied research and to effectively and critically use their data and analysis to contribute both to social science knowledge and to applications of that knowledge within and outside academia

• • • •

Philosophical Issues in Applied Social Research The Research Interview Survey Questionnaire Design Ethnographic Practice

Semester 2 • • • •

Central Issues in Applied Social Research Quantitative Data Analysis Computing with SPSS Explorations of Qualitative Methods

Summer period • Dissertation

Optional modules • • • • •

Disability, Identity, Society and Media Encountering Development: Why Gender Matters Key Issues in Identity Politics and Policies Gender Bodies, Gendered Selves Other(ed) Bodies: Anthropology of Gender and Sexual Diversity • NGOs, Governance and the Development Process • Perspectives on Childhood • Youth in Society

Further module information The core modules (eight 0-credit modules) are organised in such a way that there is a logical progression from Semester  to Semester , from the more abstract to the more concrete and from specific research methodologies to their corresponding analytical issues and techniques. Optional modules (two 0-credit modules) reflect staff’s specialist expertise in sociology and anthropology and may be subject to change. All students undertake supervised empirical research and produce a dissertation of 5,000–0,000 words.

Assessment Assessment is by means of essays, examinations and other written and oral presentations, as well as the dissertation.

Special features This MSc is ideal for part-time students. As far as possible, all core research training modules are taught on Thursdays, enabling the part-timer to be seconded from paid work in a compressed time. During the summer period of Year , they commence their dissertation research. In Year , they complete the optional modules (with lectures and seminars scheduled as far as possible on one morning or afternoon a week) and, in the summer period, finalise their dissertation.

Research areas Photograph by Mike Park.

See the list of departmental research interests on page 9.

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www.hull.ac.uk/socsci

Politics and social sciences

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MA in Criminology fastFacts Duration | Full-time  year; part-time  years Attendance | Full-time up to 8 hours a week; part-time up to 4 hours a week Entry requirements | Normally an upper second class degree or equivalent in the social sciences or a cognate discipline, but applicants with other qualifications and relevant experience are carefully considered. Competence in the English language (IELTS 6.0 or equivalent) is required of international students Fees | www.hull.ac.uk/money Location | Hull Campus Contact | Judy Savage: j.savage@hull.ac.uk | +44 (0)48 4665

About the programme This MA provides a comprehensive overview of the major components of criminology studied in the UK, including criminological theory, the criminal justice system, research methods and social control. The structure of the programme makes it an attractive option both to those coming straight from higher education and to those coming from a vocational background. While the degree is not a programme of professional training, it is often seen as a desirable qualification for those seeking to enter or get promoted in the criminal justice sector.

Programme content As a whole, the programme aims to develop in students • an advanced critical understanding of key theoretical perspectives used to understand crime and deviance • an understanding of historical and theoretical approaches to the study of punishment and social control • an advanced understanding of the principles of social science research as applicable to criminological topics, including an awareness of what can be achieved by different methodologies; when a particular methodology is most appropriately used; how the results of research may be evaluated; and the ethical principles governing criminological research • an understanding of the dimensions of social divisions and social diversity (e.g. age, class, ethnicity, gender) in relation to criminological topics • an ability to evaluate controversies in criminal justice and implementation of penal policy

MA in Criminology (Research Training Pathway) Core modules • • • • •

Theorising about Crime Crime, Deviance and Social Control Criminal Justice Research Methods in Criminology Dissertation

Optional modules • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Race and Crime Histories of Punishment Evil Policing Contemporary Imprisonment Surveillance and Social Control The Research Interview Questionnaire Design and Survey Management Ethnographic Practice Philosophical Issues in Social Research Quantitative Data Analysis Computing with SPSS Qualitative Data Analysis Central Issues in Applied Social Research

Further module information In Semester , the core modules (‘Theorising about Crime’ and ‘Crime, Deviance and Social Control’) are complemented by substantive topics relating to ‘crime’ and ‘deviance’. Similarly, in Semester , the core module entitled ‘Criminal Justice’ is taken alongside substantive topics around ‘criminal justice’, ‘punishment’ and ‘social control’. The final requirement is the submission of a ,000–5,000-word dissertation on a criminological topic of your own choice written under the guidance of a supervisor.

Assessment Assessment is by means of essays, examinations and other written and oral presentations, as well as the dissertation.

Special features This MA has been running for over 0 years. It was one of the very first postgraduate courses in criminology to be offered in the UK and has seen many academics, policy makers and senior criminal justice managers pass through its doors. This has contributed to the excellent relations that the Centre for Criminology and Criminal Justice enjoys with local, national and international criminologists and criminal justice agencies. Research funding, reach-out work and PhD students have, in part, stemmed from the MA programme. It is this history, combined with the programme’s academic and vocational appeal, that makes it so distinctive.

Research areas See the list of departmental research interests on page 9.

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fastFacts Duration | Full-time  year; part-time  years Attendance | Full-time up to 8 hours a week; part-time up to 4 hours a week Entry requirements | Normally an upper second class degree or equivalent in the social sciences or a cognate discipline, but applicants with other qualifications and relevant experience are carefully considered. Competence in the English language (IELTS 6.0 or equivalent) is required of international students Fees | www.hull.ac.uk/money Location | Hull Campus Contact | Judy Savage: j.savage@hull.ac.uk | +44 (0)48 4665

About the programme This MA provides a comprehensive overview of both quantitative and qualitative research methods in criminology and the social sciences, including research design, data analysis, SPSS, survey design, ethnography and feminist research methods. The programme is aimed at students wishing to undertake a PhD or pursue research careers in the field of criminal justice, and it is recognised by the Economic and Social Research Council as providing preparatory training for the research degree under the Socio-legal Studies and Criminology panel.

Programme content The programme aims to develop in students • a general understanding of the research process in the social sciences • an awareness of the diversity of research styles, approaches or strategies used in criminological research • more specific and practice-based knowledge of a range of quantitative and qualitative research techniques and an ability to evaluate their appropriateness to particular research settings and objectives • an appreciation of the linkages between empirical research and theoretical and substantive issues within criminology • the ability to complete successful criminological research within particular substantive fields

Core modules • • • • • • •

Research Methods in Criminology The Research Interview Questionnaire Design and Survey Management Quantitative Data Analysis Computing with SPSS Qualitative Data Analysis Dissertation

www.hull.ac.uk/socsci

Optional modules • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Theorising about Crime Crime, Deviance and Social Control I Histories of Punishment Contemporary Imprisonment Policing Ethnographic Practice Philosophical Issues in Social Research Criminal Justice Crime, Deviance and Social Control II Evil Race and Crime Surveillance and Social Control Central Issues in Applied Social Research

Further module information In Semester , you will be introduced to some of the key research techniques likely to be utilised by research students as well as some of the broader epistemological and philosophical issues involved. In Semester , you will learn some of the more specialist techniques and issues of analysis used in both quantitative and qualitative methodological procedures. These courses are complemented by the Research Methods in Criminology module (Semesters  and ), which introduces students to the wide range of research methods used by criminologists. At the same time, you will be encouraged to develop practical skills such as writing a research proposal and analysing observational field notes provided by the course lecturer. Finally, in the compulsory Dissertation module you will be encouraged to focus on the application of social research methods and skills in a criminological context.

Assessment Assessment is by means of essays, examinations and other written and oral presentations, as well as the dissertation.

Special features This programme offers an effective marriage of criminological study and research methods. Its core modules focus primarily on research training, while a number of options in criminology and research methods are also available. Within the criminology modules, a fundamental concern with the limits and problems of research evidence is ever present. You must take at least one criminology option as well as Research Methods in Criminology. Apart from this restriction, you will be free to choose from a range of postgraduate social research and criminology modules.

Research areas See the list of departmental research interests on page 9.

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MA/LLM in Criminology and Human Rights

MA in Development Studies

fastFacts

fastFacts

Duration | Full-time  year; part-time  years Attendance | Full-time up to 8 hours a week; part-time up to 4 hours a week Entry requirements | Normally an upper second class degree or equivalent in the social sciences or a cognate discipline, but applicants with other qualifications and relevant experience are carefully considered. Competence in the English language (IELTS 6.0 or equivalent) is required of international students Fees | www.hull.ac.uk/money Location | Hull Campus Contact | Judy Savage: j.savage@hull.ac.uk | +44 (0)48 4665

About the programme This programme is run jointly by the Department of Social Sciences and the School of Law. It explores the changing relationships between crime, criminal justice and human rights, and it is designed for those wishing to pursue careers in the public or the voluntary sector, especially in jobs with a strong focus on the protection of human rights generally or in the justice system. The programme will also be attractive to criminal justice professionals who want to update and broaden their knowledge in these areas for the purpose of career advancement. It is intended both as a terminal qualification and as preparation for those wishing to pursue further studies at doctoral level.

Programme content As well as core modules in the theory and law of human rights and in criminological theory, you will study options in international human rights law and criminology. The modules give students the opportunity to explore and critically analyse the conflicts between the need to maintain ‘law and order’ and the desire to protect human rights. There is a particular focus on controversial human rights issues and problems, nationally and internationally. This allows for comparative analysis and international understanding.

Core modules • • • •

40

Foundations of Human Rights (0 credits) Theorising about Crime (0 credits) Human Rights Violations (0 credits) Dissertation (60 credits)

Politics and social sciences

Optional modules • • • • • • • • • •

Criminal Justice (0 credits) International Human Rights Protection (0 credits) Law of Self-Determination (0 credits) Policing (0 credits) Democratic Values and International Law (0 credits) International Labour Standards (0 credits) Peacemaking Criminology (0 credits) Surveillance and Social Control (0 credits) Evil (0 credits) Race and Crime (0 credits)

Further module information Students take a maximum of 80 credits for the MA/LLM degree. Full-time students take two core modules and one optional module (60 credits) in Semester  and one core module and two optional modules (60 credits) in Semester . Part-time students take two core modules and one optional module (60 credits) during their first year of study, and one core module and two optional modules (60 credits) during their second year. All students undertake a supervised written dissertation (60 credits) during the summer of their last year of study. (You may choose a topic in law, in criminology or in both.) Completion of 0 module credits, excluding the dissertation, leads to a Postgraduate Diploma. Students may wish to terminate their study at this stage. Successful completion of the dissertation leads to the award of the MA/LLM. Students who have willingly terminated their studies at the diploma stage may return at a later time to complete a dissertation for the award of the MA/LLM.

Assessment Assessment is by means of essay, examinations and a supervised dissertation of 5,000–0,000 words.

Duration | Full-time  year; part-time  years Attendance | Full-time up to 8 hours a week; part-time up to 4 hours a week Entry requirements | Normally an upper second class degree or equivalent in the social sciences or a cognate discipline, but applicants with other qualifications and relevant experience are carefully considered. Competence in the English language (IELTS 6.0 or equivalent) is required of international students Fees | www.hull.ac.uk/money

• • • • • • • • • • • •

Location | Hull Campus Contact | Judy Savage: j.savage@hull.ac.uk | +44 (0)48 4665

About the programme This MA will be of interest both to those wishing to enter a career in the field of development and to those development practitioners wishing to enhance their theoretical and practical knowledge.

Programme content This interdisciplinary programme develops an understanding of problems and processes of change in the developing world, with particular attention given to social, political and environmental aspects. There is a strong emphasis on gender and development in a global context, on non-governmental organisations and on the impact of globalisation. The programme aims to

The degree can be taken as an MA or an LLM. This will depend on module options taken. The programme is designed for both full-time and part-time students. As far as possible, allowance is made for part-time students to attend one day per week. Full-time students normally attend two days per week.

• introduce the major practical and theoretical issues in contemporary development studies • provide a broad range of specialist options relevant to those wishing to work or undertake further study/research in the field of development • provide specific and practice-based knowledge of a number of quantitative and qualitative research techniques • be of particular value to those wishing to become development practitioners

Research areas

Core modules

See the list of departmental research interests on page 9.

The compulsory core module, Theorising Development, extends across the first two semesters.

Special features

General optional modules Key Issues in Identity Politics and Policies Environmental Policy and Technology Contemporary Research in Human Geography International Trends in Public Management Management in Education Aquatic Resources Development and Planning The Slave Trade: Abolition and Suppression The Demography of Slavery e-Learning: Context, Management and Implementation World Trade Organisation Dispute Settlement Curriculum Development and Managing Change Language modules in French, German, Italian and Spanish

Research training modules • • • • • • •

Ethnographic Practice Philosophical Issues in Applied Social Research The Research Interview Survey Methods and Questionnaire Design Central Issues in Applied Social Research Qualitative Data Analysis Quantitative Data Analysis

Dissertation All students undertake supervised empirical research and produce a dissertation of 5,000–0,000 words.

Further module information You must complete the core module plus two key optional modules over the two semesters, together with general optional modules and at least one but no more than four training modules.

Assessment Assessment is by means of essays, individual and group projects, presentations, reports and the dissertation.

Special features This MA draws on a range of interdisciplinary work in the social sciences and humanities, provides specialist research training and allows you the option of studying a language. Students participate in the research seminars and workshops convened by the University’s interdisciplinary Centre for the Study of Comparative Change and Development (www.hull.ac.uk/cccd).

Research areas Key optional modules • • • • • • •

See the list of departmental research interests on page 9.

Encountering Development: Why Gender Matters Current Perspectives on Gender and Development Environment and Development in Africa Democratisation, Nationalism and Ethnicity in Asia NGDOs, Governance and the Development Process Globalisation, Citizenship and Human Rights Foundations of Human Rights

www.hull.ac.uk/socsci

Politics and social sciences

4


MA in Diversity, Culture and Identity

MA in Gender Studies

fastFacts

Core modules

fastFacts

Duration | Full-time  year; part-time  years

Semester 1

Duration | Full-time  year; part-time  years

Attendance | Full-time up to 8 hours a week; part-time up to 4 hours a week Entry requirements | Normally an upper second class degree or equivalent in the social sciences or a cognate discipline, but applicants with other qualifications and relevant experience are carefully considered. Competence in the English language (IELTS 6.0 or equivalent) is required of international students Fees | www.hull.ac.uk/money Location | Hull Campus Contact | Judy Savage: j.savage@hull.ac.uk | +44 (0)48 4665

• Key Issues in Identity Politics and Policies  plus two of the following: • Philosophical Issues in Applied Social Research • The Research Interview • Survey Questionnaire Design • Ethnographic Practice

Semester 2 • Key Issues in Identity Politics and Policies II plus two of the following: • Central Issues in Applied Social Research • Quantitative Data Analysis • Computing with SPSS • Qualitative Data Analysis

Attendance | Full-time up to 8 hours a week; part-time up to 4 hours a week Entry requirements | Normally an upper second class degree or equivalent in the social sciences or a cognate discipline, but applicants with other qualifications and relevant experience are carefully considered. Competence in the English language (IELTS 6.0 or equivalent) is required of international students

This MA capitalises on the Department of Social Sciences’ strengths in sociology, anthropology, social policy and gender studies and combines these disciplines in a distinctive way. The programme focuses on issues of cultural difference (gender, sexuality, race, postcoloniality, disability), power, policy and social justice. While many of these are key themes in MA programmes in cultural or identity politics elsewhere, this MA is distinctive insofar as it brings theoretical perspectives to bear directly on social policy issues. It will therefore appeal both to students interested in vocational training and to theoretically oriented students who wish to have an applied element in their studies.

Programme content The key themes addressed in the programme include • the key theoretical debates surrounding issues of cultural differences and inequalities in local and global (post-national) contexts • the main political movements reflected in and fostered by these debates • the ways in which these debates relate to issues of social policy and provision • the ways in which social policy and provision shapes cultural differences and inequalities • how social research investigates the social world and makes choices about different methods of research • the main sources of data derived from social surveys and other systematic collections, and an in-depth critical grasp of the methods used to collect and analyse such data • how critically to evaluate the outcomes of social policy interventions

• • • • • • • • •

Current Issues in Development Current Trends in Social Theory Family and Household in Cross-Cultural Perspective Anthropology and the Environment Crime, Deviance and Social Control Disability Policy, Identity and Society Encountering Development: Why Gender Matters Gender Bodies, Gendered Selves Other(ed) Bodies: Anthropology of Gender and Sexual Diversity • The Slave Trade: Abolition and Suppression • The Demography of Slavery

Further module information Optional modules may be subject to change. All students also undertake supervised empirical research and, over the summer period, produce a dissertation of 5,000–0,000 words.

Assessment Assessment is by means of essays, examinations and other written and oral presentations, as well as the dissertation.

Special features This MA is ideal for part-time students. As far as possible, all lectures and seminars are timetabled in such a way that the part-timer can be seconded from paid work in a compressed time. During the summer period of Year , they commence their dissertation research. In Year , they complete the optional modules and, in the summer period, finalise their dissertation. Interested students may be able to undertake a short summer internship working for a relevant organisation.

Research areas See the list of departmental research interests on page 9.

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Politics and social sciences

Core modules • Feminism, Politics and Power (Semester ) • Gender Bodies, Gendered Selves (Semester ) • Dissertation (summer period)

Fees | www.hull.ac.uk/money Location | Hull Campus Contact | Judy Savage: j.savage@hull.ac.uk | +44 (0)48 4665

Optional modules About the programme

• analyse the value of feminist work and more generally gendered analyses within a range of contexts • reflect critically on the findings of different kinds of feminist research (including empirical and textual research) • critically apply a gendered perspective to a wide range of issues and tasks

About the programme As we go forward in the st century an understanding of gender relations has never been more crucial. The 0th century saw a fundamental transformation of gender relations, which continues to have a profound impact on economies and social relations worldwide. In response, gender issues have become a major focus within both academic and political spheres. Not only have they had a profound theoretical impact across the social sciences, philosophy and literature; they have also influenced policy making in Europe and North America, where equal-opportunities policies have radically affected employment legislation. Globally, gender issues have become a focus and preoccupation for political activity and social movements of all kinds. The UN conferences on women demonstrate the pervasive commitment of key decision makers to gender-related issues, and the promotion of gender equality and women’s empowerment forms a central tenet of the Millennium Development Goals launched by the United Nations in 000. Within this context, the MA in Gender Studies is making a major contribution to an established but still developing academic and political agenda.

Programme content Students who complete the programme will be able to • command an advanced and critical knowledge and understanding of contemporary gender theories • critically apply an interdisciplinary approach to the study of gender • demonstrate an advanced understanding of research methods relevant to their particular field of interest in women’s and gender studies • analyse the social, ethical and political implications of feminist research

www.hull.ac.uk/socsci

Optional modules • Independent Gender Research • Other(ed) Bodies: Anthropology of Gender and Sexual Diversity • Race, Ethnicity and Gender • Encountering Development: Why Gender Matters • Current Perspectives in Gender and Development • Feminist Historiography • Women’s Movements Worldwide • Feminist Perspectives in Social Research • Race, Ethnicity and Gender • Key Issues in Identity Politics and Policies I & II • Foundations of Human Rights • Family Matters • Sex and Gender

Further module information The MA programme comprises two semesters of taught modules with a third ‘semester’ (the summer vacation) devoted to completion of the dissertation. Postgraduate Diploma students complete 0 credits of taught modules but are not required to complete the 60-credit dissertation. Each semester, students combine core and optional modules. Options may be subject to availability and timetabling constraints.

Assessment Assessment is by means of essays, examinations and other written and oral presentations, as well as the dissertation.

Special features Gender Studies at Hull is one of the best-established interdisciplinary programmes in the country, drawing from a range of academic work across the humanities and social sciences.

Research areas See the list of departmental research interests on page 9.

Politics and social sciences

4


MA in Gender and Development

MA in Women’s and Gender Studies (GEMMA)

fastFacts

Examples of optional modules

fastFacts

Duration | Full-time  year; part-time  years

Gender modules

Duration | Full-time  year; part-time  years

Attendance | Full-time up to 8 hours a week; part-time up to 4 hours a week Entry requirements | Normally an upper second class degree or equivalent in the social sciences or a cognate discipline, but applicants with other qualifications and relevant experience are carefully considered. Competence in the English language (IELTS 6.0 or equivalent) is required of international students Fees | www.hull.ac.uk/money Location | Hull Campus Contact | Judy Savage: j.savage@hull.ac.uk | +44 (0)48 4665

About the programme Drawing on ideas and examples from Africa, Asia, Latin America and Europe, this MA explores both development theories and substantive issues, paying special attention to a gendered analysis of development. The core modules equip students with conceptual and methodological tools which are then applied to a range of issues such as gender and globalisation, industrialisation, rural change, household-level analyses, children and development, and environmental discourses. The optional modules come under three headings: gender, development, and research skills training.

Programme content Students who complete the MA will be able to • command an advanced and critical knowledge and understanding of contemporary gender and development theories • critically apply an interdisciplinary approach to the study of gender and development • demonstrate an advanced understanding of research methods relevant to their particular field of interest in gender and development studies • analyse the social, ethical and political implications of gender and development research • analyse the value of feminist work and more generally gendered analyses within a range of contexts • critically apply a gendered perspective to a wide range of issues and tasks

Core modules • Encountering Development: Why Gender Matters (Semester ) • Current Issues in Gender and Development (Semester ) • Dissertation (summer period)

• • • • • • • • •

Feminism, Politics and Power Gendered Bodies, Gendered Selves Race, Ethnicity and Gender Feminist Historiography Women’s Movements Worldwide Key Issues in Identity Politics and Policies I & II Family Matters Language, Communication and Context Sex and Gender

Development-related modules • • • • •

Environmental Policy and Technology Contemporary Research in Human Geography Foundations of Human Rights Human Rights Violations Decolonisation: The Transition from British Rule in Asia, Africa and the Middle East • The Slave Trade: Abolition and Suppression • The Environment in Theory and Practice • NGOs, Governance and the Development Process

Research training modules • • • • • • • • •

Ethnographic Practice The Research Interview Survey Methods and Questionnaire Design Philosophical Issues in Applied Social Research Central Issues in Applied Social Research Quantitative Data Analysis Qualitative Data Analysis Research Methods in the Humanities Feminist Perspectives in Social Research

Further module information There are two semesters of taught modules, with the summer period devoted to the dissertation. Students combine core modules with various options. Depending on your prior knowledge of gender theory, you may be advised to take Feminism, Politics and Power or Gendered Bodies, Gendered Selves as an option.

Assessment This is by essays, examinations and other written and oral presentations, as well as the dissertation.

Special features This MA draws on a range of interdisciplinary work in the social sciences and humanities and provides specialist research training. Students participate in the research seminars and workshops convened by the University’s interdisciplinary Centre for the Study of Comparative Change and Development (www.hull.ac.uk/cccd).

Research areas See the list of departmental research interests on page 9.

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Attendance | Up to 8 hours a week Entry requirements | Normally an upper second class degree or equivalent in the social sciences or a cognate discipline, but applicants with other qualifications and relevant experience are carefully considered. Competence in the English language (IELTS 6.0 or equivalent) is required of international students Fees | www.hull.ac.uk/money Location | Hull Campus Contact | Judy Savage: j.savage@hull.ac.uk | +44 (0)48 4665

About the programme The GEMMA programme is the first MA of its kind and falls in line with the implementation of the Bologna Process in European postgraduate provision. It carries high prestige within the European Union. It involves a consortium partnership between eight European universities: Hull, Granada, Oviedo, Utrecht, Bologna, Lodz, Institutum Studiorum Humanitatis (Ljubljana) and Central European University (Hungary). Successful applicants spend one year in their selected ‘home’ institution and all or half of their second year at a selected partner university. Successful candidates are awarded a dual Masters from both universities.

Programme content

Optional modules • Gendered Bodies, Gendered Selves • Independent Gender Research • Other(ed) Bodies: Anthropology of Gender and Sexual Diversity • Current Issues in Gender and Development • Key Issues in Identity Politics and Policies II: Cultures and Practices of In/equalities • Encountering Development: Why Gender Matters • Hystorical Fictions: Gender and Sexuality in the NeoVictorian Novel • Human Rights Violations • Research Skills, Methods and Methodologies II • Gender and Monstrosity: 880 to the Present

Further module information The programme offers institutionally specific optional modules across partner institutions alongside four common core modules. The programme totals 40 credits (0 ECTS), of which 80 credits (90 ECTS) are taught and 60 credits (0 ECTS) are for the final dissertation. Students spend their first year in the home institution completing all taught core modules (60 credits) and their optional modules (60 credits), totalling 0 credits (60 ECTS). In Year  they spend one or two semesters in their selected partner institution. They all take 60 credits (0 ECTS) of options in Semester  in the partner institution. They can then return to their home institution in Semester  to complete their final dissertation (60 credits / 0ECTS). Alternatively, they may remain at the partner institution during Semester  and complete the dissertation there, under joint supervision.

Students who complete the programme will be able to • command an advanced and critical knowledge and understanding of contemporary gender theories • critically apply an interdisciplinary approach to the study of gender • demonstrate an advanced understanding of research methods relevant to their particular field of interest in women’s and gender studies • analyse the social, ethical and political implications of feminist research • analyse the value of feminist work and more generally gendered analyses within a range of contexts • critically apply a gendered perspective to a wide range of issues and tasks • negotiate different European university environments

Core modules • Feminist Theory: Between Difference and Diversity • Feminist Methodology: Interdisciplinary Methods in Women’s and Gender Studies • Feminist Historiography • Women’s Movements Worldwide • Dissertation

www.hull.ac.uk/socsci

Assessment Assessment is by means of essays, examinations and other written and oral presentations, as well as the dissertation.

Special features This is a pioneering and highly prestigious dual Masters degree offering students the opportunity to study at various European universities in a choice of English, Spanish and Italian languages. It is an interdisciplinary programme, providing gender modules across the social sciences, the humanities and literary studies. A number of full scholarships (living allowance plus fees) are available on a competitive basis for both EU and nonEU applicants. These are awarded by the European Commission (Erasmus Mundus). Applications are made through the GEMMA website at www.ugr.es/~gemma.

Research areas See the list of departmental research interests on page 9.

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45


MA in Social Work fastFacts Duration | Full-time  years Attendance | Year : about  hours a week; Year : Practice Learning Opportunities ( x 00 days) and dissertation Entry requirements | A first or second class Honours degree (in any subject) or, exceptionally, a relevant professional qualification, plus at least Key Skills Level  (normally equivalent to GCSE grade C) in English and Mathematics. Experience of working in a ‘helping capacity’ is also desirable. Fees/funding | Most UK students receive financial support from the General Social Care Council. Bursaries cover all course fees and expenses, but self-financing students must meet all such costs themselves Location | Hull Campus Contact | Dave Marsland: d.marsland@hull.ac.uk | T +44 (0)48 46666 | F +44 (0)48 465705

About the programme This innovative two-year taught MA constitutes the professional qualification for social work, and successful completion will allow you to register with the General Social Care Council. It is run by the University in partnership with the Social Services departments in Hull, East Yorkshire, North Lincolnshire and North East Lincolnshire as well as local users and carers and a number of other partners from the voluntary and independent sectors.

Year 1 modules Core modules • • • • •

Introduction to Social Work I & II Mental Health Social Work Social Work Research Vulnerability, Risk and Protection Therapeutic Communication

MA in Restorative Justice (online) Practice Learning 1 This 00-day placement involves the planned and focused learning of skills assisted by practice teaching and is designed to ensure that specified learning objectives are met. Here you rehearse in detail your ability to perform the basic tasks of day-to-day social work. By the end of the placement you must have demonstrated your competence to do simple things well.

Practice Learning 2 (completed after the dissertation) Where possible this 00-day practice learning opportunity is relevant to your chosen specialist module. By the end of it, your performance must be at a level appropriate to a qualified social worker.

Dissertation module You will receive a handbook to help you with the preparation and writing. Workshops are also held to assist you, and you will receive individual supervision from a member of staff with expertise in your chosen area of study. The dissertation is 5,000–0,000 words long.

Assessment Modes of assessment include case studies, presentations, multi-choice questionnaires and traditional essays. Each method is that which most effectively assesses the knowledge and skills taught, and we aim to achieve a balanced assessment.

Special features Strong relationships with local service users and carers and with a range of local agencies as well as the University’s own social work agency, FASU (Family Assessment and Support Unit), allow us to provide highquality placements which offer excellent learning opportunities. FASU, which supports children and families, has been nationally recognised for its innovations in practice learning for social work. You may spend your first placement in FASU, following a scheme designed to enhance your professional skills and to ensure consonance between the practical and theoretical parts of the programme.

Specialist modules You will choose four of these modules: • Social Work with Children, Young People and their Families • Social Work with Adults • Substance Misuse • Loss, Dying and Bereavement • Working with Young Offenders • Social Work with Asylum Seekers and Refugees

Year 2 modules In Year  you will complete two practice modules and your dissertation. Practice learning opportunities are building blocks towards professional qualification. Most are taken in the voluntary and independent sectors.

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Research areas See the list of departmental research interests on page 9.

Applications Application is normally made a year in advance through UCAS. New applications can be made from early September for admission in the following academic year. The normal closing date is 5 January, but we will consider applications after this date. We offer places to applicants whose qualifications, experience, references and quality of application (including the personal statement) persuade us of their excellence. Individual interviews are held for all applicants.

fastFacts Duration | Full-time  year; part-time  years Attendance | Full-time up to 8 hours a week; part-time up to 4 hours a week (online lectures, activities and discussion) Entry requirements | Normally a . degree or equivalent in a law, social sciences or cognate discipline, but those with other qualifications and relevant experience – particularly restorative justice experience – are carefully considered. Competence in the English language is also required Fees | www.hull.ac.uk/marj Location | n/a (distance learning) Contact | Law School: lawpg@hull.ac.uk | 048 465857 | F 048 46688

About the programme The MA in Restorative Justice was developed and is taught by academics at the forefront of restorative justice scholarship. The programme provides a unique opportunity to study this fascinating and important phenomenon. It is suitable for • graduates looking to specialise after their first degree • those involved in the practice of restorative justice in a professional or voluntary capacity • professionals and managers in criminal justice agencies, educational institutions, the health sector, business and international conflict resolution who are interested in finding out about the potential of restorative justice • anybody with an interest in the future of criminal justice and conflict resolution The programme commences in September of each year and runs for  months (full-time) or 4 months (parttime). For further details go to www.hull.ac.uk/marj.

Programme content

Core modules • • • • • •

The Principles of Restorative Justice International Restorative Processes Crime, Justice and Punishment Victims, Rights and Justice Peacemaking Criminology Research Skills for Restorative Justice

You must also undertake a dissertation over the summer period.

Further module information Modules are taught online, and students have the opportunity to read lectures that have been written by published authorities in the field. Lectures are supported by books, DVDs and CD-ROMs which are included in the course fee. Online discussion between students and academics at the University is built into the weekly sessions, and this is further supported by one-to-one email supervision. Students are given opportunities to visit the University and to meet both staff and students working and studying on the course. The dissertation is an independent study of ,000–5,000 words, supervised by an academic member of staff.

Assessment Assessment is by essays which are submitted digitally to the University for marking. There are no examinations on this course, though there will be one or two introductory web- and computer-based tasks to help familiarise you with the learning environment.

Special features The MA in Restorative Justice is a distance-learning programme which can be studied off campus where and when it suits you best, whether full-time or part-time. It can be studied alongside full-time employment (we recommend the part-time programme in this case) and without visiting the UK. However, students have the opportunity to visit the UK and the University twice during the programme if they wish (accommodation and food are provided, but we do not pay your travel costs).

The MA imparts an understanding of • the key ideas and values of restorative justice • the historical development of restorative justice and its various contemporary applications • the relationship of restorative justice to traditional conceptions of criminal justice • the nature of the key practices of restorative justice, such as conferencing, victim–offender mediation and circle processes • the knowledge and skills required to evaluate critically the ideas and practices of restorative justice • the aims and methods of research into restorative justice • what we know about the effects of restorative justice

www.hull.ac.uk/socsci

Research areas The Law School and the Department of Social Sciences have strong reputations in the field of restorative justice and related subject areas. A number of individuals from both departments are at the forefront of restorative justice scholarship. Further details may be found at • www.hull.ac.uk/law/research • www.hull.ac.uk/socsci

Politics and social sciences

47


MA in Spirituality Studies fastFacts Duration | Full-time  year; part-time  years Attendance | Full-time 6 hours a week of seminars; parttime –4 hours a week of seminars Entry requirements | BA equivalent to a British Honours degree of second class or higher. Minimum IELTS score of 6.0 for non-native English-speakers Fees | www.hull.ac.uk/money Location | Hull Campus Contact | Paul Dearey: h.p.dearey@hull.ac.uk | +44 (0)48 46584

About the programme Spirituality studies is a rapidly growing field. The University has established a distinctive identity in this field through its Centre for Spirituality Studies, focusing on the interdisciplinary complexity of spirituality and the development of corresponding generic methodologies and theories. The programme is designed to meet the needs of anyone with an interest in the study of contemporary spirituality, including professionals in health, education and social work as well as religious professionals. Students benefit from the opportunity to share their different perspectives and contexts. The degree can be studied either full-time over one year or part-time over two. The part-time route enables students to combine their studies with their normal employment. Students can obtain a 60-credit Advanced Certificate, a 0-credit Advanced Diploma or a 80-credit MA in Spirituality Studies.

Programme content Students learn the concepts and methodologies necessary to study different spiritualities. The multifaceted nature of spirituality means that it must be studied from a range of perspectives, including sociology, psychology, anthropology, philosophy, hermeneutics and theology. You will study research literature, policy documentation and guidelines on spirituality most relevant to your own specialist area. You will be introduced to contemporary debates concerning spirituality and the emerging research agendas in educational studies, nursing and social work. Meanwhile you will also develop research and presentational skills. Students wishing to obtain a Masters degree must complete, under supervision, a 5,000-word dissertation worth 60 credits.

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Core modules • • • •

Theorising Spirituality Researching Spirituality Research Seminar in Spirituality Dissertation

Optional modules • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Spirituality in Health Care Spiritual Assessment in Health Care Practice Spirituality in Social Work Spirituality in Education Indian Philosophy Buddhist Ethics Loss, Bereavement and Palliative Care Interpreting Religious Practice Research Methods Empirical Studies in Educational Research Developing Professional and Interpersonal Skills Christian Leadership in Education School Chaplaincy in Action Applied Christian Ethics Introduction to Research Methods and Project Planning Advanced Health and Social Research The Nature of School Chaplaincy

Scarborough

Hull Manchester

Assessment Candidates are assessed by means of coursework assignments, seminar presentations and a dissertation. Coursework is assessed during the semester in which the module is delivered.

London

Rotterdam Brussels

Special features

Lille

• Learn about spirituality in an interdisciplinary context. • Learn about spirituality within the Every Child Matters framework, and about holistic frameworks such as SEAL (Social and Emotional Aspects of Learning). • Apply the concepts of spirituality to the core themes, issues, values and skills pertaining to social work. • In the areas of nursing and health care, learn about the ethics and practices of undertaking spiritual assessments of patients’ and clients’ needs.

Paris

Research areas The programme is staffed by experts in social work, educational studies, nursing, theology and philosophy of religion.

Admissions Service University of Hull Hull, HU6 7RX, UK T 01482 466850 F 01482 442290 E pgstudy@hull.ac.uk

Luxembourg


Independent surveys show that Hull’s Department of Politics and International Studies is one of the finest in the UK, and not just because of its excellent teaching. In the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise, more than a third of submissions by our staff were rated as internationally excellent or world-leading. Change the way you think.

www.hull.ac.uk


PG_pol&socsci