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Postgraduate study 2011

Education


The Graduate School is the main administrative focus on the Hull Campus for our research students.


Taught Masters degrees | 4 Master of Education Early Childhood Studies eLearning Inclusive Education Leadership and Learning Mentoring in Education Music, Technology and Education

Contents

The Faculty of Education | 2

Research degrees | 14 Admissions and fees Doctor of Philosophy Doctor of Education Master of Philosophy Master of Education (by research) Supervision Postgraduate training The Graduate School Research seminars Applying for a research degree

International students | 17 Offers of admission Accommodation Welfare and support

Staff and their interests | 18

Other options in education The University of Hull offers a number of other postgraduate courses supporting professional development in education which do not appear in this brochure. These include • Postgraduate Certificate in Education (PGCE) Early Years (3–7 years) at the Scarborough Campus • Postgraduate Certificate in Education (PGCE) Primary (5–11 years) at the Hull Campus • Postgraduate Certificate in Education (PGCE) Secondary at the Hull Campus • Advanced Certificate in Sustained Professional Development (ACSPD) at either the Hull or the Scarborough Campus • Postgraduate Early Years Professional Status training options, including Postgraduate Certificate in Early Childhood Education and Care (EYPS) • Postgraduate Certificate in Higher Education (PGCertHE) at the Hull Campus • Post-Compulsory Education and Training (PCET) at the Hull Campus • Advanced Certificate in Educational Studies (ACES) at the Hull Campus For more details on these courses, please request a subject brochure from Admissions Service University of Hull Hull, HU6 7RX, UK T +44 (0)1482 466850 F +44 (0)1482 442290 E pgstudy@hull.ac.uk Alternatively, see www.hull.ac.uk/education.

www.hull.ac.uk

As well as initial teacher training, we provide a wide range of courses at all levels from University Foundation Awards through Bachelors degrees to Masters and doctoral programmes. Education

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The Faculty of Education

The programmes described in this booklet are chiefly the concern of the staff of the Centre for Educational Studies (CES) and the Scarborough School of Education (SSE), each of these being part of the Faculty of Education. The CES is home to a group of around 60 staff, all involved in developing learning communities. It encompasses both teaching and research, centred on schools and reaching out to everyone concerned with learning. As well as initial teacher training (for primary and secondary teachers), we provide a wide range of courses at all levels from University Foundation Awards through Bachelors degrees to Masters and doctoral programmes. Courses are for new and experienced schoolteachers and other education workers, and many involve training and research in the wider community. Staff of the CES are involved in a number of research groups and engaged in a range of research activities with local communities and other organisations further afield. Major sponsors over recent years have included the National College for School Leadership, the Health Education Authority, the British Council, the Esmée Fairburn Foundation and the Leverhulme Trust. Partnership work includes collaboration on initial teacher training with the SSE, and there are many links with the Centre for Lifelong Learning. We also work with other universities and schools, enhancing the University’s commitment to educational achievement in the region and beyond. The CES is committed to understanding and developing learning communities. As a university centre, we specialise in accreditation and research, and these interests inform all our work. For example, we provide opportunities for the Masters-level research of our PGCE, MA and MEd students to be used by schools and others to help enhance the quality of learning in and beyond the region. The SSE has teacher education at the core of its mission and has been training primary school teachers for more than 50 years. The school enjoys a national reputation, and in the last two teacher training inspections (2004 and 2007) it received Grade 1 ratings in Management and Quality Assurance. Since 2000, the SSE has diversified into related areas of education and is well placed to offer Masters-level courses in Mentoring in Education and in Music, Technology and Education.

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www.hull.ac.uk

Education

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Taught Masters degrees

The programmes, mostly available full-time or part-time, are aimed at people who are working or are interested in working in education. All taught Masters degrees in education are offered as a Master of Education (MEd), with some named routes available. To graduate on a named route, at least two-thirds of the credit accumulated will be specialist in nature. Students are thus able to enrol for • • • • • • •

MEd MEd – Early Childhood Studies MEd – eLearning MEd – Inclusive Education MEd – Leadership and Learning MEd – Mentoring in Education (part-time only) MEd – Music, Technology and Education

You choose your route and are advised as to which modules are appropriate and necessary. The first 120 credits of the programme are taken in modules of 20 credits each, with at least three from those designated as specific for a chosen route. The last 60 credits comprise a single piece of work (usually a dissertation), again on your chosen specialist subject. Opportunities exist for transfer across to a different route, where a new pattern of modules emerges that no longer corresponds to the original plan.

Which campus? Most of the programmes are available only at the Hull Campus or the Scarborough Campus; one of them is available at either campus. (See the course outlines on pages 6–12 for details of location.) Please note, however, that any residential elements of your programme – summer schools, for example – will normally be held at the excellently equipped Scarborough Campus.

Entry to the degrees Admission is in accordance with University regulations for higher taught programmes. Prospective students will either (a) have been awarded a Bachelors degree normally in the first or second class (GPA of 3.0+) in an appropriate subject of this university or of another institution approved by the Academic Approvals Committee or (b) have been awarded professional qualification(s) or gained relevant professional experience, or both. Normally, therefore, applicants have a first degree or professional qualifications in education or training, or they have both. Applicants with an ordinary Bachelors degree (GPA >3.0) may apply for entry to a preMasters programme run by the University each summer. Successful completion of this programme leads to automatic entry to the Masters degree.

Advanced standing Applicants with appropriate entry qualifications may seek advanced standing for one of the following reasons: • credits gained at a recognised higher education institution (credit transfer) • experiential learning Up to 120 credits can be awarded in this way. Credit transfer Advanced standing can be given for credit accumulated at this university or another higher education institution. Common examples are • Postgraduate Certificate in Education (PGCE) for Qualified Teacher Status (can be worth up to 60 credits providing awarding university has included Level 7 credits) • Advanced Certificate in Sustained Professional Development (60 credits) • Post-16 Subject Leaders Programme (60 credits) • Postgraduate Certificate in Early Years Education and Care (University of Hull – 60 credits)

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Experiential learning Some of the most common claims for advanced standing come from • National Professional Qualifications such as NPQH or NPQICL (usually worth 60 credits) • professional development programmes from the National College for School Leadership such as Leading from the Middle, Leadership Pathways and Leadership Programme for Serving Headteachers (usually worth 30 credits for each programme). • Early Years Professional Status (funding by Children’s Workforce Development Agency – 60 credits) • Teaching and Learning Academy (TLA) projects at Levels 2 and 3 (usually worth 20 credits for each project) Contacts Anyone wishing to apply for advanced standing is welcome to contact Dr Trevor Male Director, Postgraduate Taught Programmes in Education + 44 (0)1482 465224 t.d.male@hull.ac.uk or CES Admissions Office +44 (0)1482 466216 admissions-ces@hull.ac.uk

www.hull.ac.uk

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Master of Education MEd/Diploma/Certificate FastFacts

Programme content

Duration | Full-time one year; part-time three years

In each of Stages 1 and 2, MEd candidates take three 20credit modules (120 credits in all).

Attendance | Full-time two days a week; part-time one day a week (with options for part-time international students to attend two summer schools in the UK) Entry requirements | First degree or equivalent in a relevant subject (GPA of 3.0+) or appropriate experience in a professional environment (IELTS 6.0 or equivalent for international students) Fees | Please see www.hull.ac.uk/money Location | Hull Campus Contact | Admissions Office, Centre for Educational Studies: + 44 (0)1482 466216 | admissions-ces@hull.ac.uk

About the programme This degree is designed to meet the needs of UK and international students with experience of working in education and those interested in a career in this field. It gives you the opportunity to extend your knowledge and understanding of • a range of current educational practice • current matters of debate in the educational world • key issues related to educational practice This degree has proven appeal for a broad range of teachers and educational managers in the UK and for participants from an increasing number of countries overseas. We make them feel welcome, well advised, well taught and supported. The programme can be studied either full- or part-time. The part-time route is most common for home students, most of whom can combine it with their normal educational employment. Most overseas students study for the degree as a one-year full-time programme, but special arrangements have been made to allow part-time students from overseas to participate: students will attend two summer schools (held annually in the UK) and complete their studies in their own country through use of open-learning materials.

Full-time students normally take the following modules, although other options will be permitted in exceptional cases. Part-time students either take the modules from the full-time route or study optional modules from other pathways. • • • • • •

Critical Issues in Education (core) Introduction to Curriculum and Assessment Theory Perspectives on Learning Leading the Educational Organisation Leadership for Learning Research Methods in Education

At the end of Stage 1, you may exit the programme with a Postgraduate Certificate in Education as long as you have earned 60 credits and have successfully completed the core module. Students undertaking Stage 2 of the degree will complete a further three modules (a total of 120 credits) and, if exiting at this point, be awarded a Postgraduate Diploma in Education. Although participants may exit with the Diploma having accumulated 120 credits, the module Research Methods in Education is required for progression to Stage 3 of the degree. Students progressing to Stage 3 complete a dissertation worth 60 credits.

Assessment Candidates are assessed by means of a coursework assignment on each chosen module and a dissertation. Appropriate assignments are normally between 4,000 and 6,000 words (or equivalent). Coursework is assessed during the semester in which the relevant module is delivered. A dissertation of 15,000–20,000 words on an approved topic is submitted at the end of the period of study.

Special features • Induction arrangements for full-time students include training in library use and workshops on academic writing and good academic practice. • Some modules are supported by visiting speakers and local school and education-related visits. • Although most students enrol in September, January enrolments are also possible.

Additional support for full-time non-EU students • Fees include additional language lessons designed to support and develop written English to academic standards.

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Early Childhood Studies MEd/Diploma/Certificate FastFacts Duration | Full-time one year; part-time three years Attendance | Full-time two days a week; part-time one day a week (with options for part-time international students to attend two summer schools in the UK) Entry requirements | First degree or equivalent in a relevant subject (GPA of 3.0+) or appropriate experience in a professional environment (IELTS 6.0 or equivalent for international students) Fees | Please see www.hull.ac.uk/money Location | Hull Campus Contact | Admissions Office, Centre for Educational Studies: + 44 (0)1482 466216 | admissions-ces@hull.ac.uk

Your other three modules in Stages 1 and 2 are chosen from the various options available within our MEd provision. (These will vary from year to year.) To progress to Stage 3, however, you must take the module Research Methods in Education. Students progressing to Stage 3 complete a dissertation worth 60 credits. This will normally focus on aspects of early childhood. At the end of Stage 1, you may exit the programme with a Postgraduate Certificate in Education (Early Childhood Studies) as long as you have earned 60 credits and have successfully completed at least two of the core modules. At the end of Stage 2, you may exit with a Postgraduate Diploma in Education (Early Childhood Studies) as long as you have earned 120 credits and have successfully completed three core modules.

Assessment About the programme The MEd in Early Childhood Studies is a specialist pathway that focuses on policies, services, child development, early years pedagogy and research in early childhood. The emphasis is on the years from birth to 5. Participants are encouraged to draw on sociocultural perspectives on childhood, government policy, relevant research and curricular approaches, and on their own experience, in examining issues related to early childhood education. A central aim is to help early years professionals to develop a clear understanding of, and a critical perspective on, issues around early childhood studies. The programme can be studied either full- or part-time. The part-time route is most common for home students, most of whom can combine it with their normal educational employment. Most overseas students take the one-year full-time programme, but special arrangements have been made to allow part-time students from overseas to participate: students will attend two summer schools (held annually in the UK) and complete their studies in their own country through use of open-learning materials.

Candidates are assessed by means of a coursework assignment on each chosen module and a dissertation. Appropriate assignments are normally between 4,000 and 6,000 words (or equivalent). Coursework is assessed during the semester in which the relevant module is delivered. A dissertation of 15,000–20,000 words on an approved topic is submitted at the end of the period of study.

Special features • Induction arrangements for full-time students include training in library use and workshops on academic writing and good academic practice. • Although most students enrol in September, January enrolments are also possible. • There is a planned annual summer school in late July each year at which modules may be studied.

Additional support for full-time non-EU students • Fees include additional language lessons designed to support and develop written English to academic standards.

Programme content In each of Stages 1 and 2, MEd candidates take three 20credit modules (120 credits in all). Three of these six modules (60 credits) must relate to the field of early childhood studies. They are chosen from • • • •

International Perspectives in Early Childhood Child Development and Pedagogy Leadership and Management in Early Years Provision Inclusive Practice in Early Years Provision

www.hull.ac.uk

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eLearning MEd/Diploma/Certificate FastFacts Duration | Full-time one year; part-time three years Attendance and location | The Masters is delivered mainly online through tutor-supported collaborative learning. The learning environment for the specialist modules is available from any location in the world, 24 hours a day, seven days a week. There are two possible start dates each year (September and March) Entry requirements | Typically a good Honours degree or equivalent in a relevant subject or appropriate experience in a professional environment. International students should also be competent in English language (IELTS 6.0 or equivalent) Fees | Please see www.hull.ac.uk/money Contact | Admissions Office, Centre for Educational Studies: + 44 (0)1482 466216 | admissions-ces@hull.ac.uk

About the programme The MEd in eLearning is a specialist pathway that provides professionals in education and training with a critical understanding of the core issues involved in the design, development and implementation of e-learning, with specific emphasis placed on students’ professional working context. The programme is aimed at professionals in a range of education and training roles in various education sectors across the world, including further and higher education, the school sector, the corporate sector, the voluntary sector and the health care area. As the specialist modules are taught online, they can be studied from anywhere in the world. The component modules are particularly suitable for those involved in • • • • • •

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teaching, lecturing, training, staff development, CPD learning support and mentoring programme/course development, instructional design education and project management libraries and information services educational consultancy

Education

Programme content In each of Stages 1 and 2, MEd candidates take three 20credit modules (120 credits in all). Three of these six modules (60 credits) must relate to the field of e-learning. They will be chosen from this list of specialist modules: • • • • •

Educational Technology: Issues in Implementation eLearning: Context, Management and Implementation Foundations of Online Learning and Teaching eTutoring and eLearning Course Design eResourcing

Your other three modules in Stages 1 and 2 are chosen from the same list and/or the various options available within our MEd provision. (These will vary from year to year.) To progress to Stage 3, however, you must take the module Research Methods in Education. Students progressing to Stage 3 complete a dissertation worth 60 credits. This will normally focus on aspects of e-learning. At the end of Stage 1, you may exit the programme with a Postgraduate Certificate in Education (eLearning) as long as you have earned 60 credits and have successfully completed at least two of the specialist modules. At the end of Stage 2, you may exit with a Postgraduate Diploma in Education (eLearning) as long as you have earned 120 credits and have successfully completed at least three of the specialist modules.

Assessment Assessment takes a variety of forms, including written assignments, project work, group assignments and reports, reflective tasks, collaborative development of an e-dossier relating to e-learning management in context, self-assessment and peer assessment. Coursework is assessed during the semester in which the relevant module is delivered. A dissertation of 15,000–20,000 words on an approved topic is submitted at the end of the period of study.

Special features • The degree is delivered mainly online, offering flexibility of time, pace and place of study. All modules can be taken on a stand-alone basis. • You will have access to a personalised online learning environment, 24 hours a day, seven days a week. • You will be able to use a resource centre providing access to supplementary materials, web links and electronic resources and materials, supported by the University’s library. • The flexible programme structure provides you with two possible start dates each year (September and March) and optional exit points at Certificate and Diploma level. • Participants are encouraged to work independently and collaboratively, and our course provides a unique opportunity to meet and interact with professionals from all over the world.


Inclusive Education MEd/Diploma/Certificate FastFacts

Programme content

Attendance | Full-time two days a week; part-time one day a week

In each of Stages 1 and 2, MEd candidates take three 20credit modules (120 credits in all). Three of these six modules (60 credits) must relate to the field of inclusive education. They are chosen from

Entry requirements | First degree or equivalent in a relevant subject (GPA of 3.0+) or appropriate experience in a professional environment (IELTS 6.0 or equivalent for international students)

• • • •

Fees | Please see www.hull.ac.uk/money

Your other three modules in Stages 1 and 2 are chosen from the various options available within our MEd provision. (These will vary from year to year.) To progress to Stage 3, however, you must take the module Research Methods in Education. Students progressing to Stage 3 complete a dissertation worth 60 credits. This will normally focus on aspects of inclusive education.

Duration | Full-time one year; part-time three years

Location | Hull Campus Contact | Admissions Office, Centre for Educational Studies: + 44 (0)1482 466216 | admissions-ces@hull.ac.uk

About the programme Educational systems and contexts today have to respond to an increasingly diverse population of learners. This specialist MEd pathway seeks to investigate the complexities around the concept of inclusion and reach understandings in regard to the impact that this might have for individuals and groups of learners. The degree allows participants to explore ways of reaching out to all learners, in varied educational contexts, with the aim of enabling them to reach their full potential and achieve satisfactory outcomes. The focus is on those that might experience marginalisation within society, but with a particular emphasis on educational contexts. There is a strong emphasis on finding ways to develop inclusive curricula to meet the needs of all learners, including, for example, those defined as having special educational needs, travellers, those from challenging social backgrounds and ethnic minorities. The programme can be studied either full- or part-time. The part-time route is most common for home students, most of whom can combine it with their normal educational employment. Most overseas students study for the degree as a one-year full-time programme, but special arrangements have been made to allow part-time students from overseas to participate: students will attend two summer schools (held annually in the UK) and complete their studies in their own country through use of open-learning materials.

Inclusion: Embracing Diversity Reaching Out to All Learners Researching Inclusion: Moving Forward Research Methods in Education

At the end of Stage 1, you may exit the programme with a Postgraduate Certificate in Education (Inclusive Education) as long as you have earned 60 credits and have successfully completed at least two of the core modules. At the end of Stage 2, you may exit with a Postgraduate Diploma in Education (Inclusive Education) as long as you have earned 120 credits and have successfully completed three core modules.

Assessment Candidates are assessed by means of a coursework assignment on each chosen module and a dissertation. Appropriate assignments are normally between 4,000 and 6,000 words (or equivalent). Coursework is assessed during the semester in which the relevant module is delivered. A dissertation of 15,000–20,000 words on an approved topic is submitted at the end of the period of study.

Special features • Induction arrangements for full-time students include training in library use and workshops on academic writing and good academic practice. • There is a planned annual summer school in late July each year at which modules may be studied.

Additional support for full-time non-EU students • Fees include additional language lessons designed to support and develop written English to academic standards.

www.hull.ac.uk

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Leadership and Learning MEd/Diploma/Certificate FastFacts Duration | Full-time one year; part-time three years Attendance | Full-time two days a week; part-time one day a week (with options for part-time international students to attend two summer schools in the UK) Entry requirements | First degree or equivalent in a relevant subject (GPA of 3.0+) or appropriate experience in a professional environment (IELTS 6.0 or equivalent for international students) Fees | Please see www.hull.ac.uk/money Location | Hull Campus Contact | Admissions Office, Centre for Educational Studies: + 44 (0)1482 466216 | admissions-ces@hull.ac.uk

About the programme The MEd in Leadership and Learning is a specialist pathway aimed at those responsible for policy, provision or practice in regard to leading learning in educational settings. The degree is based on the principle that the foremost task of all leaders in educational settings is to create and develop the most effective and efficient learning environment for the student body that they serve. Leadership knowledge and skills are required at all levels of organisations or systems, so the degree is suitable for • headteachers, principals and other senior staff in educational organisations • heads of department, subject leaders and classroombased teachers in schools and colleges • education officers, inspectors and advisers at the national or local level The programme can be studied either full- or part-time. The part-time route is most common for home students, most of whom can combine it with their normal educational employment. Most overseas students study for the degree as a one-year full-time programme, but special arrangements have been made to allow part-time students from overseas to participate: students will attend two summer schools (held annually in the UK) and complete their studies in their own country through use of open-learning materials.

Programme content In each of Stages 1 and 2, MEd candidates take three 20credit modules (120 credits in all). Three of these six modules (60 credits) must relate to the field of leadership and learning. These core modules are • Leadership for Learning • Leading the Educational Organisation • Learning and Teaching with Digital Technologies Your other three modules in Stages 1 and 2 are chosen from the same list and/or various options available within our MEd provision. (These will vary from year to year.) To progress to Stage 3, however, you must take the module Research Methods in Education. Students progressing to Stage 3 complete a dissertation worth 60 credits. This will normally focus on aspects of leadership and learning. At the end of Stage 1, you may exit the programme with a Postgraduate Certificate in Education (Leadership and Learning) as long as you have earned 60 credits and have successfully completed at least two of the specialist modules. At the end of Stage 2, you may exit the programme with a Postgraduate Diploma in Education (Leadership and Learning) as long as you have earned 120 credits and have successfully completed at least three of the specialist modules.

Assessment Candidates are assessed by means of a coursework assignment on each chosen module and a dissertation. Appropriate assignments are normally between 4,000 and 6,000 words (or equivalent). Coursework is assessed during the semester in which the relevant module is delivered. A dissertation of 15,000–20,000 words on an approved topic is submitted at the end of the period of study.

Special features • Induction arrangements for full-time students include training in library use and workshops on academic writing and good academic practice. • Although most students enrol in September, January enrolments are also possible. • There is a planned annual summer school in late July each year at which modules may be studied.

Additional support for full-time non-EU students • Fees include additional language lessons designed to support and develop written English to academic standards.

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Mentoring in Education MEd/Diploma/Certificate FastFacts Duration | Part-time three years Attendance | One day a week Entry requirements | First degree or equivalent in a relevant subject (GPA of 3.0+) or appropriate experience in a professional environment (IELTS 6.0 or equivalent for international students) Fees | Please see www.hull.ac.uk/money Location | Hull Campus or Scarborough Campus Contact | Admissions Office, Centre for Educational Studies: + 44 (0)1482 466216 | admissions-ces@hull.ac.uk

About the programme The MEd in Mentoring in Education is a specialist pathway that has been developed to reflect the growing role of the work-based mentor/coach in all phases of education (pre-school, primary, secondary and tertiary, including higher education). The programme can be studied part-time at either the Hull or the Scarborough Campus.

Assessment Candidates are assessed by means of a coursework assignment on each chosen module and a dissertation. Appropriate assignments are normally between 4,000 and 6,000 words (or equivalent). Coursework is assessed during the semester in which the relevant module is delivered. A dissertation of 15,000–20,000 words on an approved topic is submitted at the end of the period of study.

Special features • You can use a resource centre providing access to supplementary materials, web links and electronic resources and materials supported by the University’s library. • The flexible programme structure provides you with two possible start dates each year (September and January) and optional exit points at Certificate and Diploma level.

Programme content In each of Stages 1 and 2, MEd candidates take three 20credit modules (120 credits in all). Three of these six modules (60 credits) must relate to the field of mentoring in education. In other words, you must take the three core modules: • Becoming an Effective Mentor • Mentor Training and Management • Theory and Practice of Mentoring Your other three modules in Stages 1 and 2 are chosen from the various options available within our MEd provision. (These will vary from year to year.) To progress to Stage 3, however, you must take the module Research Methods in Education. Students progressing to Stage 3 complete a dissertation worth 60 credits. This will normally focus on aspects of mentoring in education. At the end of Stage 1, you may exit the programme with a Postgraduate Certificate in Education (Mentoring in Education) as long as you have earned 60 credits and have successfully completed at least two of the core modules. At the end of Stage 2, you may exit with a Postgraduate Diploma in Education (Mentoring in Education) as long as you have earned 120 credits and have successfully completed all three core modules.

www.hull.ac.uk

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Music, Technology and Education MEd/Diploma/Certificate FastFacts Duration | Part-time three years Attendance | One day a week Entry requirements | First degree or equivalent in a relevant subject (GPA of 3.0+) or appropriate experience in a professional environment (IELTS 6.0 or equivalent for international students) Fees | Please see www.hull.ac.uk/money Location | Scarborough Campus Contact | Scarborough School of Education: + 44 (0)1723 357075 | d.malton@hull.ac.uk

About the programme The MEd in Music, Technology and Education has been specifically designed for those interested in the educational aspects of using technology in music education. It examines not only the use of technology in different teaching scenarios, but also the theoretical and philosophical issues surrounding the integration of technology into the curriculum.

Programme content In each of Stages 1 and 2, MEd candidates take three 20credit modules (120 credits in all). Three of these six modules (60 credits) must relate to the field of music, technology and education. In other words, you must take the three core modules: • Creativity with Music Technology • Collaboration for Music Technologists • Technology in the Music Curriculum Your other three modules in Stages 1 and 2 are chosen from the various options available within our MEd provision. (These will vary from year to year.) To progress to Stage 3, however, you must take the module Research Methods in Education. Students progressing to Stage 3 complete a dissertation worth 60 credits. This will normally focus on aspects of music, technology and education. At the end of Stage 1, you may exit the programme with a Postgraduate Certificate in Education (Music, Technology and Education) as long as you have earned 60 credits and have successfully completed at least two of the core modules. At the end of Stage 2, you may exit with a Postgraduate Diploma in Education (Music, Technology and Education) as long as you have earned 120 credits and have successfully completed all three core modules.

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Assessment Candidates are assessed by means of coursework assignments on each chosen module and a dissertation. The coursework elements consist of written assignments of 2,500 words and short practical project portfolios. Coursework is assessed during the semester in which the relevant module is delivered. A dissertation of 15,000–20,000 words on an approved topic is submitted at the end of the period of study.

Special features • You can use a resource centre providing access to supplementary materials, web links and electronic resources and materials supported by the University’s library. • The flexible programme structure provides you with two possible start dates a year (September and March) and optional exit points at Certificate and Diploma level. • You will have access to the considerable studio resources at the Scarborough Campus: – two 32-track recording studios, including the Pro Tools HD24 system with Control 24 surface and 5.1 surround sound – two 32-track mixing studios with ATC and Genelec monitoring – two Mac-based research studios utilising Pro Tools Digi 002 systems, and Genelec monitoring (one studio features 5.1 surround sound) – an eight-channel electroacoustic music studio – a full 3D Ambisonic surround sound studio – a sequencing lab equipped with Carillon PCs, synthesisers, MIDI keyboards, and mixers – a 5:1 surround sound studio with video editing – multidisciplinary digital performance space equipped with quadraphonic PA, MIDI lighting desk, digital video projector, I-Cube controller, 4-beam sound beam ultrasound sensing kit – two research studios


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Research degrees

For prospective researchers we offer the degrees of MEd, MPhil, EdD and PhD. Supervision is provided in a variety of areas. A list of staff teaching and research interests is given on pages 18–19.

Admissions and fees Applicants for doctoral programmes should normally hold a Masters degree. The normal entry requirement for a Masters programme is a first or second class Honours degree or its equivalent. IELTS 7.0 or equivalent is also required of international students. Details of fees can be found at www.hull.ac.uk/money.

Doctor of Philosophy Students registered on the PhD programme are required to submit a portfolio of work as a formal demonstration of progress after approximately one year. The programme normally extends over a period of three years full-time or five years part-time. Candidates may be permitted to shorten this period to two years full-time or four years part-time. Candidates are examined by means of a thesis, between 70,000 and 100,000 words, on a topic chosen by the candidate and by an oral. The thesis is expected to demonstrate original research and show an awareness of the relationship of the research to a wider field of knowledge.

Doctor of Education in Education Policy and Values The degree of Doctor of Education (EdD) combines study of a taught programme at doctoral level with the preparation of a research thesis. The programme extends over a period of three years full-time or five years part-time. The first two years consist of taught modules; the subsequent period is taken up with writing a thesis. Candidates are examined by four 6,000-word assignments in the first two years then by a thesis not exceeding 50,000 words, on a topic chosen by the candidate, and by an oral examination. The thesis is expected to demonstrate original research and show an awareness of the relationship of the research to the wider field of educational policy.

Master of Philosophy The programme extends over a minimum of two years full-time or three years parttime. Candidates are examined by means of a thesis, not exceeding 70,000 words, on a topic chosen by the candidate, by an oral examination and, if required, by a written examination. During their first year of full-time study or their second year of part-time study, students may request that their registration be upgraded to the PhD programme. The upgrade depends on a formal demonstration of progress and the support of the department.

Master of Education (by research) The programme extends over a period of one year full-time or two years part-time. Candidates are examined by means of a thesis of 50,000 words, on a topic chosen by the candidate, by an oral examination and, if required, by a written examination.

Supervision Personal supervision is central to discipline-specific support and is guaranteed throughout your research. Academic staff carefully scrutinise applications for postgraduate study or research so that offers of places are made only to those applicants who are well qualified to achieve success. Each applicant is matched with a main supervisor, and each research student has at least one other supervisor to ensure quality and continuity of support. The matching of each prospective postgraduate student with specified members of staff allows concentration of expertise in small groups of staff and postgraduates who work closely together.

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Postgraduate training for research students Research training for the EdD is delivered through modules taught in the first year of the programme. Training for PhD or research Masters students is broadly based and coordinated by the programme director for research degrees. After consultation with your supervisor and the director, you will register for a series of modules. Some of these are generic (for example, Managing the Research Process, Communication Skills, or Library Skills, Information Technology and Computing); a few are determined by the area of your research; most are optional. The options constitute a rich menu of research-related opportunities, from other discipline-specific subjects to competencies that may become necessary as your individual research evolves. In effect, your supervisor will help you put together an individually tailored programme • to extend your intellectual experience and understanding of your discipline • to equip you with specific skills relevant to the conduct of your research • to develop generic skills of value to employers and your subsequent career The aim is training thoroughly integrated with research to enhance the efficiency and effectiveness of your work – and your career prospects as the holder of a higher degree. Every module carries a credit value: 60 credits entitle you to a Postgraduate Certificate in Research Training; 120, a Postgraduate Diploma. Either constitutes a formal qualification in its own right, of interest to employers whether within or beyond the world of education. We recognise that a research degree is no longer exclusively a stepping stone to an academic career. The University’s formal training scheme will certainly improve and facilitate your research, and it will help to equip you for working life in higher education if that is what you aim for, but the skills and experience provided by this training will be valued in many other areas of work.

Recent examples of successful theses ‘Trust Me, I’m a Student: An Exploration through Grounded Theory of the Student Experience in Two Small Schools’ (PhD 2011) ‘An Ethnographic Study of Lunch-Time Experiences in Primary School Dining Rooms’ (PhD 2011) ‘Comparative Perspectives on Initial Primary Teacher Education and Training in England and Pakistan’ (PhD 2008) ‘An Investigation of the Postgraduate Training Scheme at the University of Hull’ (PhD 2008)

The Graduate School The Graduate School is a University-wide institution that provides support and facilities to postgraduate research students. As a member of the Graduate School, you have someone to speak for you in University planning and to whom you can turn if there is a problem that your supervisor or the Centre for Educational Studies cannot sort out. A user group meets with Graduate School staff once a month to share information and to discuss areas of student concern or ways in which the Graduate School can improve services to postgraduates. The Graduate School also has a purpose-built facility for research students. As a research student you automatically have access to this facility, which guarantees you valuable resources and support – not only during the academic session but throughout the year. The facility operates 24 hours a day, seven days a week, and 365 days a year (including public holidays). So when some UK universities are entirely closed, our Graduate School remains open as a welcoming and secure academic and social centre. This is particularly important to non-EU student researchers.

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Located on the Hull Campus, in close proximity to all academic departments, services and the library, the Graduate School building houses some 80 networked workstations as well as quiet study areas, seminar rooms, space for social activities and its own staff. The school’s purpose is to supplement the personal supervision and discipline-specific support that you receive from the Centre for Educational Studies, not only by providing additional resources to assist you in pursuing your work but also by furnishing a social context for informal exchanges of ideas with fellow researchers from all areas of the University. Indeed it is the prime purpose of the school to foster a multidisciplinary research culture. Another objective is to counter the threat of isolation which often accompanies specialist study, by enabling you to make contacts and friendships in an environment which is at once intellectually stimulating and socially rewarding. You may choose to network with peers at the student-organised day conferences held in the school, or to participate in some of the workshops, on topics such as advanced data handling or ‘writing up’ research.

Research seminars The faculty has been running departmental seminars since the early 1990s. They take place every Monday in the Wilberforce Building, beginning at 12.30 pm and finishing an hour later, with refreshments provided. Open to anyone, they normally consist of a 30-minute presentation and 30 minutes of discussion. Speakers include visiting overseas professors, members of faculty staff, lecturers from other universities, speakers from the local authorities and the local community, members of the Centre for Educational Studies and research students. The seminars provide an informal arena for debate on both personal research interests and current areas of educational and policy interest.

Applying for a research degree Writing an appropriate research proposal is an essential part of applying for a research degree. The proposal does a number of things. It helps you to clarify your own thoughts about what you want to do; it allows potential supervisors and other members of the faculty to ask questions about content, approach, values and methodology before you embark on your study; it allows potential problems to be identified and resolved before you begin; and it enables us to identify appropriate tutors and facilities needed for study. Guidance on how to prepare your proposal is supplied with your application form.

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The University offers good value for money. In terms of the annual costs of study for non-EU students, Hull is less expensive than – for example – US colleges of equivalent esteem. Moreover, our programmes are usually shorter than those offered elsewhere in the English-speaking world (three years for a PhD programme, for example, as opposed to four or more in the US or Australasia); and living costs in Hull are much lower than almost anywhere else in Britain (some 30–40% lower than in London), while the proximity of our campus to residences means that daily travelling costs are low and that good, inexpensive shopping facilities are within easy walking distance.

International students

The University of Hull has a long tradition of educating students from countries in and beyond the EU. We have no formal quota arrangements, but in any one year around 15% of our students are from abroad. The largest groups are from continental Europe, China, Malaysia, Hong Kong, Saudi Arabia and Nigeria – in all, more than 3,000 people from over 130 countries. The International Students’ Association (which helps coordinate social and cultural activities) is, therefore, one of the largest and most dynamic of the students’ union clubs.

Offers of admission A formal offer of admission will be sent to you as soon as possible. This will not necessarily be for the programme for which you applied, if we believe a different one is more appropriate. You should therefore note that you are being accepted only for the programme specified in the offer and that there is no commitment to transfer you to another programme or to offer you a further programme on completion of the first. In some cases, conditions will be attached to our offer – these must be fulfilled before the offer can be confirmed. In such circumstances you should not come to Hull until you have received confirmation that you have satisfied the conditions.

Accommodation For the unaccompanied postgraduate from overseas, accommodation is easy to find. We have a superb range of residential accommodation – from self-catering student houses to the Taylor Court on-campus flats, which are particularly attractive to students who may be resident in Hull throughout the year. Moreover, all unaccompanied international students are guaranteed a place in Universityowned or -managed accommodation throughout their programmes, if they wish it. For students accompanied by their families, accommodation is less easy to come by, and the University has only a very limited number of family units. Please seek the advice of the University’s Accommodation Office as early as possible.

Welfare and support The University of Hull provides a comprehensive support service for all international students. The University’s Student Welfare Office and the students’ union’s Advice Centre offer pastoral support and counselling services, while the Study Advice Service can provide academic support – should you need it – to supplement that which is available through the faculty. The International Office is the first port of call for international students requiring personal support and guidance, including advice on immigration matters. All new international students are invited and encouraged to attend the arrival and orientation programme, hosted by the International Office, which takes place at the beginning of every semester and attracts about 800 students each year. Including a free transport service (conditions apply), this globally recognised programme provides invaluable information on support services and on academic and study issues. Designed to make you feel at home as soon as possible, and confirming Hull’s reputation as one of the friendliest universities in the UK, it also provides an early opportunity for social interaction will fellow students.

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Staff and their interests

Faculty of Education Dean Dina Lewis

Secretary Brenda Wilson

Centre for Educational Studies Head of Department Angela Shaw BA, MPhil, PGCE, NNEB Further education and community education; early years ‘Educare’; vocational and work-based learning; the impact of Tomlinson and work-based learning initiatives.

Professors Michael P Bottery BA, MEd, PhD Educational policy and management; values, philosophy and education; concepts of professionalism. Derek Colquhoun BEd, MSc, PhD Healthy schools; educational policy; research methods; governance; evaluation; school food.

Senior Lecturers Trevor Male BEd, AdvDipEd, MA, PhD Educational leadership and management; head teacher preparation and induction. John T Smith BA, MPhil, MEd, PhD, FRHistS History of education; the educational work of religious bodies; the Irish educational system; citizenship education. Nigel Wright MA Educational evaluation; educational research methodology; the professional development of teachers; curriculum studies; educational leadership and management.

Lecturers Shirley Bennett BA, MA, PGCE Online learning with particular reference to professional development for e-tutors and use of online learning for widening participation; assessment of learning outcomes in higher education. Stewart Bennett BEd, MA, PhD Fellow of the Imperial War Museum in Holocaust Education; initial teacher training in history with special interest in holocaust education. Kevin Burden BA, MA Information and communications technology (ICT) in education; research into ICT in education (BECTA); digital media and new illiteracies; ICT and leadership (SLICT); overseas consultancy in ICT; interactive whiteboards; leadership. Max Hope BA, PhD Social inclusion; democratic leadership; school design; participation; citizenship; research methods which use the student voice. Kyriaki (Kiki) Messiou Teacher’s Diploma, BEd, MEd, MSc, PhD Inclusive education; children’s voices; marginalisation in schools; qualitative research. Tina Page BA, PGCE, MA Initial teacher training; the professional development of teachers; comparative education; the teaching of modern languages.

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Ioanna Palaiologou BA, MEd, PhD Early childhood education; child development; international early childhood services and policies; the development of curriculum and pedagogy of nonteaching undergraduate courses in education. Patricia Shaw BA, PGCE, MA Practitioner research, particularly in the area of special needs and inclusive education. Kenneth A Spencer MSc, PhD Educational technology and media studies with particular reference to linear media, multimedia and computer-based learning. Ian White BSc, PGCE, PhD Teaching and learning in higher education mentoring; reflective learning and professional development; learning portfolios, including e-portfolios; narrative discourse analysis.

Scarborough School of Education Acting Head of Department Peter Williams MA, PGCE, MA(EdS), MAODE, EdD, FHEA ICT in education; the design of interactive learning environments; developments in e-learning and e-assessment, including the use of blended learning and e-portfolios in teacher education.

Senior Lecturer Wendy Jolliffe BA, PGCE, MEd, PhD Literacy; early years; cooperative learning; primary initial teacher training.

Lecturers Heather Davies BA, PGCE, MA Research surrounding early years pedagogy; different approaches to learning and teaching in early years settings. Kay Fraser MA, PGCE, MSc The management of change in education. Gary Wilkinson MA, PGCE, PhD Analysis of education and social policy – in particular, professionalism, power and control within the education system and the commercialisation of education, childhood and society.

Our staff offer expertise and experience across the spectrum of education, from policy and management to the practicalities of teaching and learning. www.hull.ac.uk

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Admissions Service University of Hull Hull, HU6 7RX T 01482 466850 F 01482 442290 E pgstudy@hull.ac.uk This publication is intended principally as a guide for prospective students. The matters covered by it – academic and otherwise – are subject to change from time to time, both before and after students are admitted, and the information contained in it does not form part of any contract. While every reasonable precaution was taken in the production of this brochure, the University does not accept liability for any inaccuracies.

The contents of this publication are available online at

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www.hull.ac.uk/pgdocs or in other formats on request.

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‘As Assistant Headteacher of a large comprehensive school, I joined the Masters programme to develop my awareness of current issues in education – and particularly to gain an understanding of what schools should look like in the future. This course is not only assisting my professional development but also leading to actual improvement in schools.’ Lee Preston

Change the way you think.

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EDUCATION PGBrochure 2011