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HIGHEST TEACHING QUALITY OUTSTANDING STUDENT EXPERIENCE SUPERB GRADUATE EMPLOYABILITY INNOVATION BUILT ON 80 YEARS OF EXPERIENCE

The University of Hull Hull, HU6 7RX, UK 0870 126 2000 admissions@hull.ac.uk www.hull.ac.uk H72


The University of Hull Computer science


Contents

Key facts BSc and BEng Honours degrees UCAS code Computer Science G400 BSc/CoS Computer Science with Industrial Experience (4 years) G403 BSc/COSIE Computer Science with Study Abroad (4 years) G404 BSc/COSSA Computer Science with Games Development G490 BSc/CSGD Computer Science with Games Development with Industrial Experience (4 years)* tbc Computer and Business Informatics G560 BSc/CBI Computer Software Development G600 BSc/CSDev Computer Software Development with Industrial Experience (4 years) G602 BSc/CSDvIE Computer Software Development with Study Abroad (4 years) G603 BSc/CSDvA Computer Systems Engineering H600 BEng/CSE Information Technology Management for Business GN52 BSc/ITMB GC48 BSc/CP Computing and Psychology Four-year Honours with a foundation year Computer Science Computer Science (including Foundation English Language) Computer Science with Games Development Computer and Business Informatics Computer Software Development Computer Systems Engineering

UCAS code G401 BSc/CoS4 G405 BSc/CSFEL G491 BSc/CSGD4 G561 BSc/CB14 G601 BSc/CSDev4 H601 BEng/CSE4

Why computing? Why Hull?

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What can I study?

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What is ‌? Computer Science

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Computer Science with Games Development

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Computer Software Development

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Computer and Business Informatics 6 Information Technology Management for Business 7 Computing and Psychology

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Computer Systems Engineering

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The MEng route

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The foundation route

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A year out

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MEng UCAS code Computer Science (4 years) G402 MEng/CoS Computer Science with Games Development (4 years) G492 MEng/CSGD Computer Software Development (4 years) G604 MEng/CSD

What is available at the Scarborough Campus?

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* Subject to approval.

Teaching and assessment

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Current offers Typically a mix of B and C grades from three A levels or equivalent (i.e. 200 to 280 points) or around 140 points for the foundation route, with pro rata offers for applicants studying only two A levels or equivalent.

Programme outlines

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Admissions

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FAQs

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Further information

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Why computing? Why Hull?

Why study for a computing-related degree? Computing is a subject of great social and commercial importance.The scientists who were interested in the discipline 60 years ago could never have imagined that computers would have such an impact on practically every part of modern life.The rapid growth of computers continues and will undoubtedly have an even greater global impact in the near future. By studying for a computing degree, you can gain the background and knowledge to participate in this fascinating and continually developing area. Should you decide not to pursue a career in computing after graduation, the knowledge and skills developed during your studies will equip you for a range of careers in public relations, marketing, the civil service, teaching or accountancy.

Why study computing at the University of Hull? The Department of Computer Science prides itself on excellent staff–student relations. We foster a friendly atmosphere and offer a range of courses and subject modules, so you can find something to suit your needs. For three years running our students have voted us into the top 10 for student satisfaction among mainstream English universities in the National Student Survey.The department also received high marks for providing access to relevant equipment and ease of contacting staff and getting advice with studies. We place great emphasis on students’ being able to make an immediate contribution in their chosen field, evidenced by the high proportion of graduates who find employment within six months of graduation. The QAA’s assessment The Quality Assurance Agency (QAA) ensures consistent high standards in higher education, one of their tasks being to audit universities. In the QAA’s most recent report on the department, we received high ratings for • • • •

commitment to students and quality enhancement varied assessment methods timely and informative feedback student achievement compared to other institutions (confirmed by external examiners) • the high level of academic support, from induction to graduation

• attentive support for students with special needs • effective and wide-ranging formal and informal systems • effective use of resources such as internet-based learning, online forums and IT equipment Industrial relevance We work closely with companies including Black Marble, Codemasters, Microsoft, Rare, Sony, Sumo Digital and Volvo in developing our programmes to ensure that they remain up to date and relevant to industry and commerce. Student achievement In recent years, 89% of our graduates have gained a degree at 2.2 or above, and 18% have graduated with a 1st. Our students have had outstanding success in the Imagine Cup, a prestigious international technology competition (sponsored by Microsoft) that showcases student achievement. In four of the five competitions so far, student teams from the University won the UK heat. At the 2003 world finals in Barcelona our students claimed third prize, and in 2006 one of our teams won the UK final and went on to compete in the world final in Delhi – and to meet Bill Gates in the USA. Student teams from the department have also been successful in the British Computer Society’s Computer Challenge competition (with three victories in the last six years), and have frequently achieved excellent results in the national BCS Programming Competition. The British Computer Society We maintain close links with the BCS, and our undergraduates benefit from automatic BCS student membership.This provides free personal email facilities, the newspaper Computing and the periodical Computer Bulletin, plus discounts on books, equipment and services and access to professional information and industrial contacts. BCS branch meetings are held in the department and at other local venues, and we encourage students to get involved in the BCS Young Professionals Group. Following the last BCS accreditation visit, all our established BSc degrees were awarded full exemption from the BCS Professional Examination as well as partial CEng accreditation. This is the highest award that three-year Honours programmes can achieve.

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Computer science

What can I study? We offer a variety of degrees, ranging from traditional to more unusual and innovative courses. Not only do we have degrees suitable for students with advanced qualifications in relevant subjects; we also have a range of courses suitable for applicants with unconventional backgrounds or mixes of subject qualifications.These variants involve an additional year of preliminary study, covering foundation topics including mathematics, IT and an appropriate science. If you feel that this route is suitable for you, please contact the Admissions Selectors and apply using the relevant full course code from the list inside the front cover.

For international students who do not currently have the required English language qualifications but are otherwise academically suitable for admission, the department is able to offer a BSc degree in Computer Science (including Foundation English Language).This involves a foundation year of English language and culture modules with a taste of computing, followed by three years’ study of computer science. Please contact the department directly if you are interested in this course. The following degrees are offered at our Hull Campus. Three-year Bachelor of Science (BSc) Honours degrees G400 Computer Science G490 Computer Science with Games Development G560 Computer and Business Informatics G600 Computer Software Development GN52 Information Technology Management for Business GC48 Computing and Psychology Four-year Bachelor of Science (BSc) Honours sandwich degrees G403 Computer Science with Industrial Experience G404 Computer Science with Study Abroad tbc Computer Science with Games Development with Industrial Experience G602 Computer Software Development with Industrial Experience G603 Computer Software Development with Study Abroad Four-year integrated Masters (MEng) degrees G402 Computer Science G492 Computer Science with Games Development G604 Computer Software Development Four-year Bachelor of Science (BSc) Honours degrees with a foundation year G401 Computer Science (including Foundation Science) G401 Computer Science (including Foundation Science and English Language) G405 Computer Science (including Foundation English Language)* G491 Computer Science with Games Development (including Foundation Science)

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G491 G561 G561 G601 G601

Computer Science with Games Development (including Foundation Science and English Language) Computer and Business Informatics (including Foundation Science) Computer and Business Informatics (including Foundation Science and English Language) Computer Software Development (including Foundation Science) Computer Software Development (including Foundation Science and English Language)

Three-year Bachelor of Engineering (BEng) Honours degrees H600 Computer Systems Engineering Four-year Bachelor of Engineering (BEng) Honours degrees with foundation year H601 Computer Systems Engineering (including Foundation Science) H601 Computer Systems Engineering (including Foundation Science and English Language) * For details see the panel on this page. English as a Foreign Language The Language Institute provides a range of courses in English as a Foreign Language, specially tailored to international students’ needs. It offers intensive courses for one, two or three months before the start of the academic year, focusing on English for study and research and English language, society and culture.The institute also provides an insessional programme of language support, including English for academic study and business purposes, and a year-long intensive programme. International students may also be interested in our four-year Computer Science (including Foundation English Language) BSc degree (G405), which begins with a foundation year of preparatory linguistic and cultural studies.This is particularly suitable for students who meet the academic entry requirements for our threeyear BSc and four-year integrated MEng degrees, but who want to improve their English-language competence before entering university-level study in a British environment.


www.hull.ac.uk

What is …? Computer Science Pathways in Computer Science • MEng Computer Science G402 MEng/CoS • BSc Computer Science G400 BSc/CoS • BSc Computer Science with Industrial Experience G403 BSc/COSIE • BSc Computer Science with Study Abroad G404 BSc/COSSA • BSc Computer Science (including foundation year)* G401 BSc/CoS4 • BSc Computer Science (including Foundation English Language)** G405 BSc/CSFEL * For details see pages 10–11. **For details see page 2.

The development of technology is changing the way we live.We are about to move into an area of pervasive computing, where computer systems will be all around us.The next generation of computer scientists will build radically different systems from the ones that we have today.The limits of what can be achieved will be defined by the limits of our imagination, our insight and our ability to work together rather than by the speed or cost of the hardware.

Increasingly, computer science includes the socalled ‘soft’ or ‘people’ skills necessary to ensure that the technology, both hardware and software, is used efficiently; that the requirements of the system are consistent with the needs of the business or organisation; that the system is usable by its users; and, in short, to ensure that the system, no matter how technologically advanced, makes sense.

Although the technology is changing, the validity of the basic scientific and engineering principles it is based on has not changed in the six decades since the first computers were built.These fundamentals form the basic core of our Computer Science courses and provide a platform from which our graduates can adapt to whatever the next 60 years will bring. Programming is at the heart of computer systems development – so much so that it is tempting to think computer science is all about programming. It isn’t! Programming is simply the use of a precise language to express ideas and solutions to problems. Learning the rules of a language is not particularly difficult – it is what we teach in Year 1 – but learning the language through which to express an idea is no substitute for having a good idea to express.The second and final years, therefore, are all about giving you the means to analyse and discuss ideas so that you can create powerful and useful systems which make a difference to organisations and users.

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Computer science

What is …? Computer Science with Games Development Pathways in Computer Science with Games Development • MEng Computer Science with Games Development G492 MEng/CSGD • BSc Computer Science with Games Development G490 BSc/CSGD • BSc Computer Science with Games Development with Industrial Experience UCAS code tbc • BSc Computer Science with Games Development (including foundation year)* G491 BSc/CSGD4 * For details see pages 10–11.

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The computer games industry represents the most dynamic, fast-moving and creative digital entertainment market in the world.The sector has always used the most advanced and exciting technology available, with recent advances in graphics hardware both improving the graphical content of games and releasing resources that have enabled more realistic physics and artificial intelligence (AI) to be used in games for the first time. The course takes in a detailed consideration of the industry-critical areas of programming, software engineering, computer graphics and simulation and includes a significant element of practical project work, with specific relevance to the computer games industry.Year 1 module content is the same as for some of our single-subject courses, enabling you to transfer between courses up to the end of that year. Subsequent years introduce specialist modules on games- and graphics-oriented topics, including multimedia architectures, simulation and rendering, digital audio and video techniques and advanced games programming.

Although the skills gained on the course are directly relevant to the computer games industry, they are also applicable to a range of careers which require knowledge of graphics, simulation and visualization. In financial computing, for example, your experience of visualizing and displaying data can be applied to predicting fluctuations in the market; in medical computing, graphics programming is used to display medical images to assist diagnosis and treatment; in military computing, your expertise in AI, physics modelling and the design of large, complex programs will help with the simulation of battle environments and data analysis.Your solid knowledge and understanding of computer science would also enable you to pursue a career in a variety of other computing areas, unrelated to games and graphics.


www.hull.ac.uk

What is …? Computer Software Development Pathways in Computer Software Development • MEng Computer Software Development G604 MEng/CSD • BSc Computer Software Development G600 BSc/CSDev • BSc Computer Software Development with Industrial Experience G602 BSc/CSDvIE • BSc Computer Software Development with Study Abroad G603 BSc/CSDvA • BSc Computer Software Development (including foundation year)* G601 BSc/CSDev4

Although programming is at the heart of software development, creating successful computer software involves much more than just writing code.The Computer Software Development degree explores the tools and techniques that are used at every level in the production of quality software and equips you with the skills to operate as an effective software developer.These extend from the control of the life cycle over which the code is deployed to the ways in which code can be tested as it is created. As with other engineered products, the notion of a software life cycle is used to describe the process of software development.You are exposed to a range of professional tools used at each stage of the life cycle and given the opportunity to acquire industrially relevant skills. Of particular importance in software development is the correct determination of the behaviour of the required system.Techniques are identified which will assist in solving this problem, based on the industrial experience of lecturers delivering the course.

To be effective, the entire process of software development also needs to be well managed. Managerial tasks include planning the development activities to be performed within a specified time and budget, identifying and addressing risks to which a project may be vulnerable and tracking the project’s progress.Various of techniques for addressing these problems are described and explored throughout the course. In the third-year modules you are introduced to state-of-the-art software development issues currently being addressed by research in the department and by industry. We have developed this course in conjunction with a number of industrial partners. We believe that when you graduate from this course you will have the knowledge, skills and ability to be a genuinely useful software developer.

* For details see pages 10–11.

Computer science 5


Computer science

What is …? Computer and Business Informatics Pathways in Computer and Business Informatics • BSc Computer and Business Informatics G560 BSc/CBI • BSc Computer and Business Informatics (including foundation year)* G561 BSc/CBI4 * For details see pages 10–11.

Information – its collection, storage, retrieval and processing – is vital to modern society. Informatics is the science which encompasses all of these subjects.The interplay of advancing computer technologies is producing an ever greater range of methods for the storage and retrieval of data in traditional and novel forms. This course focuses on the central role of information technology in informatics, and the way that computer systems and informatics support business. Faster communications and innovative physical detectors are just two aspects of technological development which have enabled the informationprocessing revolution. At your local supermarket checkout, for example, laser-based barcode readers or radio tags coupled to in-store stock control computers represent just one aspect of the use of computer systems in providing the integrated information processing which supports business. The configuration and integration of software to control the operation of complex systems is fundamental to the successful management and exploitation of information which is at the heart of business success, and this course is concerned with a disciplined approach to the analysis, design, implementation and use of integrated information systems in organisations and society.

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Many of the core skills – such as systems analysis and design, programming, software engineering and computer systems architecture – are common to the computer sciences generally and are incorporated into this course. Specific subjects for this course include management techniques, database operations and the use of specialist information systems to support e-commerce and e-business systems. A typical role for the successful graduate of this course is at the interface between business managers, who need computer solutions to their information-based requirements, and technical software implementers, who can only develop effective solutions when working to a carefully formulated specification.


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What is …? Information Technology Management for Business Pathways in IT Managment for Business • BSc IT Management for Business GN52 BSc/ITMB

The IT professions need individuals with a sound knowledge of fundamental IT principles and an equally sound knowledge of management skills and contemporary business practices. Such individuals are highly valued, as they can understand customer requirements in the context of their business needs, while also recognising the potential and the limitations of technologies used to implement solutions. Employers are now looking for a wider range of skills from graduates.The IT Management for Business degree (ITMB) has been created and led by a forum of the best businesses in the country (including British Airways, BT, CA, Ford, Fujitsu, Hewlett Packard, IBM, Lehman Brothers, Morgan Stanley, Norwich Union and Unilever) to ensure that graduates get the combination of business and technical skills that is vital to business today – and tomorrow.Throughout the degree, representatives from the supporting companies share their experience through ‘guru’ lectures. Rather than focusing purely on technical areas, the degree presents the best mix of skills and knowledge for students aspiring to exciting and challenging management or senior professional careers in designing, developing and implementing technology solutions for businesses. Business, project management and personal skills are as important as technical skills in this degree.

Successful students will gain fundamental knowledge and career skills across four areas: • an understanding of business drivers and processes • a grounding in IT and how it transforms business • the personal skills needed to succeed • the project management skills needed by business The course covers the fundamental principles of computing that are relevant to all business IT projects (computer programming, databases, networking and human–computer interaction) and the software development methodologies used in implementing them. Students are also exposed to relevant contemporary business and management skills, including understanding organisational behaviour, financial and business analysis, project planning and management, team working, personnel management and communication. The ITMB degree is endorsed by e-skills UK, who officially represent the IT industry to Government, and the academic outcomes are referenced to the QAA Benchmark Statements for computing and for general business and management.

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Computer science

What is …? Computing and Psychology Pathways in Computing and Psychology • BSc Computing and Psychology GC48 BSc/CP

Social computing is rapidly becoming an important branch of computing, particularly with the rise of social networking sites such as Facebook, MySpace and Bebo. Most computer systems are used by real people to address real needs.Those building such systems need a thorough knowledge of user behaviour, perceptions and expectations. Graduates of this programme will have a valuable blend of technical skills and a good understanding of how human beings perceive and interact with computer systems.This enables them to bring a human perspective to technical roles or to make a contribution to the social aspects of computing (e.g. forensics, collaborative environments, visualization).

I came from China to the University of Hull for the final year of my degree course. That was really challenging for me. I gained a lot in that year – not only the academic knowledge but also some experience of life. The Computer Science Department has really good communication with students.When I first arrived, I found that my supervisor was from China. He told me some useful information in Chinese, which was really helpful. And every time I had questions and went to ask the lecturers, they explained things to me clearly and patiently. I am now a SEED trainee, gaining a lot of software development experience, and will be starting a postgraduate MSc course at the University in October. Lisha Li BSc Computer Software Development

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This new course is focused on understanding people, computing technology and its social implications and aims to provide a balanced psychology and computing education.The cognitive elements of psychology are a natural fit with many aspects of computing, including AI and user interfaces.


www.hull.ac.uk

What is …? Computer Systems Engineering Pathways in Computer Systems Engineering • BEng Computer Systems Engineering H600 BEng/CSE • BEng Computer Systems Engineering (including foundation year)* H601 BEng/CSE4 * For details see pages 10–11.

Computer systems engineering is a total systems approach to the specification, design, manufacture and life-cycle support of products with computer-based elements.The goal is to deliver products which are fit for purpose, use appropriate implementation technologies and meet relevant quality, safety and environmental criteria. Many items in common use are the result of complex design and manufacturing processes. A high proportion of products have embedded computers, and the design process has had to integrate hardware and software.The efficient and effective use of such computer-based systems is progressively becoming a key requirement in areas ranging from consumer goods to aeroplanes and power stations. Industry’s ability to deliver these systems to meet the end-users’ requirements will be a major factor in determining our economic future. And our ability to deploy these systems to the benefit of society will have a significant impact on quality of life.

Today’s design engineer requires a sure ability to trade off the advantages and disadvantages of a range of technologies, system architectures and implementation techniques. As the complexity of systems increases, it becomes ever more important that design and manufacturing processes are based on rigorous, often formal, approaches to prove the correctness of the design as the product moves through the stages of its life cycle. Moreover, ever-reducing product life cycles and ever-increasing product complexity require engineering activities to incorporate design for manufacture (reducing time to market) and, on the other hand, design for future (anticipating emerging technologies and spreading design investment over a longer product lifetime). To create the products of the future, graduate engineers need wide technical knowledge, good analytical skills, creativity and an awareness of market and business needs.Their input is vital to the business team, and their ability to communicate effectively at all levels with the technically literate and with non-technical people is a key requirement. Computer Systems Engineering is designed specifically to address such issues. Alongside information engineering, networking and business studies, for example, you investigate hardware/software trade-offs, design for future flexibility, and verification and validation at the system level.

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Computer science

What is …? What is the MEng route?

What is the foundation route?

An MEng is a Masters-level qualification that provides an alternative to the traditional BSc-plusMSc route. Our MEng courses offer you a number of distinct benefits.The MEng qualifies you for local-authority funding in the fourth year, unlike the BSc-plus-MSc route, which means that you can gain a Masters-level qualification at a significantly lower cost to you.The first three years of the MEng courses are the same as Years 1–3 of the corresponding three-year BSc degrees. In the fourth year the MEng provides you with guaranteed industrial experience working on real commercial software development projects, heightened development expertise and soughtafter business skills which will give you a significant advantage when seeking employment. In addition, you study relevant computing subjects in more depth.

We offer a range of four-year courses in which the standard three years of BSc or BEng study described in this pamphlet follow a foundation year of preliminary studies. The foundation year is an integral part of four-year degree courses, throughout which you are registered as a student of the University. Studies during the foundation year include mathematical topics, introductory information technology and programming and a choice of options in science and technologies. The courses are designed to provide a route into the degree-level study of computing for applicants who do not offer qualifications suitable for direct entry but who nevertheless demonstrate the potential for success. The three-year BEng degree in Computer Systems Engineering similarly has a four-year foundation route option for applicants who do not achieve the required grade in Mathematics A level. For international students who have not achieved the required standard in English language (an IELTS score of 6 or a similar recognised certificate), the department is also able to offer a BSc degree in Computer Science (including Foundation English Language).This involves a foundation year of English language and culture modules with a taste of computing, followed by three years’ study of computer science. Please contact the department directly if you are interested in this course.

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www.hull.ac.uk

Four of our courses have multiple types of foundation year. Foundation English Language is especially designed for those students who don’t quite have the required language standards, while Foundation Science is for those who need to improve their science qualifications.There is also an option to choose Foundation Science and English Language, which helps students to progress in both areas. For more information on foundation years, please contact the department (details are in the ‘Further Information’ section on page 20).

What is a year out? A year out is an explicit part of four of our degree courses: G403 BSc Computer Science with Industrial Experience, G404 BSc Computer Science with Study Abroad, G602 BSc Computer Software Development with Industrial Experience and G603 BSc Computer Software Development with Study Abroad. In these courses, the year out earns credits as a formal component of the study programme which is recognised by local education authorities. All our other degree courses allow for intercalation.That is, you may choose to break your studies before the final year to gain appropriate experience in industry (and perhaps earn some cash!) or to study abroad.

Any student can apply to intercalate.The University’s Careers Service and the department’s Industrial Liaison Officer can help you find a suitable work or study placement which – combined with a good academic qualification – can make you more attractive to employers when you graduate. Students returning from a year out will often show the benefit through the high quality of their final-year work. As well as offering access to industrial opportunities within the UK, the University has exchange agreements with other universities in Europe, Canada and America, enabling you to gain international experience during your year out. Language modules are available from the University’s Language Institute to prepare you for a placement in a non-English-speaking country.

Having come from a slightly different academic background to most computer scientists here at Hull, I felt I would struggle to adjust. It wasn’t the case in the slightest. Support is constantly offered for those who need it, and work is testing yet rewarding. I feel my degree has helped prepare me for a career in the games industry. John Speak BSc Computer Science with Games Development

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Computer science

What is available at the Scarborough Campus? Honours degrees

Be inspired and create – degrees in new media and creative technologies

• BA Computer Music W390 S BSc/CM

The rapid evolution of digital media devices and production tools is enabling people to become media producers as well as consumers. Podcasting, mobile blogging, music production,VJing and the next generation of the web are becoming lifestyle components in the networked, digital world.

• BA Creative Music Technology J931 S BA/CMT S • BA Creative Music Technology (with a foundation year) J932 S BA/CMT4 • BA Creative Music Technology and Design for Digital Media GPW0 S BA/CMTDDM • BA Creative Music Technology with Business Management W3N2 S BA/CMTBM • BA Creative Music Technology with Business Management (with a foundation year) J9N2 S BA/CMTBM4 • BA Design for Digital Media W212 S BA/DDM • BA Digital Arts W280 S BA/DA ��� BA Digital Media Studies W214 S BA/DMS • BA Media Performance W490 S BA/MP • BA Theatre and Design for Digital Media WW42 S BA/TDDM • BSc Web Design and Development G451 S BSc/WDD • BSc Web Design and Development with Industrial Experience G452 S BSc/WDDwIE

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To be a practising graduate in the expanding creative industries sector, a balance between the artistic process and the technical constraints of media access and delivery is required. Equally important is the ability to reflect critically on how these developments are affecting the way we live, work and play.The degree courses offered at the University’s Scarborough Campus aim to give students this balance in an inspirational natural setting. Our suite of degrees in creative technologies are very much practice-oriented, with the relevant theoretical concepts being delivered, in context, alongside individual and group work. A large part of the final stage of these courses is an individual project, which allows you to work in your own interest area or on a contemporary research project. Recent topics have included mobile media discovery, music video production, interactive installations and interface usability studies. The range of courses offered allows you to choose to specialise in a particular digital media form, develop entrepreneurial skills, engineer novel presentation and interaction methods, or reflect on

technologies’ role in society – a unique, personalised mix of art, science, commerce and critical thinking. All the courses are supported by excellent resources for the production and manipulation of digital media, from dedicated recording studios to a digital media laboratory, both using industrystandard software and hardware. There is close collaboration between our computer scientists, artists, designers, animators, dancers, video producers, web developers, sound engineers and musicians.Their enthusiasm for combining the potential of new technologies with artistic creativity is evident in the course structures and the opportunities for collaboration between subject areas.The friendly, compact campus at Scarborough, with its creative environment, means that it is easy for you to mix with students with different interests and specialisms. The original aim of the web was for people to create and share information, not just consume. If you want to explore this creative process while gaining a sound technical understanding of many digital media forms, further details can be found in the Creative and Digital Technologies subject pamphlet.You can download or order a copy of the pamphlet from the University’s website at www.hull.ac.uk/prospectus/ug_subjectpam.html. Alternatively, you can call 0870 126 2000.


www.hull.ac.uk

Teaching and assessment In the first two years, you attend around nine compulsory 50-minute lectures per week. In Year 1, weekly programming workshops and laboratories supplement your lectures. Course lecturers also provide a formal programme of examples classes and practicals in both the first and second years. Your progress is assessed by a combination of formal written examinations, held at the end of each semester, and a coursework or practical element.The latter may be based on programming work and associated documentation and reports, or assessment may be by submission of solutions to example sheets, through essays on various topics or through team projects. Practical work is an important feature of all the degree courses, and assessed coursework and programming exercises account for up to 40% of the marks in the first two years. After the first year, a range of options gives you the opportunity to specialise. In Year 3, you also undertake an individual project – a further opportunity to specialise in the areas of computing in which you are particularly interested.You can choose your individual project from a list (which is revised each year) or, subject to the department’s approval, you can pursue a topic of your own. Recent project topics have included • • • • • • • • • • •

Racing car and circuit simulator Image metamorphosis A java painting and drawing package Animating talking head agents for virtual tourism A volunteer project database Parallel algorithm design in SR Interactive interface to star catalogue A comparison of sorting algorithms Fractal terrain generation Pipe-crawling robots Full game implementation for pay-per-view television • Virtual sensors and bitmap images • Speech synthesis for mobile devices • Performance evaluation of parallel architecture

The department uses a range of workstation and server platforms to support its teaching and research programmes, in addition to the network of PC laboratories available to all students across the campus and in the halls of residence.The network offers access to library resources and catalogues and extends to student residences – giving you continuous access to accounts and resources no matter where you decide to work. A recently constructed air-conditioned laboratory complex – containing approximately 170 PCs running Windows XP and NetWare – supports general coursework in the department.The laboratory is connected via the campus network to the internet using the latest fibre-optic technology. High-speed laser printers are available within the laboratory complex. In addition, some courses are supported by smaller, more specialised laboratories containing hardware such as games programming equipment and multimedia support. The workstations run Windows XP and connect to the department’s Active Directory infrastructure. A range of software is available over the various machines.This includes software packages for programming languages, graphics development and a complete Visual Studio environment. An Office suite, software development environments and alternative operating system access are standard to all machines. A limited number of machines also include hardware design simulators. The department is affiliated with Microsoft’s Academic Alliance, which allows you to access the latest Microsoft operating systems and development software for home use. Once registered with the department, you can download the software directly to your home PC free of charge. Alternatively, the department can order your copies of the software for a small postage and packaging fee.

Choosing Hull for my course is the best thing I could have done. Its close ties with various companies (Microsoft, Black Marble, etc), passion for the latest technologies, large-scale investment, enthusiastic lecturers, great course material and lots of hands-on developing meant that I not only found the course challenging but also very enjoyable. The course at Hull put me in a fantastic position for my future employment.Towards my final year I was interviewing for and turning down job offers from many IT companies such as Microsoft, IBM and Accenture. My experience and skills were highly sought after by many companies, especially due to the hands-on experience in the fourth year of the MEng provided by SEED and modules in commercial development. I am now in full-time employment. Andrew Brigham MEng Computer Science

Computer science

The department operates an Ordinary degree scheme to which transfer may be recommended after the completion of one or two years of an Honours programme.This transfer is available to students who are unlikely to reach Honours standard in their degree.There is no direct entry to the Ordinary degree, which is based on the core material of the Honours degrees but includes one or two additional modules.

Computing facilities

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Computer science

Programme outlines Key CS

Computer Science

CSa/i

Computer Science with Study Abroad / Industrial Experience

GD

Computer Science with Games Development

GDi

Computer Science with Games Development with Industrial Experience

The tables below give you a more detailed indication of what you would study on the different degrees that we offer on the Hull Campus.The structure and content of the courses are not static – and will change to reflect significant developments in computing – so you should take these tables as a guide only.

Foundation year All courses including a foundation year (except G405) begin with the following study pattern, in which pathway option A, B or C will be taken according to the student’s background and their prospective future studies. Module Computer Games Technology

A

The Internet: More than Just Surfing and Spam

A

Preparing for Learning at HE Level

C

SD

Computer Software Development

IT and Computing

C

Foundation Maths 1 & 2 (two modules)

C

SDa/i

Computer Software Development with Study Abroad / Industrial Experience

Foundation Physics 1 & 2 (two modules)

B

Foundation Chemistry 1 & 2 (two modules)

C

BI

Computer and Business Informatics

ITMB

Information Technology Management for Business

CP

Computing and Psychology



Compulsory module

Option Optional module 

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Pathway

Module not available for this degree programme

Year 1 A common first year for some of our single-subject courses provides you with a strong foundation of computing knowledge and enables you to transfer between our different degree courses during (or at the end of) the first year, if you wish.You take six equally weighted modules.

Module

CS CSa/i

GD GDi

SD SDa/i

BI

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Information Technology and Professional Skills Accounting and Finance Quantitative Methods for Computing Free elective Programming 1 Programming Fundamentals Computer Systems Software Engineering and HCI Introduction to Software Development Programming 2 Business Systems Management and Organisational Behaviour Pioneers of Modern Psychology Theory and Explorations in Psychology 1 Theory and Explorations in Psychology 2

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Year 2 In the second year, the development of your knowledge of core computing subjects continues and specialist modules are introduced.You take six equally weighted modules. Module Systems Analysis, Design and Process 2D Computer Graphics and User Interface Design Information Systems and User Interface Design Free elective Advanced Programming Artificial Intelligence E-Commerce and E-Business Networking and Games Architecture Networking Systems and Applications Networking and Enterprise Architecture Software Development Database Techniques Simulation and 3D Computer Graphics Communicating and Teaching Computing Personal and Management Development Managing Innovation and Change Learning and Cognition Social and Developmental Psychology

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I graduated from the University of Hull with a 2.1 in Computer Science. Like many of my coursemates, I left Hull with a tear, to find employment in London. Finding a job was not hard. Hull has an excellent reputation among employers, and the Computer Science degree course especially. It covers a vast range of subjects, from writing a compiler through to virtual environments. There are also many team-based projects. The departmental staff are very accommodating and approachable, with lectures being quite interactive and fun to attend.Their support was also very much appreciated when, during my third year, I needed to take a year out for personal reasons. Socially, Hull is an excellent choice, providing all the advantages of a campus university while being situated only a 10minute bus journey from the city centre. On campus there is a massive students’ union, with many bars and theme nights – you’re always sure to bump into your mates there.

Adrian Manic

Computer science

If I had to do it all again, I’d never consider any other place than Hull. Those four years were the best of my life. Enjoy your own time here – as you’ll be graduating before you know it!

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Final year (BSc degrees) / Year 3 (MEng) Specialisation continues with a degree-specific individual project plus specialist taught modules.You take four equally weighted modules plus a project worth twice the credits of the other modules. Module Final Project (double module) IT Internship Languages and their Compilers Mobile Devices and Applications 2D Computer Graphics and User Interface Design Virtual Environments and Advanced Graphics Advanced Graphics and Games Programming Strategic Planning and Systems Development Neural, Emergent and Agent Technologies Software Development Advanced Software Development Advanced Information Systems Data Mining and Decision Systems Distributed Systems Programming Visualization Commercial Game Development Process Psychology and Work Business Functions Business Project Management Business Law and Ethics Strategic Management Psychology and Work Psychology and Health Forensic Psychology Educational Psychology Biological Psychology, Personality and Individual Difference Learning in Humans, Animals and Androids Gender and Social Psychology Making Sense of Hearing The Social Brain and Autism ‘Is It a Bird or Is It a Plane?’:The Cognitive Neuroscience of Object Recognition False Memories Suggestion and Suggestibility Reading and Memory Development Cognition and Emotion Psychological Aspects of Reproductive Health Psychology of Deception Neuropsychology The Psychology of Relationships Gender and Social Psychology Neuropsychology of Ageing and Dementia

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Final year (MEng only) Specialisation continues, and you gain experience of working on real commercial software development projects.You take four equally weighted modules plus Commercial Development Practice, which is worth twice the credits of the other modules. Module

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Commercial Development Practice (double module) C++ Programming and Design Real-Time Computer Graphics Simulation and Concurrency Component Based Architectures Maintaining Large Software Systems Distributed Applications Advanced Rendering and AI for Games Trustworthy Computing

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The department encourages students to apply for a year out, which gives you work experience prior to graduation. A student placement is the ideal opportunity to develop your business, personal and technical skills, enhancing your academic study and preparing you for your future career. During my second year I realised how much I had learned in a year and a half but wanted to know more about applications in a real-life setting. It was then I decided to intercalate for a year and I was offered a position in the development laboratories at IBM Hursley, near Winchester. It was a great opportunity to learn, earn and gain an insight that the classroom could never provide. We were dropped into a sea of opportunity and allowed to paddle through and gain as much out of it as we could, without any pressure.We were trusted to manage our own time and workload and still had tons of extra-curricular activities.There were about 70 interns, so you can imagine what a campus-like place work was.We partied hard but worked hard too.

Ope-Oluwa Soyannwo BEng Computer Systems Engineering

Computer science

It was definitely a lifechanging experience which challenged me, gave me more confidence and allowed me to build contacts with people of different levels and backgrounds. I’ve also built an excellent CV. I have no regrets. In fact I would advise everyone to do the same.Take a year out and gain experience. It’s worth it!

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Admissions We do not require you to have studied computing before, although we welcome applicants with previous knowledge. Our experience has shown that mature students generally flourish on our courses, and we welcome applications from candidates who may offer relevant career experience rather than recent academic qualifications.We also welcome motivated applicants who wish to begin their study of computing with us. Should you be interested in studying here, you will usually be invited to visit the department on one of our open days.This gives you an opportunity to meet some of the students and staff and to see some of our facilities.You are also given a tour of the campus, guided by current students, which gives you the chance to discuss our courses and get a student’s view of the University and the department.The tour includes the students’ union, the library and the large on-campus Sports and Fitness Centre, plus a visit to some of the University accommodation. If you are presently undecided about the most appropriate of our courses for your interests, then please apply using the general Computer Science code G400. After your visit to the department and a discussion with our staff, you are able to change your course code if you wish. Subject to departmental approval, it is also possible to change within the first few weeks of starting your degree here – in fact it is usually possible to transfer between the majority of the department’s courses during the first year of study on account of our largely common first year.

Scholarships, bursaries and industrial sponsorship Several scholarships based on academic achievement are available each year. Applications for bursaries based on personal circumstances rather than academic qualifications are also considered. Please contact the department for further details of the scholarships and bursaries available for 2009 entry. We welcome applications from candidates who are sponsored and who wish to spend a year in industry during their course. Industrial sponsorships can provide up to £1,000 per year to supplement normal student funding.

Entry requirements We generally look for clear evidence of potential to succeed in university-level studies, with particular regard to the intellectual qualities of logical thinking, methodical working and breadth of vision which are needed for success in software design and development work. So we are interested in your choice of subjects at A level, or in other qualifications such as BTEC or Baccalaureate, and in your achieved or expected results. We normally ask for 200–280 UCAS points at A level or equivalent, including two subjects at A2. A pass at grade B or C in GCSE Mathematics (or equivalent) is required for all courses; GCSE English at grade C or equivalent is also expected. The four-year courses with a foundation year are designed for applicants who do not have the conventional background or subject qualifications, so lower attainment (usually around 140 points) in relevant subjects – or good grades in less relevant subjects – can be considered for admission. For international students who have not achieved an IELTS score of 6 or an equivalent recognised certificate, the department offers a BSc degree in Computer Science (including Foundation English Language).This involves a foundation year of English language and culture modules, followed by three years’ study of computer science. Please contact the department directly if you are interested in this course.

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FAQs How do I get to know other people in the department? Our induction week includes a welcome party where you meet staff and other first-years.You will soon get to know other members of your year through tutorials and practical classes. What is a typical week like? A typical week in the first and second years involves around nine hours of lectures and six hours of support classes such as practicals and tutorials.There is less formal contact time in the final year, when students are working on their individual projects. In between formal classes, you have plenty of time to complete your coursework and pursue all your other interests. Is there tutorial support? Teaching support is provided in a variety of ways. For example, several tutorial sessions or examples classes may be organised per week, each for a subset of students. Alternatively, open-door clinic sessions may be provided to give practical support with lab work or coursework. How do I decide which modules to take? Each year you receive a handbook giving full details of each module and showing the compulsory and optional modules.Your supervisor is also available to advise you. How are my modules assessed? The module specifications outline the method of assessment for each module: normally a mix of coursework and written examination at the end of the semester in which it is studied. What happens if I fail a module? Do I have to leave? No.You may have a chance to retake the module. Most students pass the resit, but even if you find that you are unable to maintain the level required for an Honours degree, you may be able to transfer to an Ordinary degree.

Can I comment on the teaching I receive? Yes. At the end of each module we collect your comments. Staff review a summary of the feedback and present a report to the next staff and Staff–Student Committee meetings. Comments can be made in other ways too – through our Quality Incident Book, the Quality Officer, your rep on the Staff–Student Committee, your personal supervisor, the Director of Undergraduate Studies or the Head of Department. Where do I buy books? There is a bookshop on campus, which stocks all essential and recommended titles on our booklists. Second-hand copies can sometimes be bought from other students. Books can also be ordered from local bookshops or via the internet. How easy is it to change degree course? It is usually possible to change registration from one course to another up to the end of your first year and sometimes up to the end of your second year, depending on the optional modules you have chosen. Is there any time for sport or leisure activities? Wednesday afternoons are free for all undergraduates.The compact nature of the campus means that you won’t have to spend much time travelling around. If you were feeling energetic, you could even fit in a game of squash between lectures! Can I transfer from a different institution? The Credit Accumulation and Transfer Scheme (CATS) facilitates such transfers. But in a technological subject such as computer science, the particular syllabus content represented by transfer credits – especially its coverage of programming languages – is critically important. If you wish to explore the possibility of a transfer, please contact us to discuss this – even if your present institution is not operating CATS.

Why do the degree courses encompass professional development? Our courses are technical in nature, but it is no longer enough to be just a good ‘techie’. Computing professionals must be able to communicate at different technical and organisational levels, to work in teams, to be comfortable giving presentations and to use modern communications technology effectively. In addition to such transferable skills, we believe it is important that graduates have a firm understanding of the legal, moral and social implications of their future activities. Do you expect that your graduates will have good employment prospects? Students who work hard and attain a good degree are very well positioned to take advantage of the exciting opportunities that careers in computing offer. All of our degrees provide a grounding in programming and software engineering, which constitutes a solid foundation for traditional computing careers. Depending on the degree you choose, you can also gain a deep understanding of specific areas of computing such as internet technology and software engineering.

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Can I get help if I am having problems with a module? Our open-door policy means that you can call at any time on any member of staff and seek their help. Staff are busy, of course, but you will find that we are approachable and genuinely willing to help.

Who can I turn to for help and advice after I’ve started? Throughout your time here, one member of staff acts as your personal supervisor.This ensures that there is at least one person you can turn to for advice on any matter, whether academic or personal.The Counselling Service, hall wardens and their assistants, tutors for student houses and the students’ union Advice Centre are also concerned, in different ways, with your welfare.

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Further information Staff Professor of Software Engineering R Phillips MSc, PhD, CEng, MBCS Professor of Computer Science G R Brookes MA, MSc, PhD, CEng, FBCS, FRSA Reader C Kambhampati BE, PhD, MIEE, MIEEE, CEng Senior Lecturers L Bottaci BA, PhD, CEng, MBCS Y Papadopoulos BSc, PhD W J Viant BSc D P M Wills BSc H Wright MA, DPhil Lecturers M Brayshaw BSc, MSc, PhD, MBCS P M Chapman BSc, MSc, PhD D N Davis BSc, MSc, PhD N A Gordon BSc, PhD, MBCS, HETC D J Grey BEng, PhD, AMIEE Q Li BSc D McKie BSc R S Miles BSc, CEng J H Purdy BSc, PhD J D Rayner BSc, PhD P A Robinson BEng, PhD B C Tompsett BSc, MSc, EurIng, CEng, MBCS B Wang BSc, MSc, DPhil

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Careers and further study

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The applications of computers and computing continue to grow in industry, in commerce and in pure and applied research. Our graduates have moved into all of these areas for their first employment – joining computer manufacturers, software houses and IT departments – while others have undertaken postgraduate study and research. Hull graduates have recently gained employment with, among others, Sony, Government Communications Headquarters, Logica, Dell Computers, Fujitsu and News International.

For general course or admissions enquiries, write to the Senior Admissions Officer:

In designing our degree programmes, we aim to provide you with a good theoretical and practical training which will interest potential employers and equip you with the tools to undertake further study. The University has an excellent Careers Service, which gives individual advice to students about possible careers. It also arranges recruiting visits by prospective employers during your final year.The University does consistently well in the ‘graduate employment’ category of national surveys, and it has one of the lowest graduate unemployment rates in the UK. Research is an important part of the department’s academic work, and there are opportunities for graduates to undertake research leading to an MSc or PhD, or both. Current research interests in the department include human–computer interaction, artificial intelligence, virtual environments, local area networks, parallel computer architecture, computer graphics, medical imaging, graphical interfaces for specialist information systems, expert systems and interactive system design.

Dr M Brayshaw Department of Computer Science The University of Hull Hull, HU6 7RX, UK Joan Hopper (Admissions Secretary) T 01482 465067 E admissions@dcs.hull.ac.uk Applications Applications are made online through the Universities and Colleges Admissions Service (UCAS), either independently or with the help of your school or college.There are full instructions for all applicants at www.ucas.com, or you can call the UCAS Customer Service Unit on 0871 468 0468 for further information and advice.

And finally … We are a friendly department, and if you decide to study at the University of Hull you will have every opportunity to get to know us inside and outside of the classroom and lab. One member of staff will be your personal supervisor from the outset, and you will remain in touch with them throughout your University career. In addition, the Head of Department is willing to see any student at any time. We have attempted to tell you as much as possible about the workings of the department in this pamphlet. But if you require more information, do not hesitate to send a letter or an email to the Undergraduate Admissions Selectors or to telephone the department directly. If you have a UCAS applicant number, please quote it in all communications.


Free Elective Scheme Studying for a degree at Hull is a unique experience.We aim to provide you with an education that offers both depth and breadth of knowledge.To meet these ends the University has developed an optional Free Elective Scheme.This scheme enables the majority of undergraduate students to take one module a year from outside their main course of study. So, how does it work? Each year you take 120 credits’ worth of modules.

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What sort of subjects can I take? You can take almost any free elective module from outside your main course of study, usually at your home campus.You can even take a module from another faculty. You should discuss your choice of free electives with your supervisor. Among many others, options available might include • • • • • •

Computer Games Technology Quantitative Methods Introduction to Psychology Introduction to Business Management Career Management Skills modules in modern languages

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Here you have the option to take a free elective or another module from your main course of study.

What are the main reasons for participating? • The scheme gives you the opportunity to study a subject without having to commit yourself to taking further modules in that subject area. • By taking a free elective you are able to follow up your interests as part of your degree. • With a broader education you may acquire extra skills that will help you when you enter the employment market.

Admissions policy Admissions information provided in this pamphlet is intended as a general guide and cannot cover all possibilities. Entry requirements are generally stated in terms of A level grades and/or UCAS points, but we encourage applications from people with a wide range of other qualifications and/or experience. Some further details of the various entry routes are included in our general prospectus. Please contact the Admissions Office (see below) with any specific queries about admissions.

Disclaimer This pamphlet is intended principally as a guide for applicants.The matters covered by it – academic and otherwise – are subject to change from time to time both before and after students are admitted. While every reasonable precaution was taken in the production of this pamphlet, the University does not accept liability for any inaccuracies or changes. Information relating to study programmes is issued for the general guidance of students entering the University and does not form part of any contract.The University hopes to provide the courses and facilities described, but reserves the right to withdraw or to make alterations to courses and facilities if necessary.

Address For general enquiries, please write to Admissions Service The University of Hull Hull, HU6 7RX T 01482 466100 F 01482 442290 E admissions@hull.ac.uk Dates of semesters For the current semester dates please visit our website at www.hull.ac.uk/hulluniversity/semesterdates.


Computer science - University of Hull Undergraduate Subject Brochure 2009