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Chemistry

Undergraduate study

Entry 2012


Key facts

Chemistry at Hull | 1

Honours degree

BSc UCAS code

Why choose Hull? | 6

Chemistry and chemistry with a specialism

3-year course

4-year course

Chemistry

F100 BSc/C

F102 MChem/Chem

Admissions and after | 8 MChem and MPharmSci courses | 10 Industrial experience | 11 Course outlines | 12

MChem/MPharmSci UCAS code

Chemistry (with Industrial Experience) F103 MChem/CI Chemistry with Forensic Science and Toxicology

F1B2 BSc/CFor

Chemistry with Forensic Science and Toxicology (with Industrial Experience)

Careers | 26

Chemistry with Analytical Chemistry and Toxicology

Research | 28

Chemistry with Analytical Chemistry and Toxicology (with Industrial Experience) Chemistry with Molecular Medicine

F1BG MChem/CFoI F184 BSc/CACT

F187 MChem/CACT

F153 BSc/CMMed

F151 MChem/CMMe

F186 MChem/ACTI

Chemistry with Molecular Medicine (with Industrial Experience) Chemistry with Nanotechnology

F1BF MChem/CFor

F152 MChem/CMMI F166 BSc/CNan

Chemistry with Nanotechnology (with Industrial Experience)

F167 MChem/CNan F168 MChem/CNaI

Combined programmes Pharmaceutical Science

FBC2 BSc/PhS

Pharmaceutical Science (with Industrial Experience)

FB1F MPharm/PhW

Contact address

Chemistry with Business

F1NC BSc/CBus

Our admissions tutor, Dr Mike Hird, will be pleased to provide more information on any aspect of our courses, the department or the University. Please contact him directly:

Forensic Science with Criminology

F4M9 BSc/FSC

Chemical Sciences

F190 FdSc (2 years) BSc (+1 year)

Dr Mike Hird Department of Chemistry University of Hull Hull, HU6 7RX

FdSc Chemical Science (3 years) BSc Chemistry (5 years or FdSc + 2 years) NEBOSH and BSc Safety and Environmental Management

T 01482 465866 (direct) or 01482 465475 (admissions secretary) F 01482 466410 m.hird@hull.ac.uk or admissions-chem@hull.ac.uk www.hull.ac.uk/chemistry

Dates of semesters Semester 1 24 Sep – 14 Dec 2012

Semester 2 28 Jan – 10 May 2013

FB12 MPharm/PhS

Single-subject degree with foundation year Chemistry (1 + 3 years)

F101 BSc/C4

Part-time study Please apply directly to the Department of Chemistry, not UCAS, for any of the part-time options.

Entry requirements Our typical offer is 280–300 points (with at least a B in Chemistry) at A level or equivalent, depending on the subjects offered and your UCAS application. Other qualifications, such as BTEC, AVCE Science, Advanced GNVQ, Science Access Awards, the International Baccalaureate and the Irish Leaving Certificate, are welcomed. The foundation entry course (F101) is for applicants who are not sufficiently qualified for direct Year 1 entry. Direct entry to Year 2 or 3 is possible for suitably qualified applicants. Recognising their particularly high success rate, we warmly welcome applications from mature students. We consider applicants on the basis of academic qualifications (see above) and/or on the basis of other relevant knowledge and skills, such as might be derived from work experience. We are flexible about entry requirements. Contact us for advice in respect of qualifications and grades other than those mentioned above.


Chemistry at Hull The chemical sciences are the basis of life and of the way in which we live. Chemistry is an exciting and wide-ranging discipline which occupies the central position among the sciences. It is involved in everything around us. The work of chemists has a massive impact on the quality of life through the design, synthesis, evaluation and manufacture of a multitude of essential goods such as industrial and household materials, medicines, pesticides, clothing, food, and advanced materials with specific properties for modern technology. Rapid advances in technology, medical care and crime detection demonstrate the unique importance of the chemical sciences to our lives. It is only through the imagination of chemists that our quality of life will continue to improve during the 21st century. There will be strong demand for skilled chemical scientists of all specialities across the world to be involved in developing better drugs and improved materials, and in ensuring a cleaner environment. Chemistry is a core science that covers an exciting and diverse range of subject areas. Analytical chemistry, pharmaceutical and medicinal chemistry, materials chemistry, forensic science and toxicology, theoretical and computational chemistry, and many others make up the mosaic of speciality areas that comprise our discipline. Accordingly, chemistry attracts and stimulates students who have a range of talents and professional aspirations.

Follow your curiosity You have chosen to study chemistry at university because you have a real curiosity about the natural world and the ability to follow this interest through study and experiment. A degree in chemistry or in chemistry with a specialisation not only trains you for a job in chemistry, in research or industry, but also develops your problem-solving ability, your computer skills and the way in which you tackle real problems. These skills are the most prized in the employment market, whether you choose a career in science or in one of a wide range of commercial areas. The Department of Chemistry at the University of Hull is consistently highly rated in national leagues tables – such as a top-three rating for teaching quality in the National Student Survey (2010) and a top-four rating from The Guardian (2011). It is home to the Higher Education Academy Physical Sciences Centre, a National Teaching Fellow and three recipients of Royal Society of Chemistry Teaching Awards – more than any other department in the UK. In this pamphlet, you will read about its innovative and distinctive degree programmes, continually developed to remain at the forefront of our science, and to meet the interests and demands of both students and employers. This is also the home of world-class research, for which we received an RSC Chemical Landmark Award in 2005 and which enables us to provide expert teaching of the most advanced ideas and the instrumentation to train you in the most modern techniques. It is in one of our research groups that you will spend a large part of your final year, doing cutting-edge research in your chosen field.

www.hull.ac.uk

The Guardian University Guide 2011 League table of UK chemistry departments: ‘Satisfied with teaching’ category University

%

1 Queen’s, Belfast

98

2 Loughborough

95

3 St Andrews

94

4 Hull

94

Chemistry

1


Our degrees You may study chemistry as a single subject or with a specialisation such as molecular medicine, forensic science, analytical chemistry, nanotechnology, criminology or business. We offer a joint course with the Department of Biological Sciences covering biomedical and molecular sciences and a truly interdisciplinary pharmaceutical science course. We pride ourselves on the exibility of our courses, enabling you to develop your interests and change your specialisation as your knowledge and fascination grows. Our close research connections with the UK and European chemical industry allow us to operate an industrial placement year as an optional supplement to all our degree courses. Experienced research chemists from companies such as Croda and BP participate in the teaching of our industrially orientated courses.

Come and meet us The best way for you and your family to ďŹ nd out about the courses and the facilities that we offer is to visit the department. We would welcome the opportunity to meet you (we will subsidise your travel costs) and to show you our laboratories and discuss our courses with you. Most of all, we would like you to talk to our current students about their experiences and aspirations. Our approach to teaching and to your learning is distinctively informal and supportive, and you will experience this during the application process and at our open days. More information on our open days, our courses and student life at Hull can be found at www.hull.ac.uk/chemistry.

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‘From the moment I applied I felt instantly welcome at Hull. I’ve found that the small details are where the Chemistry Department has gained its sterling reputation; help is always willingly available from some of the most dynamic chemists I have ever encountered. The department is more than adequately equipped and is located in the centre of a visually stunning campus. With a flexible, enjoyable course and one of the most vibrant cities in the country to call my home, I’ve never looked back.’ Sophie Darragh Chemistry with Forensic Science and Toxicology

www.hull.ac.uk

Chemistry

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In 2008, 95% of our academic staff were officially judged to be conducting research of international standard, and the 2010 National Student Survey reported that 97% of Hull Chemistry students found their course intellectually stimulating (incidentally, Sam Troughton – seen here in the BBC’s Robin Hood – is one of many notable Hull graduates!).


Crystal gazing Award-winning University of Hull chemists developed many of the liquid-crystal molecules used in the displays of phones, TVs and laptops. The department is proud of its continuing tradition of research excellence; drug synthesis, smart nanomaterials and miniaturised reactors have now become leading themes too. Whatever your speciality, you’ll be taught by world-class authorities in the subject.


Why choose Hull?

Courses • A wide range of innovative degree courses (FdSc, BSc and MChem) to suit all interests across the wide range of chemistry topics. • A ‘premier league’ chemistry department; highly rated consistently in national league tables – such as a top-three rating fot teaching in the National Student Survey (2010) and top four in The Guardian (University Guide 2011). • Courses mix traditional academic standards with pioneering and dynamic specialisms reflecting the needs and interests of today’s students, industry and commerce. • Course design allows flexibility of transfer between chemistry and chemical science courses during the first two years. • Core chemistry during the first two years provides the depth of knowledge required by the specialist courses, while optional modules from a wide range of topics develop interests and specialist knowledge. A confidence-building course in the relevant aspects of maths is most helpful for students without A level Mathematics.

Additional benefits • An optional year out in industry on all courses allows you to gain experience and earn a salary. For the MChem or MPharmSci courses in chemistry, chemical science and pharmaceutical science, the industrial year is assessed, through written assignments and reports, as a full year of the four-year degree. For the BSc and Chemistry with Business courses, a Certificate of Industrial Experience is awarded. • There is pioneering world-class research and a strong interaction between research and teaching, especially in the final-year research project. • We enjoy an established and envied reputation with employers for providing students with problem-solving, management, communication and computer skills. These are integral to the courses and contribute directly to the excellent job prospects of our graduates. • Prestigious Hopkins Scholarships are awarded to the best incoming students. A wide range of departmental and industrially funded prizes are available to reward achievement and progress in undergraduate studies. Scholarships are available to international students.

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Chemistry


www.hull.ac.uk

Chemistry

7


Admissions and after

Admissions Students with a wide range of qualifications have very successfully studied for a chemistry degree at Hull. Our entry requirements range between 280 and 300 points (with at least a B in Chemistry) at A level or equivalent, depending on the range of subjects offered and the UCAS personal statements, but offers may vary in individual cases and circumstances. • At least a grade C in one of Mathematics, Physics and Biology is preferred, but is not essential. • Other qualifications are also warmly welcomed, including BTEC, AVCE Science, Advanced GNVQ Science, other vocational awards and Science Access Awards. • Direct entry to the second or third year is possible for some students with HND or other suitable qualifications. • Other qualifications, including the International Baccalaureate (28–32 points), the Irish Leaving Certificate (BBBCC–ABBBB) and similar awards, are fully acceptable. The University encourages applications from people of all backgrounds. We consider applicants on the basis of academic qualifications (see above) and/or on the basis of other relevant knowledge and skills. In Chemistry we have a particularly strong record of success with mature students, whose applications are always warmly welcomed. A four-year course incorporating a foundation year (F101) is provided for those who wish to apply for one of our degrees but are not qualified for direct entry. Success in the foundation year guarantees entry to any of our courses (BSc or MChem). All applicants and their parents (or other guests) are invited to visit us shortly after their UCAS application is received, but prior visits are warmly welcomed. A visit will enable you to see the teaching and research facilities, tour our attractive campus and department, and question staff and students. Midweek and weekend open days are available, and pre-arranged individual visits are welcomed through the year. We pride ourselves on the personal and friendly approach of our admissions team.

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Scholarships, finance and support We fund generous bursary and scholarship schemes that recognise both achievement on entry and performance during the degree. • Prestigious Hopkins Scholarships, to the value of £1,500 per annum (excluding any industrial experience years), will be awarded to the strongest entrants each year. • A wide range of departmental and industrially funded prizes are awarded each year to undergraduates who do well in their studies. We also offer financial advice to our students, and we actively support them in finding temporary posts in industry or part-time positions where such work is necessary to alleviate financial problems. Paid vacation work in a research group is often available.

Teaching and assessment The academic year at Hull is split into two semesters: the first starts in late September and the second finishes in June, with vacations at Christmas and Easter. Each semester consists of a teaching period followed by a period of assessment. Each course is made up of modules, taught through a variety of lectures and workshops, small-group seminars, tutorials and laboratory classes. Assessment is through a combination of examinations and continually assessed coursework. All practical work is continuously assessed. The final-year research project is assessed continuously and through a final report and presentation. Credits are earned from the successful completion of each module, and all modules count towards the final degree. The module and credit system allows greater flexibility within our courses and between the many different universities that operate the same system.

‘The Chemistry Department at Hull has helped me develop academically. The staff are committed to supporting the learning of all the students and getting the best from each of them, while the research carried out in the department really gives the students fascinating examples of where their study can lead to. I would definitely recommend studying chemistry at Hull.’ Adam Slade BSc Chemistry

www.hull.ac.uk

Chemistry

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MChem and MPharmSci courses MChem (Master of Chemistry) and MPharmSci (Master of Pharmaceutical Science) courses are higher-level undergraduate programmes that cover a broader range of advanced topics than the traditional BSc Honours degrees. They are designed for those students who wish to become professional scientists in academia and industry, and they give graduates the very best opportunities for employment and postgraduate study. We offer two types of MChem and MPharmSci degree, both lasting four years:

Four full years of study and training at the University • Years 1 and 2 follow the same pattern as the three-year BSc analogues, with introductory and intermediate modules in core chemistry and optional modules reflecting specialisms and interests. • Years 3 and 4 involve advanced courses in the most modern aspects of chemistry and chemical research. You develop state-of-the-art laboratory and analytical skills. • In Year 4, you plan, execute and report a major research project that you choose from one of the many research groups in the department.

Two years of study and training at the University and a paid and assessed year of industrial experience followed by a final year at the University • Years 1 and 2 follow the same pattern as the three-year BSc analogues, with introductory and intermediate modules in core chemistry and optional modules reflecting specialisms and interests. • Year 3 is spent working and studying – and receiving a salary – in the chemical industry. This industrial year is assessed through written assessments, site visits by University staff and a final report. • Year 4 involves following advanced courses in the most modern aspects of chemistry and chemical research. You develop state-of-the-art laboratory and analytical skills, and build on the specific skills developed during the industrial year, as you plan, execute and report a research project that you choose from one of the many offered by research groups in the department. MChem courses are available for all of the main chemistry and chemical science degrees – Chemistry, Chemistry with Analytical Chemistry and Toxicology, Chemistry with Molecular Medicine, Chemistry with Forensic Science and Toxicology, and Chemistry with Nanotechnology. MPharmSci courses are available for the Pharmaceutical Science degree. These courses are more fully described below and on our website.

Advantages of the MChem and MPharmSci MChem and MPharmSci courses were introduced nationally to reflect the everincreasing width and breadth of chemistry and pharmaceutical science. Three-year BSc courses only allow sufficient time to cover basic knowledge and a selection of advanced and specialist topics. MChem and MPharmSci courses give you the flexibility to develop your interests in all aspects of modern chemistry and related subjects and provide you with the skills and knowledge of a professional scientist. An MChem or MPharmSci gives you a running start for top-flight careers in fundamental research or in the chemical industry. Transfer from BSc to MChem (or MPharmSci) or vice versa is possible up to the end of the second year. However, it is easier when dealing with student loan applications to transfer from MChem (or MPharmSci) to BSc, and so it is advisable to apply initially for the MChem (or MPharmSci).

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Industrial experience A year in industry makes the degree truly vocational. In addition to the financial rewards, it imparts skills, experience and knowledge which can give you a valuable head start in your career. A year in industry is possible with all courses. Students apply for their own places, but we provide ample guidance and assistance. We have very strong links with industry at local, national and European levels, and we have a member of staff who is dedicated to matching students to the right placements in industry. We have an excellent record of securing valuable industrial placements. In recent years, students have enjoyed placements throughout the UK and Europe, including positions with Smith & Nephew and BP Chemicals in Hull, Glaxo Wellcome, Pfizer, Metropolitan Police Forensic Laboratories, L’Oréal in Paris, Zeneca in Lyon, Henkel in Düsseldorf, and Wacker Chemie in Burghausen. The industrial placement is usually organised during the second year and taken during Year 3. For the four-year chemistry, chemical science and pharmaceutical science programmes, the industrial year is fully assessed – it not only gains you invaluable experience and a regular salary but also counts towards your final degree result. It therefore requires the successful completion of academic assignments, a continuous log and a final report. For BSc and Combined Honours programmes, the placements take the form of a year out and a Certificate of Industrial Experience is awarded.

www.hull.ac.uk

Chemistry

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Course outlines Chemistry

The fourth year

MChem (F102 and F103) and BSc (F100)

All students follow advanced, specialist modules reflecting up-to-the-minute topics drawn from the most significant recent international developments in chemistry and related subjects. These give students the knowledge and expertise needed to become professional scientists and the skills needed to pursue and lead research in a university or industrial setting.

The Chemistry courses give a broad, balanced presentation of modern chemistry while being sufficiently flexible to allow individual interests and preferences to develop through the pursuit of various specialisms.

The first two years Core modules account for 80% of each course. These include theoretical and practical aspects of analytical, inorganic, organic and physical chemistry and transferable skills such as communication, group working, computing and information technology. Optional modules account for the remaining 20% and cover a wide range of topics to extend and develop your knowledge and interests. They include areas designed to widen your expertise, such as biology, physics and support in mathematics, and new topics designed to widen your interests, such as forensic science, internet programming, environmental and pharmaceutical science and even the history and philosophy of science.

The third year Students on the MChem Industrial Experience course spend this year in industry gaining valuable skills and experience – and a salary. BSc students and the other MChem students pursue a variety of advanced theoretical, practical and analytical topics reflecting the wide range of modern chemistry. In the second semester, students join a research group to conduct a research project. For the MChem students, this takes the form of a group project that will foster communication, project development and leadership skills of the type used in industrial research project. All students present their research results to the department. Presentation, communication, computer, internet, information retrieval and problem-solving skills – essential for all careers, scientific or otherwise – are thus integrated within the courses.

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Throughout the year, students develop a research project in one of the many internationally recognised research groups in the department, employing the same methodology used in an industrial or academic setting. In the first semester, students develop an understanding of the context, potential benefits and worldwide knowledge-base of their chosen research area, using databases and internet-based resources. In the second semester, students who have spent a year in industry pursue the research project for two days a week and the other MChem students spend four days on their research project. All students present their research results to the department, write an extended dissertation detailing their results and conclusions and construct a website to present their work. For almost all students, the research project proves to be the most rewarding and enjoyable part of their degree, and this is reflected in the large percentage who continue to pursue their interests in research careers. The department-wide research base means that projects can be offered in – among others – analytical, drug design, forensic, nanotechnology, computing and educational areas.


Chemistry with Analytical Chemistry and Toxicology MChem (F187 and F186) and BSc (F184) The need for well-trained analysts is expanding worldwide, especially in pharmaceutical, biomedical, industrial, food and environmental sciences. This course is designed to meet the requirements of these and related areas and for students with a strong interest in instrumentation, analysis, forensic science and toxicology. The BSc course gives a good basic knowledge of chemistry and allows considerable specialisation in analytical chemistry and the fundamentals of toxicology. The MChem degrees provide a more complete training for those who aspire to the highest level. Chemistry with Analytical Chemistry and Toxicology offers excellent, worldwide career opportunities, not least for those who wish to become forensic scientists.

The first two years The first two years are similar to Years 1 and 2 of the straight Chemistry courses and provide the firm foundation of core chemistry required of analytical chemists. Fundamentals of analytical chemistry such as spectrometry and chromatography are taught within the core programme, and specialist analytical, biomedical and toxicology topics are introduced in additional modules.

The third year Students on the Industrial Experience course spend this year in industry gaining valuable skills, first-hand experience of the practice of analytical chemistry or toxicology – and a salary. It is strongly recommended that those wishing to become professional analytical scientists should apply for the MChem course that includes industrial experience (F186).

All students present their research results to the department. Presentation, communication, computer, internet, information retrieval and problem-solving skills – essential for all careers, scientific or otherwise – are thus integrated within the courses.

The fourth year All students follow advanced, specialist analytical and toxicology modules reflecting up-to-the-minute topics drawn from key international developments such as process analysis, chemometrics, sensors and ‘lab-on-achip’ research. These give students the knowledge and expertise needed to become professional analytical scientists and the skills needed to pursue and lead research in a university or industrial setting. Through the year, students develop a research project, normally in the analytical science research groups in the department, employing the same methodology used in an industrial or academic setting. In the first semester, students develop an understanding of the context, potential benefits and worldwide knowledge-base of their chosen research area, using databases and internet-based resources. In the second semester, students who have spent a year in industry pursue the research project for two days a week and the other MChem students spend four days on their research project. All students present their research results to the department, write an extended dissertation detailing their results and conclusions and construct a website to present their work. For almost all students, the research project proves to be the most rewarding and enjoyable part of their degree, and this is reflected in the large percentage who continue to pursue their interests in research careers.

BSc students and the other MChem students pursue advanced analytical, spectroscopic and toxicology topics in theory and practice. The practical work includes hands-on experience of today’s instrumental techniques. In the second semester, students join a research group to conduct a research project. For the MChem students, this takes the form of a group project that will foster communication, project development and leadership skills of the type used in industrial research.

www.hull.ac.uk

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Chemistry with Forensic Science and Toxicology MChem (F1BF and F1BG) and BSc (F1B2) Forensic science is the study of possible criminal activity and is an archetypal problem-solving discipline. It involves the detection of trace amounts of explosives, poisons and drugs and the identification of fibres, paint, combustion residues, glass fragments, hair and a wide range of other materials. Forensic science is also key to personal identification by DNA profiling and fingerprinting, document authentication and counterfeit currency identification. Toxicology is the scientific investigation of the interaction of chemicals with living organisms to establish toxic effects, the mechanism by which they occur and the means by which organisms can metabolise and eliminate them. The revolutions in forensic science and toxicology have been brought about by advances in analytical chemistry – the study and development of techniques for the identification and quantification of chemical substances. Most techniques require instrumental measurements and are able to detect substances at extremely low levels, typically 10–9 g per litre or lower.

An interdisciplinary science Our degree courses incorporating forensic science are built on our many years of experience and expertise in analytical chemistry. A strong background in a pure science is vital for potential forensic scientists. Real forensic scientists require knowledge of modern analytical science and toxicology. This, in turn, requires knowledge and understanding of chemical and biological processes and high-sensitivity analytical techniques, and an appreciation of other fields such as biochemistry, physics, electronics, computing and statistics. So we meld forensic science, analytical chemistry and toxicology into truly integrated, interdisciplinary courses of study.

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The first two years The first two years are similar to Years 1 and 2 of the straight Chemistry courses and provide the firm foundation of core chemistry and analytical techniques required of analytical chemists and forensic scientists. The organisation of forensic science in the UK, the strategies used for collection of evidence and analysis of samples, and the toxicological effects of chemicals in the environment, in warfare and in the body, and their detection, are introduced.

The third year Students on the Industrial Experience course spend this year in industry, typically in an analytical chemistry or forensic science laboratory, gaining valuable skills, firsthand experience of the practice of research – and a salary. BSc students and the other MChem students pursue advanced topics in forensic science and analytical spectroscopy, with emphasis on the analysis of evidence from crime scenes via hands-on practical work and problem and case solving. In the second semester, students join a research group to conduct a research project. For the MChem students, this takes the form of a group project that will foster communication, project development and leadership skills of the type used in industrial research. All students present their research results to the department. Evidence-building, presentation, communication, computer, internet, information retrieval and problem-solving skills – essential for all careers, scientific or otherwise – are thus integrated within the courses.


The fourth year All students take advanced, specialist modules in analytical and forensic science, including aspects of the most modern sample detection techniques and case studies centred on recent advances in forensic science and toxicology. You learn the strengths and weaknesses of the techniques available to the forensic scientist and the language needed to communicate with professionals in related disciplines. Throughout the year, students develop a research project, normally in the analytical science research groups in the department, employing the same methodology used in a forensic, industrial or academic setting. Students also develop an understanding of the context, potential benefits and worldwide knowledge-base of their chosen research area, using databases and internet-based resources. In the second semester, students who have spent a year in industry pursue the research project for two days a week and the other MChem students spend four days on their research project. All students present their research results to the department, write an extended dissertation detailing their results and conclusions and construct a website to present their work. For almost all students, the research project proves to be the most rewarding and enjoyable part of their degree, and this is reflected in the large percentage who continue to pursue their interests in research careers.

Well-equipped graduates Graduates from these courses have a strong grasp of forensic science and analytical chemistry, with sufficient knowledge of toxicology to be able to communicate with professional toxicologists, built on a firm basic understanding of chemistry and the ability to solve problems scientifically. All of these skills are highly valued by employers. As well as specifically offering an essential base for a career and postgraduate study in forensic science, these courses provide employment opportunities in, for example, pollution control, industrial systems and human and animal toxicology. As a chemistry graduate, you possess highly valued analytical, problem-solving and IT skills that equip you equally well for the general graduate job market. The Analytical Science Group at Hull has strong national and international contacts with public- and private-sector laboratories which take a keen interest in our students. Our established international research strengths mean that our students benefit from the most modern analytical instrumentation.

‘As a mature student with learning difficulties, I have found the staff at Hull most helpful in facilitating my personal and academic progress. The student services offered by the University are truly excellent, and the Department of Chemistry has superb facilities, including spacious, modern laboratories with high levels of equipment.’ Matthew Hardy Chemistry with Forensic Science and Toxicology

www.hull.ac.uk

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Chemistry with Molecular Medicine MChem (F151 and F152) and BSc (F153) Pharmaceutical science and biotechnology lie at the interface of chemistry and biology. Medicinal chemists discover and develop new drugs and treatments. They need to know how and why these drugs exert their effects to maximise their performance and minimise or eliminate side effects. To develop future medical technology, they need to understand the properties of biological molecules themselves; and they need a strong synthetic and theoretical understanding of chemistry as well as knowledge of the molecular basis of biology and medicine. Our courses are designed to meet the requirements of this rapidly growing area of research and industry. It is estimated that it takes around 10 years to bring a new drug from the drawing board to the drug cabinet and that each day of this costs about a million dollars. By using insight, skilful synthesis and imagination, the medicinal chemist can accelerate this process, bringing considerable savings and medical benefits. Such scientists are highly sought after by the pharmaceutical industry.

The first two years The first two years are similar to Years 1 and 2 of the straight Chemistry courses and provide the firm foundation of core chemistry required of medicinal chemists. The fundamentals of microbiology and biochemistry are taught, and the process of drug discovery is introduced in additional modules.

The third year Students on the Industrial Experience course spend this year in industry gaining valuable skills, first-hand experience of the practice of research – and a salary. BSc students and the other MChem students pursue advanced topics in bioorganic, bioinorganic and biological macromolecules in theory and practice, studying the properties of proteins, nucleic acids and cellular membranes. Practical work includes hands-on experience of advanced synthetic and instrumental techniques and modern computer-based drug design strategies. In the second semester, students join a research group to conduct a research project. For the MChem students, this takes the form of a group project that will foster communication, project development and leadership skills of the type used in industrial research.

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All students present their research results to the department. Presentation, communication, computer, internet, information retrieval and problem-solving skills – essential for all careers, scientific or otherwise – are thus integrated within the courses.

The fourth year All students follow advanced, specialist modules in molecular medicine and aspects of pharmacy (including antibacterial, antifungal, antitumour and antiviral agents and the delivery of drugs to the patient) and acquire the language and the broad knowledge of physiology, biochemistry, pharmacology and pharmacy needed to communicate and lead research work with scientists in other disciplines such as geneticists, cell biologists, computer scientists and clinicians. Throughout the year, students develop a research project, normally in the biological chemistry research groups in the department, employing the same methodology used in an industrial or academic setting. In the first semester, students develop an understanding of the context, potential benefits and worldwide knowledge-base of their chosen research area, using databases and internet-based resources. In the second semester, students who have spent a year in industry pursue the research project for two days a week and the other MChem students spend four days on their research project. All students present their research results to the department, write an extended dissertation detailing their results and conclusions and construct a website to present their work. For almost all students, the research project proves to be the most rewarding and enjoyable part of their degree, and this is reflected in the large percentage who continue to pursue their interests in research careers.


Chemistry with Nanotechnology MChem (F167 and F168) and BSc (F166) Nanotechnology is a new area of materials science that is revolutionising the development of novel designer technology. It is concerned with manipulation at the nanometre scale (from 1 to 10 nanometres, where 1 nm is about the length of three gold atoms) to develop and characterise materials with very special properties. These materials find potential and actual applications in many technological areas such as electronics, dispersions and coatings, sensors, liquid crystals, ceramics and biotechnology. The design, development, characterisation and application of smart and clean materials is a rapidly growing multidisciplinary activity which has enormous economic, social and environmental benefits and offers worldwide employment opportunities.

The first two years The first two years are similar to Years 1 and 2 of the straight Chemistry courses and provide the firm foundation of core chemistry required for understanding materials at the atomic level. The environmental impact of chemistry and the need to develop clean and green technology are introduced, as well as the resurgence of interest in materials with nanoscale devices such as carbon nanotubes, surfactants and sensors.

The third year Students on the Industrial Experience course spend this year in industry gaining valuable skills, first-hand experience of the practice of research – and a salary.

All students present their research results to the department. Presentation, communication, computer, internet, information retrieval and problem-solving skills – essential for all careers, scientific or otherwise – are thus integrated within the courses.

The fourth year All students follow advanced, specialist modules in nanotechnology, including up-to-the-minute coverage of the most recent developments and hot areas both in industry and in the universities and the wish list of potential smart materials that will change the way we live in the 21st century. Throughout the year, students develop a research project, normally in the nanotechnology research groups in the department, employing the same methodology used in an industrial or academic setting. In the first semester, students develop an understanding of the context, potential benefits and worldwide knowledgebase of their chosen research area, using databases and internet-based resources. In the second semester, students who have spent a year in industry pursue the research project for two days a week and the other MChem students spend four days on their research project. All students present their research results to the department, write an extended dissertation detailing their results and conclusions and construct a website to present their work. For almost all students, the research project proves to be the most rewarding and enjoyable part of their degree, and this is reflected in the large percentage who continue to pursue their interests in research careers.

BSc students and the other MChem students pursue advanced topics in materials science such as lasers, magnetic devices for information storage, the development of liquid crystals for displays and biotechnology. The practical work includes hands-on experience of advanced synthetic and spectroscopic techniques. In the second semester, students join a research group to conduct a research project. For the MChem students, this takes the form of a group project that will foster communication, project development and leadership skills of the type used in industrial research.

www.hull.ac.uk

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Forensic Science with Criminology

The third year

BSc (F4M9)

Modules in chemistry focus on advanced topics in analytical and forensic science and toxicology, including laboratory classes. Criminology modules include such topics as the history of crime, social analysis and punishment; surveillance and social control; victims, rights, and justice; and policing. A research project is also undertaken during the final year, and this can be chosen from a wide range of both scientific and social topics.

There is a growing need for graduates who combine a good scientific knowledge and understanding of the technological techniques required for the detection, solving and prevention of crime with a thorough background in the social, psychological and legal issues surrounding crime. Forensic Science with Criminology offers the opportunity to study a broad range of science topics organised around the area of forensic science but also includes the study of criminology, thus placing the subject in a wider social context. The course gives a good grounding in the basic chemical and biological sciences but also covers the wider area of forensic science, including topics such as presenting evidence, drugs, explosives, DNA analysis, toxicology and physical evidence. Criminology is concerned with understanding crime, which is one of the major social problems of our time. It draws on a number of disciplines, including social policy, sociology, psychology and law, to investigate a range of theoretical and policy issues relating to the extent, nature and distribution of crime.

The first year The first year involves foundation modules across the wider topics of organic, inorganic, physical and analytical chemistry which are taught through lectures, small-group seminars, tutorials and laboratory classes. A module of introductory forensic science and biological chemistry is included. Other modules are concerned with criminology in terms of criminal justice processes and the social, psychological and legal aspects of crime.

The second year Modules in the second year build on the foundations of the first year, with the core modules maintaining an equal split between chemistry and criminology.

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Please note that a BA Criminology with Forensic Science course (M9F4) is offered by the Department of Criminology for those seeking a less scientific study of forensic science. Please visit the Criminology website at www.hull.ac.uk/fass for more details.


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Pharmaceutical Science MPharmSci (FB12 and FB1F) and BSc (FBC2) Pharmaceutical science embraces the full range of chemistry and aspects of biochemistry and biology dealing with interactions of drugs and diseases at the molecular level. Chemistry is important through all stages of pharmaceutical production – drug design, synthesis, biological action, formulation and delivery. Toxicology, the molecular science of toxic effects, and analytical chemistry, to establish purity and assess contamination, are also fundamental to pharmaceutical science. There is always a need for new medicines to tackle intractable and new diseases and to replace ageing and less potent drugs. The genetic and proteomic revolutions are transforming the science of medicine. These developments and the rapidly expanding pharmaceutical industry require scientists able to lead research across traditional disciplines. Pharmaceutical science is a truly interdisciplinary science, and these wide-ranging programmes provide a broad but thorough background in the chemical, biological and technological basis of medicinal agents.

The first two years Study in the first two years combines aspects of chemistry and biology that relate to medicines, including the biochemistry of the body, drug design and the medical and molecular basis of disease.

The third year Students on the Industrial Experience programme spend this year in industry gaining valuable skills, first-hand experience of the practice of research – and a salary. BSc students and the other MPharmSci students pursue advanced topics in genetics, proteomics, toxicology, drug metabolism and pharmacokinetics. Alongside these scientific courses, students also study key aspects of the pharmaceutical industry, including legislation, property rights and marketing. Practical work includes hands-on experience of advanced synthetic, formulation and instrumental techniques. In the second semester, students join a research group to conduct a research project. For the MPharmSci students, this takes the form of a group project that will foster communication, project development and leadership skills of the type used in industrial research.

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All students present their research results to the department. Presentation, communication, computer, internet, information retrieval and problem-solving skills – essential for all careers, scientific or otherwise – are thus integrated within the programmes.

The fourth year All students take advanced modules in clinical chemistry and analysis, drug design and delivery, along with specialist courses in molecular medicine such as chemotherapy and radiopharmaceuticals. Throughout the year, students develop a research project, normally in the biological chemistry or analytical science research groups in the department, employing the same methodology used in an industrial or academic setting. In the first semester, students develop an understanding of the context, potential benefits and worldwide knowledge-base of their chosen research area, using databases and internet-based resources. In the second semester, students who have spent a year in industry pursue the research project for two days a week and the other MPharmSci students spend four days on their research. All students present their research results to the department, write an extended dissertation detailing their results and conclusions and construct a website to present their work. For almost all students, the research project proves to be the most rewarding and enjoyable part of their degree, and this is reflected in the large percentage who continue to pursue their interests in research careers.


‘Hull University is a great place to study, especially as everything I need is on the one campus. The Chemistry Department’s facilities are more than I could ask for: modern labs, high-tech equipment and comfy lecture theatres. The staff are friendly and – more importantly – always there if you need help or support.’ Michelle Scott MPharmSci

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Chemistry with Business

The third year

BSc (FINC)

Modern developments in chemistry are introduced, with some optional modules to reflect special interests. Students additionally choose one advanced business module, according to their developing personal and career interests, from a selection including business development, international financial management, ethics and management, and international marketing. In the second semester, students join a research group to conduct a research project.

The chemical industry is a vast and worldwide enterprise and is one of the most important sectors of the UK economy. While the need for well-qualified research chemists is strong, there is also demand for graduates who combine a good knowledge of fundamental chemistry, industrial processes and environmental issues with business knowledge, flair and experience for careers in management and marketing. This degree course, taught jointly by the Department of Chemistry and the University’s Business School, combines courses in traditional and modern chemistry with modules providing full knowledge of the basic principles of business. Students can specialise in business, economics, financial management or marketing. The course can be extended by a year spent gaining paid industrial experience, for which students are additionally awarded a Certificate of Industrial Experience and Competence. The course is designed primarily for those wishing to pursue careers in management and marketing but also provides the basis for a career in chemical research.

The first year A firm grounding in fundamental chemistry is combined with the development of key chemical and professional skills, including presentation, analysis and computing. Students additionally choose one business-oriented module in each semester from a selection designed to reflect career aspirations, including courses on the business environment, organisational behaviour, marketing, accounting and finance.

The second year Knowledge of fundamental theoretical, practical and analytical chemistry is further developed together with the skills expected of management professionals, including use of the internet and the delivery of effective presentations. The course again offers students the opportunity to choose one business module in each semester from a selection of topics including business strategy, financial management, buyer behaviour, business law and ethics, accounting, marketing information and research, and understanding organisations.

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All students present their research results to the department. Presentation, communication, computer, internet, information retrieval and problem-solving skills – essential for all careers, scientific or otherwise – are thus integrated within the courses.


Chemical Sciences

The third year (optional – leading to BSc)

FdSc and BSc (part-time)

Cutting-edge chemistry topics across all branches of analytical, inorganic, organic and physical convey the state of the art in research and industrial chemistry. Advanced laboratory and scientific literature are taken in Semester 1, followed by a work-based research project chosen from a wide variety of topics in Semester 2.

There is a growing need for well-qualified graduates in chemistry, with a good overall grasp of the experimental techniques, who seek technician employment, rather than research and development careers, within the chemical industry. The two-year full-time Chemical Sciences Foundation degree (FdSc) course is designed to provide a foundation of chemical knowledge and skills across a range of analytical, inorganic, organic and physical topics. The course is more applied and work-focused than the traditional three-year BSc Chemistry courses; indeed, work-based learning, including a project, is designed to take place in local industry. Hence the course is supported by the Yorkshire and Humber Chemical Industries Training Organisation. The FdSc course is an excellent option for students seeking a shorter, more applied and work-focused qualification than a traditional BSc Chemistry course; and, importantly, success in the FdSc course allows progression to a BSc Chemical Sciences course, which takes a further year. Note that the Chemical Sciences FdSc is a Foundation degree, and is not to be confused with our Foundation Year course (F101). However, students who are not sufficiently qualified for direct Year 1 entry to the FdSc course can enter through the Foundation Year course (F101).

The first year Study in the first year involves the foundations of the four fundamental branches of chemistry – analytical, inorganic, organic and physical. The varied teaching methods include lectures, group seminars, small-group tutorials and laboratory classes, in addition to a period of work-based learning. Chemical and professional skills include group working and communication, and support in mathematics and physics. You also chose a free elective from a wide range of available topics that fit the core timetable.

The second year The second-year core modules build on those of Year 1 in their across-the-board coverage of analytical, inorganic, organic and physical chemistry topics. A work-based project spans both semesters of what is the final year of the FdSc course, but successful students can progress to the BSc qualification (see below).

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Foundation Chemistry BSc (F101) The four-year BSc in Chemistry offers a preliminary year for students who are not suitably qualified for direct entry to our Honours degrees and have a keen interest in chemistry or pharmaceutical science and a desire to succeed. Success during the Foundation Year guarantees entry to any of our degree courses. So you can, if you wish, extend your study to the MChem courses, which would involve a total of five years’ study.

The department has an established reputation for its part-time courses in chemistry and, through the Institute for Chemistry in Industry, in safety and environmental management. Students from a wide variety of small, medium and large local and regional chemical companies, as well as a number of individuals wishing to retrain, have successfully obtained qualifications. Applications for these courses should be made directly to the department (see inner front cover).

The first year

FdSc and BSc Chemistry

The Foundation Year is taught within the department to the standard required for entry to all of the mainstream degree courses offered by the Department of Chemistry. The level reached at the end of the year is similar to that necessary for a grade C in A level Chemistry, but the course is tailored to maximise success in our degree courses.

The part-time Chemistry course is divided into two distinct sections, FdSc and BSc. The FdSc is called a Foundation degree, and takes three years of distance learning to complete on a part-time basis. The distancelearning modules cover a wide and varied range of topics across analytical, inorganic, organic and physical chemistry, and are complemented by short periods of laboratory work to be completed in the department during the normal student vacation periods just before Easter and during early September. Successful FdSc students can progress to the BSc qualification through a further two years of distance learning, or, if they wish, can complete the BSc qualification in one year of fulltime study. The further two years of distance learning involve the study of cutting-edge chemistry topics across all branches of analytical, inorganic, organic and physical chemistry, which convey the state of the art in research and industrial chemistry. Advanced laboratory is taken in the department during Year 4, and a workbased research project chosen from a wide variety of topics is taken in Year 5.

The teaching in the Foundation Year involves two modules of chemistry (one per semester). The chemistry is supported with a module of mathematics and a module of physics in Semester 1, followed in Semester 2 by a choice of either a module of biology or a module of further physics, plus a compulsory module of study skills which serves as preparation for the following years of degree-level teaching. Students with an interest in organic, biological and pharmaceutical chemistry are advised to take the biology option in Semester 2. During this year, you are a full member of the Department of Chemistry and the University of Hull. You are accordingly entitled to use all University facilities and, like other first-year students, are guaranteed a place in University accommodation for the first year (if you wish it). You also have a departmental supervisor whom you meet several times during the year and, as a member of the student Chem Soc, are warmly welcomed to all departmental events.

Years 2–4 (or 2–5) Successful completion of the Foundation Year guarantees entry to any Chemistry, ‘Chemistry with …’ or Pharmaceutical Science course of your choice, as described in the preceding pages. For further details, please contact Dr Mike Hird (01482 465866 or m.hird@hull.ac.uk).

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Part-time study

Chemistry

The normal entry requirements are A level Chemistry, Advanced GNVQ or a BTEC National Certificate or Diploma in which chemistry is a major subject. Applications from those with other qualifications and/or appropriate experience are welcomed.

Safety and environmental management The Institute for Chemistry in Industry maintains and develops strong links with the industrial and public services communities, especially, but not exclusively, in the Yorkshire and Lincolnshire areas, and runs NEBOSH and BSc courses in safety and environmental management. More information on the courses, entry requirements and facilities available can be found on the Institute for Chemistry in Industry website: www.hull.ac.uk/ICI.


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Careers The University’s Careers and Appointments Service will advise you at any time, including during your first two years, about possible careers. It also organises recruiting visits to the campus by all the major employers during your final year. Additionally, we have widespread contact with industry through the Institute for Chemistry in Industry, through Hull graduates who are now in senior positions and through a large number of research collaborations – we are currently the most successful chemistry department in the country for attracting industrial funds for research and are ranked among the top 10 universities nationally for the job prospects of our Chemistry graduates.

A shortage subject For a number of years there has been a national shortage of suitably qualified chemists in industry, in university research and in school teaching, and this situation is unlikely to change in the near future. Nevertheless, the successful chemist needs to have the balance of academic and professional skills and personal qualities that is provided by all our courses.

The world’s your oyster Modern chemistry ranges from computer programming at one extreme, through industrial chemistry and analysis, to the study of biological processes and diseases at the other, and graduates find a correspondingly wide range of jobs. • Some use their chemistry and their communication skills to become teachers in universities, schools and colleges. • Some use their knowledge of core chemistry and specialist topics and the research skills developed in their final-year research project to follow research careers in universities, government research laboratories and research institutes, and industrial research and development. • Those with entrepreneurial ambitions use their specialist knowledge and problem-solving and communication skills in companies that aim to lead the biotechnology, pharmaceutical and nanotechnology markets. • Many find employment in laboratories carrying out testing, development, production and analysis. • The various skills fostered by our degree programmes provide the basis for longterm career development, and many chemists finally leave the laboratory to work in project and senior management, sales and marketing. The chemical industry is one of the largest and most successful in the country. Nearly 50% of the top 150 executives in the UK’s major chemical companies have degrees in chemistry. Our degrees also provide excellent training in fundamental scientific principles, in practical, organisational and computing skills, and in self-discipline. These qualities make chemistry graduates very attractive to the general graduate job market. Many take up careers in computing, administration, accountancy, insurance, banking and journalism, where their chemistry is not directly involved but the scientific and personal skills developed in their degrees prove invaluable.

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Research The strength and breadth of the research in the department in which you choose to study is almost as important as the degrees it offers. Research and teaching work together to provide the opportunity, expertise and equipment needed for a complete training. • In your final-year project, you will commit a lot of time and energy to undertake cutting-edge research within one of our research teams, and, to prepare you for this, the modules you take during your degree become progressively more specialised. • Final-year modules cover state-of-the-art material and need to be taught by those with the appropriate expertise. • During your degree, you will gain hands-on experience of modern instrumentation that is only available as a by-product of research enterprise. • Indeed, we are confident that at the end of your degree you will want to continue working in scientific research or in laboratory work. The Department of Chemistry offers excellent opportunities to pursue pioneering postgraduate research for a PhD, while the strong network of industrial links built up through its research are a major advantage for those seeking careers in the chemical industry. The department is proud of its continuing tradition of research excellence. Hull chemists developed many of the liquid crystal molecules that are used in the multibillion-dollar display industry. The next generation of smart nanomaterials, such as light-emitting polymers, liquids which become solid when a voltage is applied and porous solids which remove pollutants, are now being developed. Novel cancer drugs which are activated by lasers when they reach the cancer site, designed to avoid side effects, are being made here. The development of new materials such as these, which promise to provide the technological and medical breakthroughs of tomorrow, needs creative and imaginative chemists. Research at Hull is changing the way chemistry and analysis is done by miniaturising synthesis and the measurement of trace amounts of chemicals to the size of a computer chip. Using computer-controlled arrays of chemical ‘lab-on-achips’, thousands of new compounds can be made or measured each day instead of the few per day in a traditional laboratory. Chemical sensors and drug delivery devices can be made small enough to be implanted into people. Disposable miniature devices will have a huge impact in areas such as forensic science and environmental monitoring. Hull, as a leading centre for this research with widespread industrial and Government support, is bringing this concept to reality. The benefits for the environment will be startling. Research at Hull is wide-ranging and, by its nature, is continually changing and developing. At present, more than 60 postgraduate students are carrying out research for the PhD, and there are over 30 postdoctoral researchers. While many of these researchers studied for BSc and MChem degrees at Hull, the department also attracts researchers from across the world – it is a truly international research centre.

Further information More details of the research enterprise can be found on the departmental website by following the links to the research groups: www.hull.ac.uk/chemistry/research.php. More details of recent research developments can be found by regularly checking the departmental news page: www.hull.ac.uk/chemistry/news.

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Free Elective Scheme Studying for a degree at the University of Hull is a unique experience. We aim to provide you with an education that offers both depth and breadth of knowledge. To meet these ends the University has developed an optional Free Elective Scheme. This scheme enables the majority of undergraduate students to take one module a year from outside their main course of study.

Admissions policy Admissions information provided in this pamphlet is intended as a general guide and cannot cover all possibilities. Entry requirements are generally stated in terms of A

So, how does it work?

level grades and/or UCAS points,

Each year you take 120 credits’ worth of modules.

but we encourage applications from people with a wide range of

SEMESTER 1

SEMESTER 2

other qualifications and/or

20 credits

20 credits

the various entry routes are

20 credits

20 credits

Please contact the Admissions

experience. Some further details of

included in our general prospectus.

Service (see below) with any

20 credits

specific queries about admissions.

20 credits

Disclaimer

Here you take modules from your main course of study.

Here you have the option to take a free elective or another module from your main course of study.

This publication is intended principally as a guide for prospective students. The matters covered by it – academic and

What sort of subjects can I take? You can take almost any free elective module from outside your main course of study, usually at your home campus. You can even take a module from another faculty. You should discuss your choice of free electives with your supervisor.

What are the main reasons for participating? • The scheme gives you the opportunity to study a subject without having to commit yourself to taking further modules in that subject area. • By taking a free elective you are able to follow up your interests as part of your degree. • With a broader education you may acquire extra skills that will help you when you enter the employment market.

otherwise – are subject to change from time to time, both before and after students are admitted, and the information contained in it does not form part of any contract. While every reasonable precaution was taken in the production of this brochure, the University does not accept liability for any inaccuracies.

Address For general enquiries, please write to Admissions Service University of Hull Hull, HU6 7RX T 01482 466100 F 01482 442290 E admissions@hull.ac.uk


The organic light emitting diode (OLED) technology under development in our Department of Chemistry will produce brighter, sharper and more energy eďŹƒcient display screens for mobile phones, laptops and TVs. OLEDs are tipped to be one of the major technological breakthroughs of the next ďŹ ve years.

Change the way you think.

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Chemistry 2012 Revised