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Undergraduate study

Law

Entry 2012


Key facts

Law at Hull | 1

Degree course

Why study law at Hull? | 4

LLB Law

Degree courses | 16 Law options | 29 Beyond the classroom | 30 Admissions | 31

UCAS code

Length (years)

M100

3

N/A

5

LLB Law (including Foundation English Language)

M1Q3

4

LLB Commercial Law

M221

3

LLB International Law

M130

3

LLB Law and Legislative Studies

ML12

4

LLB Law with Business

M1N1

3

LLB Law with Criminology

M1M2

3

LLB Law with French Law and Language

M1R1

4

LLB Law with German Law and Language

M1R2

4

LLB Law with Literature

M1QH

3

LLB Law with Philosophy

M1V5

3

LLB Law with Politics

M1L2

3

LLB Law with Spanish Law and Language

M1R4

4

LLB Senior Status

M101

2

N/A

3

LLB Law (part-time)

LLB Senior Status (part-time)

Law as a minor subject You can also study law as part of a BA degree in Criminology with Law, in English with Law, or in Politics, Philosophy and Law (with or without Foundation English Language). For details please see the subject brochures for Criminology and Sociology, English, Politics and International Studies, and Philosophy.

Admissions

Admissions contact Admissions Secretary The Law School University of Hull Hull, HU6 7RX T 01482 465857 F 01482 466388 law@hull.ac.uk www.hull.ac.uk/law

Dates of semesters Semester 1 24 Sep – 14 Dec 2012

Semester 2 28 Jan – 10 May 2013

The standard offer for the majority of our courses is 320 UCAS points from three A levels or equivalent qualifications. We recognise all A level subjects for entrance purposes, and we normally include every recognised subject (including General Studies) in conditional offers. We are willing to consider resit grades. There are some exceptions to the general entry requirements outlined above: • Applicants for LLB Law with Literature will be required to obtain at least a grade B in A level English (or equivalent). • Applicants for LLB Law and Legislative Studies will be required to obtain 340 UCAS points from three A levels (or equivalent). Applicants will also be required to attend an interview before an offer is made. • Applicants for LLB Law with French, German or Spanish Law and Language require at least a grade B in the relevant A level language (or equivalent). • Applicants for the LLB Senior Status programme (which is designed for graduates in a discipline other than law) will be required to have or obtain at least a 2.2 Honours degree (or equivalent). We welcome applicants who wish to defer entry or to take a gap year. Should you require advice with regard to admissions, please contact the Law School office.


Law at Hull The Law School received the highest form of approval from the Quality Assurance Agency for Higher Education (QAA) in its most recent developmental engagement (2003/04). At the heart of the review is the student learning experience. Taking this into account, the QAA expressed confidence in the quality of the Law School’s academic standards and the quality of the learning opportunities available. In the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise (RAE), 85 per cent of the Law School’s research activity was judged to be of international quality. In the 2010 National Student Survey, 87% of Hull Law students who participated in the survey said that they were satisfied with the quality of the course while 92% agreed that their course was intellectually stimulating. The LLB degree offered at the University is a ‘qualifying law degree’ for the purposes of the legal professions, approved by both the Law Society and the General Council of the Bar. The Law School has an agreement with the College of Law, BPP (at Leeds and Manchester), the University of Northumbria and the University of Sheffield, whereby LLB graduates are guaranteed a place on one of their Legal Practice Courses (subject to conditions).

Director’s welcome This brochure is designed to provide you with information about studying law at the University of Hull. I hope you find the answers to most of your questions here, but if you would like further information on any matter, please get in touch and we will respond as quickly and helpfully as we can. Law has been taught at Hull since 1927. Since its foundation, the Law School has dedicated itself to providing a quality legal education in a supportive and stimulating environment. This remains true today. While the Law School is large enough to offer the advantages of a major institution, it is still a friendly and intimate place in which to study. Furthermore, the Law School’s staff are not only committed to providing you with the best research-led teaching possible, but also dedicated to challenging you to make the most of your own intellectual and personal abilities. Should you decide to come to the Law School, I look forward to welcoming you in person.

Professor Lindsay Moir

www.hull.ac.uk

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Mission statement The Law School is committed to the ideal of an academy of legal scholars fostering critical enquiry and learning. Its aim is to foster evaluation, analysis and presentation of legal ideas and phenomena, including formal legal rules, principles and concepts, informal norms and legal institutions, practices and procedures, whether or not these are conventionally recognised or formally defined as part of the legal system. The Law School attaches priority to the promotion of scholarship through the development and enrichment of its research activities and output. The school recognises the obligation of its entire academic staff to contribute through their research to the body of legal scholarship, and sees research as an essential foundation for successful teaching and service activity. The school is also committed to the expansion of, and support for, postgraduate student research. The school is committed to its undergraduate and postgraduate teaching, recognising and valuing the fact that students will come from different places and diverse backgrounds, with different experiences and from different disciplines. The school is committed to excellence in teaching and learning, and acknowledges the importance of its obligation to all its students to provide the best possible legal education. The school is committed to using a variety of teaching methods tailored to suit the aim of producing critical learners, with students as participants in this process rather than customers. The school is committed to regular reviews of its organisational and institutional structures in order to promote the development of a framework for the generation and communication of ideas and open channels of communication. It will continue to develop and allocate resources so as to exploit its opportunities to contribute to the activities of the scholarly community of which it is a part.

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‘I took the opportunity to study Law with Business at Hull as it allowed me to take some complementary business subjects alongside the modules that would culminate in a qualifying law degree. ‘I wasn’t sure which career route to pursue, and the course at Hull meant I could keep my options open while I worked out what I wanted to do. I also think that the major/minor degree provided an extra level of analysis as well as devloping “commercial awareness”. ‘I would urge anyone thinking of embarking on a legal career to consider this course. If you have decided to study law at Hull, my advice would be to think about what you would like to take out of your degree, as a ‘Law with’ course could provide the edge you need to succeed in your future career.’ Luke Jackson LLB Law with Business

www.hull.ac.uk

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Why study law at Hull? ‘Because of the friendly and supportive environment’ Staff The Law School prides itself on its excellent staff–student ratio: if you study law at Hull you are a name, not a number. Our staff hail from a variety of countries (including China, England, France, Germany, Nigeria, Pakistan, Scotland and the United States), providing an extraordinary range of legal experience and perspectives and allowing the Law School to offer a wide range of subjects, many of them exclusive to this university. Our staff are committed to the pastoral care of their students. Each student is allocated a staff member as their personal supervisor throughout their degree. In addition, there is a unique and highly praised IT culture that forms an integral part of the teaching in terms of training, documentation, support, online resources (such as LexisNexis Butterworths and Westlaw UK) and online learning.

Students The diversity of our students is one of the Law School’s strengths. The majority are of UK origin and 18–24 years old, with a gender balance usually around 50/50, but our youngest enrolled student was 17 and our oldest 70. The school has a long record of involvement with institutions around the world; over the last decade alone, students from more than 90 countries have studied here. We are determined that the Law School will maintain its mix by age, gender and national origin. The school has always welcomed a significant number of international students (some supported by University of Hull and Law School scholarships). This has promoted the growth of student societies. The school has long-established links with South-East Asia and has recently developed links with countries such as Cyprus and Nigeria – leading, for example, to a thriving Nigerian Students’ Society. The wide range of students from different cultures studying throughout the University means that students from every background can find friendship and support in the International Students’ Association as well as in societies such as the Afro-Caribbean Society, the Chinese Society and many others.

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‘Because of the excellent research’ At Hull you will be taught by lecturers who are highly active in research. Most of those who teach you will also have published academic books and articles in academic journals, as well as undertaking other research activities such as supervising students who are doing research for the higher degree of PhD. Many of the books and articles published by law teachers at Hull are highly acclaimed nationally and internationally, and some books are used as texts on courses at other universities in the UK, North America, Australasia and elsewhere. This will benefit you in a number of ways. It means you will be taught by academics of the highest calibre – those whose writing is read by students and scholars throughout the world. At Hull, your courses will be lively – being informed by the latest original research. In addition to the core subjects of the law curriculum, you will have the opportunity to study cutting-edge topics on which your lecturers are doing research and writing books. Indeed, through your contributions to tutorial discussions you may even influence what they write. Also, because Hull lecturers are at the forefront of legal research, we are often visited by high-profile academics and professionals from elsewhere, who will frequently give guest lectures. For further details of the research being undertaken at the University of Hull Law School, please visit www.hull.ac.uk/law. Attached to the Law School are a number of specialist research institutes.

Institute of European Public Law Inaugurated in 1992, the institute promotes research and provides postgraduate teaching in the area of European public law. It also supports public lectures delivered by leaders in that field. All lectures are published in the institute’s journal, European Public Law.

‘After serving as a senior US civil servant in Washington for 28 years and teaching administrative law to practising lawyers as well, I now enjoy my new career living in Yorkshire and teaching in a law school classroom. Because I also teach each summer in America, I make an effort to incorporate multijurisdictional public law issues and non-traditional teaching methods into the seminar in American Public Law – one of the few such courses regularly offered by a UK law school. It allows students to experiment with practical lawyering skills by representing a hypothetical client in court proceedings based on an actual American case. Students tell me it is not only challenging but fun. I also enjoy helping Hull students who wish to pursue postgraduate educational or professional opportunities in the United States.’ Gary Edles Visiting Professor

www.hull.ac.uk

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McCoubrey Centre for International Law The centre was set up in memory of the late Professor Hilaire McCoubrey, with the aim of promoting a better understanding of international law, which encompasses higher standards of humanity, ecology, democracy, peace, sustainability and fairness. It currently supports research in the areas of human rights, armed conflict, the law of the sea, and trade and development.

Institute of Applied Ethics A number of Law School staff undertake research within the University's Institute of Applied Ethics (IAE). The institute brings together researchers from philosophy, law, politics and cognate disciplines in ways that provide a creative forum for the development of projects in applied ethics. Currently, IAE-affiliated Law School staff are engaged in projects on competence to consent in biomedical research, the ethics of restorative justice, the epistemology of expert evidence and the theory and practice of children’s rights.

Trade and Commercial Law Centre In recognition of the growing expertise which the Law School has accumulated in the field of commercial law, a specialist research group was formed in 2006: the Trade and Commercial Law Centre (TCLC). The TCLC brings together legal scholars with particular research interests in the field of commercial law, which for our purposes includes a range of different aspects of commercial law – although we have particular strengths in domestic and international sales law, maritime and shipping law and company law. The TCLC provides a focal point for our research and teaching activities in commercial law. There is already a strong track record of high-quality publications, on which we shall build in the years to come. Moreover, in line with the school's focus on research-led teaching, we offer a range of modules based on staff research interests and a dedicated degree course in this field (LLB Commercial Law).

The Wilberforce Institute for the study of Slavery and Emancipation Slavery and the social injustices associated with it are as real today as they were 200 years ago, when William Wilberforce led the movement which ended the British slave trade in 1807. The Emancipation Movement still has unfinished business. The University of Hull has established a research institute to address this critical issue for the 21st century. It builds on its world-class reputation for research into the history of slavery and emancipation, and its association with the world’s first Professorship in Social Justice.

Experts and Institutions The role of expert knowledge in society raises a host of philosophical, political, legal, sociological and historical issues. Experts and Institutions is an interdisciplinary research centre, launched in September 2009, which is devoted to these questions. It is closely linked to the Institute of Applied Ethics, particularly its Criminal Justice Ethics and Biomedical Ethics research programmes, but has a separate existence as ethical questions are only part of its remit.

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‘Because of excellence in learning and teaching’ The school’s degree courses are consistent with the QAA and Law Society Benchmark Statements on Law and the University’s Learning and Teaching Strategy. Their learning outcomes reflect the institution’s fundamental aims to encourage independent learning and critical thinking. The QAA developmental engagement of 2003/04 expressed confidence in the academic standards set and achieved by all of our courses and in the quality of learning opportunities that support students in achieving those academic standards. The review covered all the taught courses offered by the Law School. In particular, the QAA praised • • • •

the number and quality of the school’s academic staff the quality of teaching materials and the use of good practice the proactive monitoring and support provided by staff the wide range of courses and the distinctive research-led modules that we offer, which are not widely available in the UK • the high level of graduate employment The report also noted that our students responded positively when their views were sought. The Law School is committed to excellence in learning and teaching and to using a variety of teaching methods tailored to suit the aim of producing critical learners. We see students as participants in this process rather than customers. The school also recognises that half of its student population will choose not to enter the legal profession and therefore aims to endow students with the intellectual and transferable skills necessary to allow them to choose a number of career paths.

Teaching methods Our courses are modular, and our basic teaching methods are lectures, tutorials and seminars. In most modules there are two or three lectures per week, supplemented by regular teaching in smaller groups. Lectures are backed up by detailed syllabuses and other documentation, and frequently make use of electronic resources. Lectures are used, among other things, to present an outline of particular areas which are to be treated in more detail in smaller groups; to provide an overview of a particular topic and to show its relationship with other areas; to consider in detail particular areas of difficulty; and to present the latest thinking of subject specialists. Seminars and tutorials are discussion forums on particular topics facilitated by a tutor. They allow for the free airing of opinions and offer the chance to explore issues of importance, interest or controversy. They also facilitate the development of interpersonal and team-working skills such as listening, speaking and empathy. Seminars and tutorials typically focus on a series of questions or tasks which require preparation beforehand. There may also be coursework assignments. Most modules require students to study independently by way of preparation for assignments (assessed and non-assessed), tutorials, discussion groups and lectures.

www.hull.ac.uk

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A varied teaching programme In the Law School, we believe that the teaching of law should not be separated from its social, moral and political context. Studying law at Hull is not just about learning rules and cases: it is about learning the ideas, values and policies that shape the law and the skills necessary to research, evaluate and apply it. Our degrees are designed to ensure maximum flexibility. After studying the compulsory subjects, students on the single-subject LLB are free to choose from a range of optional modules. An emphasis on research-led teaching allows staff to develop specialised modules based on new theories, analyses and perspectives developed in their research. Students may opt to follow a general path or to specialise at an early stage. Two exciting themed degrees – the LLB International Law and the LLB Commercial Law – allow students to follow a particular specialist pathway from the outset and for this to be recognised in the title of the degree with which they graduate.

Assessment methods Like most English law schools, we use a variety of methods to assess your progress, and methods vary between modules. They can broadly be divided into the following categories. Formal examinations Held at the end of each semester (in January and May–June), examinations are used to assess knowledge and understanding of specific subjects and last between two and three hours. As with all examinations at Hull, high marks are awarded for the application of understanding and the ability to argue a case, rather than just for knowledge itself. Some exam questions require an essay discussing the theories, issues and arguments that surround a particular legal question; others, known as problem questions, require the student to apply the law to a hypothetical set of facts. Assessed essays A significant number of modules are partially or fully assessed by way of assessed essays. Most first-year modules, for example, will feature an assessed essay. Essays require a higher standard of referencing and argument than that expected in formal examinations. Assessed problem questions are also set in a number of modules. Projects and dissertations Projects and dissertations are longer pieces of independent legal research that students undertake under the supervision of a member of staff. Year 2 and 3 modules often use this method of assessment, and the project’s specific topic is often decided by the student. In addition, you can choose to write a dissertation, on a topic of your choice, under the supervision of a staff member with relevant expertise. Other methods Although these are our most common methods of assessment, we also incorporate new and more innovative assessment methods when these are deemed appropriate. Recent modules, for example, have assessed students’ ability to present an oral argument or a ‘learning log’ based on a self-evaluation of their own research skills. We expect a variety of assessment methods to develop in the future, and increasingly modules incorporate several methods to ensure that students develop a range of oral, written and research skills.

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Non-assessed work During your time at Hull, you will undertake a significant amount of what we term ‘non-assessed’ work. Non-assessed assignments – ranging from projects to problem questions – are usually compulsory and are used by tutors to gauge your progress. They offer you a chance to undertake work similar to that which will ultimately count towards your final examinations and to learn from any mistakes.

‘Because of the facilities and services’ Location The Law School occupies offices on the first and fourth floors of the Wilberforce Building, on the University’s spacious Hull Campus. Many lectures are given in the same building, which also houses a cafe and computer facilities. The building is serviced by two lifts so that people with physical disabilities should have no access problems.

Law library The school regards the library as a primary resource for students and has given it a high priority in funding allocations. The law collection (the Sir Roy Marshall Library) is housed on the second floor of the central Brynmor Jones Library, with good provision of reading space. The library has a fully computerised catalogue as well as access to Westlaw UK and Lexis online legal databases. The collection comprises 30,000 volumes of law reports, statutes, periodicals, monographs and textbooks, along with the University’s European Documentation Centre. The library also houses photocopying facilities and computer workstations. The library has extensive opening hours and a variety of borrowing arrangements, designed to ensure equitable access for all students to key materials. Staff are always willing to assist with enquiries and offer dedicated library and study skills training. There are also study rooms that can be booked for private or group study.

Study Advice Service Located in the Brynmor Jones Library, the Study Advice Service offers free, generic advice, guidance and support at every level of study, full- or part-time, on all aspects of academic writing, study skills, mathematics/numeracy and statistics. For more information, please visit www.hull.ac.uk/studyadvice.

International Office If you are from overseas, the International Office will be your first port of call at the University. With staff from five countries, collectively speaking more than a dozen languages, the International Office is truly international and is dedicated to providing support from the moment you first contact the University until you graduate. It organises the International Welcome, manages the student exchange programmes and provides an immigration service to assist with applications for UK student visas.

Mature Student Adviser The Mature Student Adviser can see students on an individual and confidential basis to help sort out issues. It may be that you feel you need some help but you are not sure where to go. The Mature Student Adviser can help identify which support service might best meet your need.

www.hull.ac.uk

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Disability Services The Disability Services team at Hull are there to help you make the most of your time at university. They support students with a range of disabilities, from dyslexia, Asperger’s syndrome and other specific learning disabilities to physical disabilities, unseen disabilities and debilitating medical conditions. You can call them on 01482 462020, or you can email the Disabilities Officer at disability-services@hull.ac.uk.

‘Because of the excellent computing provision’ Hull’s Law School was one of the first in the country to establish a position for an IT Officer, which reflects our enthusiastic approach to the use of computers in teaching and learning. We emphasise students’ training in computing applications and use, as we require them to implement those skills in their reading for most modules and as part of the Legal Skills module. Law students benefit from • the Law School’s own computer room, for the exclusive use of law students • a further computer room located within the Law School’s building • full access to all computer rooms throughout the University, including a 24/7 facility • opportunities for training in the use of the electronic legal databases, Westlaw UK and Lexis and other electronic resources • Wi-Fi throughout the campus Students are expected to word-process all of their work. They are also required to access electronic legal material via Westlaw and Lexis, and to use the University’s web-based learning environment, eBridge – which ensures that documents are available at any time, whether at home or abroad. IT training, documentation and support are also available from the Computer Centre.

‘Because of the opportunity to broaden your horizons by studying abroad’ Students (other than those on our Law with Language degrees) may apply to transfer to the Erasmus programme, leading to an LLB with European Legal Studies. This is a reciprocal exchange arrangement with other European universities, which extends the degree by an extra year. Students apply to transfer to this programme at the beginning of the second year of the LLB. Selection for Erasmus is based on academic merit and – although foreign-language ability is desirable – some of our partner institutions teach in English. Students on the Erasmus programme spend their third year abroad, studying law at a university in France, Germany, Spain or the Netherlands, and then return to Hull for a fourth year to complete the LLB. These links have also resulted in a series of lectures by scholars from our partner institutions as well as visiting lectureships.

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‘Because our graduates have excellent employment prospects’ Hull produces some of the most employable graduates in the country. Our flexible degree structure and opportunities to study themed degrees can be tailored to suit your particular career path or generalised to keep your options open. While a number of our graduates embark on legal careers as solicitors or barristers, many use their degree as a springboard for a career in other areas such as finance, management, the Civil Service and research. Our strong links with local firms allow for vacation placements, and a series of seminars provided by the Careers Service help you to make the best of your options. Areas of employment include • The Civil Service • Law Teacher • Licensed Conveyancer • Paralegal • The Police Force • Legal Secretary • Risk Adviser • Stockbroking • Electoral Officer • Television Researcher

The Careers Service The University’s Careers Service is well equipped to advise students on the range of career choices available in the professions and outside them. It has a well-resourced library of information, and staff are able to offer help with applications and interview techniques, advice on vacation work experience and mini-pupillages, and more individual careers advice if needed. The service arranges a series of lectures each year on the Bar and on qualifying and practising as a solicitor, as well as lectures on alternatives to entering the professions. For those who decide to pursue a career at the Bar, the school maintains links with the Inner Temple of the Bar. The Careers Service arranges an annual visit to the Inns of Court, and there are other careers events during the year which provide opportunities to find out more about the Bar and meet members of local chambers. Similarly, for those interested in practice as a solicitor, the service arranges a careers fair with local and national firms, representatives of the Crown Prosecution Service and similar employers.

www.hull.ac.uk

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‘Because of the scholarships and other financial support’ Home/EU students While the cost of living in Hull is among the most reasonable in the UK, going to university can still be a significant investment. To ensure that everyone who wishes to study for a degree can best afford to do so, the University provides financial support in two ways: bursaries and scholarships. UK/EU students may be eligible for a bursary or scholarship (or both) to assist with fees. Please visit the University website (www.hull.ac.uk) for current information.

International students University scholarships The University has long been concerned about the effect of high tuition fees on the number of international students able to afford to study in Britain. We feel that students from different backgrounds make an important contribution to the University’s intellectual, social and cultural life. Around 5% of our current students come from overseas, and we hope to maintain this level. The University has a number of full and partial fee scholarships available for international applicants. All of these scholarships are awarded on the basis of academic merit, and are administered by the University’s International Office. Please see the details on eligibility below for more information. Law School Scholarships The Law School is keen to attract good international students and – conscious of the costs involved in studying in Britain – normally awards up to two partial fees scholarships annually to undergraduate applicants of outstanding merit. Please contact the Law School (at the address on the inner cover of this pamphlet) for further details. Eligibility Scholarships cover all academic areas and are offered on a competitive basis to those applicants who are considered most able academically. Educational achievements and references are taken into account. To be eligible for a scholarship award, the applicant must be liable to pay tuition fees at the full-cost rate for international students. Applicants from EU countries are therefore not eligible. Scholarships are awarded only to new students – continuing students are not eligible. Additionally, the International Office publishes a leaflet with full details of scholarships available each year for international students. The leaflet is available on their website (www.hull.ac.uk/ international) or from International Office University of Hull Hull, HU6 7RX, UK +44 (0)1482 466904 international@hull.ac.uk

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Prizes As a result of various donations and bequests the Law School is able to offer a number of prizes to students of merit. Prizes for overall performance on the degree include the Cavendish Law Prize, the Departmental Prize, the J Lewenstein Prizes, the Lionel Rosen Memorial Prize in Law, the Professor F W Taylor Fund and the Sweet & Maxwell Law Prize. Additionally there are a number of named prizes attached to particular subject areas: • • • • • • • • • • • •

the Andrew Marvell Jackson Prize Fund the Blackstone Prize in Consumer Law the Blackstone Prize in Employment Law the Carol Kaplan White Prize in Family Law the Jeremy R Hyde, CBE, Prize (Law Clinic module) the J Haydon Glen Prize in Public Law the J L Lee Memorial Prize in Common Law (Tortious Obligations) the Josephine C Onoh Memorial Prizes in Public International Law the Margaret Owen Barbeau Prize in Company Law the Prince Delphus Adebayo Odubanjo Prize in Property Law the Richard Wyvill Memorial Prize in Conflict of Laws the Timothy Durkin Prize in Medicine, Ethics and the Law

www.hull.ac.uk

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Life skills With a dedicated centre for international law and modules encompassing human rights, democracy, slavery, the protection of refugees and the laws of war, your days of putting the world to rights needn’t end when you leave the students’ union bar.


In 2010 National Student Survey, 87% of Hull law students who participated in the survey said that they were satisfied with the quality of the course while 92% agreed that their course was intellectually stimulating. And we don’t just excel at teaching. The most recent Research Assessment Exercise found 85% o our research activity to be ‘of international quality’.


Degree courses You can choose from a range of undergraduate courses: • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

LLB Law LLB International Law LLB Commercial Law LLB Law (part-time) (5 years) LLB Law – Senior Status (for graduates in other disciplines) (2 years) LLB Law – Senior Status (part-time) LLB Law with Criminology LLB Law with Business LLB Law with French, German or Spanish Law and Language (4 years) LLB Law with Literature LLB Law with Philosophy LLB Law with Politics LLB Law and Legislative Studies (4 years) LLB European Legal Studies (no direct entry) (4 years) LLB Law (including Foundation English Language) (4 years)

The content and structure of these courses are outlined on pages 18–28. The single-subject law degrees are taught entirely within the Law School, though LLB Law students may wish to take advantage of optional modules offered by other departments – what we call ‘free elective’ modules – in their second and third years. In the ‘Law with’ degrees, two-thirds of your time is spent in the Law School and one-third in the other department. All of our LLB degrees are qualifying law degrees and provide the necessary exemptions for the purposes of the professional bodies. Except where otherwise specified in the above list, all the degrees take three years. Each year is divided into two semesters, during which you study six modules consisting of a number of compulsory and optional modules. Modules are taught either for one semester or over both semesters (‘long-thin’ modules). Students taking one of our three-year degree courses, including LLB International Law and LLB Commercial Law, may wish to spend an extra year studying law at one of our partner institutions in the Netherlands, Germany, Spain or France. This route leads to, for example, an LLB Law (European Legal Studies), LLB International Law (European Legal Studies) or LLB Commercial Law (European Legal Studies). For more information on the year abroad, please visit www.hull.ac.uk/law. The school offers a wide range of options, but – due to the absence of some staff on research leave – it cannot guarantee that all of those listed on page 29 will run in any particular year. For the most up-to-date information on the degree courses, visit www.hull.ac.uk/law.

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‘The excellent Law School and Hull’s reputation as the friendliest university in the country made this institution an obvious choice for me, and I am pleased to say that I have not been disappointed. I have been surprised, however, to find so much friendliness shown by staff as well as students. ‘The curriculum itself has been stimulating and challenging, and it offers students plenty of choice and flexibility. But the department goes beyond this, organising regular visits from firms, academics and colleges. The Legal Advice Centre has allowed me to gain practical experience that is not offered by many universities, and this will help me stand out in the competitive legal profession. ‘Thanks to all this, and thanks to the close-knit campus and the brilliant friends I have made, I have really enjoyed my time here at Hull.’ Alice Cummins LLB Law

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LLB Law

LLB International Law

An important aspect of the Hull LLB is its progressive nature and flexibility. Alongside the compulsory subjects, you are free to select from a variety of optional modules – so you can follow a general path or you can specialise at an early stage in your legal education. You must study the core law subjects across the first two years of the degree. You can also choose from a range of law options and study free elective modules from outside the Law School.

This distinctive course builds on our considerable teaching and research expertise in international law, and is an opportunity to explore and understand English law with a particular focus on international law issues. It is an ideal choice for anyone aiming for a career in the English legal profession or in any field where a thorough understanding of international law would be advantageous.

A distinctive feature of the Hull LLB is that your final year consists entirely of optional modules. In choosing your modules, therefore, you might decide to take a general path or to specialise by opting for modules related to particular areas of law such as criminal law, commercial law, international law or human rights. You might also want to test your practical lawyering skills by choosing the Law Clinic module, which gets you working in the Law School’s Legal Advice Centre (see page 30).

Year 1 (0% of degree classification) Semester 1 Legal Skills Legal Systems Contract Law (long-thin) Criminal Law (long-thin) Semester 2 Public Law and the Constitution Tort

Year 2 (40% of degree classification) Semester 1 Public Law and Administration Land Law European Union Law (long-thin) Law option or free elective (long-thin) Semester 2 Jurisprudence Law of Trusts

Year 3 (60% of degree classification) Semester 1 Law option Law option Law option (long-thin) Law option or free elective (long-thin) Semester 2 Law option Law option

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Students leave the course with a range of skills designed to help them understand key issues in law, exercise critical judgement and demonstrate knowledge of issues related specifically to international law.

Year 1 (0% of degree classification) Semester 1 Legal Skills Legal Systems Contract Law (long-thin) Criminal Law (long-thin) Semester 2 Public Law and the Constitution Tort

Year 2 (40% of degree classification) Semester 1 Public Law and Administration Land Law European Union Law (long-thin) International Law (long-thin) Semester 2 Jurisprudence Law of Trusts

Year 3 (60% of degree classification) A supervised research dissertation in the field of international law. You may then select from a range of international law modules. Below is a list of modules offered in previous years. • • • • • • • •

International Human Rights Protection International Law and the Use of Force Laws of War Private International Family Law Protecting Human Rights in the UK Transnational Commercial Law Introduction to Islamic Law International Protection of Refugees


LLB Commercial Law This distinctive course builds on our considerable teaching and research expertise in commercial law, and we believe that it is an exciting opportunity for students seeking to explore and understand English law with a particular focus on commercial law issues. It would be an ideal choice for anyone aiming for a career in the English legal profession or a field of commerce. The course offers students a structured degree pathway that focuses on modules forming part of commercial law. Students leave the course with a range of skills designed to help them understand key issues in law, exercise critical judgement and demonstrate knowledge of issues related specifically to commercial law.

Year 3 (60% of degree classification) A supervised research dissertation in the field of commercial law. You may then select from a range of commercial law modules. Below is a list of modules offered in previous years. • • • • • • • • • •

Modern Perspectives on Contractual Obligations Intellectual Property Law Admiralty Law Carriage of Goods by Sea European Influences on Contract Law Company Law Employment Law Transnational Commercial Law EU Business Law Consumer Law

Year 1 (0% of degree classification) Semester 1 Legal Skills Legal Systems Contract Law (long-thin) Criminal Law (long-thin) Semester 2 Public Law and the Constitution Tort

Year 2 (40% of degree classification) Semester 1 Public Law and Administration Land Law European Union Law (long-thin) Principles of Commercial Law (long-thin) Semester 2 Jurisprudence Law of Trusts

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LLB Law (including Foundation English Language) Offering a traditional law degree and allowing students to start with a lower level of English language competence, this four-year course is an exciting opportunity for non-native Englishspeakers who are seeking to explore and understand English law through a range of modules and from a variety of angles. It would be an ideal choice for anyone aiming for a career in the English legal profession or hoping to work in a field where a thorough understanding of English law would be advantageous. The foundation year is designed to facilitate entry for students who meet our entrance requirements but do not yet have a strong enough proficiency in English to meet the IELTS 6.5 criterion for entry to the LLB. Students must study core law subjects spread across the three years of the degree. You can also choose from a range of law options and study free elective modules from outside the Law School. You may wish to study English for Law, a module offered as a free elective and taught by a former solicitor in the Department of Modern Languages. Prospective students who have an appropriate level of English (IELTS 5.5 or equivalent) and would like to know more about enrolling on this course should contact the Admissions team: law@hull.ac.uk.

Year 1 (0% of degree classification) Semester 1 Foundation English for Academic Purposes 1 General Language Skills Development 1 Foundation in British Studies (long-thin) Foundation in English for Law (long-thin) Semester 2 Foundation English for Academic Purposes 2 General Language Skills Development 2

Year 2 (0% of degree classification) Semester 1 Legal Skills Legal Systems Criminal Law (long-thin) Contract Law (long-thin) Semester 2 Public Law and the Constitution Tort

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Year 3 (40% of degree classification) Semester 1 Public Law and Administration Land Law EU Law (long-thin) Law option or free elective (long-thin) Semester 2 Jurisprudence Law of Trusts

Year 4 (60% of degree classification) Semester 1 Law option Law option Law option (long-thin) Law option or free elective (long-thin) Semester 2 Law option Law option


LLB Senior Status

LLB Senior Status (part-time)

This is a fast-track law degree designed for non-law graduates and lawyers from foreign jurisdictions who wish to broaden their education by studying the fundamental principles of English law at undergraduate level. This course would be an ideal choice for UK/EU and overseas graduates planning a career in the English legal profession.

The part-time degree is available in the daytime, and students share classes with those on full-time courses. It is an entirely internal, on-campus course with teaching provided through lectures, tutorials and seminars.

Year 1 Semester 1 Legal Systems Legal Skills Criminal Law (long-thin) Contract Law (long-thin) Semester 2 Law of Tort Public Law and the Constitution

Year 2 Semester 1 Public Law and Administration Land Law EU Law (long-thin) Law option (long-thin) Semester 2 Law of Trusts Law option

This is a fast-track law degree designed for non-law graduates and lawyers from foreign jurisdictions who wish to broaden their education by studying the fundamental principles of English law at undergraduate level. This course would be an ideal choice for UK/EU and overseas graduates planning a career in the English legal profession.

Year 1 Semester 1 Legal Systems Legal Skills Criminal Law (long-thin) Semester 2 Public Law and the Constitution

Year 2 Semester 1 Public Law and Administration EU Law (long-thin) Contract Law (long-thin) Semester 2 Law of Tort

Year 3 Semester 1 Land Law Law option (long-thin) Semester 2 Law of Trusts Law option

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LLB Law with Criminology This course allows you to obtain a qualifying law degree and gain an introduction to the basic concepts of criminology. The disciplines are closely related and share a number of common concerns. You are able to combine legal training with the multidisciplinary social science approach of criminology. Career options include jobs in the legal profession or in the police, probation or prison service. There are 11 core law subjects across the three years of the degree. You can also choose from a range of law options and study a free elective module from outside the Law School in the final year. To gain the LLB with Criminology, you must take 100 credits’ worth of criminology modules (five modules). The Law School has members of staff with considerable expertise in various aspects of criminal law, and there is a strong research synergy with Criminology which provides the necessary intellectual framework for a strong joint degree course in these subjects.

Year 1 (0% of degree classification) Semester 1 Legal Skills Legal Systems Development of Criminological Theory (long-thin) Contract Law (long-thin) Semester 2 Public Law and the Constitution Tort

Year 2 (40% of degree classification) Semester 1 Public Law and Administration Criminology option Criminal Law (long-thin) Law option (long-thin) Semester 2 Punishment and Society or Criminal Evidence and Investigations Jurisprudence

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Year 3 (60% of degree classification) Semester 1 Land Law Criminology option European Union Law (long-thin) Option or free elective (long-thin) Semester 2 Law of Trusts Criminology option


LLB Law with French Law and Language

Year 3 – Year Abroad (10% of degree classification) Year 4 (60% of degree classification)

This is a four-year course that incorporates a year studying French law at one of our partner institutions. In Years 1 and 2, two-thirds of your time is devoted to studying law and one-third to studying French language and culture.

Semester 1 Land Law French Language 5 Law option (long-thin) Law option or free elective (long-thin)

In addition to studying some of the compulsory subjects in the first two years, you take a Comparative Law module in the second year to provide a basis for your year abroad. An introduction to French law, taught in French, prepares you for studying in France.

Semester 2 Law of Trusts Law option

The courses offered during your year abroad vary between universities, but incorporate the basic elements of a French law degree (civil law and public law). There is ample module choice, allowing you to study subjects which interest you. You must also pass the examinations set by the relevant institutions. This work forms part of your final degree

Year 1 (0% of degree classification) Semester 1 Legal Skills French Language 1 Contract Law (long-thin) Criminal Law (long-thin) Semester 2 Public Law and the Constitution French Language 2

Year 2 (30% of degree classification) Semester 1 Public Law and Administration French Language 3 European Union Law (long-thin) Comparative Law [with French] (long-thin) Semester 2 Tort French Language 4

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LLB Law with German Law and Language

LLB Law with Spanish Law and Language

This four-year course incorporates a year studying German law at one of our partner institutions. In the first two years, approximately two-thirds of your time is devoted to studying law and one-third to studying German language and culture.

This four-year course incorporates a year studying Spanish law at a Spanish university. In the first two years, approximately two-thirds of your time is devoted to studying law and one-third to studying the language and culture of Spain.

In addition to studying some of the compulsory subjects in the first two years, you take Comparative Law in Year 2 to provide a basis for your year abroad. An introduction to German law, taught in German, prepares you for studying in Germany. During your year abroad, you study at the basic level of a German law degree (civil law and public law). You will also be offered some module choice so that you can study subjects which interest you. The Law School provides guidance on the best subjects to take. You must pass the examinations set by the relevant institutions, and this work will form part of your final degree.

In addition to some of the compulsory subjects in the first two years, you take a Comparative Law module in Year 2 to provide a basis for your year abroad. Preparation for studying in Spain is given through an introduction to Spanish law (which is taught in Spanish). This focuses on Spanish examination and study techniques as well as the substantive elements of Spanish law.

Year 1 (0% of degree classification) Semester 1 Legal Skills German Language 1 Contract Law (long-thin) Criminal Law (long-thin) Semester 2 Public Law and the Constitution German Language 2

Year 2 (30% of degree classification) Semester 1 Public Law and Administration German Language 3 European Union Law (long-thin) Comparative Law [with German] (long-thin) Semester 2 Tort German Language 4

Year 3 – Year Abroad (10% of degree classification) Year 4 (60% of degree classification) Semester 1 Land Law German Language 5 Law option (long-thin) Law option or free elective (long-thin) Semester 2 Law of Trusts Law option

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During your year abroad, you study at the basic level of a Spanish law degree. The courses offered will vary between universities, but will incorporate the basic elements of a Spanish law degree (civil law and public law). You will also be offered some module choice so that you can study subjects which interest you. The Law School provides guidance on the best subjects to take. You will have to pass the examinations set by the relevant institutions, and this work will form part of your final degree.

Year 1 (0% of degree classification) Semester 1 Legal Skills Spanish Language 1 Contract Law (long-thin) Criminal Law (long-thin) Semester 2 Public Law and the Constitution Spanish Language 2

Year 2 (30% of degree classification) Semester 1 Public Law and Administration Spanish in Practice 1 European Union Law (long-thin) Comparative Law [with Spanish] (long-thin) Semester 2 Tort Spanish in Practice 2

Year 3 – Year Abroad (10% of degree classification)


Year 4 (60% of degree classification)

LLB Law with Business

Semester 1 Land Law Spanish Language Skills 1 Law option (long-thin) Law option or free elective (long-thin)

This course should prove particularly attractive to those seeking entry into the legal profession or who wish to pursue a career in business combined with knowledge of aspects of English law.

Semester 2 Law of Trusts Law option or Spanish Language Skills 2

You must study the core law modules across the three years of the degree. You can also choose from a wide range of Law School or Business School options, with the opportunity to study a free elective from elsewhere in the final year. To gain the LLB Law with Business, you must take 100 credits’ worth of business modules (five modules). The relationship between law and business is crucial, both to the development of the law and to the commercial realities of the business environment. This joint course will allow you to gain an understanding of the fundamental tenets of both subjects and to develop particular insights into the impact of law and regulation on the commercial sector.

Year 1 (0% of degree classification) Semester 1 Legal Skills Business Environments Criminal Law (long-thin) Contract Law (long-thin) Semester 2 Public Law and the Constitution Marketing

Year 2 (40% of degree classification) Semester 1 Public Law and Administration Business Functions EU Law (long-thin) Principles of Commercial Law (long-thin) Semester 2 Law of Tort Managing Innovation and Change

Year 3 (60% of degree classification) Semester 1 Land Law International Business Law option or free elective (long-thin) Law option or free elective (long-thin) Semester 2 Law of Trusts Law option

www.hull.ac.uk

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LLB Law and Legislative Studies

LLB Law with Literature

This exciting four-year course allows students to combine a qualifying law degree with study of the legislative process in the University’s highly respected Department of Politics and first-hand experience of that process through a year’s placement at Westminster working for an MP or peer. It is an ideal degree for someone wishing to combine a legal and a political career or to work in Parliament or the Civil Service.

This course combines a qualifying law degree with the study of literature through modules offered by the English Department. It is an ideal choice for anyone aiming for a career in the legal profession but with a strong interest in literature and literary studies.

This is an exclusive opportunity to obtain a degree which will make your CV stand out. Only a few students are offered a place on the course each year, and there is a special admissions process whereby all applicants must have an interview with the Department of Politics (most likely at a University Open Day).

Year 1 (o% of degree classification) Semester 1 Legal Skills British Government Key Skills in Politics (long-thin) Contract Law (long-thin) Semester 2 Public Law and the Constitution Law of Tort

Year 2 (30% of degree classification) Semester 1 Electoral and Voting Systems The Contemporary House of Commons Paths of Research in Politics (long-thin) Criminal Law (long-thin) Semester 2 Parliament in the UK: Approaches to Reform Jurisprudence

Year 3 – Westminster Placement (10% of degree classification) Year 4 (60% of degree classification) Semester 1 Land Law Public Law and Administration Comparative Legislatures European Union Law (long-thin) Semester 2 Law of Trusts Law option

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You will complete 240 credits (12 modules) in law and 100 credits (five modules) in English. You will be able to choose from a wide range of English and law options. There is also the opportunity to study a free elective module in your final year. A distinctive feature of the course is the compulsory ‘Law and Literature’ module, which has been specifically developed to examine the interrelationship between the two disciplines from a variety of perspectives. This is taught by staff from English and Law, and teaching is directly informed by the research interests of staff.

Year 1 (0% of degree classification) Semester 1 Legal Skills Legal Systems Introduction to Literary Studies (long-thin) Contract Law (long-thin) Semester 2 Public Law and the Constitution Law of Tort

Year 2 (40% of degree classification) Semester 1 Public Law and Administration Literature option Law and Literature (long-thin) Criminal Law (long-thin) Semester 2 Jurisprudence Literature option

Year 3 (60% of degree classification) Semester 1 Land Law Literature option European Union Law (long-thin) Law option, or free elective (long-thin) Semester 2 Law of Trusts Literature option


LLB Law with Philosophy

LLB Law with Politics

Law and philosophy are complementary subjects: particular areas of law rest on controversial philosophical premises, and it is fundamental that both lawyers and philosophers have the ability to engage in rational argument. The skills that you acquire in the philosophy components of this degree are useful within the context of the law modules.

Most European countries recognise that there is a close relationship between law and politics; studying the two subjects together allows you to see the relationship between them and how they approach similar areas with different ideas.

Staff in the Law School and the Philosophy Department have complementary research interests in particular issues, such as law and medical ethics and the philosophy of punishment. To gain the LLB Law with Philosophy, you must study the core law modules across the three years of the degree. You can also choose from a wide range of law options and study a free elective module from outside the Law School in the final year. You must also take 100 credits’ worth of philosophy modules (five modules).

Year 1 (0% of degree classification) Semester 1 Legal Skills Legal Systems Contract Law (long-thin) Introduction to Philosophy (long-thin) Semester 2 Public Law and the Constitution Tort

Year 2 (40% of degree classification) Semester 1 Public Law and Administration Philosophy module Criminal Law (long-thin) Law option (long-thin) Semester 2 Jurisprudence Philosophy of Law

Year 3 (60% of degree classification) Semester 1 Land Law Philosophy module European Union law (long-thin) Option or free elective (long-thin)

You must study 11 core law subjects across the three years of this degree. You can also choose from a range of law options and study a free elective module from outside the Law School in the final year. To gain the LLB Law with Politics degree, you must take 100 credits’ worth of politics modules (five modules).

Year 1 (0% of degree classification) Semester 1 Legal Skills Legal Systems Contract Law (long-thin) Key Skills in Politics (long-thin) Semester 2 Public Law and the Constitution Tort

Year 2 (40% of degree classification) Semester 1 Public Law and Administration Politics module Criminal Law (long-thin) Law option (long-thin) Semester 2 Politics module Jurisprudence

Year 3 (60% of degree classification) Semester 1 Land Law Politics module European Union Law (long-thin) Option or free elective (long-thin) Semester 2 Law of Trusts Politics module

Semester 2 Law of Trusts Philosophy module

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LLB Law (part-time) The part-time degree is available in the daytime, and students share classes with those on full-time courses. It is an entirely internal, on-campus course with teaching provided through lectures, tutorials and seminars. The course can assist with career development, can be the first step in a change of career or can simply be taken for the interest and intellectual stimulation it offers. It is spread over five years, divided into 10 semesters, and leads to the degree of Bachelor of Laws with Honours (LLB) – the same degree as that awarded to full-time students. There are three levels of study. Level 4: certificate Two years (four semesters). For those who opt to finish at the end of this level, a University Certificate of Higher Education may be awarded. Level 5: diploma One and a half years (three semesters). For those who opt to finish at the end of this level, a University Diploma of Higher Education may be awarded. Level 6: degree One and a half years (three semesters). This completes the course and leads to the award of the LLB degree. Modules are taught either for one semester or over both semesters (‘long-thin’ modules). You have the opportunity to pursue a free elective during Years 3 and 5. The free elective allows you to study a module unrelated to law.

Level 4 Year 1 Semester 1 Legal Skills Contract Law (long-thin) Semester 2 Public Law and the Constitution

Year 2 Semester 1 Legal Systems Criminal Law (long-thin) Semester 2 Tort

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Level 5 Year 3 Semester 1 Public Law and Administration European Union Law (long-thin) Law option or free elective (long-thin) Semester 2 Jurisprudence

Year 4 Semester 1 Land Law Law option (level 6)

Level 6 Year 4 Semester 2 Law of Trusts Law option (Level 6)

Year 5 Semester 1 Law option (long-thin) Law option (long-thin) Law option or free elective Semester 2 Law option


Law options The optional modules listed below may vary from year to year, according to staff availability or the creation of new modules. Current students are issued with a module options brochure around Easter to help them make their module choices for the following year. • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Admiralty Law American Public Law Carriage of Goods by Sea Commercial Sale of Goods Company Law Comparative Law Competition Law Consumer Law Criminal Evidence and the Criminal Trial Criminal Evidence and Investigations Dissertation (Semester 1) Dissertation (Semester 2) Employment Law Environmental Law and Regulation European Infulences on Contract Law European Public Law I European Public Law II European Union Business Law Family Law (Year 2 or 3) Family Protection Intellectual Property Law International Human Rights Protection International Law (Year 2 or 3) International Law and Use of Force International Protection of Refugees Introduction to Islamic Law Law and Information Law and Literature Law Clinic Laws of War Law of the Sea Law, War and Crime Legal Research Process Mediation Medicine, Ethics and the Law Modern Perspectives on Contractual Obligations Penology Principles of Commercial Law Private International Family Law Protecting Human Rights in the UK Protecting Rights: Dual Vigilance in the EC Public Company Law and Investor Protection Sex(uality), Gender and the Law Transnational Commercial Law

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Beyond the classroom

The Student Law Society The Law Society organises a programme of social events for students as well as offering academic support. The society, with support from staff, also organises a range of pro bono schemes which enable students to experience legal volunteering within the local community, as well as mooting, client interviewing and negotiation. For more information, visit www.hulllawsoc.co.uk.

Mooting, client interviewing, negotiation and debating These voluntary activities develop students’ practical legal skills and are very popular with students aiming to become barristers and solicitors. Mooting involves the presentation and legal debate of a case before members of staff who act as judges, while client interviewing involves providing ‘clients’ with legal advice in relation to a given problem. Negotiation involves discussion and compromise between parties in relation to a case that is resolved outside the courtroom. The competitions receive generous support from local legal practitioners, with support for client interviewing coming from Stamp, Jackson & Procter Solicitors, support for mooting from Wilberforce Chambers and support for negotiation from Andrew Jackson Solicitors. Student ‘legal teams’ representing the Law School have earned widespread recognition in national competitions. Their most recent successes: • finalists in the National Negotiation Competition 2010 and 2011 • finalists in the National Client Interviewing Competition 2010 • semi-finalists in the inaugural Beechcroft Mooting Shield 2010

The Staff–Student Committee The Law School’s Staff–Student Committee is chaired by a student and involves staff members and elected student representatives from each year of study. Student contribution to the running of the school is highly valued, and the committee ensures that meaningful dialogue between staff and students takes place.

The Legal Advice Centre

Alan Johnson, MP, opening the Legal Advice Centre.

In February 2010, the Law School opened a Legal Advice Centre which provides free, confidential, independent legal advice to the community. As part of the Law Clinic module, students are given the opportunity of dealing with live cases as presented by real clients in a practice setting, and of gaining hands-on, work-based experience which will prove invaluable in their later careers. Participating students work under the supervision of qualified members of staff and have so far provided advice on a range of different issues. Students undertake extensive training, which is provided both from within the University and by local practitioners. The centre has developed close relationships with the Citizens Advice Bureau, the local authority and the voluntary sector in Hull, as well as the Community Legal Advice Centre, which is a partnership between the Council and the Legal Services Commission. Cases can be referred if necessary to local law firms or to the CAB. So far the centre has been extremely busy, with a large number of clients coming through the door presenting a diverse range of legal problems.

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Admissions We expect to admit approximately 225 undergraduates in 2012.

UK/EU students The standard offer for the vast majority of our courses is 320 UCAS points from three A levels or equivalent UCAS tariff qualifications. The Law School recognises all A level subjects for entrance purposes, and we normally include every recognised subject offered by applicants (including General Studies) in conditional offers. We are willing to consider resit grades. There are some exceptions to the general entry requirements outlined above. They are as follows. • Applicants for M1QH LLB Law with Literature will be required to obtain at least a grade B in A level English (or equivalent). • Applicants for ML12 LLB Law and Legislative Studies will be required to obtain 340 UCAS points from three A levels (or equivalent). Applicants will also be required to attend an interview before an offer is made. • Applicants for M1R1, M1R2 or M1R4 LLB Law with French, German or Spanish Law and Language will be required to obtain at least a grade B in the relevant A level language (or equivalent). • Applicants for the M101 LLB Senior Status programme (which is designed for graduates in a discipline other than law) will be required to have or obtain at least a 2.2 Honours degree (or equivalent). We welcome applicants who wish to defer entry or to take a gap year. Should you require advice with regard to the admissions requirements, please contact the Law School office.

International students Recognising that individual applicants will be able to demonstrate their ability to study law in a variety of ways, the University accepts a range of international qualifications. The standard requirements for entry are, for example, • A levels: three grade Bs at A level or points equivalent – though the conditions set out above for specific courses still apply • Cyprus Apolyterion (at 19 or better) • International Baccalaureate – 30 points with 16 at Higher Level • Canadian Senior Matriculation Diploma: English Language plus four approved subjects We also require evidence of a good command of English. The minimum standards are • grade C at GCSE English • IELTS: overall score of 6.5 with at least 6.0 in the reading and writing components • TOEFL: internet-based test with an overall score of 110 and with at least 26 in all skills If you need help with your English, this can be arranged at the University. See www.hull.ac.uk/languages for details of the University’s Language Learning Centre.

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Other qualifications We welcome applications from candidates with qualifications other than those mentioned above. Acceptable alternatives include various diplomas and certificates such as those held by Registered General Nurses or by teachers in the UK and abroad, those awarded by the Business and Technician Education Council (BTEC), ONC and HNC, OND and HND, or GNVQ at advanced level with additional units with distinction. Where the qualifications held are classified on the UCAS tariff, the usual points offer will be the same as for those taking A levels. Where it is not included in the qualification, some evidence of proficiency in English is normally required. If you hold a qualification not mentioned here and would like to check whether you are eligible for entry, contact the Law School’s Admissions team.

Mature students We welcome applications from mature candidates, whether taking A levels or offering non-conventional qualifications, but we may require them to attend an interview. Our requirements may be modified according to each applicant’s circumstances and experience, but he or she needs to show satisfactory evidence of recent study (or otherwise demonstrate the ability to satisfy the demands of an academic programme).

How to apply Applications to the Law School must be made via UCAS, except for part-time students and exchange students. UCAS 0871 468 0468 app.req@ucas.ac.uk www.ucas.com/students/apply If you are interested in applying for the part-time LLB, please contact the Law School direct.

Contacts Admissions Service 01482 466100 admissions@hull.ac.uk Law School Admissions Secretary T 01482 465857 F 01482 466388 law@hull.ac.uk www.hull.ac.uk/law University of Hull Hull, HU6 7RX

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Admissions policy Admissions information provided in this pamphlet is intended as a general guide and cannot cover all possibilities. Entry requirements are generally stated in terms of A level grades and/or UCAS points, but we encourage applications from people with a wide range of other qualifications and/or experience. Some further details of the various entry routes are included in our general prospectus. Please contact the Admissions Service (see below) with any specific queries about admissions.

Disclaimer This publication is intended principally as a guide for prospective students. The matters covered by it – academic and otherwise – are subject to change from time to time, both before and after students are admitted, and the information contained in it does not form part of any contract. While every reasonable precaution was taken in the production of this brochure, the University does not accept liability for any inaccuracies.

Address For general enquiries, please write to Admissions Service University of Hull Hull, HU6 7RX T 01482 466100 F 01482 442290 E admissions@hull.ac.uk

Picture credits Front cover © iStockphoto.com/WilliamJMurphy Pages 4 © iStockphoto.com/hatman12 Page 14 & 15 © iStockphoto.com/poco_bw


Approved by both the Law Society and the General Council of the Bar, our law programmes guarantee graduates achieving a 2.2 degree (or better) a place on a Legal Practice Course – the final step to becoming a qualified solicitor.

Change the way you think.

www.hull.ac.uk

2475~UG Law 2012  

Entry2012 Undergraduate study

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