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HUGO COLÓN ACEVEDO M.L.A. 1-AP HARVARD GSD ARCHITECT IN TRAINING LEED AP


CATAテ前 WATERFRONT

OTHER

RECLAIMING THE FOREST

EMBRACING WATER COMMONS

REARING URBANISM

SCOPE OF CLIMATE DEFENSE

WATER LINKS

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CATAテ前 WATERFRONT


CATAÑO WATERFRONT UNIVERSITY OF PUERTO RICO | M.ARCH | 2007

ANALYSIS

Instructor: Francisco Gutierrez

Cataño Waterfront consisted in establishing an architectural program that served as a catalyst for the revitalization of the waterfront in the town of Cataño, Puerto Rico and the linkage of different programs within the San Juan Bay with the objective of acquiring knowledge in urban design concepts and theories.

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Cataño is a small town located southwest of the San Juan Bay with astonishing views to the historic city of San Juan and other important attractions. These attractions give Cataño a significant potential as a destination for tourists. But, despite its potential, this waterfront possesses high levels of pollution, a significant drawback I had to overcome in this project because the cost is not apt for swimming. However, as part of the San Juan Bay, Cataño is also part of an underdeveloped network of a water transportation system that connects the historic district of San Juan and the banking district of Hato Rey. After a rigorous analysis of the area, my project consisted of a network of public pools that served as “artificial beaches” for the population of Cataño. I strategically located the pools in front of a public school, near a residential zone, and next to a proposed mall - designed by one of my fellow students- guaranteeing the continuous use of the complex by making it accessible to the general public. 6

Hugo Colón Acevedo

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Project Site

1 Old San Juan, Historic District 2 Isla Grande Airport 3 Puerto Rico Convention Center 4 Commercial Ports 5 Cataño 6 Bacardi Brewing Company


Proposed “Public Beach” for Cataño Parks and Natural Reserves PR165 Highway Existing Ferry Terminal Proposed Ferry Terminal Existing Urban Train Line Luis Muñoz Marín Airport to Cataño Department of Transportation Proposed Carolina Extension

CATAÑO Area: 7 sq mi (18.23 km2) Population: 30,000 Density: 4,272.3/sq mi

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D N C

4

B

0

2 1

6

A

7 8 9

3

10

7

E

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5

11

14 12 12

1. General Use Pool 2. Children Pool 3. Olympic Pool 4. Kayak Marina

5. Beach Volleyball 6. Mechanical Room 7. Restroom and Lockers 8. Storage

SECTION “E” 8

Hugo Colón Acevedo

9. Lifeguard Office 10. Administration 11. Skate Park 12. Existing School

13. Existing Medical Clinic 14. Peer’s Proposed Mall

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13

200’


PROJECT DETAILS The complex occupies approximately 200,000 sq ft and consists of a four pools and sport facilities organized by a datum of small buildings that provide services such as public bathrooms, rental space and mechanical equipment rooms. The pools are divided depending of the use; one being for children, one for swimmers, another which simulates a “beach” grading from shallow to deeper waters and one pool access to the bay for the rental of kayaks or other water sport equipment. It also provides sports amenities such as three beach volleyball courts, one basketball court and a skate park.

WATER SYSTEMS

SECTION “A”

SECTION “B”

The project uses filtered salt water from the bay in order to minimize the impact of potable water consumption. The filtered water would be returned to the bay in a continuous cycle of water treatment and cleaning. This new infrastructure assumes a more responsible role in the ecology.

SECTION “C”

SECTION “D”

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1. View of the kayak marina entry and the parking area from the sidewalk. 2. Puerto Rico has a strong “automobile� culture. People use the car not only as a means of transportation, but as a recreation amenity as well. Puertoricans frequently listen to music from the car while eating and talking outside the vehicle. Recognizing this cultural background the project establishes zones of leisure adjacent to the parking area. These zones are distinguished by changes in the floor pattern and material, and by elevated planters that serve as sitting area. 3. Main entry to the complex showing the administration and utility buildings. 4. Many public beaches in Puerto Rico provide the opportunity for local vendors to establish street commerce. Recognizing this, the project provides a designated area for the street vendors to locate their kiosks. 5. View from the swimming pool 6. View of the children pool and lifeguard tower. 7. Aerial view of the complex from the volleyball courts

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WATER LINKS - THESIS


WATER LINKS - THESIS

Concept

UNIVERSITY OF PUERTO RICO | M.ARCH | 2008

“Water Links” Diagram

Advisors: Jorge Lizardi, Sonia Miranda, Joel Franqui

As the city of San Juan was developed, it lacks regulatory paths that could join communities through alternate means of mobility other than highways and automobiles. Rivers, streams and other bodies of water have the potential of organizing a city marked by years of suburban developments. For this reason, this thesis studies how bodies of water are essential in the re-conceptualization/re-organization of our cities.

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Using architectural and landscape strategies to provide new civic space for the residents of the area while incorporating existing programs along its trajectory. The project establishes a connection along the course of a stream while emphasizing three strategic points. The first [Zone A] is located at the stream’s delta, adjacent to an existent sport complex. The second [Zone B] is located at the middle of the course adjacent to the José Padilla School, a Baseball Park and a Church. The Third [Zone C] is located upstream, at the channelized portion of the creek next to the Antonio Sarriera School and the municipal pool.

1 San Juan Bay 2 Rio Piedras River 3 Caño Martín Peña

Caño Martín Peña Suárez Canal San José Lagoon

16 Hugo Colón Acevedo

San Antón Creek

4 José Méndez Creek 5 San José Lagoon 6 Suárez Canal

7 San Antón Creek 8 Carolina River Possible Destinations


Social Housing near creek’s delta

Residential area along natural portion of creek

Existing School and Baseball Park

Suárez

Residential area

Antonio Sarriera School

l

Channe

et

ui Stre

Iturreg

3.

SAN ANTÓN CREEK AREA: 3 miles long

Ramal 8

Natural portion of the creek near delta

4.

2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

oR

5.

am p

Plaza Internacional Mall, by Fuster and Partners Ciudad Berwind mix-use development, by Integra Design Group Roberto Clemente Sport Complex Redevelopment, by Sasaki Associates José Padilla School and Park [existing] Antonio Sarriera School and Park [existing] Parque Escorial Shopping Center [existing]

Country Club

Country Club

.C

1.

2.

Av e

USES:

ico

1.

Comandante

65 Infantería Ave [PR-3]

6.

Concrete channel and residential area Hugo Colón Acevedo 17


N 0’

500’

ZONE “A” ROBERTO CLEMENTE SPORT COMPLEX ADDITION

ZONE “B” JOSÉ PADILLA PARK

ZONE “C” ANTONIO SARRIERA PARK

Hugo Colón Acevedo 19


POOL AND SPORT COMPLEX [ZONE “A”]

N

1. Swimming Pool 2. Restrooms 3. Mechanical Equipment Room 4. Commercial Kiosk 5. Restaurant

6. Classroom 7. Bicycle and Kayak rental 8. Beach Volleyball Courts #

Marked view

B

A 1

D

C

2

3

4

1

5 A

1 B

8

2

4

3

D

20 Hugo Colón Acevedo

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C

SECTION “A”

6

SECTION “B”


1

SECTION “C”

SECTION “D” Hugo Colón Acevedo 21


JOSÉ PADILLA PARK [ZONE “B”]

N

1

2

2 #

Marked view

22 Hugo Colón Acevedo

1. As a strategy for creating new spaces along the stream, the project establishes a river pond in order to provide more access to the water. 2. Botanical garden 3. Hydroponics greenhouse 4. Existing church Restaurant 5. Existing José Padilla School 6. Existing community convention center 7. New Pedestrian Bridge 8. River walkway


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ANTONIO SARRIERA [ZONE “C”] Vegetation

Pedestrian Infrastructure

1

1. Existing Antonio Sarriera School 7. Proposed river walkway and plaza 2. New commercial kiosks 8. Concrete channel modification 3. Existing pool creating a system of vegetated 4. Existing park terraces for water filtration. 5. Proposed water retention pond for # Marked view runoff filtration 6. Existing electric substation

24 Hugo Colón Acevedo

Water Infrastructure


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1


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SCOPE OF CLIMATE DEFENSE


SCOPE OF CLIMATE DEFENSE HARVARD UNIVERSITY GSD | 1ST SEMESTER | 2011 Instructors: Pierre Belanger, Niall Kirkwood, Kelly Shannon, Julia Watson Team: Hugo Colón, Lauren Elachi, Lindsey Nelson

As climate change poses an additional threat to our coasts, the role of the military shall focus on an additional defense measure. The Massachusetts Military Reservation [MMR] in Cape Cod has the opportunity to serve as a new coastal defense

Grounds for a Climate Based Mission

laboratory in which the military puts into practice the construction and deployment of new defense mechanisms. These defense mechanisms are constructed using decommissioned military equipment and machinery such as tanks and take the form of artificial islands which protect the cape’s shores from increasing storm surges and storms.

30 Hugo Colón Acevedo

Artificial Reef Seeding

Storm Shelter and Evacuation Routes

Climate and Anthropogenic Flows


Artificial Reef Seeding

Networks of Accumulation, Direction and Dispersal

Zones of Intervention

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REARING URBANISM


REARING URBANISM HARVARD UNIVERSITY GSD | 2ND SEMESTER | 2012 Instructors: Miho Mazereeuw; Chris Reed, Coordinator

This studio focused on the development of urban form as driven by productive ecologies and environmental dynamics—a landscape-based urbanism. It introduced methods and representational techniques for inventing and describing urban form and the dynamic, adapted ecologies that might be invoked to shape it. Building form and fabric, and local and regional infrastructures, as well as study the various dynamic relationships between the city and its reconstituted estuarine setting were studied. Through a research based approach, the project used aquaculture systems with the objective of reducing stormwater runoff and CSO effluents on the Bay. The system provides a organized system of ponds in wish water is cleaned over time while producing fish to help repopulate the degraded fish populations in the area. It re grades and reshapes the shoreline in order to provide more wetland and interstitial habitat for different ecosystems to emerge. Striped Bass [Morone saxatilis]

Atlantic Silverside [Menidia menidia]

34 Hugo Colón Acevedo


Fish Pond Dimensions

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Treatment Wetland 75958 m3

Juvenile Ponds

Transitional Ponds

Rearing Ponds

1160m3

6590 m3

15854 m3

285m3

4751m3

9930m3

573 m3

7838 m3

10223 m3

694 m3

6673 m3

8528 m3

Residential Courtyard Typology

Office Elevated Typology

River Boardwalk System

36 Hugo Col贸n Acevedo

Commercial Plinth Typology Commercial 126, 212 m2 F.A.R. 1.25 Office 152,124 m2 F.A.R. 1.14 Residential 117,153 m2 F.A.R. 1.16 Total F.A.R. 3.0

Residential Elevated Typology


Duckweed Pond

Rainbow Trout 45.5m

http://www.fao.org/fishery/culturedspecies/search/en

Rainbow Trout

Duckweed Tertiary Waste Water Treatment

2600

Duckweed Pond

Nursery Fish Pond

Transitional Pond

Rearing Pond

Outflow

Semi-Intensive Rearing Pond Rearing Pond

Semi-Intensive Rearing Pond

Rearing Pond

FISH POND TYPOLOGY

Hydroponics

Water Treatment Diagram

82.0%

89.0%

90.6%

96.3%

93.6%

99.8%

100%

100%

100%

Duckweed Waste Water Treatment [8-10 days]

Wastewater treatment and use in agriculture - FAO 1992, http://www.fao.org.

Assessment of the Efficiency of Duckweed (Lemna gibba) in Wastewater Treatment, Central Lab for Environmental Quality Monitoring, National Water Research, Cairo, Egypt

6.5-8.5

ph

.08m

Temperature

ph

10-21 °C

Depth

Temperature

Depth

Rainbow Trout

10-21 °C

1m

6.5-8.5

Outflow

10-21 °C

1.3m

6.5-8.5

Adult

Juvenile 160 days

Rearing Pond

ph

66.7%

Sedimentation 10 days

Transitional Pond

Temperature

Fecal Coliform

64.4%

Nursery Fish Pond

Duckweed Tertiary Waste Water Treatment

Depth

Cd

300

Zn

BOD mg/l

150

Pb

Grease mg/l

200

Cu

Alkalinity mg/l

100

Orthi-Phosphate

Chloride mg/l

20

Ammonia

P mg/l

85

Nitrate

N mg/l

350

Chemical Oxygen Demand

TSS mg/l

850

Biochemical Oxygen

TDS mg/l

1200

T.T.S.

TS mg/l

Quality of Water

Topographical Modification +4m AMSL

Pump

Tilapia Rainbow Trout

Hydroponic Farm

1.5- 2 years

240 days

40 - 80 days

http://www.fao.org/fishery/culturedspecies/Oncorhynchus_mykiss/en

http://www.ehow.com/how-does_4603736_lettuce-grow.html

Pump

Tilapia Rainbow Trout

100%

100%

100%

10-21 °C

.08m

6.5-8.5

2 :1

10-21 °C

1m

6.5-8.5

10-21 °C

1.3m

6.5-8.5

Adult

Juvenile 160 days

1.5 :1

Pond System

Rainbow Trout

ph

99.8%

Temperature

93.6%

Depth

96.3%

ph

90.6%

Temperature

89.0%

Depth

82.0%

Assessment of the Efficiency of Duckweed (Lemna gibba) in Wastewater Treatment, Central Lab for Environmental Quality Monitoring, National Water Research, Cairo, Egypt

ph

66.7%

Duckweed Waste Water Treatment [8-10 days]

Wastewater treatment and use in agriculture - FAO 1992, http://www.fao.org.

Temperature

Fecal Coliform

64.4%

Sedimentation 10 days

Water Feeder Canal

Depth

Cd

300

Zn

BOD mg/l

150

Pb

Grease mg/l

200

Cu

Alkalinity mg/l

100

Orthi-Phosphate

Chloride mg/l

20

Ammonia

P mg/l

85

Nitrate

N mg/l

350

Chemical Oxygen Demand

TSS mg/l

850

Biochemical Oxygen

TDS mg/l

1200

Water Feeder Canal

T.T.S.

TS mg/l

Quality of Water

Pond Excavation

Hydroponic Farm

1.5- 2 years

240 days

40 - 80 days

http://www.fao.org/fishery/culturedspecies/Oncorhynchus_mykiss/en

2 :1

2 :1

Water Feeder Canal

Water Feeder Canal 10 cm

Clay core and underlayer

Water Treatment Typical Sections

http://www.ehow.com/how-does_4603736_lettuce-grow.html

Harvesting Sump [.05% Slope]

10 cm

Monk Tower [Water Outlet]

Dike Crest

1.3m

2,5078

2 :1

10 cm

1.5 :1

2 :1

Clay core and underlayer

Harvesting 2 :1 Sump [.05% Slope]

10 cm

Monk Tower [Water Outlet]

1.5 :1

sqm

49,798

sqm

25,998

sqm

Impermeable Clay Core Dike Crest

1.3m

Grading [Building Zoning] +5m AMSL [Area: 133,046 sqm]

Impermeable Soil

1.5 :1

Permeable Soil

Sludge Accumulation

Impermeable Clay Core

Permeable Soil

2 :1

Vegetated Soil | Erosion Control

Wetland plants

Wastewater Treatment + Aquaculture

1.5 :1

2 :1

Impermeable Clay Core

Building Program

2 :1

sqm

0.3m

3,2170

2 :1

1.5 :1

0.3m

Circulation System Vehicular

Duckweed as feed [herbivore fish]

Impermeable Soil Permeable Soil

Permeable Soil

Sludge Accumulation

Impermeable Clay Core

Impermeable soil

Vegetated Soil | Erosion Control

Wetland plants

Duckweed as feed [herbivore fish]

Hugo Colón Acevedo 37

Hydroponics


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EMBRACING WATER COMMONS


EMBRACING WATER COMMONS HARVARD UNIVERSITY GSD | 3RD SEMESTER | 2012 Instructors: Paola Vigano; Lauren Abrahams

The city of Lawrence once stood as an important Industrial city while taking advantage of the Merrimack River. Today, the industries faded and the river itself has passed to be of a secondary importance. In addition to this, the immigration of less privileged social classes have brought social problems and a sense of insecurity that enhances the everlasting abandonment of this once productive city.

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Trails

Canoe Trips

Roads

Canoe Entrance

Dams

Hydrology

Cultural

School

Agricultural

Recreation

Conservation

Merrimack River

Today the city is trying to ameliorate the effects of abandoned industries by bringing new economic opportunities and reusing the old Mill structures mainly as lofts. Although these well intended strategies are important for the future of the city, the wave of immigrants has brought a younger population that not necessarily appreciate the existing historical infrastructure. The need for a common identity is evident and the need to embrace these new cultures must come in hand with the creation of a versatile common space that enhances the sense of belonging.


Network of leftover water infrastructure Hugo Col贸n Acevedo 43


Recreation

Water Related

Improvised Open Space

Lawrence Open Space In Lawrence, open space is scarce and mostly related to schools and sports facilities. Even its main open space area, the Common is designed partly as a baseball park and facilities. The largest open space area in the city is the cemetery in which lies an opportunity for citizen’s recreation. Another area of possible public space opportunities are the informal gathering places created by parking lots (images to the right) and abandoned lots. However, the greatest opportunity for the creation of new open space and economic potential lies on the two rivers in Lawrence, the Merrimack and Spicket rivers. 44 Hugo Colón Acevedo


Hydrology

Cultural

School Related

Agricultural

Sport | Recreation

Conservation

Open Space Taxonomy

Hugo Col贸n Acevedo 45


Scenario Site 1: Stevens Pond

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Scenario Site 2: William Kennedy Community Park

Storm water Management

Allow space for flooding Hugo Col贸n Acevedo 47


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RECLAIMING THE FOREST


RECLAIMING THE FOREST HARVARD UNIVERSITY GSD |4TH SEMESTER | 2013 Instructors: Anita Berrizbeitia; Kelly Doran; Tomas Folch

The Baker River in the Aysen region in Chile has an extensive logging tradition that dates back to the 1900’s. Due to intensive modifications of the native forest communities via forest fires and logging many species are in danger and hence the area is used mainly for livestock and pasture lands. The characteristic town of Tortel which depends highly on the cutting and production of timber products derived from native species such as the Ciprés de las Güaitecas and Lenga needs a secure input of wood. However, the government has issued several laws that limit the cutting of these species posing an additional pressure on the local loggers. The Hydroaysen project, a series of five dams proposed in the area, two of which are proposed in the Baker River, pose an additional threat to the native forests. However they also present an opportunity for a new project that enhances silviculture while recolonizing the lost forest. By means of a reforestation and management strategy a new forest can be implemented within a 120 year span thus enhancing the local logging culture.

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Dam as Catalyst 0m

2500m

Baker 2 Reservoir

at

er Riv

Tug

Bo

Managed Lenga Forest

ws Flo

Managed Lenga Forest

Managed Lenga Forest

Sawmill

Baker River

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Saw Mill Plan

Dam Cross Sections

Saw Mill Complex Plan

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OTHER


CONSTRUCTED MARSHLAND HARVARD UNIVERSITY gsd |2ND SEMESTER | 2012 Instructors:NIall Kirkwood, Pierre Belanger

Concrete Sidewalk Asphalt Road

As part of the Ecologies, Techniques and Technologies IV course, the assignment consisted of selecting a previous design intervention in order to develop sections and details. This project presents a three-dimensional profile of a constructed marshland through terracing. Since the existing marshland was altered due to urban development, the project consists on developing topographic modifications to permit deposit of water during high tide levels. The new land forms will allow new habitats to thrive while providing coastal defense against increasing tidal surge. With the use of T-shaped retention walls for higher ground stabilization and project creates different levels of wetlands. From an urban point of view, the project provides an urban quality through the use of material and the creation of new urban spaces such as plazas, activity pockets and coastal access.

T-Shape Concrete Cantiliver Ratining Wall

Saltwater Cordgrass [Spartina patens] Vegetated Swale - Bent Alkali [Puccinellia agrostidea]

Field Bent Alkali [Puccinellia agrostidea]

Saltwater Marsh Pond Ocean

By analyzing the different layers involved in the creation of the marshland, two details were developed in order to provide more information for the construction and specifications.

Beach sand Clay Soil Ponds Vegetated Swale

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a

i

0.10m

0.30m

b 0.30m 0.30m 0.10m

2

c d

i

g

0.30m

m n

b

f

2

1

c d e

g

h

2.79m

e

f

g

f

l

0.10m

j

f

e

0.10m 0.15m

0.50m

1 1

3.25m

a

l

2

0.30m

c d

0.30m 0.10m

e

g

h

j

h

h 0.30m

0.30m 0.30m

k

0.30m

k

Field a. T-Shape Concrete Cantiliver Retaining Wall b. Weephole c. Sandy Clay d. Clay e. Sand Subbase f. Waterproof Membrane g. Gravel Backfill h. Drain Tile Sloped to Daylight

i. Saltwater Cordgrass j. Water Level k.Compacted Subgrade l. High Tide Line m. Concrete Sidewalk n. Gravel Base

Road

25m

Marchland

Sand

Detail 2 Detail 1

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VERNAL POOL ANALYSIS HARVARD UNIVERSITY GSD | 1st SEMESTER | 2011 Instructors: Betsy Colburn, Tim Dekker

62 Hugo Col贸n Acevedo


GRAPHIC DESIGN AND INFOGRAPHICS HARVARD UNIVERSITY GSD |Research assistant Supervisor:Gareth Doherty - EXUMA Project Harvard GSD

TECHNOLOGY Distillate [MSD,LSD.GT] HFO [MSD, LSD,GT]

REGIONAL USAGE

POTENTIAL

Intentional Homicides GREATER ANTILLES

FUEL TYPE

CUBA HAITÍ DOMINICAN REPUBLIC PUERTO RICO JAMAICA TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO BARBADOS

Coal [PC, CFB]

SAINT LUCIA SAINT VINCENT AND THE GRENADINES GRENADA ANTIGUA AND BARBUDA

LNG

DOMINICA SAINT KITTS AND NEVIS

Mid-Scale LNG

CURAÇAO

CNG

Solar Photovoltaics

BONAIRE  SINT EUSTATIUS 

LESSER ANTILLES

Pipeline Gas

ARUBA SINT MAARTEN

SABA BRITISH VIRGIN ISLANDS ANGUILLA MONTSERRAT MARTINIQUE   GUADELOUPE  SAINT MARTIN

Forests

Reefs

6.9 Million Ha

20,000 km2

MOST APPEALING PLACES TO CRUISE

SAINT BARTHÉLEMY

Concentrating Solar Power

Panama Canal

West Mexico

THE BAHAMAS

8% 8%

Europe 13% Meditarranean

45%

Caribbean

Caribbean

US VIRGIN ISLANDS

8% of World’s Reefs

14%

Bermuda

15%

24%

CAYMAN ISLANDS

Alaska 23% TURKS AND CAICOS ISLANDS

15%

Hawai

0.17″% of World’s Forests

World 4030 Million Ha

Bahamas

Wind

0

500

1000

255,300 km2 1500

2500

2000

3000

Millions

Geothermal

Caribbean Reef Threats Marine Based Threats

Panama Canal

West Mexico Panama Canal

8% 8%Europe

Europe

15%

13%

Hydro

Coastal Development

60%

33%

35% Sediment and Pollution

Overfishing

Forests

MOST APPEALING MOST PLACES APPEALING TO CRUISEPLACES TO CRUISE

Meditarranean

Bermuda

13% 45%

Meditarranean 14%

14%

15%

15% 24%

Hawai

8% 8% Caribbean

Bermuda 15% 15% Alaska 23% 23% Hawai Bahamas

45%

Forests

6.9 Million Ha6.9 Million Ha

West Mexico Caribbean

24% Alaska

Bahamas

Caribbean Caribbean

World

World

Reefs

Reefs

20,000 km2 20,000 km2

8% of World’s 8% ofReefs World’s Reefs

0.17″% of World’s 0.17″% ofForests World’s Forests

4030 Million4030 Ha Million Ha 255,300 km2255,300 km2

Emerging Technologies Wave, Tidal, OTEC

Caribbean Reef Threats Caribbean Reef Threats Marine Based Threats

Marine Based Threats

Hugo Colón Acevedo 63


Contact:

hugocolon.arq@gmail.com 787-635-2715

Portfolio hugo colón acevedo  

Landscape Architecture Work from Harvard Graduate School of Design and the University of Puerto Rico.

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