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“Celebrating the rich history of Martin County and the people who make it great”

Martin County

JOURNAL

Year Three, Issue Twenty Eight

Wednesday, July 11, 2012

11 Pages

City asks water customers to reduce usage By COURTNEy HUgHETT Martin County Journal Publisher

away from obtaining a doctorate at Ball technical English, psychology, AP psycholState. She is married to James “Travis” ogy, and English 10. He and his wife Tricia, Roush and has been teaching at Brown a teacher in Bedford, have two children, The Shoals School Board last Thursday County High School. Elle, age seven, and Finn, age two. night finished filling administrative posiMalone is a 1996 graduate of BedBoth positions were hired on a twotions vacated recently by the superintenford North Lawrence where he still year contract. dent and high school and elementary resides and currently teaches at “With turnover of our new adminisprincipals. At their last meeting, the Mitchell. He is a 2001 graduate tration, I feel our school has the board hired Joan Keller as superintenof Central Bible College opportunity to go in a new dident. Keller told the board last Thurswith a B.A. in Theolrection and I feel that we’ve day that nine applications were ogy, a 2002 graduhired exceptional people to received for the principal posiate of Evangel guide our ship,” said board tions. After interviews on MonUniversity with a member Mary Lou Billings. day and Tuesday of last week, B.S. in CommuBoard member Bill Shobe Keller recommended hiring nications, a 2008 noted that nine candidates Austin Malone to fill the elegraduate of Indiwere interviewed and he was mentary principal position and ana University surprised at the quality of those Candace Roush to fill the high with a masters of edinterviewed. “These two stood AUSTIN MALONE school principal position. ucation degree out,” he said. CANDACE ROUSH Roush is a 2001 graduate of in secondary education, and a In other business, the board voted to keep Shoals High School, a 2005 graduate of In- 2012 graduate of Oakland City University meeting dates as the second Thursday of the diana University, and a 2007 graduate of where he received his K-12 administration month at 5 p.m. with board members receivColumbus State in George where she re- license. He has taught at Mitchell High ing $109 for each regular meeting and $60 ceived her Masters. Roush said she is a year School for six years teaching US History, (See ‘PRINCIPALS’ on page two)

The Loogootee City Council decided at their meeting Monday night, July 9 to ask water customers to voluntarily reduce their water usage due to the ongoing drought. According to Utilities Manager Bo Wilson, water levels are not at alarming lows, but his department continues to monitor the situation. Wilson said he would like to see a 10 to 15 percent reduction in water use by customers. He presented an ordinance to the council for consideration noting that if customers voluntarily reduce usage now, a mandatory ban may not have to be issued down the road. Some things Wilson mentioned that should not be done include washing down homes and driveways, watering lawns, washing vehicles, or filling pools. He said watering landscaping plants or a garden is fine. Council member Rick Norris suggested not allowing customers to receive adjustments on their bills. He said this might make customers more aware about turning off a garden hose. He noted that one adjustment presented this month from a customer showed 16,000 gallons of water lost due to a hose being left on. The council decided to discuss the ordinance further at their next meeting. Morgan Huebner, Loogootee Fire Department Chief, told the council that his department has received almost all equipment from the FEMA grant monies they received. Included in the equipment were 20 SCBA (self-contained breathing apparatus) units with 20 additional air tanks and 23 SCBA masks. The tanks are smaller than what the department has used before but they hold twice as much air. The department was trained on the new equipment on July 2 and (See ‘WATER’ on page two)

The Martin County 4-H Fair will kick off next weekend, Friday, July 20. Once again this year, there will be free admission to the fairgrounds and the fair will offer a new carnival company – W.D. Deaton Amusements. On Friday, July 20, the poultry show will begin at 10 a.m. with the poultry showmanship awards at noon. The rabbit show will be held in the livestock arena at 1 p.m. Carnival rides will be available from 5 p.m. to 10 p.m. with the community building which houses 4-H exhibits open to the public beginning at 5 p.m. The queen contest will begin at 6:30 p.m. on Friday at the free stage. The public dress revue will take place during the queen contest. The demolition derby will start at 7 p.m. in the grandstands. Admission is $10 with children five and under getting in for free. A pit pass is $20 for anyone over the age of 18. On Saturday, July 21, the community building will be open to the public at 9 a.m. and the beef show will also begin at that time. Registration for the corn hole tourna-

ment will start at noon with the contest at 1 p.m. Horse and pony check-in will be held from noon to 3 p.m. Carnival rides and games will be open from noon to 10 p.m. on Saturday. The sheep show will start at 1 p.m. and the hot dog eating contest, sponsored by the junior leaders, will start at 4 p.m. The truck and tractor pulls will begin in the grandstand at 7 p.m. Admission is $5 with children five and under receiving free admission. Pit passes are $10. Sunday, July 22 begins with the swine show at 8 a.m. The community building will also be open to the public starting at 8 a.m. Carnival rides and games will be open from noon to 10 p.m. The goat show will be held at 1 p.m. and the Oreo stacking contest, sponsored by the junior leaders, will begin at 4 p.m. The kiddie tractor pull registration will start at 6 p.m. with the event beginning at 7 p.m. The horse and pony show-pleasure classes will start at 6 p.m. On Monday evening, July 23, the commu(See ‘4-H FAIR’ on page two)

Simply gorgeous

-Photo by Bill Whorrall

Despite horrible drought conditions, Martin County photographer Bill Whorrall captured the beautiful view above from the Scenic Overlook outside Shoals on Monday. This photos is part of an on-going appreciation of Martin County by Whorrall. To see how you can order his books see his ad in this week’s issue of the Martin County Journal. Also watch for photos by Bill in upcoming issues which is planned to be a regular feature.

Shoals School hires two new principals By COURTNEy HUgHETT Martin County Journal Publisher

2012 Martin County 4-H Fair to begin next Friday, July 20th

-Photo provided Shown above are the young ladies that are in the running for Miss Martin County this year. From left to right are Addison Dant, Tia Sanders, Kylie Sims, Haley Wade, Allison Kiser, and Sarah Richer. The queen contest will be held Friday night, July 20 at 6:30 p.m. on the free stage.

www.martincountyjournal.com • info@martincountyjournal.com • 812-259-4309 • Fax: 888–380–2761


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Martin County Journal

Wednesday, July 11, 2012

PRINCIPALS

-Photo provided Shown above are the members of the Loogootee Fire Department modeling their new SCBA (self-contained breathing apparatus) equipment recently purchased with FEMA grant money. See the city council story for more information.

WATER

(Continued from page one) it is now in service on the trucks. This is the first time since 1970 that SCBA equipment will be provided to all the firemen. The equipment was purchased through Towers Fire Apparatus Company for $91,000. The grant was for $112,000. The council approved the salary ordinance for next year to include a 50 cent raise for all full-time employees and 25 cents for part-time. Also included in the raise were the mayor and clerk-treasurer. City attorney Mark Jones declined a raise and the council decided not to give themselves one either. The council also approved a $3,000 annual salary for new building commissioner Jason Greene. Council member Norris noted that since this is a paid position he feels a phone number should be provided for residents to contact the building commissioner. Mayor Harty agreed noting that Greene is currently looking into purchasing a Trac Phone. Greene was also added to the cell phone stipend to receive $29 per month to cover the cost. Also approved in the fire department was a $200 salary increase for the chief from $1,600 to $1,800, the assistant chief from $800 to $1,000, the captain from $450 to $650, and the lieutenant from $300 to $500. They also agreed to increase the fire departments stipend for fire runs and meetings by $5 to $35 and $20. The council decided to keep new hires at $10.75 per hour. Huebner also presented the council with the low quote to replace the roof at the south side fire station. The council approved it which was $6,823.14 from Huff Construction. Huebner did not present the other quote but said it was from Graber Post Buildings for around $7,800. The roof will be metal and replace asphalt shingles. Pat Street approached the council about getting the alley behind The Bargain Shop made into a one-way street. She said the residents of the alley had originally signed a petition to present to the council for the city to vacate the alley, giving ownership back to the residents. After the petition was signed, one resident changed his mind and took his name off the petition. She said since they

LETTER TO THE EDITOR

‘The response was greatly appreciated’

To the editor of the Martin County Journal, We would like to offer a huge thank you to everyone that supported the recent events here in our community for the benefit of Middle Way House. Over the past few weeks we have collected personal hygiene items at St John’s Lutheran Church, as well as Divine Chiropractic and were overwhelmed at the response. On Saturday, June 30, a bake sale was held at St John’s Lutheran Church which was also a huge success. Thanks to everyone who donated items for these projects or purchased baked goods. The response was greatly appreciated and will aid those in crisis situations. Sue Page On behalf of Middle Way House Martin County

cannot get the alley vacated, she would like to see it become one way noting that vehicles have torn up her landscaping timbers 10 times driving through the alley. She also said that the alley is a regular hangout for drinkers and she has found drug paraphernalia on more than one occasion. After discussion, attorney Jones said that the adjacent property owners can file with the clerk-treasurer to have the alley vacated. After the filing, a notice will be put in a local publication and then a public hearing will be held with the council. Regardless of whether one or more property owners in the alley are opposed, the council will ultimately decide to vacate. Street said she will look into doing this. The council also discussed the new state smoking ban. The state’s ban says that anyone found smoking within eight feet of a business entrance will receive a fine. The first offense is $1,000 with fines going up to $10,000 and can be issued by the health department and local law enforcement. The city has the option of making the laws more stringent if they wish. The mayor proposed banning smoking in all city-owned vehicles and equipment. Council member John Frahley, who is also a city street employee, said he didn’t think banning smoking in oneperson vehicles such as a back hoe or opencab equipment would be necessary since no one’s rights would be violated. After discussion, the council voted to ban smoking in all closed-cab equipment. Anyone found in violation will be subject to a written warning on the first offense, a five-day unpaid suspension for the second offense, and termination on the third offense. It was also noted that if any city employee or city-owned building renter employee violated the state’s smoking ban, they would be responsible for paying the fines imposed, not the city. Russ Hager came before the council to ask if his state license, that he paid $30 for, to drive his four-wheeler in the city was valid. Police chief Kelly Rayhill said it was against the law in Loogootee to allow a fourwheeler within city limits and the council agreed to follow that law. Hager said he would contact the state and tell them “their license ain’t worth a damn down here in Loogootee.” The council approved two building permits. One was for Kiersten Home and Designs for a 2,693-square-foot commercial building on Broadway and SE First streets. The second was for a concrete pad to put in a trailer at 203 SW 3rd Street for Jeramey Osborne. The council voted to have a special meeting to go over the budget on Monday, July 16 at 5 p.m. Street superintendent Donnie Grindstaff asked the council’s guidance on what to do about two trees that need to be cut down on John C. Strange Avenue. He said the survey isn’t clear on who owns the property where the trees are located, the city or the property owner. A quote was received from Melton Tree Service for $1,100 to remove one tree and cut the dead wood off the other. The council decided to speak with the property owner and see if they would be willing to pay half since it is undecided on who owns the trees.

(Continued from page one) for special or executive sessions. The board of finance and officers on the board remain the same. The board will reorganize again in January. The board accepted the resignation of Brenda Hendrix from the position of second shift custodian and Kelly Springer from the positions of special education pre-school bus driver, teaching assistant; and girls’ high school basketball attendant. The board approved, with board member Christy Farhar abstaining from the vote, hiring Ed Farhar as girls’ varsity basketball coach for the 2012-13 season. Due to lack of participation in the high school volleyball program, the board rescinded their action at last meeting to approve LaTrisha McKibben and Kayla Bauer as varsity assistant/JV volleyball coaches for the 2012-13 season. Superintendent Keller explained that if more girls express interest in participating in the volleyball program, the issue will be re-visited. The board approved the textbook rental prices for next school year. Superintendent Keller noted that all prices have gone down. For kindergarten the fee is $109.26, first grade is $148.57, down $30; second grade is $139.45, down $25; third grade is $130.57, down $11; fourth grade is $102.11, down $6; fifth grade is $99.94, down $10; and sixth grade is $107.27, down $10. Prices for the junior/senior high are based on which individual subjects a student chooses to take rather than at a specific cost per grade level: The board approved the 2013 school budget and advertising calendar as presented. The special meeting and budget workshop is scheduled to be held on August 2 with advertising the following two weeks and then a public hearing on August 23 with adoption being held on September 13 at the regular board meeting. Superintendent Keller recommended the board approve the purchase of Fink Forms Software to use during the 2013 budget process. The initial cost of the software is $2,495 with an annual fee of $750. Keller explained that she would be happy to pay for the software from her own money as it is a great tool to have now that the budget must be uploaded to the state database. The board voted to allow Keller to purchase the software saying that it would be paid for out of school funds. The board approved Keller to serve on the

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advisory council of the Samaritan Center for a two year term. Superintendent Keller asked for permission to advertise for two non-certified positions and permission to hire a second shift custodian and special education pre-school bus driver and teaching assistant before the next meeting. The board approved. At the last meeting the board approved allowing Midwestern Engineers to produce project specifications for asphalt work that needs to be replaced throughout the school grounds. Superintendent Keller asked that the board reconsider the timeline associated with the project. She explained that the specifications need to be finalized during the winter months to allow the project to be completed during the next warm season. She said the project could be pushed out to next summer and patching can be done on the main parking lot and the playground for the time being. The next board meeting will be a special session on August 2 at 5 p.m. No regular July meeting will be held.

4-H FAIR

(Continued from page one) nity building will open to the public at 5 p.m. Carnival rides and games will be open from 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. and caricature drawings, sponsored by Kountry Kids Daycare, and face painting will be available from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. The horse and pony show will begin at 6 p.m. Silly Safari will perform at 6:30 p.m. and again at 8 p.m. and Farm Bureau games will begin in their building at 7 p.m. On Tuesday evening, July 24 the community building will again be open at 5 p.m. for the public. The supreme showmanship awards will start at 5:30 p.m. with the livestock auction starting at 7 p.m. Carnival rides and games will be available from 5 p.m. to 10 p.m. and balloon animals will be available on the fairway from 6 to 8 p.m. 4-H projects will be released from 8 p.m. to 10 p.m. on Tuesday night. The following are the dates for project check-in at the Martin County 4-H Fair this year: non-perishable projects check-in on Tuesday, July 17 from 5-8 p.m.; perishable projects and Future 4-H projects check-in on Wednesday, July 18 from 5-8 p.m. Livestock check-in will be on Thursday, July 19 from 5-10 p.m. If you have questions about checkin, call the extension office at 295-2412.

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3 Wednesday, July 11, 2012

OBITUARIEs

DAVID HARRIS David L. Harris passed away at 6:10 a.m. July 9, 2012 at his home surrounded by his family. A resident of Loogootee, he was 70. He was born May 9, 1942 in Washington; the son of Otto and Agnes (Rodgers) Harris. He married Donna Kaye (Spradlin) Harris of Lynnville on December 31, DAVID HARRIS 1967. He was a 1960 graduate of Loogootee High School and a graduate of Eastern Illinois University receiving a degree in secondary education and administration. He was a teacher and administrator in Illinois for several years. He was a retired businessman who owned the former Midwest Printing Company and WKMD radio station. He also served two terms on the Loogootee School Board.

Martin County

JOURNAL

p.o. Box 148 loogootee, in 47553 courtney@martincountyjournal.com

He was an avid fan of Loogootee High School sports and Indiana University Basketball. He enjoyed spending his time walking his grand dog, Bogey, and traveling to California to visit his daughters. He is survived by his wife Donna Kaye (Spradlin) Harris, three daughters, Michelle (Jeff) Fee of Greenwood, Kimberly Harris and Kindra Harris, both of Redlands, California; two sisters, Carolyn (James) Waller of Evansville and Joann (Tony) Nonte of Washington; one brother, James Harris of Port St. Lucie, Florida; and aunt, Wava Reister of Washington. No funeral service will be held but visitation will take place tomorrow, Thursday, July 12 from 4 to 8 p.m. at Lee Funeral Home in Loogootee. WILLIS BRAUN Willis John Braun passed away at 5:12 a.m. July 6, 2012 at the I.U. Health Paoli

Hospital. A resident of Shoals, he was 82. He was born June 4, 1930 in Huntingburg; the son of Harry and Caroline (Krodel) Braun. He married Carla Dant on December 31, 1955, on New Year’s Eve at St. WILLIS BRAUN John’s Lutheran Church Dubois Crossroads. Upon completion of his schooling, he joined his father working on the family farm. He entered the United States Army and served in the Korean War, returning to Shoals in 1954 as a Cpl. Upon his return from the service, he worked for Lee Floor Company for six years, installing tile and hardwood flooring for the French Lick hotels and school gyms. He then started a career with National Gypsum and retired in 1993, after thirty-five years of service. He was a member of the St. John’s

Lutheran Church Loogootee, Shoals American Legion Post #61, Shoals V.F. W. Post #8589, Indiana Sheriff’s Association, and the Indiana State Police Alliance. He will be greatly missed by his family including his wife, Carla L. Braun of Shoals; son, Brad and Karen Braun of Bloomington; daughter, Annette and Larry Shaw of Shoals; three granddaughters, Kimberly Braun, Summer Shaw, and Cassidy Shaw, whom were the light of his life; and one sister, Betty Ervin of Plainfield. He was preceded in death by parents, two brothers, Curtis and Cleo Braun; and one sister, Artis Bowling. A funeral service was held Tuesday, July 10 at Queen-Lee Funeral Home. Burial followed in Spring Hill Cemetery. American Legion Post #61 accorded military graveside rites. Preferred expressions of sympathy may be made to Loogootee St. John’s Lutheran Church.

Commissioners hear veterans, community corrections reports By COURTNEy HUgHETT Martin County Journal Publisher The Martin County Commissioners met Tuesday night, July 10. Commissioner John Wininger and County Attorney Dave Lett were not present. Sheriff Rob Street reported that the repairs to the outside of the jail are progressing and look very good. He also reported that after replacing two pumps on the boiler in the jail a leak was found. The contractor who replaced the pumps came back to jail and said the leak was probably due to a bad gasket. The pump replacement cost was approved by the commissioners on an emergency basis for $2,800. Highway superintendent Jim Williams informed the commissioners that the county’s new mower lost a blade on Tuesday. He said that one is on order and should be in by today. He also noted that his workers are close to getting all mowing done once through the entire county. Kathy Collins, director of community corrections, presented the commissioners with a semi-annual report of community service hours. She thanked the recycling center for

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working with her department and providing a place for community service workers to put in their hours – more than half the time of all community service work. Collins told commissioners that as a comparison, the work done for the six months with community service saved the county $17,000 they would pay a $10 per hour worker. Emergency Management Director Monte Wolf wanted it known that despite the recent rainfall the county is still under a burn ban. Commissioner Dan Gregory spoke about the affect of the drought on the corn and soybean farmers and said he is praying for them. John Handsborough with Washington National Insurance presented the commissioners with information on supplemental benefits for county employees. He explained his company’s premium pay back policy and said his company already offers benefits to 80 percent of Indiana counties. Commissioner Paul George read the quarterly veterans’ service officer report provided by Tom Trambaugh. The report stated that between April 1 and June 30, the service office provided 18 rides for veterans totaling 2,268 miles. Trambaugh made 45 phone calls and met with six veterans and their families.

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-Photo provided

Runners up

-Photo provided

Shown above are the Loogootee Little League 2012 Major League Softball Champions. Shown in the front row, from left to right, are Alexis Long, Bethany Welker, and Emily Crane. In the second row, from left to right, are Mackenzie Wagoner, Katie Hupp, Haley Erwin, Shaylyn Bruner, Sydney Davis, and Sara Street. In the back row, from left to right, are Coach Kent Hupp, Elizabeth Stoll, Taylor george, Ivory Ashby, and Coach Rob Street.

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The Loogootee Little League nine-year-old All Stars won second place at the Paoli Tourney June 23 and 24. Pictured in the front row, from left to right, are Zach Perkins, Jalen Wildman, Jayden Leatherman, Wyatt Street, and Jordan Wildman. In the second row, from left to right, are Seth Blackwell, Jace Walton, Wyatt Sheetz, Austin Brittain, and Bryant Eckerle. Not pictured is Caden Chandler.


4 Wednesday, July 11, 2012

PUBLIC NOTICEs

Martin County

JOURNAL

p.o. Box 148 loogootee, in 47553 courtney@martincountyjournal.com

Martin County Sheriff’s Department log SUNDAy, JULy 1 11:43 p.m. - Received a report of harassment in Loogootee. MONDAy, JULy 2 7:08 a.m. - Received a report of a property damage accident on Highway 150. 1:52 p.m. - Received a report of a domestic dispute on County Farm Road. 3:54 p.m. - Received a report of a found dog. It is a brown puppy found in the Indian Springs area. 4:16 p.m. - Received a report of a hit-andrun accident in Loogootee. 6:43 p.m. - Received a report of a field fire off State Road 550. Shoals Volunteer Fire Department responded. 8:50 p.m. - Received a report of a burglary alarm on Ziegler Road. 10:01 p.m. - Received a report of a tree across the highway on Highway150 near Butler Bridge Road. TUESDAy, JULy 3 12:24 a.m. - Received a request for an ambulance on Butcher Boulevard. Martin County Ambulance Service responded. 3:16 a.m. - Received a request for an ambulance in the Shoals area. Martin County Ambulance Service responded. 4:25 a.m. - Received a noise complaint in Crane Village. 9:25 a.m. - Received a report of an unauthorized vehicle in a private parking lot. 10:05 a.m. - Received a report of a reckless driver US 231 North southbound from Boggs Lake. Loogootee City Police took the complaint. 5:45 p.m. - Received a report of a suspicious vehicle on Baxter Cemetery Road. 7:30 p.m. - Received a report of a property damage accident. 8:10 p.m. - Received a report of a car on fire on US 50, east of Shoals. Shoals Volunteer Fire Department and Major T.A. Burkhardt responded. 8:20 p.m. - Received a report of a domestic dispute. 8:45 p.m. - Received a request for an ambulance at Boggs Park. Martin County Ambulance Service and Loogootee Volunteer Fire Department responded. 10:58 p.m. - Received a report of a suspicious vehicle on Dover Hill Road. 11:03 p.m. - Received a report of a subject sitting along side the roadway US 231 South. 11:53 p.m. - Received a report of a property damage accident US 231 South, north of Whitfield. WEDNESDAy, JULy 4 12:23 a.m. - Received a report of a property damage accident on Highway 50, east of Shoals. 3:25 a.m. - Received a report of a domestic dispute in Loogootee. 7:30 a.m. - Received a request for an ambulance on Poplar Street, Loogootee. Martin County Ambulance Service responded. 8:18 a.m. - Received a report of a theft in Shoals. 10:38 a.m. - Received a report of a theft in Shoals. 10:57 a.m. - Received a report of a theft in Crane Village. 11:15 a.m. - Received a request for an ambulance on First Street, Loogootee. Martin County Ambulance Service responded. 1:45 p.m. - Received a request for a VIN check. 1:47 p.m. - Loogootee Fire Department re-

quested assistance with a field fire on Killion Mill Road. 3:54 p.m. - Received a request for an ambulance on Doe Run Lane. Martin County Ambulance and Shoals Volunteer Fire Department responded. 11:00 p.m. - Received a request for an ambulance in Loogootee. Martin County Ambulance Service responded. 11:13 p.m. - Received a report of a tree down on Rama Dye Road. THURSDAy, JULy 5 2:06 a.m. - Received a report of a suspicious vehicle on US 150. 2:37 a.m. - Received a report of tree across the roadway on Highway 50. Shoals Volunteer Fire Department removed the tree. 9:00 a.m. - Received a report of a deer stuck in the mud on Brooks Bridge Road. 10:20 a.m. - Received a report of a property damage accident on US 50 East of Shoals. 10:25 a.m. - Received a report of an abandoned vehicle on Highway 150 near Singing Hill. 12:09 p.m. - Received a report of a house fire on Doane Lane, Shoals. Shoals Volunteer Fire Department and Martin County Ambulance Service responded. 3:45 p.m. - Received a report of suspicious activity in Loogootee. 6:34 p.m. - Received a report of vandalism on Ivy Lane. 6:52 p.m. - Received a report of a dog not letting people cross the street on 3rd Street, Loogootee. 6:58 p.m. - Received a report of a domestic dispute on Martin Lane. 8:03 p.m. - Received a report of a theft on Cedar Street, Loogootee. 8:20 p.m. - Received a report of a dog in a van at Pizza Junction that will not get out. 10:08 p.m. - Received a request for an ambulance Poplar Street, Loogootee. Martin County Ambulance Service responded. 10:40 p.m. - Received a report of a theft in Loogootee. 11:45 p.m. - Received a report of a bonfire in Crane Village. FRIDAy, JULy 6 9:45 a.m. - Received a request for an ambulance at the intersection of US highway 231 and Highway 50. Martin County Ambulance Service responded. 11:25 a.m. - Received a report of a theft in Shoals. 11:35 a.m. - Received a dog complaint on Chicken Farm Road. Dog owner was cited. 12:38 p.m. - Received a request for an ambulance on Poplar Street, Loogootee. Martin County Ambulance Service responded. 1:25 p.m. - Received a report of a field fire on Mount Calvary Road. Martin County Civil Defense and Loogootee Volunteer Fire Department responded. 1:45 p.m. - Received a report of a burglary on Morgan Curve Road. 2:50 p.m. - Received a report of a theft in Crane Village. 4:20 p.m. - Received a report of a tree down US 231 South. 6:36 p.m. - Received a report of an erratic driver on Highway 50. 8:48 p.m. - Received a report of a personal injury accident on US 50 and Scenic Hill Road. Deputy Damon Baker, Martin County Ambulance Service and Loogootee Volunteer Fire Department responded. 8:56 p.m. - Received a report of a tree across the roadway on Highway 150 and Windom Road. Shoals Volunteer Fire Department responded and removed the tree from the roadway. 10:13 p.m. - Received a complaint of fireworks being set off in Loogootee. 10:35 p.m. - Received a complaint of fireworks being set off on Turkey Hill Lane. 11:20 p.m. - Received a complaint of fireworks being set off in Loogootee. SATURDAy, JULy 7 12:27 a.m. - Received a complaint of fireworks being set off on Mill Road.

1:25 a.m. - Received a report of a breakin on Highway 150. 2:57 a.m. - Received a request of an ambulance on Martin Lane. Martin County Ambulance Service and Williams Volunteer Fire Department responded. 7:20 a.m. - Received a complaint that someone had put a tree in the culvert on Fairview Lane. 3:14 p.m. - Received a report of a broken down vehicle on US 231 South of Loogootee. 5:56 p.m. - Received a report of a tree across the roadway on Highway 150. 6:17 p.m. - Received a request for an ambulance in Shoals. Martin County Ambulance Service and Shoals Volunteer Fire Department responded. 6:30 p.m. - Received a report of a personal injury accident on Highway 150 near the Orange County line. Deputy Josh Greene Martin County Ambulance Service, Shoals Volunteer Fire Department, and Orange County Sheriffs Office all responded. SUNDAy, JULy 8 12:05 a.m. - Received a report of a burglary alarm in Loogootee. 5:42 a.m. - Received a complaint of fireworks being set off in Loogootee. 7:13 a.m. - Received a report of a coin bucket in the back of a truck in Loogootee. 7:35 a.m. - Received a report of a burglary in Loogootee. 1:40 p.m. - Received a report of a tree down on Hart Road. Martin County Civil Defense responded. 3:00 p.m. - Received a report of a tree down on State Road 450 and Indian Springs Road. Martin County Civil Defense responded. 3:15 p.m. - Received a report of debris in the roadway on State Road 450. 3:21 p.m. - Received a report of a domestic dispute in Shoals. 3:25 p.m. - Received a report of a tree across the roadway on Dover Hill Road. Shoals Volunteer Fire Department responded and removed the tree. 4:22 p.m. - Received a report of a burglary in Shoals. 6:08 p.m. - Received a report of a tree fallen down on a house on West River Road. Deputy Josh Greene and Shoals Volunteer Fire Department responded. 6:55 p.m. - Received a report of harassment. 6:58 p.m. - Received a call that the power was out.

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7:07 p.m. - Received a call that the power was out. 9:41 p.m. - Received a report of fireworks being set off in Loogootee. MONDAy, JULy 9 6:50 a.m. - Received a report of an erratic driver on US 50. 7:20 a.m. - Received a report of a tree down on Killion Mill Road. 8:10 a.m. - Received a report of vehicle vandalism. 10:45 a.m. - Received a report of a burglary in Crane Village. 10:55 a.m. - Received a request for an ambulance on Church Street, Loogootee. Martin County Ambulance Service responded. 4:40 p.m. - Received a dog complaint. 5:34 p.m. - Received a request for an ambulance on Chicken Farm Road. Martin County Ambulance Service responded. 6:14 p.m. - Received a report of harassment. 6:39 p.m. - Received a report of a burglary in Loogootee. TUESDAy, JULy 10 7:41 a.m. - Received a report of a theft in Shoals. The Martin County Sheriff’s Department would like to take this time to advise all citizens of Martin County to keep their doors locked and to not allow strangers in your home. If someone seems suspicious, note the description of the person, hair color, clothing, height weight, type of car they are driving etc. And please feel free to contact your local police agency.

Jail bookings

TUESDAy, JULy 3 11:51 p.m. - Teiara Haines, of Loogootee, was arrested on theft charges. WEDNESDAy, JULy 4 1:04 a.m. - Brandon Graham, of Loogootee, was arrested for conspiracy to manufacture methamphetamine and maintaining a common nuisance. 1:04 a.m. - Richard Wetter, of Loogootee, was arrested for conspiracy to manufacture methamphetamine, maintaining a common nuisance, possession of precursors, and illegal possession of a legend drug. 11:53 p.m. - Jason Kinder, of Mitchell, was arrested for operating a vehicle while intoxicated with a minor in the vehicle. THURSDAy, JULy 5 7:01 p.m. - Randy Stone of Shoals was arrested on criminal mischief charges.

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Wednesday, July 11, 2012

Martin County Journal

page 5

Loogootee Police log Martin County Court News MONDAy, JULy 2 1:15 p.m. - Terry Pielemeier came on station and advised his wife had struck a telephone pole on Wood Street. Chief Rayhill completed a case report. 4:14 p.m. - Caller advised of possible underage drinking. TUESDAy, JULy 3 9:30 a.m. - Caller reported a vehicle parked illegally on his property. Chief Rayhill placed an abandoned tag on the vehicle. 5:41 p.m. - Caller requested an ID check on a trailer. 5:43 p.m. - Caller reported several kids setting off fireworks in mailboxes and near vehicles. Captain Hennette spoke with the kids and parents. 8:49 p.m. - First responders were requested at West Boggs for a female having a seizure. 8:53 p.m. - Caller reported possible drug use on East Broadway Street. Subjects were located and cited for possession of marijuana. 9:45 p.m. - Caller reported a domestic dispute in Redwing Trailer Court. WEDNESDAy, JULy 4 3:25 a.m. - Caller reported a domestic dispute on Butcher Boulevard. 1:35 p.m. - Loogootee Fire was dispatched to Lark Ranch for a field fire. 9:38 p.m. - Caller requested a welfare check on a person on Cedar Street. 9:58 p.m. - Caller reported possible child abuse. 11:16 p.m. - Caller reported harassment. THURSDAy, JULy 5 12:01 a.m. - Caller reported small flames burning from fireworks. 8:29 p.m. - Caller reported receiving harassing text messages. 9:00 p.m. - Caller reported to be on the lookout for a white Buick which may contain a male, female and child. These persons might have committed theft. 10:40 p.m. - Caller reported someone may have been in his house. He stated items at his

door did not belong to him. FRIDAy, JULy 6 1:22 p.m. - Caller reported a hay bail on fire on Mt. Calvary Road. Loogootee Fire was dispatched. 8:53 p.m. - First Responders were requested on US 50 for a vehicle accident. SATURDAy, JULy 7 1:00 p.m. - Caller reported his vehicle was broken down near Williams Bros. 1:57 p.m. - Caller reported his vehicle had been broken into. Captain Akles completed a case report. 2:30 p.m. - Caller reported dogs on SE 1st Street without shade and water. Captain Akles was unable to locate the dogs. 4:45 p.m. - Caller reported an ice truck had hit the building at Gasoline Alley. 6:41 p.m. - Caller reported a possible intoxicated driver on US 231. SUNDAy, JULy 8 7:35 a.m. - Caller reported a theft from his vehicle while parked on Queen Street. 7:43 a.m. - Female caller reported harassment. 5:29 p.m. - Captain Akles responded to a business alarm on Church Street. 8:02 p.m. - Caller reported a speeding vehicle on Broadway Street. 10:15 p.m. - Caller reported an aggressive dog near Church Street. In order to operate a golf cart inside city limits, the golf cart must be registered by the city. Anyone found operating without a valid sticker may be cited and the golf cart can be impounded.

Persons listed on criminals charges are innocent until proven guilty in a court of law. CIVIL COURT New Suits Filed June 27 Midland Funding, LLC vs. Jill Lake, civil collection. July 2 LVNV Funding, LLC vs. Julia Sanders, civil collection. July 3 Hoosier Accounts Service vs. Jacqueline and Carl Combs, civil collection. Springs Valley Bank & Trust Company vs. Rheta Tomlinson-Chastain, Russell D. Chastain, and Treasurer of Martin County, mortgage foreclosure. SMALL CLAIMS COURT New Suits Filed June 27

Carl Wiscaver vs. Travis Allen, complaint. June 28 Hoosier Accounts Service vs. Lawrence and Monica Ryan, complaint. Hoosier Accounts Service vs. Morgan K. and Lisa Kirtley, complaint. Hoosier Accounts Service vs. Mark and Laura Roberts, complaint. Hoosier Accounts Service vs. Kenneth McGuire, complaint. Hoosier Accounts Service vs. Jaime Browder, complaint. Hoosier Accounts Service vs. Robert G. Wilz, complaint. Hoosier Accounts Service vs. Angel R. Mayfield, complaint. Hoosier Accounts Service vs. Joshua R. Hopkins, complaint. Hoosier Accounts Service vs. Dillon M. McDonald, complaint.

Accident reports WEDNESDAy, JULy 4 3:40 p.m. - Amber Meyer, of Odon, was operating a 2005 Harley and was exiting the gas pumps at Marathon when she pulled into the path of a 2003 GMC operated by Traci Cornelius. No injuries were reported. Captain Akles investigated.

-Photo provided Conservation officers Paul Axton and Eric Stamps are shown firing while moving through the water during training at West Boggs Lake.

Conservation officers report Operation Dry Water results Indiana Conservation Officers made 10 arrests for boating while intoxicated during a three-day campaign in June designed to bring awareness to the potential dangers of mixing alcohol and boating. According to Maj. Michael Portteus, Indiana’s boating law administrator for the DNR, the 10 arrests during the Operation Dry Water campaign from June 22-24 represented an increase from six BWI arrests during the same period in 2011. So far in 2012, 142 boat operators have been charged with boating while intoxicated. Indiana Conservation Officers recorded 178 arrests for boating while intoxicated in 2011 and 138 BWI arrests in 2010. “The number of intoxicated boater complaints by our citizens demonstrates an increased public awareness that our safe boaters are concerned about their safety being compromised,” said Lt. Bill Browne, public relations officer for the DNR Division of Law Enforcement. “Keeping our

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lakes, rivers and reservoirs safe takes an effort from all of us, and we appreciate the efforts of our safe boaters.” Operation Dry Water is part of a national campaign and has increased public awareness of boating while intoxicated. Officers from across the state are reporting instances of boats using designated drivers. “Operation Dry Water is about lives being saved and people boating safely,” said Cpl. Bill Beville, Indiana’s 2010 Boating Officer of the Year. “Therefore the campaign was a success for all Indiana boaters.” Indiana has approximately 217,000 registered boats, according to the Bureau of Motor Vehicles. Although the arrests for boating while intoxicated have increased, boating fatalities in Indiana are decreasing. According to Indiana Conservation Officer reports, there has been one fatality in 2012 as a result of a boat accident compared to 11 in 2011 and nine in 2010.

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-Photo provided Daviess County Indiana Conservation Officers Blake Everhart and Lt Tony Sanders take cover and fire behind a boat dock at West Boggs.

Conservation officers train at West Boggs Indiana Conservation Officers from District 7 recently participated in a water survival training course held at West Boggs. The training consisted of survival swimming techniques as well as firearms training from both a boat and in the water. During the training, the officers fired replica air pistols at multiple targets using available cover such as boats, docks, and

trees. They also fired at targets from moving boats. The training was instructed by district firearms and defensive tactics instructors Indiana Conservation Officers are responsible for patrolling Indiana waterways and providing a safe atmosphere for Indiana boaters and sportsmen. Operational district seven includes officers from the ten southwest counties of Indiana.


6 Wednesday, July 11, 2012

OUTDOORs

Martin County

p.o. Box 148 loogootee, in 47553 courtney@martincountyjournal.com

DNR to start second round of input on fish, hunt, and trap regulations The DNR Division of Fish & Wildlife wants to hear your thoughts about suggested fishing, hunting and trapping regulations in Indiana. From July 15 to August 1, the public can use a convenient online form to provide input to the DNR. The process is like a “virtual” open house. To participate, go to wildlife.IN.gov and click on the “Got INput?” box near the middle of the page. The form will be available for use beginning July 15. A list of potential regulations will also be available on the “Got INput?” page. There will also be two on-site open houses, one in southern Indiana and another in northern Indiana. The first open house will be July 25 from 5-7 p.m. at the

Spring Mill State Park Inn near Mitchell. The second open house will be July 30 from 5-7 p.m. at the Plymouth Public Library in Plymouth. Input on specific suggested regulations can also be mailed to: DNR Division of Fish & Wildlife, Attn: Proposed Regulatory Changes, 402 W. Washington St., Room W273 Indianapolis, IN 46204. The July 15 to August 1 public input period is the second input period by the Division of Fish & Wildlife this year. The earlier round was May 15 to June 1. After reviewing input, DFW staff will consider all suggestions before proposing regulations to the Natural Resource Commission.

ICOs investigate fish kill in Patoka River After locating the dead fish, Cpl. Stinson notified the Indiana Department of Environmental Management, who sent an official to test the water. Test results revealed a depleted oxygen level, but no cause has been determined. Cpl. Stinson reported numerous dead fish of various species, but no official number has been released. An investigation is ongoing.

On Wednesday, July 4, a fish kill on the Patoka River was reported to Indiana Conservation Officers. According to the investigating officer, Cpl. Trent Stinson, dead fish were found on areas of the river from Ell Creek road in Dubois county to CR 550S in Pike County. This stretch of the Patoka covers approximately 18 river miles.

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Nielsen: Indiana drought worst on crop conditions since 1988 By JENNIFER STEWART Purdue University News Service Indiana crop conditions continue to deteriorate daily as the drought worsens to a level not seen since 1988, Purdue Extension corn specialist Bob Nielsen said Thursday, July 5. The state’s corn crop has fallen off such that only 19 percent was rated good to excellent by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Nielsen said during a news conference at the Indiana State Fairgrounds. As of July 1, more than 90 percent of the crop acres were rated as short to very short for soil moisture. As a majority of the corn crop enters the crucial and sensitive pollination period, there is little chance for recovery, Nielsen said. Without rain and cooler temperatures, he said, corn could lose up to 10 percent yield potential daily. “A break in the drought and heat for the remainder of the season would certainly minimize further deterioration of the corn crop but would not result in recovery to anywhere close to normal yields,” he said. Rain that parts of Indiana received in the past week prevented the drought from worsening, but more rain more often would be needed to bring the state out of drought. Most of the state continued to experience various intensity of drought, according to the U.S. Drought Monitor (http://droughtmonitor.unl.edu/DM_state.htm?IN,MW)) update on Thursday. The southwest and northeast remained in extreme drought, the secondhighest level of drought. Purdue Extension agricultural economist Chris Hurt estimated that as of July 1, Indiana had already lost 20 percent of the expected corn yields - down to 133 bushels per acre, compared with 166 expected at spring planting. Soybeans fared slightly better in the yield projections, down 15 percent at 41.3 bushels per acre instead of 48.6 bushels expected early in the season. Part of the reason is because soybeans still have time to recover somewhat with a return to more normal rainfall. “Soybean yields are significantly related to August temperatures and precipitation,” Hurt said. “There is still potential for yield recovery in soybeans up until late July and even into August.” Commodity markets already have taken notice of the projected yield losses. At the end of trading on Tuesday, July 3 corn cash prices were up about 27 percent, and soybean prices were up about 5 percent. But Hurt said that might not be enough to compensate producers’ lost farm income from low yields. “Indiana is the worst hit of the major corn and soybean states,” he said. “This is a situation where Indiana’s average yield losses

Leaves curl tightly on drought-stressed corn in a Tippecanoe County, Ind. field. A majority of Indiana is in severe to extreme drought, according to the U.S. Drought Monitor, http://droughtmonitor.unl.edu (Purdue Agriculture Photo/Jennifer Stewart) might not be compensated by high enough prices, and revenues can fall sharply - a potentially difficult financial situation.” The higher grain prices also could have a ripple effect on animal agriculture, which relies heavily on corn and soybean meal to feed livestock. Forages also will be in short supply. “The animal production sector also faces the potential for large financial losses due to much higher feed prices for corn, soybean meal and forages for dairy, beef and sheep herds,” Hurt said. The effects of the drought also could touch agricultural businesses, such as handlers and processors, equipment dealers, and seed, fertilizer and pesticide providers. Ultimately, consumers are likely to see an increase in food prices of 2.5 percent to 3.5 percent into 2013, Hurt said. One bright spot for crop farmers is that they enter the 2012 drought in a better financial situation than what farmers experienced leading up to the drought of 1988, which devastated crops. Hurt said farm incomes have been stronger in the past two years and that with land values at record-high levels, crop farmers have generally higher net worth. Crop insurance also could play a major role in helping farmers avoid devastation this year, Hurt said. About 75 percent of Indiana crop acres are covered by some form of crop insurance. “But crop insurance generally does not provide for full recovery of losses,” he noted. “It is often used to help avoid catastrophic financial losses.” Crop insurance commonly covers 65 percent to 85 percent of a crop’s overall estimated value, depending on the type and levels of coverage farmers select. Purdue Extension has compiled drought resources for grain and livestock farmers as well as consumers. Links to those resources are available at www.purdue.edu/drought.

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Wednesday, July 11, 2012

Martin County Journal

page 7

Not all drought-related news is bad Low water requires increased Good news on some bugs: Despite the massive cloud of news about the harmful effects of drought and extreme heat, those current conditions across Indiana may have at least a dull bronze lining, at least in some instances. But you have to look hard. Here’s a sampling. Anglers have reason for optimism. -In the Wabash River, the drought is killing invasive Asian carp, which are a threat to native species. Asian carp prefer living in oxbows and backwater areas, which are drying up and leaving the fish stranded without adequate water. “At least Asian carp may not gain an additional competitive advantage over native species this year,” said Bill James, chief of fisheries for Indiana DNR. “It might be a year where things kind of hold their own. Species like smallmouth bass tend to have higher reproductive success during low flow years.” -The drought has created favorable fishing conditions for many species. For example, low water in Indiana’s streams and rivers has concentrated fish in pockets of deeper water, making them easier to find. In Lake Michigan, summer-run steelhead are hesitant to return to warmer-than-normal streams and are concentrating in near-shore water, resulting in excellent fishing. -The good news with a warning: As water heats, its capacity to hold oxygen diminishes, and could result in fish kills. Wildlife in general: -While wildlife will be stressed and there may be some lower survival of young and mortality of older, weaker animals, and increased predation as prey and predators congregate on limited resources, wildlife species have ways of adapting as they have in previous drought years. Wildlife will reduce their activities or change the timing of their activities, thus they may not be as visible to us. When the rains return we may be surprised by the wildlife that appear as conditions improve.

-The raining of honeydew from tulip trees has stopped or slowed. Starting in May, tulip tree scale began “raining” honeydew, a sticky waste product of the scale, on people and property near such trees. That “rain” has slowed as the trees adjust to a lack of real rain. The scale epidemic was a result of mild winter weather and early spring weather. Reduced honeydew “rain” is good, clean news, short-term, for humans; however, the current reduction is also due to the scale’s maturing. Although the trees are still releasing some honeydew, tulip tree leaves are turning yellow, then will turn brown and fall off, a method of surviving both the scale and the drought. People with tulip trees should consider switching from using insecticide to battle the scale to watering their tree, if affordable. If you like hearing the annual cicadas’ singing, you may be hearing their tune sooner this year because of the early spring. Their singing period also may be longer because of the dry soil prolonging emergence. From State Parks & Reservoirs: -Nature centers, found at many state parks & reservoirs, are usually air-conditioned. The educational opportunities provided may seem even “cooler” than usual under these extreme heat conditions. Many properties offer refreshing treats like boat rentals, snack bars, lakes and swimming pools. Please note that some reservoir beaches are closed due to low water. See InterpretiveServices.IN.gov http://www.in.gov/dnr/parklake/2389.htm and StateParks.IN.gov http://www.in.gov/dnr/parklake/ for more information. Waterfront owners: -Lower water allows waterfront property owners to check manmade features around streams, rivers and lakes for problems that are otherwise typically hidden underwater. Repair or maintenance projects already underway may have a longer work window.

diligence at boat ramps

As a result of the drought, more public boat ramps are becoming unsafe for launching trailered boats, especially on rivers. Shallow water has increased the risk that boat operators will drive their trailers over the ends of boat ramps, especially in muddy rivers where ramps can be difficult to see underwater. The trailers could become stuck or damaged, according to Jamie Smyth, fisheries staff specialist with the DNR Division of Fish & Wildlife. “Use common sense,” Smyth said. “Don’t push it too far. If you decide to launch a trailered boat, go nice and slow.” DNR boat ramps are administered through the DNR divisions of Fish & Wildlife and State Parks & Reservoirs. The Division of Fish & Wildlife maintains hundreds of boat ramps across Indiana through its public access program and does not monitor water levels at each one.

DFW does not plan on closing any ramps and is instead urging people to use their own discretion. Some ramps are currently only suitable for launching canoes, kayaks and small, hand-carried boats, Smyth said. “Once you safely launch your boat, use extra caution to avoid shallow water, rocks and other obstacles,” Smyth said. The DNR Division of State Parks & Reservoirs has closed the Portland Mills boat ramp at Raccoon Lake, although the main boat ramp remains open. At Mississinewa Lake, the Pearson Mill boat ramp is open for small boats only and the Frances Slocum boat ramp is open for bass-type boats, but not large speed boats. The Red Bridge and Miami boat ramps at Mississinewa remain open with no restrictions. Water levels are abnormally low at all DNR reservoirs, and boaters are urged to use caution.

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8 Wednesday, July 11, 2012

COMMUNITY

Martin County

JOURNAL

p.o. Box 148 loogootee, in 47553 courtney@martincountyjournal.com

Humane society pet celebrities calendar contest now underway Entries are now being accepted for the 21st annual Pet Celebrities of Martin County Calendar, sponsored by the Martin County Humane Society. Pet dogs, cats, horses, squirrels, birds, and other animals have been featured over the years. Twelve photos are selected from all entries as featured “pet of the month.” Winners also receive a Martin County Humane Society T-shirt. All other entered pictures will be placed in the calendar as well. Any pet is eligible for entry, but no people should be included in the picture. One picture will be selected if multiple entries of

the same pet are submitted. There is also a memorial page to honor the memory of beloved pets. Please include the pet’s name, owner’s name and address, and phone number on the back of each picture. There is a $5 entry fee per picture. Please enclose a stamped, self-addressed envelope for the return of the pictures. All entries should be mailed to the Martin County Humane Society, P.O. Box 537, Shoals, Indiana, 47581, no later than September 15, 2012. Start collecting those pictures today. Your pet may be the next Pet Celebrity of Martin County.

Health department provides back-to-school vaccines Summer is quickly passing us by; it will only be a few weeks until school is back in session. Now is the perfect time to think about the shots your student may need before they go back to school in the fall. Kindergarten or first-time first grade students, 6th grade students and college students may need immunizations before they can begin classes this fall. The Martin County Health Department conducts immunization clinics every Wednesday from 8:30 a.m. to 12 p.m. and from 12:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. On the first Wednesday of each month the clinic remains open until 6 p.m. Please note that Wednesday is the only day a nurse is available for immunizations. The health department office is located in the Shoals Federal Building (Post Office). The Martin County Health Department has a contract with a company called VaxCare which will enable them to vaccinate children who are covered by insurance that pays for vaccines. VaxCare will provide the department with vaccine and will bill the patient’s insurance for the cost. The patient must bring their insurance card at every visit or no vaccines can be given on that day. The health department will continue to vaccinate children on Medicaid, the uninsured and those who have insurance that does not pay for vaccines through the Vaccines for Children (VFC) program. They also provide Tetanus vaccine; Hepatitis A and B vaccine and TB testing to those age 19 and older without insurance for a fee. Adults with insurance that will pay for vaccines may be able to receive certain vaccines and have VaxCare bill their insurance. If you need additional information or if you have questions, call 247-3303. College students should receive information from their school concerning the required vaccines for incoming students. Most require a TB test within six months of the start of classes, a Tetanus booster (if the child has not received within the last 10 years). Also, proof of childhood vaccines for MMR and polio are often needed. The Hepatitis B series is recommended for students in health care fields or similar studies. The meningitis vaccine is recommended for students who will be living in dorms. For children that will be attending kindergarten or first grade this fall (less than seven years of age) the immunization requirements are as follows: -5 doses of DTaP, DTP, or pediatric diphtheria-tetanus vaccine (DT), or 4 doses are

acceptable if the 4th dose was administered on or after the 4th birthday; -4 doses of any combination of OPV or IPV by age 4-6, or 3 doses of all IPV or OPV are acceptable if the 3rd dose was administered on or after the 4th birthday; -2 doses of MMR, measles, mumps and rubella (German Measles) vaccine on or after the first birthday; -3 doses of hepatitis B vaccine, and -2 doses of Varicella (Chicken Pox) on or after the first birthday or record of disease. Physician documentation of disease history, including month and year, is proof of immunity for children entering preschool, kindergarten and 1st grade. A signed statement from the parent/guardian indicating history of disease, including month and year is required for children in grades 2-12. In addition to those immunizations required for kindergarten, 6th grade students are required to receive a Tdap (Tetanus and Pertussis) vaccine and a Meningococcal vaccine. Those 6th grade students who have not received a chickenpox booster shot will need to have it before the start of the school year.

Classes, programs at the Martin County Learning Center USAJOBS WORKSHOP - USAJOBS is the federal government’s official website for Crane job announcement opportunities. Course contents include USAJOBS job announcements and Knowledge, Skills, Abilities (KSAs), how to post a resume online, and identifying personal skills to highlight on a resume or during the interview. Prerequisite: Participants should have general computer knowledge. Instructor: Darlene Ridgway, Bramble Consulting. Price is $40 per applicant for the two-hour session (6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.). The workshop includes a resume assistance booklet and handouts. The next workshop will be July 12, 2012. Please call or e-mail Kris at the learning center to register. Free Tutoring - Free tutoring for reading, writing, math, English, life skills, pre-GED, and GED. Call Martin County SOAR at 812-709-1618 (toll free throughout Martin County) or e-mail martincountysoar@hotmail.com Learning Center Contact - Kris Beasley, Coordinator, 812-295-2674 or e-mail kbeasley10@ivytech.edu Office Hours - Monday through Thursday 4-9 p.m. and Friday by appointment only.

Cinderella

-Photo provided

Actors Community Theatre will present the musical Cinderella in Jasper starting this weekend, Friday July 13, 14, and 15 and next weekend July 20, 21, and 22. Show times are 7:30 p.m. on Friday and Saturday and 2 p.m. on Sunday. Two kids from Loogootee are in the production, Curtis Slaubaugh, the son of Myron and Charlotte Slaubaugh and Chantel greene, the daughter of Don and Donna greene. Curtis will be playing the French horn in the orchestra and Chantel is in the performance as townspeople/chorus. This is Chantel’s second performance with A.C.T. The actors and organizers of the musical have been working on the production since end of May. The musical will be held at the Jasper Community Arts Center on the campus of VUJC. Tickets are available at the door and are $10 for Friday and Saturday and $8 on Sunday.

Calendar of Events Drought meeting A Forage and Livestock Drought Management Meeting will be held Thursday July 12 at 1 p.m. at the Springville Feeder Auction and 7 p.m. at the Little York Auction Facility. A Purdue Forage and Beef Specialist will be on hand to present programs and answer drought related questions. Farm Service Agency personnel will also be there to answer questions. For questions contact Dave Redman at the Purdue Extension Office: 812-275-4623. Loogootee School Board meeting The Loogootee School Board will meet Tuesday, July 17 at 7 p.m. in the meeting room off the superintendent’s office. Items on the agenda include bread and milk bids, cafeteria prices, and personnel actions. The meeting is open to the public. Divine Chiropractic 1st anniversary In appreciation for your patronage and in celebration of their one year anniversary of the opening of Divine Chiropractic, Dr. Jordan Divine and staff will be hosting a Customer Appreciation Dinner on Saturday, July 28 from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Divine Chiropractic located at 404 N. John F. Kennedy Avenue, Loogootee. For further information or to arrange an appointment, you may contact Divine Chiropractic at 812-295-5600. 30-year reunion, LHS Class of 1982 The LHS Class of 1982 will hold their 30year class reunion on July 14, at the American Legion Country Club starting at 6 p.m. Meat, tea, and lemonade will be provided. Please bring a covered dish, appetizer, dessert, etc. D J Dave and Linda will start at 7 p.m. Invitations have been mailed. Contact Brenda Coulter at loogooteehs1982@yahoo.com with questions.

gED classes GED classes are being held at WorkOne in Loogootee on Monday, Tuesday, and Thursday from 4 to 7 p.m. Potential students can contact Vicki Conrad through email at vickiconrad@ymail.com for questions. There is a minimum requirement of 12 hours per student once they enroll in class, but actual time in class varies with each student. The class is free and is sponsored through Vincennes University. Students wishing to enroll need to visit WorkOne at 4 p.m. on Monday, Tuesday, or Thursday. SOAR Tutoring The Martin County SOAR board meets on the second Tuesday of every month at 9 a.m. in the Martin County Learning Center at the fairgrounds. The meetings are open to the public, and anyone is invited to attend. SOAR provides free tutoring in reading, writing, English, math, GED prep, and life skills. Call 812.709.1618 or email martincountysoar@hotmail.com for more information. Solid waste board The Martin County Solid Waste Board holds their monthly meetings on the third Wednesday of each month at 6 p.m. at the recycling center located at 500 Industrial Park Drive in Loogootee. The meetings are open to the public and anyone is invited to attend. Humane society meetings The Martin County Humane Society meets on the third Tuesday of the month at Loogootee Municipal Building, at 7 p.m. To become a member, contact Martin County Humane Society, P. O. Box 537, Shoals, Indiana 47581, call Don at 296-0952. Tourism meetings The MCCC Tourism Committee meets on the second Wednesday of each month at 7 p.m. in the Martin County Community Learning Center on the fairgrounds. Soil and Water meetings The Martin County SWCD meets the third Monday of the month at the SWCD office located at Martin County Learning Center. Office hours for the district are 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. weekdays except Thursdays when it is closed. Visit www.martinswcd. com or call at 295-3149.


Wednesday, July 11, 2012

Martin County Journal

Hoosiers still have time to get share of Skechers $40 million settlement Indiana Attorney General Greg Zoeller and the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) encourage consumers who purchased Skechers rocker-bottom shoes to apply for their slice of the recent $40 million settlement. In May, Indiana along with the FTC and 43 other states filed a settlement with Skechers USA, Inc. for falsely claiming its shoes caused consumers to lose weight. Those who purchased the company’s line of Shape-ups, Tone-ups or Resistance Runners after August 1, 2008, are eligible to obtain a partial refund. Consumers can apply for a refund by visiting www.skecherssettlement.com or calling 866-325-4186. According to the FTC, hundreds of thousands of claims have already been submitted, but no refunds will be distributed until after the claims period ends – a date that has not yet been determined. “Settlements between companies and the states can provide unique opportunities for consumers who feel they have been ripped off to receive full or partial refunds,� Zoeller said. “Hoosiers should know that submitting a claim is easy and free.� A separate settlement was reached with RealNetworks, Inc. which is an online digital services company that offers subscriptions to games, video and music through free trial offers. According to the agreement between the company and the state of Washington, customers nationwide signed

up for free trials, but were unknowingly signed up and charged for monthly subscriptions via pre-checked boxes on the online sign-up form. The settlement provides for a $2 million claims-based pool to provide full restitution for consumers who were victimized. Indiana consumers can make a claim if, at any time between January 1, 2007 and December 31, 2009, they were enrolled in one of RealNetworks’ paid subscription products and contend that the enrollment occurred without their consent or knowledge. Paid subscription products included in this program are SuperPass, GamePass, FunTicket, FunPass and Rhapsody. Also, consumers are eligible for a refund if they contacted RealNetworks’ customer service representatives to cancel a subscription to one of the products, but were unsuccessful, resulting in unwanted charges after the cancellation attempt. Consumers who were unknowingly signed up should receive an email or postcard indicating that they are eligible for a refund. Consumers who believe they are eligible should visit www.realnetworksrestitution.com to submit a claim before the August 22 deadline. Zoeller warned consumers who shop online should be cautious when signing up for free trial offers and read the fine print carefully. Many companies offer free trials which can rapidly result in monthly charges – unless consumers take quick action.

page 9

The Messmer Report By District 63 State Representative

Mark Messmer

4-H offers more than just fairs to our community For years, my family and I have enjoyed participating in 4-H events. And I know that for many people in our community, going to our local county and 4-H Fairs is a tradition that they enjoy every year. I believe this is partially because we know that 4-H is an excellent organization that offers leadership and educational programs to the youth in our communities and gives back to the areas they are based in. Nationally, 4-H is considered a premier youth organization and is the largest in the United States. In Indiana, 4-H programs are supported by Purdue University, which also hosts top-notch agricultural services for farmers across the state. In addition, 4-H offers hands-on experiences to children of all ages in order to teach them life-long skills such as leadership, citizenship, communication, and decision- making. Their motto and mission are to “learn by doing� and “to make the best better.� In my time living in Southern Indiana, I have witnessed the many benefits 4-H programs offer to our youth. If you have the chance

to make it to one of the fairs this year, or have participated in a 4-H program before, I’m sure you’ve witnessed the positive impact they have. This year, the County and 4-H Fair in Dubois County is July 14-21, in Pike County it is July 22-28, in Martin County it is July 20-24 and the 4-H Fair in Daviess County is July 14-20. The many activities they provide every year are fun for people of all ages. I remember my children when they were younger loved to see the animals, and even now they will ride the carnival rides, watch the demo derby, tractor pulls and pig wrestling. Our kids have enjoyed participating in a variety of 4-H programs over the years, and have learned greatly from it. 4-H is full of tradition, and the fair is a great example of the excellent values and fun learning experiences they offer to everyone. So, I hope you take the time to visit one of our county 4-H fairs. Thank you for your continued support and, as always, if you have any questions or concerns I can be reached by phone at 317232-9671 or by e-mail at H63@in.gov.

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National employment situation for June Nonfarm payroll employment continued to edge up in June (+80,000), and the unemployment rate was unchanged at 8.2 percent, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported last week. Professional and business services added jobs, and employment in other major industries changed little over the month. Household Survey Data - The number of unemployed persons (12.7 million) was essentially unchanged in June, and the unemployment rate held at 8.2 percent. Among the major worker groups, the unemployment rate for blacks (14.4 percent) edged up over the month, while the rates for adult men (7.8 percent), adult women (7.4 percent), teenagers (23.7 percent), whites (7.4 percent), and Hispanics (11.0 percent) showed little or no change. The jobless rate for Asians was 6.3 percent in June (not seasonally adjusted), little changed from a year earlier. In June, the number of long-term unemployed (those jobless for 27 weeks and over) was essentially unchanged at 5.4 million. These individuals accounted for 41.9 percent of the unemployed. Both the civilian labor force participation rate and the employment-population ratio were unchanged in June at 63.8 and 58.6 percent, respectively. The number of persons employed part time for economic reasons (sometimes referred to as involuntary part-time workers) was essentially unchanged at 8.2 million. These individuals were working part time because their hours had been cut back or because they were unable to find a full-time job. In June, 2.5 million persons were marginally attached to the labor force, down from 2.7 million a year earlier. (These data are not seasonally adjusted.) These individuals were not in the labor force, wanted and were available for work, and had looked for a job sometime in the prior 12 months. They were not counted as unemployed because they had not searched for work in the 4 weeks preceding the survey. Among the marginally attached, there were 821,000 discouraged workers in June, a decline of 161,000 from a year earlier. (These data are not seasonally adjusted.) Discouraged workers are persons not currently looking for work because they believe no jobs are available for them. The remaining 1.7 million persons marginally attached to the labor force in June had not searched for work in the 4 weeks preceding the sur-

vey for reasons such as school attendance or family responsibilities. Establishment Survey Data - Total nonfarm payroll employment continued to edge up in June (+80,000). In the second quarter, employment growth averaged 75,000 per month, compared with an average monthly gain of 226,000 for the first quarter of the year. Slower job growth in the second quarter occurred in most major industries. Professional and business services added 47,000 jobs in June, with temporary help services accounting for 25,000 of the increase. Employment also rose in management and technical consulting services (+9,000) and in computer systems design and related services (+7,000). Employment in professional and business services has grown by 1.5 million since its most recent low point in September 2009. Employment in manufacturing continued to edge up in June (+11,000). Growth in the second quarter averaged 10,000 per month, compared with an average of 41,000 per month during the first quarter. In June, employment increased in motor vehicles and parts (+7,000) and in fabricated metal products (+5,000). Employment continued to trend up in health care (+13,000) and wholesale trade (+9,000) in June. Employment in other major industries, including mining and logging, construction, retail trade, transportation and warehousing, financial activities, leisure and hospitality, and government, showed little or no change. The average workweek for all employees on private nonfarm payrolls edged up by 0.1 hour to 34.5 hours in June. The manufacturing workweek edged up by 0.1 hour to 40.7 hours, and factory overtime was 3.3 hours for the fifth consecutive month. The average workweek for production and nonsupervisory employees on private nonfarm payrolls edged up by 0.1 hour to 33.8 hours. In June, average hourly earnings for all employees on private nonfarm payrolls increased by 6 cents to $23.50. Over the year, average hourly earnings have increased by 2.0 percent. In June, average hourly earnings of private-sector production and nonsupervisory employees increased by 5 cents to $19.74. The change in total nonfarm payroll employment for April was revised from +77,000 to +68,000, and the change for May was revised from +69,000 to +77,000.

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page 10

Martin County Journal

Wednesday, July 11, 2012

Purdue physicists part of discovery of new particle that could be Higgs boson Bortoletto and Shipsey led the camera design and assembly teams. Purdue physics professors Virgil Barnes and Laszlo Gutay contributed key design features to two major components of the detector: the Hadron calorimeters, which detect showers of particles coming from high energy quarks; and the Muon detectors, which detect heavy relatives of the electron. Bortoletto also is the upgrade coordinator of the U.S. CMS and is responsible for coordinating the 47 U.S. universities working to upgrade the CMS camera. In addition, Purdue physics professors Matthew Jones, David Miller and Norbert Neumeister are part of the international CMS team, and 20 other Purdue personnel, including engineers, scientists, post-doctoral researchers, graduate students and undergraduates have participated in the experiment. Neumeister, with close collaboration from Purdue’s information technology group, also is contributing to the global distributed computing system that analyzed the data from the experiments. The Purdue CMS “Tier 2” data storage and processing center is the largest one of its kind among U.S. universities. Bortoletto has been involved in several of the analyses searching for the Higgs boson, and Neumeister and Shipsey have been involved in the internal reviewing process. Higgs bosons, if they exist, are short-lived and quickly decay into other particles. Because scientists cannot look directly for the particle, its discovery relies on observations of excess amounts of the particles into which it can decay. However, just as making change for a one-dollar bill can be done using different combinations of coins, Higgs bosons can decay into different combinations of particles. Bortoletto’s group looked for evidence of specific subatomic particles that would result from one possible decay of a Higgs boson. To avoid any possible bias while analyzing new data and ensure objectivity when looking for much sought-after signs of new physics, physicists draw “blinds” over the region where an excess of decay events is expected, Bortoletto said. This region is only “unblended” when they are satisfied enough with their procedures to give confidence in the ultimate result. “The moment the analysis was unblinded was amazing,” Bortoletto said. “The excess at 125.3 GeV was easy to see, and we felt as though a major discovery was appearing in front of us. The statistical significance achieved was enough to be classified as a discovery. The probability of the background alone fluctuating by this amount is one in three million.” CMS reported observations consistent with expectations for the Standard Model Higgs boson. The results were found with a statistical significance of 4.9 sigma, a unit

By ELIZABETH K. gARDNER Purdue University News Service Purdue University scientists were part of a historical event this 4th of July as scientists working on the biggest international experiment in particle physics history announced the discovery of a new particle that may be the long-sought Higgs boson. Purdue’s particle physics group has been a part of the more than two-decade search for the elusive particle, which could confirm the Standard Model of physics and provide insight into how the universe formed. Daniela Bortoletto, the Edward Purcell Distinguished Professor of Physics, and Ian Shipsey, the Julian Schwinger Distinguished Professor of Physics, attended the announcement at the European Organization for Nuclear Research, or CERN, laboratory in Geneva, Switzerland. “On a day where fireworks lit up skies across America, the world of science unveiled explosive news concerning the longtime elusive Higgs boson particle,” said Shipsey, who also is the co-coordinator of the Large Hadron Collider Physics Center at Fermilab, near Chicago, and was recently elected chair of the Compact Muon Solenoid Collaboration Board at CERN. “More data are needed to establish whether this new particle has all the properties of the Standard Model Higgs boson or whether some do not match, which would imply new physics beyond the Standard Model. Either way we’ve discovered one more key to unlock the mysteries of the universe.” The announcement was received with cheers during a joint seminar at CERN and the ICHEP Conference in Melbourne, Australia. The results came from experiments using the largest machine ever built by mankind, the 27 kilometer-long Large Hadron Collider or LHC. Superconducting magnets that drive the collider are kept at 1.9 Kelvins, colder than outer space, and billions of protons traveling near the speed of light collide at the world record energy of 8 trillion electron volts. The energy of these collisions transforms into tiny subatomic particles, which may never have been seen before and some of which live for only onetrillionth-of-one-trillionth of a second. The Compact Muon Solenoid is one of three detectors at the LHC that captures traces of these tiny particles. It is, in essence, a 14,000-ton camera the size of a four-story office building that almost completely surrounds one section of the collider and takes up to 40 million pictures every second. Purdue scientists and students contributed to the design and construction of several key parts of the CMS camera, the software used to operate camera and analyze the collisions, and have contributed to a variety of key measurements with the data.

Purdue University professors Ian Shipsey and Daniela Bortoletto stand with Edinburgh University professors Alan Walker and Peter Higgs at CERN. Purdue scientists were part of the team of scientists who announced on July 4 the discovery of a new particle that may be the Higgs boson. Higgs is the professor for whom the particle is named and was the first to suggest the particle as the mechanism that gives mass to matter. Pictured from left are Walker, Shipsey, Higgs, Bortoletto. (Purdue University photo/courtesy of Bortoletto) some of which we are really hoping to find at the LHC,” Barnes said. “It is not impossible that our new particle could be, for exone of the postulated ample, supersymmetric Higgses.” The Higgs boson is named after Peter Higgs, a professor of physics at the University of Edinburgh, who first suggested the particle as the mechanism that gives mass to matter. Shipsey was a graduate student at the University of Edinburgh and attended classes taught by Higgs. This announceAn illustration of a particle collision ment was the first time Shipsey had seen measured by the CMS detector. (Image Higgs in 20 years. “Peter was a brilliant teacher and all the courtesy of CERN) students were in awe of him,” Shipsey said. of standard deviation, which means scien“However, he is an extremely modest pertists are 99.99997 percent certain of the disson and is somewhat embarrassed that the covery. particle carries his name. It was wonderful The Standard Model of particle physics to see him again and share this moment describes the basic building blocks of matwith him.” ter and their interactions, and its explanaThe LHC continues to deliver new data at tions of elementary particles and forces an impressive rate. By the end of 2012, have held true through more than four CMS hopes to have more than triple its total decades of experimental testing. The Higgs current data sample. These data will enable boson remains the only missing piece of the CMS to further elucidate the nature of this model and, without it the critical component newly observed particle. They will also of how these particles obtain mass cannot allow CMS to extend the reach of their be explained. many other searches for new physics, Bor“The Standard Model Higgs would tidily toletto said. complete the Standard Model of particles and forces,” Barnes said. “However, the very precise and successful Standard Model does not explain all that we have observed.” It does not give us guidance on how to unify gravity with the other known forces of nature, explain why there are exactly three pairs of quarks and three generations of leptons or explain why the third generations are some ten-thousand times heavier than the first generations, he said. “There are some very appealing theories involving a whole host of new particles,

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Wednesday, July 11, 2012

Martin County Journal

page 11

Martin County Humane Society

SPECIAL FEATURE

Looking to adopt a dog? The Martin County Humane Society may have that pet you are looking for. Take a look at the pooches up for adoption below. If interested or would like to meet one of these dogs, call the number located below the photograph. &

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Coco - Female Lab mix - 1 year old Call Don greene at 812-296-0952.

Woody - Male Lab mix 1 1/2 years old, neutered Call Sandy Sherfick at 812-295-3388.

Charlie - Male Coon Hound 7 years old Call Sandy Sherfick at 812-295-3388.

Shadow - Male Lab mix 8 months old Call Courtney Hughett at 812-259-4309.

Bailey - Female german Shepherd mix 4 and 1/2 months old Call Sandy Sherfick at 812-295-3388.

Jager - Male Pom/Beagle mix 1 year old, neutered Call Sandy Sherfick at 812-295-3388.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;A dog is the only thing on earth that loves you more than he loves himself.â&#x20AC;? -Josh Billings

Misty - Female Shih-Tzu mix 8 months old Call Don greene at 812-296-0952.

Lady - Female Pointer 3 years old Call Don greene at 812-296-0952.

Male Shih Tzu mix 1 year old Call Courtney Hughett

Zoey Female german Shepard mix 1 1/2 years old Call Courtney Hughett at 812-259-4309.

Journal 071112  

Martin County Journal July 11, 2012 issue

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