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“Celebrating the rich history of Martin County and the people who make it great”

Martin County

JOURNAL

Year Three, Issue Six

Wednesday, February 8, 2012

12 Pages

Council fields questions on solid waste; judge learning budget set-up public hearings. He said once that is done it should come to the commissioners or council. Fuhrman asked why the solid waste district Hazel Fuhrman approached the Martin County Council Monday night, February 6 needs $600,000 each year to operate and asking questions about the $24 user fee the why they can give so much money away to Solid Waste District wants to impose. She county projects. Council member Hawkins suggested asked how this got started. Council member Fuhrman attend a Rich Summers told her solid waste meeting to “We’ve been weaning them that last year the county council cut the back and now they don’t have the ask those questions. Council member tax rate for the solid excess funds,” Summers said, noting waste from $131,000 -Photo provided -County Council Member that he may not be to $88,000. He said Warren Albright on the completely correct on Lorri Zeller, mother of basketball players Luke, tyler, and Cody Zeller, was the that this year the state solid waste tax levy his information, that if guest speaker at the Shoals Lady Rox Basketball Banquet last week. Mrs. Zeller tried to pass a bill that spoke to the girls about the importance of teamwork, motivation, and other life skills. would cut tax rates for Amendment 8 of SenIn the front row, from left to right, are Megan Sanders, Michaela Brockman, guest solid waste districts completely causing the ate Bill 210 gets passed it would do away speaker Lorri Zeller, Rachel Harder and Kelsey Hardwick. In the back row, left to recycling centers to be self-sustaining. He with the solid waste board and all business right, are girls’ basketball assistant coach tom Sowders, coach Matt Sowders and said that bill didn’t pass last week but it may would be reverted to the county council. January Roush. Fuhrman asked if the county should have come up again. He said the user fee would take the place of the tax levy which would to support the solid waste if those whom utistill be collected just not given to the recy- lized the recycling center already pay for the cling center. Summers said that the $88,000 services. She said they should raise their own would be used for other county departments prices instead of imposing fees on the entire county. distributed from the general fund. Fuhrman and council member Stoll said Council member Lonnie Hawkins said that any new tax could not be approved without that a lot of money has been given away by the recycling center, so they have excess. ing as the county’s veteran service officer the consent of the commissioners and county BY COURtNEY HUGHEtt Discussion ensued on the gifted money and council. He said the solid waste board was being vacated by Eugene Wilcoxen. TramMartin County Journal Publisher (See ‘COUNCIL’ on page two) baugh said he served with the United States only getting the ball rolling by setting up Clerk Julie Fithian returned to the Martin Army from 1970-1971 and was also emCounty Commissioners Tuesday night, Feb- ployed at Crane for 40 years. The commisruary 7 to get the okay on the buildings pro- sioners approved Trambaugh to take the posed for the combining of polling sites. position and noted that his phone number The commissioners first heard of the com- will be made available to the public soon. Highway Superintendent Jim Williams bining of the polling sites at their last meeting and wanted to hold off on the approval brought the commissioners a photo of a to get public feedback. The sites would be county bridge on Deep Cut Lake Road that reduced from 14 to 8. The county’s election they had been destroyed last Friday. board already approved the site combining Williams said a semi crossed the bridge however the commissioners were tasked with a larger load than the nine-ton limit with approving the polling site buildings and caused irreversible damage. Williams chosen. Commissioner Paul George said he said he has not received a police report on had received one phone call in opposition the incident and is at a standstill until he has with the caller stating they felt it would be it. The bridge is 62-feet long and a total loss. an inconvenience to voters although the Williams said that a bridge of close to the caller understood the money saving oppor- same size that was recently replaced in the tunity. Fithian said that she had received no county cost around $170,000 which does complaints. She added that after speaking not include the roadwork. The commissionto her vendors, the county will save $24,000 ers agreed that they needed to see the police on equipment alone per election or $48,000 report and speak to the insurance company per year. The commissioners approved the before proceeding. They did however state -Photo provided that it would be several months before the building choices. Shown above, in the center, is Bill Whorrall, honored with the Martin County Tom Trambaugh came before the com- bridge could be replaced and re-opened. Chamber of Commerce’s “Gene Shaw Citizen of the Year” award. At left is Marie missioners stating he was interested in serv- (See ‘COMMISSIONERS’, page three) Hawkins, chamber vice president, and at right is Nancy Steiner, chamber president.

BY COURtNEY HUGHEtt Martin County Journal Publisher

Mrs. Zeller . . .

Commissioners okay polling sites and talk bridge repairs

Immunization changes at health department

The Martin County Health Department has a contract with a company called VaxCare which will enable them to vaccinate children who are covered by insurance that pays for vaccines. VaxCare will provide the vaccine and will bill the patient’s insurance for the cost. The patient must bring their insurance card at every visit or no vaccines can be given on that day. The health department will continue to vaccinate children on Medicaid, the uninsured, and those who have insurance that does not pay for vaccines through the Vaccines for Children (VFC) program. The de-

partment also provides Tetanus vaccine; Hepatitis A and B vaccine and TB testing to those age 19 and older without insurance for a fee. Adults with insurance that will pay for vaccines may be able to receive certain vaccines and have VaxCare bill their insurance. Immunization Clinic Hours are every Wednesday from 8:30 to noon and 12:30 to 4:30 p.m. The first Wednesday of each month the clinic is open until 6 pm. Please note that Wednesday is the only day a nurse is available for immunizations. If you have questions, please contact 2473303.

Whorrall named ‘Citizen of the Year’ The Martin County Chamber of Commerce held their annual dinner meeting on Thursday, February 2 at the Martin County Community Building. The guest speaker was Mrs. Linda Klinck from Logansport, who spoke to an impressive crowd of over 100 on the importance of identifying what makes Martin County unique and the role each person has in inspiring growth. The third annual “Gene Shaw Citizen of the Year” award was given to Bill Whorrall for pictorial representation of the area in his

books over the past several years. Marie Hawkins nominated Whorrall for the award and introduced him that night by reading her nomination letter in which many of Mr. Whorrall’s very impressive accomplishments were listed. The chamber would like to thank Jolene McAtee of Jolene’s Decorating for beautifully decorating the tables, Carla Harner of Carla’s Catering and Creations for catering a delicious meal and Joel Weitkamp and Betsy Graves for providing music during the evening.

www.martincountyjournal.com • info@martincountyjournal.com • 812-259-4309 • Fax: 877–471–2907


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Martin County Journal

COUNCIL

Chamber Annual Dinner -Photos provided A crowd of more than 100 people, as shown above, attended the Martin County Chamber of Commerce Annual Dinner last thursday night at the community building. this year’s guest speaker Linda Klinck, at right, spoke to the crowd about the uniqueness of Martin County and the role each resident plays in its growth. the event was catered by Carla’s Catering and Creations.

Primary filing deadline Friday Candidate filings for the 2012 Primary Election are now open. The last day to file is Friday, February 10 at noon. The school board elections have been moved to the general election this year. Candidate filings are not currently open for school board candidate filings. The following is a list of seats up for election this year. Listed after each one is the person who currently holds that position. Those who have filed to run for the open positions to date is listed underneath. For more information call the Martin County Clerk’s Office at 812-247-3651. AUDITOR - (currently held by Nancy Steiner) January Roush (D) COMMISSIONER DISTRICT 1 (currently held by John Wininger) Kevin R. Boyd (R) Eric N. Cooper (D) COMMISSIONER DISTRICT 3 (currently held by Dan Gregory) Dan Gregory (R) CORONER (currently held by Mark J. Franklin) Mark J. Franklin (D) COUNTY COUNCIL AT-LARGE three seats open (currently held by Warren Albright, Floyd “Lonnie” Hawkins, and Richard Summers) all three seats are county-wide. Richard Summers (D) Warren D. Albright (R) Floyd “Lonnie” Hawkins (D) RECORDER (currently held by Gerald D. Montgomery) Gerald D. Montgomery (R) Mitchell Green (D) SURVEYOR (currently held by Paul

Sanders) Paul Sanders TREASURER (currently held by Diana M. Schutte) Vicki D. Boyd (D) PRECINCT COMMITTEEMEN East Memphis Earl Boyd, Jr. (R) West Memphis Gerald D. Montgomery (R) Perry 1 Richard Taylor (D) Perry 2 - No filings to date Perry 3 Brian Boyd (R) Perry 4 - No filings to date Perry 5 - No filings to date Perry 6 - No filings to date Perry 7 - No filings to date Crane - No filings to date Rutherford - No filings to date Lost River Phillip Emmons (R) Mitcheltree - No filings to date North Center Kenneth L. Brett (R) South Center - No filings to date North Halbert William R. Shaw (R) South Halbert Gerald D. Montgomery (R) Southeast Halbert Marcia A. Lewis (R) STATE CONVENTION DELEGATES - 4 at-large Republican seats, 4 at-large Democrat seats Kevin R. Boyd (R) Gerald D. Montgomery (R) Warren D. Albright (R) Floyd “Lonnie” Hawkins (D)

(Continued from page one) it was noted that this is one reason the tax levy was reduced. Council member Lynn Gee told Fuhrman that the recycling center funded many things that would have never happened otherwise because the county didn’t have the money. “Or maybe you could do without it,” said Fuhrman. Gee replied by asking if the county could do without road signs. The recycling center picked up the tab on the 911 road signs that according to council member Hawkins was going to be mandated by the state. He said that they would have put up the signs regardless and then sent the county a bill. Council member Warren Albright said that the recycling center did have money several years ago to give away to county-related projects however over the years the council has cut them back continuously. “We’ve been weaning them back and now they don’t have the excess funds,” he said. Council member Hawkins again suggested that Fuhrman attend the next solid waste meeting to ask these questions. In other business, Judge Lynne Ellis spoke to the council regarding her budget. She said that she is trying to understand it all and is working with past year’s budgets along with the 89-page budget manual. She said that she was recently questioned by a council member about purchasing benches for the courtroom without consent from the council or asking the historical society to use the benches from the old courthouse. She wanted it known that she did ask the historical society and they denied her request but in hindsight she should have come to the council prior to the purchase. Ellis then told the council that a representative with the state board of accounts informed her that appointing legal counsel without money available in her budget is a crime. The county council appropriated $20,000 for legal counsel this year. Ellis said that last year $120,000 was spent which came out of five different county funds including Rainy Day. A portion of the public defender fees are reimbursed by the state. Ellis said that $8,300 was not reported in the third quarter last year causing the county to lose $2,500 in reimbursements. “That’s unacceptable to me. I mean I am on the line and expected to stay within my budget and to lose $2,500 because we say $20,000 is what we’re going to put in the public defender fund makes me look bad, makes us all look bad,” she said. She added that there have been comments made about how much money she is asking for and that she needs to stay within her budget. “I’m doing my best to work together with everyone and it’s been very difficult to get a grasp on this budget,” she said. She said she has a bachelor’s degree in accounting and has done it for 30 years but she’s required help from the state board of accounts and the Indiana Department of Corrections Accounts for her to figure out what is going on. She told Auditor Steiner that she would like a report at the end of each month of what each of her accounts contain, including community corrections, probation, and circuit court, whether any money was spent or not, so they know how much money they have. She added that to eliminate confusion, she would like a lump sum put into the supplemental public defender fund and not have to use five or more funds. Ellis then told the council that she encumbered $1,800 to Beachy Woodworking to refinish the tables in the courtroom. She said that now she knows she should have come to the council to inform them that she would be

Wednesday, February 8, 2012

taking an additional amount of $1,500 from the probation user fund to capital outlay. She said that appropriation will be coming to them now. “I wanted you guys to know up front, the $1,800 has already been encumbered and they’re going to start the work in a couple weeks,” she said. She added that it was not her goal to spend the county’s money but to bring it in saying that she thinks her office brought in $200,000 last year. She said she is understanding the process more now and what needs to be brought to the council and what doesn’t. Judge Ellis also reported to the council that the transition of the county’s email to Google Apps has been completed. She said that all county employees, including elected officials, should now have a martincounty.in.gov email address and if not they should contact RTC Communications. Clerk Julie Fithian came before the council to see about getting new computers for her office. She said she had a quote from Computer Systems, Inc. (CSI) for $13,900 which would be for 10 computers and four printers. She said she is $1,600 short in her budget. Council member Lynn Gee asked Auditor Steiner where they could take from out of the county budget. Steiner replied that until the budget is approved by the state she is unable to say. Council member Randy Wininger asked Fithian if she could do with less. Fithian replied that she could purchase less but she was hoping to replace all the equipment at one time so she could be done with it. Judge Lynne Ellis spoke up saying that she is unsure what kind of printers Fithian needs but offered four new printers, two of which are still in the box, that she said were ordered by the previous administration. Fithian said, if those printers will work, it would knock $2,400 off her quote from CSI. The council agreed to allow Fithian to purchase the computers if no additional money would be required outside of her clerk budget. Fithian said she would look at the printers the judge has and see if they will work for her office. Moments later Judge Ellis said she would have to go back on her offer as she needs to keep one of the unboxed printers for her own office. Highway Superintendent Jim Williams told the council that when he received his budget he noticed that $30,000 was cut from his payroll. Auditor Steiner explained that since the highway department was short at the end of 2011 in making payroll and the budget was worked out in July of last year, the shortage was probably a result. She said the council wouldn’t have known in July of the end-of-the-year shortage. Williams said he wanted to make the council aware so when he came to them for additional funding this year it wasn’t a surprise. The council approved Donna Hawkins to serve on the park and recreation board.

6

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3 Wednesday, February 8, 2012

OBITUARIES

DEACON JOSEPH StURGIS Deacon Joseph V. Sturgis died at 10:15 a.m. Wednesday, February 1, 2012 at Hillside Manor Nursing Home in Washington. A resident of Loogootee, he was 78. He was born February 27, 1933, in Runnemede, New Jersey; the son of James F. and Mary (McAndrews) Sturgis. He married Theresa M. (Erb) Sturgis on August 13, 1955 and she preceded him in death on December 31, 2002. He was a member of St. John Catholic Church, a lifetime member of the Loogootee Knights of Columbus and a U.S. Army veteran of the Korean War. He was a graduate of West Philadelphia Catholic Boys High School and was also a graduate of Rutgers University in Camden, New Jersey. Joseph was a retired comptroller with Naval Surface Warfare Center Crane and was ordained a deacon in the Catholic Church in May 1978. He was assigned to St. Thomas Catholic Church in Vincennes for 11 years and to St. John Catholic Church in Loogootee for 17 years. He is survived by one daughter, Mary T. Sturgis of Elnora; one son, Joseph V. Sturgis of Elnora; four grandchildren; and nine great-grandchildren. He was also preceded in death by his parents and one daughter, Kathleen C. Drake.\ A Mass of Christian Burial was celebrated Saturday, February 4 at St. John Catholic Church in Loogootee. The main celebrant was Bishop Charles C. Thompson of the Diocese of Evansville, along with

priests and deacons of the Diocese. Burial was in St. John Catholic Cemetery, with military graveside services conducted by the American Legion and V.F.W. Online condolences may be made at www.brocksmithblakefuneralhomes.com. FREDERICK tAYLOR Frederick D. Taylor passed away at 12:40 p.m. on February 1, 2012 at Daviess Community Hospital. A resident of Shoals, he was 84. He was born November 23, 1927 in Indian Springs; the son of Henry M. and Della Abigail (Chastain) Taylor. He married Betty Runyon on August 24, 1952, and she preceded him in death on October 6, 1964. Fred retired as a fork lift operator from United States Gypsum. He is survived by one daughter, Gloria Jean Taylor of Shoals; two sisters, Sylvia and Carl Rush of Dover Hill and Lois June and Robert Conklin of Dover Hill; three brothers, Gerald Max and Lina Taylor of Sana Maria, California, Henry “Hank” Taylor Jr. of Loogootee, and Roger D. and Connie Taylor of Elnora; several nieces, nephews and cousins. He was preceded in death by his parents, wife, two sisters, Julia Kathleen Litton and Emily Halajean Silver; his twin brother, William Eugene; and brother, James Eldon Taylor. A funeral service was held Saturday, February 4 at Queen-Lee Funeral Home in

COMMISSIONERS

(Continued from page one) Williams also updated the commissioners on bridge 62 on Spout Springs Road that has an outer beam that has cracked. The county’s bridge inspector had suggested narrowing the bridge by two feet, from 21 feet to 19, which would prevent vehicles from driving over the outer portion of the bridge and causing further damage. The bridge has been damaged for several years according to older inspection reports. Williams said that he spoke with a contractor who said the cost to replace the beam would be $12,000 and the cost to bring in a crane to set it would be $15,000. Williams also reported that his department received $16,744 in FEMA and INDOT money from the flood damage last spring. He also told commissioners that one of the department’s 2002 trucks lost a transmission on Tuesday however he has no further information on what the problem is at this time. The commissioners accepted both bids for the log jam/debris removal in Lost River. Rainey Construction, of Bedford, was awarded the bid for the Indian Creek site and CLR Incorporated, of Bloomington, was awarded the bid for the Lost River site. The removal is being paid for by a dis-

aster relief grant from problems associated with floods in 2008. The commissioners approved and signed the CASA (Court Appointed Special Advocates) contract between Martin and Daviess Counties for Judge Lynne Ellis. Ellis explained that Daviess County started the program with a $40,000 grant they received and allowed Martin County to join. She said the volunteer advocates help children who have been removed from their parents. Judge Ellis also reported that she heard back from the administration at Shoals School regarding putting a program in place for suspended students. Community corrections will fund the program that is a pilot project allowing students to receive schoolday credit for in-school suspension or choose to volunteer for community service at a county non-profit organization. “We’re excited about that and hopefully it will work for the school,” said Ellis. She also noted that Loogootee School declined participation in the program stating that they didn’t have a problem with suspensions and that they have the funding to do such a project on their own if needed. The commissioners approved Don Bowling to serve for three more years on the Westgate Authority Board.

Martin County

JOURNAL

p.o. Box 148 loogootee, in 47553 courtney@martincountyjournal.com Shoals. Burial followed in Trinity Springs Cemetery. LINA “GRANNY” MCPHERSON Lina Elizabeth “Granny” McPherson passed away at 1:30 p.m. Friday, February 3, 2012, at her home. A resident of Shoals, she was 85. She was born December 22, 1926, in Lawrence County; the daughter of James M. and Minnie Pearl (Patton) Reynolds. She married James Owen McPherson November 7, 1942 and he preceded her in death October 20, 2009. She was a homemaker and a member of the House of Prayer. Surviving relatives include daughter, Brenda (Paul) Moffatt of Shoals; sons, Larry (Bonnie) McPherson of Medora, Garry (Vicki) McPherson of Shoals, and Perry (Linda) McPherson of Bloomington; daughter in law, Sue McPherson of Mitchell; sisters, Dolly Gaddy of Charlotte, North Carolina and Ruby Reynolds of Bedford; 12 grandchildren, and 11 great grandchildren Her parents, husband, daughter, Linda McPherson; and son, Terry McPherson, preceded her in death. A graveside service was held Tuesday, February 7 at Mt. Olive Cemetery with Rev. Bill Raines officiating. RICHARD DENNY Richard Freeman Denny passed away at 8:53 p.m. on February 2, 2012 at Community Hospital in Indianapolis. A resident of Greenwood, he was 70. He was born November 9, 1941 in Shoals; the son of General Freeman and Ida Pauline (Holt) Denny. He graduated from Shoals High School. He served in the United States Army during the Korean War. He was a Freemason and Shriner. He retired from Allison GM Transmissions in Indianapolis as a machinist. He is survived by his companion, Gwen Hughes of Greenwood; one daughter, Bonnie Pauline Denny of Madison, Wisconsin; one son, Wallace Glenn Denny of Indi-

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anapolis; a grandson, Mykal Richard Denny of Beech Grove; and one sister, Nancy A Williams of Bloomfield; nephew, John Michael Denny of Portland, Oregon, and sister-in-law, Wanda Jane Denny. He was preceded in death by his parents, son, Richard Andrew Denny in 1997; and a brother, John Denny in 2009. Services were held Tuesday, February 7 at Queen-Lee Funeral Home in Shoals. Burial followed in Springhill Cemetery. American Legion Post #61 accorded military graveside rites. Preferred expressions of sympathy may be made to the March of Dimes. Condolences may be made online to the family at www.queenlee.com RUBY MAE BLEDSOE Ruby Mae Bledsoe died at 2:45 p.m. Thursday, February 2, 2012 at the Loogootee Nursing Center. A resident of Loogootee, she was 85. She was born July 28, 1926, in Carlisle; the daughter of Guy and Fern (Niewald) Jones. She married Dale Morton Bledsoe on October 11, 1944 and he preceded her in death on January 26, 2005. She was a homemaker and a member of the Loogootee Christian Church. She had formerly worked at the Loogootee Textile, NSWC Crane, and for the Loogootee School Corporation as a cafeteria cook. She was a 1944 graduate of Loogootee High School and was an avid gardener, seamstress and loved being with her grandchildren and great-grandchildren. She is survived by three sons and daughters-in-law, Tony and Sophie Bledsoe of Loogootee, Ron and Linda Bledsoe of Loogootee and Larry and Judy Bledsoe of Loogootee; two daughters and sons-in-law, Linda and Richard C. Green of Loogootee, and Kathy and Garry Burks of Washington; one brother, Thomas Jones of Bedford; one sister, Elanor Stuckey of Middleburg, Kentucky; 14 grandchildren; and 31 greatgrandchildren. Her parents, Guy and Fern (Niewald) Jones; one sister, Geneva Jones; and two brothers, Bob and Kenneth Jones, are also deceased. The funeral service was held Monday, February 6 at the Loogootee Christian Church in Loogootee. Burial followed in Goodwill Cemetery in Loogootee. Online condolences may be made at www.brocksmithblakefuneralhomes.com.

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4 Wednesday, February 8, 2012

PUBLIC NOTICES

Martin County

JOURNAL

p.o. Box 148 loogootee, in 47553 courtney@martincountyjournal.com

Martin County Sheriff’s Department log tUESDAY, JANUARY 31 3:34 p.m. - Received a call from a concerned mother in reference to her daughter. 4:15 p.m. - Received a report of a reckless driver on U.S. 231, south of Loogootee, near the construction site. 4:52 p.m. - Received a request for an ambulance at Martin County Healthcare. The patient was transported to Jasper Memorial Hospital. 5:22 p.m. - Received a commercial burglar alarm east of Loogootee. 8:39 p.m. - Received a request for an ambulance for a child in Loogootee. 9:08 p.m. - Received a report of harassing text messages. 9:37 p.m. - Received a report of a vehicle off the roadway on U.S. 50 at the S.R. 450 junction. 10:16 p.m. - Received a request for an ambulance in Loogootee. No transport was necessary. WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 1 12:50 a.m. - Received a report of a stranded motorist on U.S. 231, approximately six miles south of Loogootee. 8:16 a.m. - A male caller reported a parking issue in Loogootee. 9:20 a.m. - Received a report of a stranded motorist on Truelove Church Road, off of U.S. 231, south of Loogootee. 12:15 p.m. - Received a report of a speeding vehicle headed north from the Alfordsville turnoff on U.S. 231. 3:24 p.m. - Received a request for a vehicle check at White River Co-Op. 3:41 p.m. - Received a report of a speeding vehicle, eastbound from Cannelburg on U.S. 50. 4:05 p.m. - Received a request for an ambulance on 1250E in Odon. Daviess County Sheriff’s Department was contacted. 4:50 p.m. - Received a request for assistance from Loogootee Police Department regarding a possible intoxicated subject shooting a weapon inside a residence in Loogootee. The call was unfounded. 4:56 p.m. - Received a request for an ambulance on Doe Run Lane. The subject was transported to Daviess Community Hospital 5:55 p.m. - Received a request for an ambulance in Loogootee. The subject was transported to Daviess Community Hospital. 10:47 p.m. - Received a call regarding a prowler in Shoals. 11:00 p.m. - Received a request for a welfare check on a subject possibly walking from Loogootee to the Rutherford area. tHURSDAY, FEBRUARY 2 1:46 a.m. - Received a request for a welfare check on a subject that has failed to arrive at her destination. 6:41 a.m. - Received a report of an accident on U.S. 50, just east of Loogootee. 7:39 a.m. - Received a report of a theft. 7:56 a.m. - Received a request for an ambulance on St. Joseph Road. The subject was transported to Jasper Memorial Hospital. 8:43 a.m. - Received a report of a deer accident that occurred on U.S. 50 just east of Loogootee. The caller advised she will go to the sheriff’s department after she gets off work today. 8:55 a.m. - Received a report of vandalism to a county-owned tractor. 9:30 a.m. - Received information in reference to a controlled burn on Killion Mill Road. 11:49 a.m. - Received a report of a theft on Doe Run Avenue. 1:55 p.m. - Received a report of a theft now in progress on Doe Run Avenue. 2:04 p.m. - Received a report of vandalism to a vehicle in Shoals. 2:25 p.m. - A female in Shoals called regarding a domestic dispute. 4:17 p.m. - The subject involved in the deer accident before work this morning arrived at the station to file an accident report. 7:19 p.m. - Received a report of a smoke

from a resident on U.S. 50; just west of St. Mary’s Road. Daviess County Sheriff’s Department was contacted. FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 3 6:58 a.m. - Received a report of a deer accident. The caller advised she hit a deer on the way to work and continued to work. She advised she will contact the department again after work for a report. 7:22 a.m. - A male subject in Loogootee called in reference to a complaint on a resident of Crane regarding a dog. 8:26 a.m. - Received a request for an ambulance on Emmons Ridge Road. The subject was transported to Jasper Memorial Hospital. 9:00 a.m. - Received a call from a subject regarding a lost wallet. 9:58 a.m. - Received a call regarding a domestic dispute in Shoals. 10:36 a.m. - Received a request for an ambulance on S.R. 550. No transport was necessary. 11:40 a.m. - A male subject came on station to report harassment. 11:50 a.m. - Received a complaint on a dog running loose in the Shoals area. 11:59 a.m. - Received a request for an ambulance in Shoals. The subject was transported to Daviess Community Hospital. 12:34 p.m. - Received a report of a theft of a gate. 12:35 p.m. - Received a report that a semi tore up the bridge on Deep Cut Lake Road, off of U.S. 50, and left the scene. 12:58 p.m. - Received a report of stolen medication. 1:15 p.m. - Received a report of stolen medication. This caller called back minutes later to advise she had located the medication. 5:06 p.m. - Received a call regarding a domestic dispute in Loogootee. 5:38 p.m. - Received a report of a hot tub fire on U.S. 231, south of Loogootee. 7:26 p.m. - The female that called in the deer accident at 6:58 a.m. called to file a report. 7:50 p.m. - Received a request for an ambulance on E 400N. Daviess County Sheriff’s Department was contacted. 8:05 p.m. - Received a report of a possible impaired driver on U.S. 231, southbound from Haysville area. 8:30 p.m. - Received a report of a deer accident on U.S. 231, near C.R. 1050N. 8:42 p.m. - Received a request for assistance with a locked vehicle in Shoals. 9:29 p.m. - Received a request for an ambulance in Loogootee. No transport was necessary. 10:35 p.m. - Received a report of a possible impaired driver northbound on U.S. 231, near the intersection of Highway 58. Daviess County was contacted. 11:10 p.m. - Received a report of a stranded motorist in Loogootee. 11:45 p.m. - A caller reported a tree down on U.S. 231, just south of Whitfield. 11:50 p.m. - Received a request for assistance with a locked vehicle at RJ’s Food Mart in Shoals. SAtURDAY, FEBRUARY 4 8:57 a.m. - Received a call regarding an abandoned vehicle in Shoals. 9:18 a.m. - Received a residential burglar alarm on Cherry Road. 9:21 a.m. - Received a report of an erratic driver on U.S. 50, near Brickyard Road. 9:33 a.m. - Received a report of a large tree on the roadway on U.S. 231, just south of the construction site. 9:44 a.m. - Received a call regarding a parking situation in Loogootee. 10:33 a.m. - A female caller called to speak with a Loogootee officer regarding a case. 11:35 a.m. - Sergeant Keller responded to the Crane Village for a dog complaint. 12:51 p.m. - Received a request for a vehicle inspection on Abel Hill Road.

2:25 p.m. - Received a report of mailbox vandalism on Old School Road. 5:14 p.m. - A male caller called in reference to his daughter being chased by a male subject. 6:21 p.m. - Received a request for an ambulance in Shoals. The subject was transported to Jasper Memorial Hospital. 9:33 p.m. - Received a report of possible gun shots on Poplar Grove Road. SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 5 6:55 a.m. - A female caller reported a battery and theft. 6:55 a.m. - A female caller reported a violation of a protective order. 9:15 a.m. - Received a report of a vehicle with keys in it and windows down at the Methodist Church in Loogootee. 9:30 a.m. - Received a report of mailbox vandalism on Cherry Road. 10:05 a.m. - A caller requested assistance with retrieving personal property. 10:19 a.m. - A male caller advised his wife had taken his keys and locked the doors to his vehicle. 2:24 p.m. - Received a report of mailbox vandalism on Haw Creek Road. 3:00 p.m. - Received a report of a theft of rocks on Mt. Calvary Road. 5:18 p.m. - A male caller advised of possible shots fired from his neighbor’s resi-

dence and hitting his barn. 8:05 p.m. - Received a call regarding a custody issue. 10:00 p.m. - A female caller in Shoals reported harassing phone calls. MONDAY, FEBRUARY 6 3:00 a.m. - Received a request for a welfare check on a subject in Doe Run area. 9:30 a.m. - Received a second call regarding the welfare check requested earlier. 11:10 a.m. - Received information regarding an unlicensed driver. 12:05 p.m. - Received a report of a semi that backed into a car in Loogootee and continued on eastbound on U.S. 50, without stopping. The driver of the semi was located east of Shoals. 12:50 p.m. - Received a request for an ambulance in Shoals. The subject was transported to Jasper Memorial Hospital. 2:05 p.m. - Received a report of a theft of tractor weights. 8:00 p.m. - A male caller advised he was being chased and threatened in Loogootee. tUESDAY, FEBRUARY 7 3:41 a.m. - Received a report of a deer accident on Loogootee Dover Hill Road. 7:30 a.m. - Received a report of a possible prowler in Loogootee. 8:45 a.m. - Received a report of mailbox vandalism on Dover Hill Road.

No surprise - meth lab numbers continue to rise The Indiana State Police Meth Suppression Section was started back in January of 2006. That year there were 803 Meth labs dismantled around the state. Meth Lab Statistics are in for 2011, and they reflect the trend followed since 2006, as there were an all-time high of 1,437 meth labs found. That is up from the 1,395 labs found in 2010. Along with a higher number of labs found is also a higher number of people arrested, 1,420, up from 1,252 in 2010. Methamphetamine is a highly-addictive drug that speeds up the nervous system. Addicts make the drug through a chemical process that changes the allergy drug, Pseudoephedrine, into a powder or rock form for snorting, smoking or shooting directly into their veins. The “One Pot Method� has become the most popular method of manufacturing. The One Pot cook process is a short cut to the manufacture of meth by combining all necessary ingredients in one reaction vessel, typically a 20-ounce drink bottle, two-liter bottle or a glass bottle/jar. The cook process combines incompatible chemicals that eas-

ily cause flash fires or explosions. It also produces a smaller, yet just as potent amount of methamphetamine, which means more meth labs and more trips to stores to buy or steal the products used in the manufacture of meth. Signs to look for meth manufacturing are a strong ammonia smell, or solvent smell like an auto body shop. Look for air linetype rubber tubing, ether or camp fuel cans, plastic bottles, Pseudoephedrine packages, lithium battery casings, and propane tanks with a blue or green discoloration around the valve. The chemicals are highly explosive and fumes are toxic to breath and will damage internal organs. Often times meth labs are found as a result of an anonymous tip from a neighbor or friend. Anyone with information about illegal drug use may call the Indiana State Police Drug Tip Line at 1-800-453-4756. Tips can be made and kept anonymous. The Indiana Meth Investigation System or IMIS, can also take tips on meth labs. Just go to www.meth.in.gov and click on the “Report Suspected Meth Activity� Link.

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Wednesday, February 8, 2012

Martin County Journal

page 5

Loogootee Police log Martin County Court News

MONDAY, JANUARY 30 1:40 a.m. - Report of several 911 hangups from N. Oak Street. Sgt. Norris checked the area. 7:50 a.m. - Request for a welfare check on a subject on Church Street. 8:55 a.m. - Caller reported two dogs running loose on Lincoln Avenue. Officer was unable to locate. 10:44 a.m. - Chief Rayhill assisted with a funeral detail. 1:54 p.m. - Caller reported a possible intoxicated driver on US 50. Officer was unable to locate the vehicle. 3:49 p.m. - Caller reported medication stolen from her residence. Caller was advised that the LPD does not complete case reports for stolen medication. 5:05 p.m. - Caller requested a welfare check on a male on S. Kentucky Avenue. 5:06 p.m. - Child protective services requested assistance with a family matter. 5:25 p.m. - Caller reported a civil dispute. Sgt. Norris spoke with the caller. tUESDAY, JANUARY 31 1:41 p.m. - Caller requested an officer regarding a VIN check. Chief Rayhill completed the paperwork. 4:13 p.m. - Caller reported a reckless driver on US 231. 7:40 p.m. - Caller reported she was having problems with her ten-year-old daughter. Sgt. Hennette responded. WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 1 4:26 p.m. - Caller reported vehicles doing property damage near the city pool parking lot. Sgt. Hennette responded. 5:06 p.m. - Caller reported a vehicle stalled in the road. 6:40 p.m. - Caller reported a person walking down the middle of Broadway Street. Officer was unable to locate. 7:46 p.m. - Male caller reported receiving harassing phone messages from his sister. Male was advised to seek a protective order. 11:00 p.m. - Caller reported a suspicious

person on Broadway Street. tHURSDAY, FEBRUARY 2 6:41 a.m. - First responders were requested east on US 50 regarding a two-vehicle accident. 3:49 p.m. - Caller reported a dog had been struck on Dewey Street. 4:51 p.m. - Caller reported dogs running loose in Shaded Estates. Sgt. Hennette spoke with the dog owner. 5:11 p.m. - Caller reported a possible intoxicated driver on Cedar Street. FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 3 1:43 p.m. - Caller reported a male was outside her residence yelling. Captain Akles responded. 1:31 p.m. - An employee at Dollar General reported a female shoplifter. A name was given. Captain Akles was the investigating officer. 3:08 p.m. - Caller reported damage to her brake line on her vehicle. She requested to speak with an officer. 5:40 p.m. - Caller reported a hot tub on fire on US 231 South. Loogootee Fire was dispatched. SAtURDAY, FEBRUARY 4 9:44 a.m. - Caller reported a parking violation at the city square. 5:55 p.m. - Male came on station to report theft of a camera. He was given a statement form. 8:06 p.m. - Caller reported a possible intoxicated driver on US 231. 8:45 p.m. - A male came on station to report his ex-girlfriend had stolen his laptop. Sgt. Norris responded. The male was able to retrieve his laptop. SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 5 5:09 p.m. - Caller reported a slight vehicle accident on SE 3rd Street. 6:25 p.m. - Caller reported an injured dog near the city pool. Sgt. Norris was unable to locate. 8:17 p.m. - Caller reported her neighbor’s dog barking constantly. Sgt. Norris spoke with the dog owner.

County real estate transfers Keith E. Graber and Suzzetta Graber, of Daviess County, Indiana to Leslie K. Graber and Elaine S. Graber, of Daviess County, Indiana, a part of the southwest quarter of the southwest quarter of Section 13, Township 3 North, Range 5 West, Martin County, Indiana, containing 6.385 acres, more or less. John M. Divine and Linda M. Divine, of Martin County, Indiana to Marty G. Peek and Samuel J. Peek and Ashley E. Peek, of Martin County, Indiana, a part of the southwest quarter of Section 5, Township 3 North, Range 4 West, Perry Town-

ship, Martin County, Indiana, containing 8.77 acres, more or less. John Raymond Norris and Ruth Ann Norris, of Martin County, Indiana to Phillip M. Smith, of Martin County, Indiana, Lot Number 5 in Oliver and Taylor’s Addition to the City of Loogootee, Indiana except 10 feet of even width off of the south end. William L. Hayden, of Clark County, Indiana to Raymond Baxter, of Martin County, Indiana, a part of the northwest quarter of the southeast quarter of Section 14, Township 4 North, Range 3 West, containing two acres.

Martin County jail bookings SAtURDAY, FEBRUARY 4 3:41 a.m. - Nancy Salmon, 39, of Shoals, was arrested and charged with operating while intoxicated. 8:07 p.m. - Jared Butcher, 20, of Loogootee, was arrested and charged with possession of a legend drug. 11:05 p.m. - Brian D. Passen, 45, of Shel-

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burn, was arrested and charged with operating while intoxicated and driving while suspended. 11:28 p.m. - Zachary T. Blaker, 28, of Shoals, was arrested and charged with operating while intoxicated. SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 5 2:02 a.m. - Nikolas L. Holt, 18, of Spencer, was arrested and charged with possession of paraphernalia. MONDAY, FEBRUARY 6 11:24 p.m. - Andrea M. Himsel, 26, of Jasper, was arrested and charged with possession of paraphernalia and possession of marijuana.

Persons listed on criminals charges are innocent until proven guilty in a court of law. CRIMINAL COURt New Charges Filed January 24 Christopher M. Parsons, operating a vehicle with an ACE of .08 or more, a Class C Misdemeanor. Ronnie L. Hollars, operating a vehicle with an ACE of .08 or more, a Class C Misdemeanor. January 27 CRIMINAL CONvICtIONS AND SENtENCING January 24 Kenneth J. Kemp, convicted of operating a vehicle with an ACE of .08 or more, a Class C Misdemeanor. Sentenced to serve 60 days in the Martin County Security Center with 58 days suspended including credit for one actual day previously served and day for day good time credit for each day of actual incarceration. Defendant received 11 months of probation. Floyd D. Sollman, convicted of reckless driving, a Class B Misdemeanor. Sentenced to serve 180 days in the Martin County Security Center with 178 days suspended including credit for one actual day previously served and day for day good time credit for each day of actual incarceration. Defendant received 5 months of probation. January 31 Rex Garmon, convicted of operating a vehicle with an ACE of .08 or more, a Class C Misdemeanor. Sentenced to serve 60 days in the Martin County Security Center with 58 days suspended including credit for one actual day previously served and day for day good time credit for each day of actual incarceration. Defendant received 11 months of probation. CRIMINAL CHARGES DISMISSED January 13 Mandy M. Goins, possession of marijuana, a Class A Misdemeanor, dismissed. January 24 Kenneth J. Kemp, illegal consumption of an alcoholic beverage, a Class C Misdemeanor, dismissed. CIvIL COURt New Suits Filed January 25 Jessica Zehr vs. Jonathan Zehr, petition for dissolution of marriage. January 26 Voin Holdings, LLC vs. William E. Tolley, civil collection. January 27 Christopher Royston vs. Symetra Assigned Benefits Service, civil plenary. CIvIL COURt JUDGMENtS January 24 Judgment in favor of the plaintiff Springs Valley Bank and against the defendants Phillip and Lois A. Sewell for mortgage foreclosure in the amount of $392,083.54. CIvIL COURt DISMISSED LVNV Funding, LLC vs. Debbie Hayes, civil collection, dismissed. SMALL CLAIMS JUDGMENtS February 2 Judgment in favor of the plaintiff Toy’s Auto Parts and against the defendant Steve Harrington in the amount of $540.33.

SMALL CLAIMS DISMISSED White River Co-Op vs. Maxine Merrilees, complaint, dismissed. tRAFFIC tICKEtS PAID January 25 – January 31 Brant Bahler, West Lafayette, speeding 42 in a 30, $120. William Bradley, Loogootee, failure of occupant to use seatbelt, $25. Diana Brown, Loogootee, learner’s permit violation; failure to yield right-of-way at entrance to through highway, $125. Casondra Davis, Columbus, driving while suspended, $120. Nicolas Hayes, Mitchell, speeding 62 in a 45, $179.50. Justin Hoskins, Loogootee, unregistered vehicle; expired plates, $119. Isaac Jones, Shoals, speeding 51 in a 40, $120. Mark Sergent, Mitchell, seatbelt violation, $25. Bryan Tapley, Olive Branch, Mississippi, operating a vehicle without financial responsibility; speeding, $125. Darwin Taylor, Olney, Illinois, inspection/repair and maintenance parts and accessories, $120. MARRIAGE LICENSES February 2 Bryan Scott Salmon of Shoals and Tiffany Ann Young of Loogootee.

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6 Wednesday, February 8, 2012

COMMUNITY

Martin County

JOURNAL

p.o. Box 148 loogootee, in 47553 courtney@martincountyjournal.com

tri Kappa holds meeting BY AUDREY ROBINSON Tri Kappa Recording Secretary On January 24, 2012, a meeting of Delta Tau Chapter of Tri Kappa was held at the Loogootee United Methodist Church. Hostesses for the evening were Rhonda Poehlein, Terry Swayze, Peggy Mattingly, and Tonya Mathies. The theme for the meeting was “Artists”. After refreshments, the meeting was called to order by President Christina Crane. Roll call was read with members responding by telling “What is your Favorite Cartoon Character?” December minutes were read and approved. Treasurer Kristi Ausbrooks read the treasurer’s report. Katie Milligan, Corresponding Secretary, read the following correspondence: a thank you from the Martin County Community Foundation, a request for a Loogootee Post Prom donation, a request for a donation to Shawnee Theatre, invitation to Roy Juarez Jr, “Homeless by Choice” presentation at Antioch Christian Church, invitation to members to join Riley Cheer Guild for $15 per year, and a request for donation to the Girl Scouts #440 to attend trip to Washington DC. After discussion, a decision was made to donate to Girl Scouts #440. Art: Rhonda Poehlein gave a report on Indiana Artists. She talked of Robert Clark’s “Love” that became a stamp, Adam Egenolf pottery, aluminum pottery and how it is made, and the calendars with many old Indiana barns. She had displays of some of this art on the tables. Peggy Mattingly brought in one of each of her daughter’s, Tonya and Nikki’s, “art” projects from many school years ago. These were the clay pottery that Mr. Willis has had the young Martin County children making in art class for many years. By-laws: Audrey Robinson received the state approved by-laws . College care packages: Little Kindnesses

this month were the items to go in the college care packages and the volunteer appreciation baskets. Historian: Judy Treffinger reported that the calendar project has been going on for 14 years. During those years, it has produced profits of over $47,000 for Delta Tau to distribute to state and local charity, culture and education. Mental Health: Kathy Lingenfelter reported on mental health. Scholarship: Information was to be provided to the newspapers and schools in January. Tri Kappa Week: Committee is planning for February. Tri Kappa Nut: Judy Kluesner reported that the nut sales have gone extremely well this year. Thank you to everyone who bought and sold nuts this year. This project is Delta Tau’s largest fundraiser each year. Birthday Calendar Committee: Judy Treffinger reported that the calendar project has gone very well this year. This project is Delta Tau’s second largest fundraiser each year. Judy Treffinger has the picture that was taken of Delta Tau members at the last meeting. If anyone would like a copy, contact Judy. The Riley Blankets will be made at the next meeting. If possible, please come to the meeting to help support this project. The home economics teacher is going to be contacted again to see if she is still willing to use this as a project in her class. Top Ten Dinner tentative dates in April. This will be determined ASAP. The 2nd round of secret sister gifts need to be brought to the February meeting. Please make arrangements to deliver your gift to the meeting if you cannot make the February meeting. The next meeting will be held on February 28. The meeting was closed by President Christina Crane.

Comedy opens February 17 at OtP The Woody Allen comedy “Play It Again, Sam” will open February 17 at the Old Town Players Theatre and Arts Center, 432 Broadway Street. Performances will continue February 18-19 and 24-25-26. The cast will feature Tiffany Conover as Barbara, Steve Gray as Humphrey Bogart, Zane Grogan (Bedford) as Allan Felix, Susannah Julian (Bloomfield) as Art House Girl, Jessica Larimer (Terre Haute) as Linda Christie, Shar Mahoney as Vanessa, Kathy Mooney as Sharon/Gina, Bill Simmons as Dick Christie, Kayla Turnage as Nancy, and Dustin Williams as Jeffrey. The cast is led by artistic director Darrell Wolven (Washington). The production staff includes Bill Simmons as assistant director, Christian Dart as the light/sound technician, and Dustin Williams as the spotlight operator. Tickets cost $10 for adults, $8 for senior citizens and students and will be sold at the door starting one hour before show time. Tickets can also be purchased in advance at Eyeworks, First Vincennes Savings Bank, and the Vincennes University Bookstore Show times are 8 p.m. (EST) Fridays and Saturdays and 3 p.m. Sundays. The OTP Theatre and Arts Center now offers premium seating. For a small up-charge, patrons can enjoy the show from the best seats in the house - comfortable club chairs offering prime viewing. This seating option is limited and is sold on a first-come basis. Group rates are available with advance reservation. Call 812-882-1639 or email oldtownplayers@gmail.com. ABOUT THE PLAY This witty commentary on love and dating was written by Woody Allen, the awardwinning writer/director of the films “Annie Hall” and “Hannah and Her Sisters.” “Play It Again, Sam,” tells the story of

hapless underdog Allan Felix. This mildmannered film critic is insecure with women and thinks that things would go his way if only he had the technique of his hero, Humphrey Bogart. Much to his surprise, Bogart comes to the rescue with advice for the romantically challenged. After a series of hilariously awkward dates that try even Bogey’s patience, Allan is faced with a difficult decision…one he may regret!

Art exhibit opens thursday “All Dolled Up,” an exhibition of handmade dolls, will open on February 9 at VU’s Shircliff Gallery of Art. The exhibit will continue through March 1. The public is invited to a reception with artist and curator Nichol Brinkman in the Gallery on February 21 at 11 a.m. (EST). Brinkman will speak in an open forum at 2 p.m. in Shircliff Auditorium. Gallery hours are 8 a.m. to 9 p.m., Monday through Thursday; 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Fridays; 12-3 p.m. on Sundays. Shircliff Gallery of Art is located at the corner of First and Harrison streets inside the Shircliff Humanities Center. For more information, contact Morgan Ford Willingham, Shircliff Gallery director and assistant professor of Art and Design, 812-888-4316, mwillingham@vinu.edu. About the exhibition “All Dolled Up” includes the works of artists Paola Colombo, Jessi Halliday Mesalic, Mimi Kirchner, Jess Quinn, Jennifer Strunge, and Nichol Brinkman who curated the exhibit. Brinkman selected the artists based on their sense of whimsy, imagination, design sensibilities, and refined craftsmanship. Her intention for this show is to capture a childlike sense of wonder and awe in everyone who views it.

Pizza delivery . . .

-Photo by Brooke Gregory

Martin County Humane Society volunteers spent the afternoon last Sunday delivering pizzas for Pizza & More for donations. A total of $160 was raised. Shown above in the front is Brady taylor. Seated, from left to right, are Karen Hickman, Marianne Swartz, terri Dye, Doreene Farley, Jennifer Randolph, and Donna Greene. In the back row, from left to right, are Linda Sherfick, Candy taylor, Don Greene, Courtney Hughett, Noel Harty, and Josh Hughett.

Calendar of Events Animal control meeting The Martin County Animal Control Commission will hold a special meeting with elected officials and law enforcement personnel on Monday, February 20 at 6 p.m. in the council chambers of the Loogootee Municipal Building. The public is invited to attend. Shoals School Board The Shoals School Board will meet Thursday, February 9 at 5 p.m. in the central administration office. The meeting is open to the public. Chamber meetings The Martin County Chamber of Commerce will hold their next meeting March 14 at noon at Stoll’s Lakeview Restaurant. Humane society meetings The Martin County Humane Society meets on the third Tuesday of the month at Loogootee Municipal Building, at 7 p.m. To become a member, contact Martin County Humane Society, P. O. Box 537, Shoals, Indiana 47581, call Don at 296-0952. tax Counseling for the Elderly Generations is once again providing Tax Counseling for the Elderly (TCE). This program provides free assistance to low-income, elderly and special-needs taxpayers in filling out both the federal and state tax forms. Volunteers have completed their certification with the Internal Revenue Service and are ready to

complete tax forms at Loogootee Senior Center, 406 N.W. First Street, Mondays, Tuesdays and Wednesdays, noon to 3 p.m. by appointment only. Call 247-2525. The Martin County TCE Coordinator is Kenny Woods. Youth football meetings Martin County Youth Football League meets on the first Wednesday of the month at Pizza Junction at 7 p.m. Questions, call Audrey Robinson at 295-4773. tourism meetings The MCCC Tourism Committee meets on the second Wednesday of each month at 7 p.m. in the Martin County Community Learning Center on the fairgrounds. Soil and Water meetings The Martin County SWCD meets the third Monday of the month at the SWCD office located at Martin County Learning Center. Office hours for the district are 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. weekdays except Thursdays when it is closed. Visit www.martinswcd. com or call at 295-3149.

Loogootee Little League registration Registration for the 2012 Loogootee Little League Baseball and Softball Season will be held in the former Elementary East cafeteria (Lee’s Gym) on Sunday, February 12, from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m., Wednesday, February 22, from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m., and Sunday, March 4, from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Boys and girls who will be four by April 30 are eligible to participate in tee-ball. Boys who do not turn 13 years old until after April 30 are allowed to play Little League Baseball. Girls, who were 12 years old or under on December 31, 2011, are eligible to play softball. Cost is $40 for the first child in the family, $70 for two children, and $100 for three or more.

Retired senior volunteers Martin County Retired Senior Volunteer Program (RSVP) office is open weekly from 1:30-3:30 p.m. at the Loogootee United Methodist Church. If you are over 55 years old and do any volunteer work the program needs you as a member. No additional volunteer work is necessary. Any questions, call Martha Greene 295-3131.

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7 Wednesday, February 8, 2012

STATE GOVERNMENT

Martin County

JOURNAL

p.o. Box 148 loogootee, in 47553 courtney@martincountyjournal.com

Indiana: the nation’s The Messmer Report 23rd Right to Work State By District 63 State Representative After over 40 hours of testimony, debate, and discussion over the past year House Bill (HB) 1001, Employee’s Right to Work passed the Indiana House of Representatives two weeks ago and last week passed the State Senate. Governor Mitch Daniels signed the bill into law last Wednesday. HB 1001 will now make Indiana the nation’s 23rd Right to Work state, and the first state in the industrial Midwest to become a Right to Work state. Rep. Jerry Torr (R-Carmel) authored and House Speaker Brian C. Bosma (R-Indianapolis) co-authored House Bill 1001, Employee’s Right to Work which states that an employee cannot be forced to join or financially support a union in order to get or keep a job. On November 21, 2011 Speaker Bosma announced that his number one priority this session would focus on Right to Work and bringing more jobs to Indiana. “With the latest unemployment number stubbornly hovering at nine percent, it is critical that we bring more employment opportunities to Indiana

and give Hoosiers the freedom to choose how their hard earned money is spent.” Rep. Torr began the Right to Work pursuit in 2004 when he first filed a bill on this legislation. “Evidence shows that Right to Work is a job creation strategy and in these hard economic times it is imperative that we become the 23rd Right to Work state and help put the over quarter million unemployed Hoosiers back to work.” Indiana will now be the first Right to Work state in the nation that does not have a Right to Work state on its border. “Despite the success that we have had in job creation, we needed to take this last step in order to kick job creation to its highest gear. We are in the heart of the industrial Midwest and we are already getting looks from employers in Ohio, Kentucky, Illinois and other states due to the passage of this legislation,” said Speaker Bosma. “I announced that our number one priority this session was to bring jobs to Indiana and the passing of this bill has resulted in a victory for all Hoosiers.”

Total nonfarm payroll employment rose by 243,000 in January, and the unemployment rate decreased to 8.3 percent, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported last week. Job growth was widespread in the private sector, with large employment gains in professional and business services, leisure and hospitality, and manufacturing. Government employment changed little over the month. Household Survey Data The unemployment rate declined by 0.2 percentage point in January to 8.3 percent; the rate has fallen by 0.8 point since August. The number of unemployed persons declined to 12.8 million in January. Among the major worker groups, the unemployment rates for adult men (7.7 percent) and blacks (13.6 percent) declined in January. The unemployment rates for adult women (7.7 percent), teenagers (23.2 percent), whites (7.4 percent), and Hispanics (10.5 percent) were little changed. The jobless rate for Asians was 6.7 percent, not seasonally adjusted. In January, the number of job losers and persons who completed temporary jobs fell to 7.3 million. The number of long-term unemployed (those jobless for 27 weeks or more) was little changed at 5.5 million and accounted for 42.9 percent of the unemployed. After accounting for the annual adjustments to the population controls, the employment-population ratio (58.5 percent) rose in January, while the civilian labor force participation rate held at 63.7 percent. The number of persons employed part time for economic reasons, at 8.2 million, changed little in January. These individuals were working part time because their hours had been cut back or because they were unable to find a full-time job. In January, 2.8 million persons were marginally attached to the labor force, essentially unchanged from a year earlier. (The data are not seasonally adjusted.) These individuals were not in the labor force, wanted and were available for work, and had looked for a job sometime in the prior 12 months. They were not counted as unemployed because they had not searched for work in the 4 weeks preceding the survey. Among the marginally attached, there were 1.1 million discouraged workers in January, little different from a year earlier. (The data are not seasonally adjusted.) Discouraged workers are persons not currently looking for work because they believe no jobs are available for them. The remaining 1.7 million persons marginally attached to the labor force in January had not searched for work in the 4 weeks preceding the survey for reasons such

as school attendance or family responsibilities. Establishment Survey Data Total nonfarm payroll employment rose by 243,000 in January. Private-sector employment grew by 257,000, with the largest employment gains in professional and business services, leisure and hospitality, and manufacturing. Government employment was little changed over the month. Professional and business services continued to add jobs in January (+70,000). About half of the increase occurred in employment services (+33,000). Job gains also occurred in accounting and bookkeeping (+13,000) and in architectural and engineering services (+7,000). Over the month, employment in leisure and hospitality increased by 44,000, primarily in food services and drinking places (+33,000). Since a recent low in February 2010, food services have added 487,000 jobs. In January, health care employment continued to grow (+31,000). Within the industry, hospitals and ambulatory care services each added 13,000 jobs. Wholesale trade employment increased by 14,000 over the month. Since a recent employment low in May 2010, wholesale trade has added 144,000 jobs. Employment in retail trade continued to trend up in January. Job gains in department stores (+19,000), health and personal care stores (+7,000), and automobile dealers (+7,000) were partially offset by losses in clothing and clothing accessory stores (14,000). Since an employment trough in December 2009, retail trade has added 390,000 jobs. In the goods-producing sector, manufacturing added 50,000 jobs. Nearly all of the increase occurred in durable goods manufacturing, with job growth in fabricated metal products (+11,000), machinery (+11,000), and motor vehicles and parts (+8,000). Durable goods manufacturing has added 418,000 jobs over the past 2 years. Employment in construction increased by 21,000 in January, following a gain of 31,000 in the previous month. Over the past 2 months, nonresidential specialty trade contractors added 30,000 jobs. Mining added 10,000 jobs in January, with most of the gain in support activities for mining (+8,000). Since a recent low in October 2009, mining employment has expanded by 172,000. Government employment changed little in January. Over the past 12 months, the sector has lost 276,000 jobs, with declines in local government; state government, excluding education; and the U.S. Postal Service.

States’ January employment

Mark Messmer Halftime in the legislature It’s half-time in the state legislature and we’ve been able to pass 108 bills out of the House that will hopefully make Indiana a better place to both live and work. On the survey I sent out to all of District 63 before the start of session, I asked if you would support prohibiting local government officials from hiring his or her family member. I, and many of my colleagues, received a very positive response; up to 75 and 80 percent of those asked responded yes. This session I co-authored House Bill 1005 which would do just that: prohibit local government officials from hiring a relative. It would also prevent a person from serving on the executive board that approves their own salary and benefits. A second bill I co-authored this session would phase out what is commonly known as the ‘death tax’. Most states have eliminated this tax which taxes the money an individual receives after a loved one has passed away. It is unfair to Hoosiers to have to pay taxes again on money that has already been taxed. In fact, many seniors leave Indiana for just this reason. The inheritance tax will now be reduced by nine percent each year over the next 10 years. Another bill of interest that passed this session includes a bill that would allow those who receive state-funded assistance, or welfare, to be randomly drug tested by FSSA. An amendment to this bill also requires legislators to consent to random drug testing. If an individual who is receiving state-funded assistance fails a drug test or refuses to consent to a drug test under reasonable suspicion, then they would lose their assistance for six months. We want to ensure that the money they are receiving is going towards food and clothing for their families and not illegal substances. If this

bill passes, it will start off as a pilot program in three counties, hopefully this bill will help in that endeavor. A statewide smoking ban also passed the House this week. It would prohibit smoking in public places and in enclosed areas of employment. Smoking would still be allowed in casinos, cigar and hookah bars, and fraternal and social clubs that only allow people in over the age of 18. Businesses will have up to 18 months to comply with the new law if this bill is passed in the Senate, too. Finally, a bill was passed in the House this week that would create a Health Care Compact which, upon approval of the U.S. Congress, would allow states to be primarily responsible for the regulation of health care in their state. It would allow all member states of the compact to suspend all federal laws, regulations and orders concerning health care that are inconsistent with the laws and regulations adopted by the member state under the compact. Other states that have passed the health care compact are Georgia, Missouri, Oklahoma and Texas. The aim is to help combat the expensive overhaul of our healthcare system when ‘Obamacare’ goes into effect. All of these bills have passed the House and now move on to the Senate for further consideration. Also, congratulations to Schnitzelbank Restaurant for winning the Super 46 Sandwich competition. Their bratwurst has been voted the best sandwich in the state. They have been serving delicious German food for many years in our community and I’m so glad to see them receive this honor. I appreciate your continued feedback on issues facing our state and community. I hope you have a safe and happy Super Bowl weekend.

Study says Hoosiers are packing on the pounds faster than the average American There are a third more overweight and obese Hoosiers than just two decades ago, says a new report from Ball State University. “Burden of Obesity Among Adults in Indiana,” compiled by Ball State’s Global Health Institute (GHI), found that 66.5 percent of the adult population in Indiana is overweight or obese — or about 3.2 million people as measured by body mass index (BMI). The national average is about 64 percent. This is an increase from 1991 when 50 percent of Hoosiers were overweight or obese and the national average was about 46 percent. “This is a clear indication that two-thirds of our population may be at risk, and this is preventable,” said Kerry Anne McGeary, GHI director and Phyllis A. Miller professor of health economics. “Obesity poses a major risk for serious diet-related chronic diseases, including type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, hypertension and stroke, as well as certain forms of cancer. Obesity is listed as the fifth largest cause of death. “The economic ramifications of obesity are startling. In 2008, the total annual economic cost of obesity in the United States was estimated to be as high as $147 billion. An overweight or obese person in our country spends $1,500, or 41 percent, more each year on medical care than a person with a healthy weight.” The study also found: -About 73.4 percent of males report being overweight or obese compared to 59.5 percent of females.

-About 69 percent of adults older than 65 report being overweight or obese as compared to 42.5 percent of adults ages 18 to 24. -Nearly 75 percent of black, non-Hispanic adults report being overweight or obese compared to 65.8 percent of white, non-Hispanic adults and 71 percent for Hispanic adults. -About 63.9 percent of adults with household incomes of $75,000 or more annually report being overweight or obese. The rate increases to 67.1 percent for households with incomes of $50,000 to $75,000; 69.6 percent of adults with household incomes of less than $15,000; and 71.2 percent of adults with household incomes of $15,000-$25,000. -Adults with a college education had the lowest level of obesity or being overweight (61.9 percent) as compared to adults without a high school degree (67 percent) or with a high school degree (69.3). GHI also found that 10.5 percent of adults who report being overweight or obese also acknowledge having cardiovascular disease as compared to 6.4 percent of adults who are not overweight or obese but have cardiovascular problems. McGeary points out that the state has started several programs, including INShape Indiana, to help reduce obesity rates and mitigate its growth. “As a state, we’ve acknowledged that obesity is a problem that we cannot afford,” she said. “It will be interesting to look at the trend over the next 10 years to see if Hoosiers are paying attention and changing their lifestyles.”


page 8

Martin County Journal

Wednesday, February 8, 2012

Week in review at the Indiana General Assembly sonably resist unlawful entry by law enforcement officers into a citizen’s residence. Public outcry over the ruling prompted lawmakers to review current law to address concerns about how the law may be interpreted by citizens that could lead to dangerous situations for both the citizens and law enforcement officers. SB 1 would permit a person to resist the unlawful entry into a home by a law enforcement officer under certain conditions. SB 6 would remove a provision in state law that makes it a crime to manufacture, possess, sell, lend, give away or purchase knives with blades that open automatically, commonly known as switchblades. SB 11 would make attending an animal fighting contest in the state a Class D Felony. Testimony revealed that Indiana’s law regarding animal fighting is less strict than laws in surrounding states, and that these events attract drugs, gambling and weapons. The bill seeks to increase the penalty for spectatorship and hopefully eliminate this activity in Indiana. SB 18 provides that the duty of a parent to make child support payments would cease at the age of 19, or until age 21 if the child is enrolled in and has not yet graduated from high school. Current law requires child support payments to be made until a child reaches age 21. SB 31 would extend the period during which a qualified service member or dependent may be eligible to receive assistance from the Military Family Relief Fund from one year to three years. In addition, the bill provides that a member of the Indiana National Guard may be eligible to receive assistance from this fund if the member is activated for state duty. SB 253 would allow state universities to adopt a policy to award educational credit to servicemen and women who have successfully completed military training and classes. In addition, the bill would provide that an occupational or professional licensure board shall issue a license, certificate, registration, or permit to a military service applicant or military spouse who meets certain requirements. SB 83 would require each school corporation to include cursive writing in the curriculum. This would also apply to accredited nonpublic schools that participate in the state’s voucher program. SB 89 would provide that a school board may require the teaching of various theories concerning the origin of life in science classes, including, but not limited to, Chris-

Press release by Senate Democrat Lindel Hume Wednesday, February 1 Final changes were made to hundreds of bills as lawmakers worked through late night sessions to meet mid-session deadlines. The following brief summary highlights some of the action taken by the Senate thus far. Fast-tracked bills Two bills have already been approved by both chambers and advanced to the governor for final consideration. The governor signed Senate Bill (SB) 4, authored by Hume, into law on January 30, which is aimed at protecting children against exploitation. Passage of the legislation will toughen current law and make it easier for law enforcement to arrest and prosecute persons involved with the promotion of underage prostitution and human trafficking. These criminals target large events such as the Super Bowl being held in Indianapolis February 5. Previous host cities experienced a spike in this type of criminal activity in the days surrounding the event. Human trafficking is estimated to be a $32 billion industry worldwide, affecting nearly 12.3 million adults and children, making it the second largest crime business in the world. The controversial “Right to Work” legislation contained in House Bill (HB) 1001 was also pushed through this session. Under this measure, unions and companies will commit a Class A Misdemeanor if they negotiate contracts requiring all members of a union to pay fees for representation provided by unions. Thousands of Hoosiers representing labor unions have maintained a constant presence at the Statehouse throughout the past month trying to encourage lawmakers to defeat the legislation. Proponents argue that the bill is needed to bring more jobs to Indiana. Opponents contend that jobs in “Right to Work” states generally pay lower wages and include fewer benefits, affecting all employees in the state and local economies. After being fast-tracked by Republican leaders in both chambers, HB 1001 was approved by a House vote of 54-44, and 28-22 in the Senate. The governor, who originally opposed “Right to Work” signed the bill into law last week. Other bills of interest approved by the Senate now awaiting House consideration include the following: SB 1, co-authored by Hume, was introduced in response to Barnes v. Indiana, a state Supreme Court decision handed down in 2011. In Barnes, the Court ruled 3-2 that Indiana will not recognize the ‘Castle Doctrine’, which is the common-law right to rea-

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tianity, Judaism, Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism, and Scientology. SB 273 would strengthen the regulation of outdoor stage equipment like the concert rigging equipment that collapsed in 2011 at the Indiana State Fair. To ensure public safety and public confidence, this legislation would establish statewide standards for the installation and inspection of such structures, and institute a permit process to determine the safety and functionality of these structures. SB 143 would change how an automatic taxpayer refund would take place if the state’s excess reserves surpass $100 million. The bill stipulates that if the amount of the excess reserves is less than $100 million, 100 percent of the excess reserves must be transferred to the Pension Stabilization Fund; and if the amount of the excess reserves is $100 million or more, 50 percent of the excess reserves would be transferred to the Pension Stabilization Fund and 50 percent of the excess reserves would be used for the purposes of providing an automatic taxpayer refund. In addition, the bill would change the distribution so that each eligible taxpayer would receive the same automatic refund amount. SB 170 would provide that relatives may not be employed by a local unit of government in positions that result in one relative being in the direct line of supervision of another relative. In addition, the bill would prevent firefighters, police officers, park officials and other municipal employees from serving in an elected position on a county council or board of commissioners that sets agency budgets and salaries. The bill stipulates that upon election, public officers would have to resign their position to serve in the elected office. SB 233, co-authored by Hume, would require that all candidates for each municipal office must be included on an election ballot even if the candidate is unopposed. A law passed in 2011 allowed clerks to omit candidates for municipal offices from an election ballot if the race for that office was uncontested. That change was unpopular with voters and municipal candidates.

SB 271 would prohibit a landlord from requiring a lien on a motor vehicle that is owned by a tenant as a security deposit or to secure a rent payment by the tenant. SB 274 provides immunity for a crime of public intoxication or minor possession, consumption, or transportation of an alcoholic beverage if that person called 911 for someone in need of medical assistance due to an alcohol-related emergency. The legislation, referred to as the “Lifeline Bill,” was suggested by students from several state universities seeking limited immunity from prosecution for Indiana college students who want to help friends in need of medical attention, but fear arrest for underage drinking. House bills now eligible for Senate consideration HB 1376 would provide additional assistance to the victims of last summer’s State Fair tragedy. The bill would double the current state liability cap of $5 million to $10 million that the victims’ families would receive. In addition, the bill would provide additional funds for full-day kindergarten and refunds to state taxpayers. Funding for these initiatives would come from the recently discovered $320 million in state revenue from electronic filing of corporate income tax payments. HB 1134 would ban school districts from charging fees for bus transportation. The proposal is in response to student transportation problems experienced by Franklin Township Schools in Marion County. After parents rejected a referendum that would have brought in additional funding for the struggling school district last year, its bus service for the 2012-2013 school year was outsourced to a company that charged parents a transportation fee of $47.50 per month for the first child and $40.50 for each additional child. To stay informed about bills moving through the General Assembly or to track legislation, log on to www.in.gov/legislative. From this site, you can also watch House and Senate committee hearings and session floor debate.

Lt. Governor Skillman accepting 2012 Hoosier Rising Star applications Lt. Governor Becky Skillman announced last Friday that she is accepting nominations for the 2012 Hoosier Rising Star Award. The Hoosier Rising Star, created by Lt. Governor Skillman in 2007, acknowledges Hoosier youth who have made a significant difference in their communities. “Hoosiers are hard-working and compassionate across generations,” said Lt. Governor Skillman. “This award celebrates Indiana’s outstanding young Hoosiers, many of whom roll up their sleeves and tackle projects that most adults would find intimidating. That kind of leadership ought to be rewarded.” Hoosiers are encouraged to nominate public, private or home-school students across Indiana, enrolled in K-12 during the 2011-2012 school year. Priority will be

given to students who have created or led an innovative project that address targeted issues in their communities including economic development, environmental issues, tourism, education, and social issues (abuse, crime, hunger and poverty). A completed nomination form is required. Nominations forms can be found on the Lt. Governor’s website, www.lg.in.gov. Nominations may be supplemented by the student’s resume or biography, up to three letters of recommendation and any relevant press clippings. The nomination form and any additional materials must be submitted by March 2, 2012. For more information on the award and nomination process, visit www.lg.in.gov or call the Lt. Governor’s Office at (317) 2324545.

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Wednesday, February 8, 2012

Martin County Journal

New Beginnings Community Church W eekly M essage

BY ERNIE CANELL Pastor, New Beginnings Church Be a bringer You know as you get older it seems the days go faster and you don’t seem to get as much accomplished as you hoped. This past week was a busy week. Every night we had some sort of meeting in the church. Youth met Monday, Women’s Group on Tuesday, Bible Study and Prayer on Wednesday, Men’s meeting on Thursday, and a meeting for our Easter Extravaganza Experience on Friday. I tell you this because it is the same with people who do not run a church. They have ball games, meetings, shopping, friends, work and the like, that keep them busy. So busy that they forget the most important thing and that is serving the purpose that God has set for us. If you are not taking the time to spend with God you are missing out on the blessings that God has already planned for you. This week’s sermon was about being a bringer, which is the ultimate purpose for a believer in Jesus Christ. It’s not something that should be taken lightly. It is commanded by Jesus. It is also blessed by Jesus, saying He will be with us as we bring others. We all get busy; we should never get

too busy doing our own stuff to do His. There should be so much excitement in the person who has come to receive the greatest free gift they could ever have. Knowing you have a life with Christ you would want to tell everyone what Jesus has done for you. Not only that but like the men who had to tear the roof off the house to get the lame man to Jesus, we should want to bring people to Christ no matter what it takes. I encourage everyone to bring a friend or family member to church this coming Sunday. Our “I Love You Challenge”. Last time we did this we had to bring out chairs because there was not enough room. I also encourage everyone to bring someone to the adult Valentine dinner and movie this Friday night at 6:30 p.m. A great dinner is being planned and we are going to watch the new movie “Courageous”. It will be a great date night for couples that want to get out together. I hope you are not too busy to bring someone the greatest Valentine gift they could receive, a gift of a new heart and life in Jesus Christ. It you have any questions about how you can have a relationship with God, please call 709-0258 and I will be happy to talk to you. Have a great Valentine’s Day!

page 9

Classes and programs at the Martin County Community Learning Center Ivy Tech Community College Class: Introduction to Computers - Explore the world of computers in a safe, fun, and nonthreatening environment, even if you don’t know what a computer looks like. We’ll cover computer anxiety, important terms, parts of the computer, keyboard, using the mouse, and moving around the computer to complete different tasks. Textbook is included in course fee. This course will run four Tuesdays, March 27 – April 17, from 6 to 9 p.m. For more information on Ivy Tech Community College classes and to register, contact the Center for Lifelong Learning at 812-330-4400 or log on www.ivytech.edu/cll. GED – Adult Basic Education - GED – Adult Basic Education classes will start again on February 13. Classes will be on Monday, Tuesday, and Thursday from 4 to 7 p.m. For information, contact Vincennes University at 812-888-5749 or call the learning center. USAJOBS Workshop (Resume Builder) USAJOBS is the federal government’s official website. USAJOBS provides access to more than 30,000 job listings worldwide and job postings are updated daily. This is an online resume training session and will provide applicants with information and guidance on completing a government-style resume for Crane and other federal agencies. The USAJOBS workshop is provided by Bramble Consulting (Darlene Ridgway). Workshops will be held on February 7 and 23 and March 6 and 22 from 6-8:30 p.m. Cost is $40. Contact Kris by email or call the learning center to sign up. Resume and Cover Letter Basics - This is a basic course designed to help applicants

with their resume and cover letter for the private sector or government contractor positions. The class is from 6 to 8 p.m. on February 16 and the cost is $25. This course is being offered by Darlene Ridgway with Bramble Consulting. Applicants need to preregister no later than the Friday before the scheduled class date. Contact Kris by e-mail or call the learning center to pre-register. Learning Center Contact - Kris Beasley, Coordinator, 812-295-2674 or e-mail kbeasley10@ivytech.edu Office Hours - Monday through Thursday 4-9 p.m. and Friday by appointment only.

Solid Waste Board 2012 meeting schedule The Martin County Solid Waste Management Board held the reorganization and first meeting of the year on January 18 at the recycling center in Loogootee. Officers elected were President: county council member Richard Summers, Vice President: Town of Shoal’s Board Member Roger Lee Abel Jr., and Secretary/Treasurer: Loogootee Mayor Noel Harty. Other board members include: Commissioner Dan Gregory, Commissioner John Wininger, Commissioner Paul George and City of Loogootee Council member Rick Norris. J. David Lett is the District’s Attorney and Laura Albertson is the District Administrator. Monthly meetings will be held the fourth Wednesday of each month at 6 p.m. at the Martin County Recycling Center located at 500 Industrial Park Drive in Loogootee. The meetings of the Solid Waste Board are open meetings and the public is invited and encouraged to attend.

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10 Wednesday, February 8, 2012

SCHOOL & SPORTS

Martin County

JOURNAL

p.o. Box 148 loogootee, in 47553 courtney@martincountyjournal.com

Lady Rox fall in sectional round one The Shoals Lady Rox fell in the opening round of the Barr-Reeve Sectional Tuesday night, against defending state champs Vincennes Rivet, 42-67, despite a game-high 24 points for senior Michaele Brockman including five 3-point field goals. Nicole Harder added eight for Shoals, Bri Wagler finished with four, and Rachel Harder and Caitlin Sanders had three points each. The Lady Rox finished the season 7-15. In sectional action, Loogootee will take on North Daviess Friday night at 6:30 p.m. and Rivet will move on to take on BarrReeve at 7:30 p.m.

The Lady Rox also fell in overtime last Wednesday night to West Washington, 4851. The girls held a three-point lead at the half but were outscored 13-7 by the Lady Senators in the third quarter. Despite four 3pointers by Nicole Harder and three by Michaela Brockman and Rachel Harder, Shoals was unable to hold on in the extra frame. Nicole Harder finished with a game-high 15 points followed by Brockman with 14, Rachel Harder with nine, Ashton Allbright with six, and Lezlie Hart with four. Shoals finished with 14 team fouls, West Washington had 12.

visitor . . .

-Photo provided

On January 2, Glenda Ferguson spoke to the Shoals fourth graders about Laura Ingalls Wilder and her life as a pioneer and author. In the photos above, from left to right, are Ethan Fromme, Aerial McCarty, Jasie Sipes, and Mrs. Ferguson.

Indiana students to get free help in filing for financial aid St. John Food Drive

-Photo provided

On Sunday, February 5, high school students from St. John Catholic Parish did a city-wide canned food drive. they collected several boxes of food and want to thank all those in the community who donated. All food was donated to the St. vincent de Paul Food Bank. Shown above in the front, from left to right, are trenton Arvin, taylor Walker, and MacKenzie Walker. In the back row, from left to right, are Hayden Bell, tylan Norris, Allie Walker, Christian Kilburn, and Hunter Crays.

Loogootee and Shoals

SChool lUNCh MENUS

LOOGOOtEE ELEMENtARY Breakfast tHURSDAY, FEBRUARY 9 Cereal, toast, applesauce, juice, milk FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 10 Sausage, egg, biscuit, milk MONDAY, FEBRUARY 13 French toast, sausage, fruit, milk tUESDAY, FEBRUARY 14 Breakfast pizza, egg, fruit, milk WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 15 Biscuit and gravy, sausage, applesauce, milk Lunch tHURSDAY, FEBRUARY 9 Bologna and cheese sandwich, green beans, pineapple, cottage cheese FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 10 Pizza, carrot sticks, peach crisp, milk MONDAY, FEBRUARY 13 Chicken nuggets, corn, fruit, bread, milk tUESDAY, FEBRUARY 14 Hamburgers, French fries, baked beans, milk WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 15 Chili, applesauce, cheese and crackers, carrot sticks, sweet rolls LOOGOOtEE INtERMEDIAtE AND JR./SR. HIGH SCHOOL Lunch tHURSDAY, FEBRUARY 9 Chicken noodle soup or pizza, peanut butter and jelly, cheese and crackers, peaches, salad plate, milk FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 10 Spicy chicken sandwich or pizza, French fries, green beans, fruit, salad plate, milk MONDAY, FEBRUARY 13 Grilled chicken sandwich or pizza, baked potato, broccoli and cheese, fruit, salad plate, milk

tUESDAY, FEBRUARY 14 Chicken nuggets or pizza, macaroni and cheese, peas, fruit, salad plate, milk WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 15 Salisbury steak or pizza, mashed potatoes, corn, fruit, salad plate, milk SHOALS SCHOOLS Breakfast tHURSDAY, FEBRUARY 9 Cereal, string cheese, juice, milk; choice 4th-12th: grab-n-go bag FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 10 Peanut butter and jelly sandwich, raisins, juice, milk; choice 4th-12th: grab-n-go bag MONDAY, FEBRUARY 13 Breakfast wrap, fresh fruit, juice, milk; choice 4th-12th: grab-n-go bag tUESDAY, FEBRUARY 14 Cereal, yogurt, juice, milk; choice 4th12th: grab-n-go bag WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 15 French toast, sausage, juice, milk; choice 4th-12th: grab-n-go bag Lunch tHURSDAY, FEBRUARY 9 Chicken taco, corn, refried beans, baked apples, milk; choice 4th-12th: beef and bean burrito FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 10 Bosco sticks with marinara sauce, green beans, fruit salad, milk MONDAY, FEBRUARY 13 Sloppy Joe, broccoli with cheese, salad, fresh fruit, cookie, milk tUESDAY, FEBRUARY 14 Salisbury steak, mashed potatoes, peas, fruit, roll, milk; choice 4th-12th: pizza WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 15 Cheese pizza, green beans, fruit, pudding, milk; choice 4th-12th: deli wrap

Financial aid professionals will be on hand at Vincennes University’s Vincennes and Jasper campuses to help college-bound students and their families open the door to financial aid during College Goal Sunday on February 12 at 2 p.m. (EST). The Vincennes Campus event will take place at the Shake Learning Resources Center and on the Jasper Campus in the Classroom Building. Statewide, College Goal Sunday will take place at 39 total sites. This free event is designed to help college-bound Indiana students and their families to complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). On-site help will be available from financial aid experts, primarily from Indiana colleges and universities. The FAFSA is required for students to be considered for federal and state grants, loans, and scholarships at most colleges, universities, and vocational/technical schools nationwide and must be filed by March 10 to be eligible for state aid. Completing this form correctly and by the deadline is sometimes perceived to be complicated and time consuming. In one afternoon at College Goal Sunday, students and their families can get free help and file the form online. To make filing the FAFSA easier, volunteers walk through the form line-by-line and answer individual questions. All sites offer FAFSA online capabilities and many have Spanish interpreters. A complete list of sites is available at www.CollegeGoalSunday .org. Students should attend with their parent(s) or guardian(s) and bring their parents’ completed 2011 IRS 1040 tax returns, W-2 forms, and other 2011 income and benefits information. Students who worked last year should bring their income information. Students 24 years or older may attend alone and bring their own completed 2011 IRS 1040 tax return, W-2 form, or other 2011 income and benefits information. Before coming to the event, students and parents may apply for their U.S. Department of Education Personal Identification Numbers (PINs) at www.pin.ed.gov. Students who attend any of the College Goal Sunday sites and submit a completed evaluation form will automatically be entered in a drawing for an educational prize. Winners will be notified in March and prizes will be sent directly to the higher education institutions selected by the winning students.

About College Goal Sunday Now in its 23rd year, College Goal Sunday, a charitable program of the Indiana Student Financial Aid Association (ISFAA), has helped more than 87,000 Indiana students and families complete the FAFSA properly and on time, opening the door to financial aid for college. For more information about College Goal Sunday or Financial Aid Awareness Month, call the Helpline at 800-992-2076 or visit www.CollegeGoalSunday.org. “Nearly half of Indiana’s college students qualify for financial aid from the State of Indiana,” said Donette Cassman, Sallie Mae, Inc., chair of College Goal Sunday. “College Goal Sunday helps students and families better understand the financial aid process and brings students one step closer to fulfilling their educational goals.” According to the State Student Assistance Commission of Indiana (SSACI), programs like College Goal Sunday are reaching firstgeneration college students. According to SSACI statistics, in recent years more single-parent Hoosier families have filed for financial aid, indicating that programs like College Goal Sunday are reaching high-risk students and their families. “Financial aid professionals have seen first-hand the disappointment of students who don’t complete their financial aid paperwork properly,” said Cassman. “That’s why the Indiana Student Financial Aid Association continues to provide College Goal Sunday. If our assistance gives students a better chance at higher education, we’re fulfilling our mission.” For more information about College Goal Sunday or Financial Aid Awareness Month, call the Helpline at 800-992-2076 or visit www.CollegeGoalSunday.org.

Loogootee Boys defeat Southridge The Loogootee Boys’ Basketball team improved to 13-3 on the season with a win over Southridge at home last Saturday night, 52-41. Senior Bryant Ackerman finished with a game-high 19 points followed by Conner Wittmer with 17, Matt Mathies with eight, Austin Bradley, Waylon Matthews, Will Nonte, and Cam Wagler with two points each. Matthews finished with two 3-points, Wittmer had one. Both teams finished with 14 team fouls.


11 Wednesday, February 8, 2012

OUTDOORS

DeBoer: Farmland property taxes to continue rising into 2015 BY JENNIFER StEWARt Purdue University News Service Farmland owners are in for more property tax increases at least into 2015, Purdue Extension agricultural economist Larry DeBoer says. In the January 27 issue of his column “Capital Comments,” DeBoer said the base rate for the assessment of an acre of farmland will jump from $1,290 in 2011 to $1,500 in 2012. He estimates the base rate will be about $2,030 per acre by 2015. The 2007 base rate was $880. Indiana farmland is assessed based on its use value rather than its market value - a practice not uncommon among other states. For example, farmland that borders commercial or residential development is not assessed based on selling price but rather only on the income it can earn from farming, DeBoer said. When determining property taxes, the government uses a formula that takes into account the base rate, productivity factor and influence factor. The productivity factor is based on soil productivity for growing corn. Subtracted from that for some acreage is an influence

factor, which is a percentage reduction in the dollar amount based on conditions such as frequent flooding, grade or forest cover. Changes in the assessed value come into play because of the way the base rate is calculated each year. Indiana’s assessed values change each year based on several factors, including land rents, commodity prices, costs and interest rates. Increasing land rents, high commodity prices and low interest rates have combined to create a trend of increase. “The base rate is a six-year rolling average,” DeBoer said. That means the base rate for 2011 was based on figures from the years 2002-07. The base rate for 2012 was calculated from the years 2003-08. Because corn and soybean prices in 2002 were relatively low and interest rates were high, those numbers combined to help keep the average lower in 2011’s assessments. Now the numbers from 2002 have been replaced with the high commodity prices and lower interest rates of 2008, resulting in an increase in assessed value. “Here’s where a new quirk in the formula comes in. The Department of Local Government Finance drops the highest value of the six from the average,” DeBoer said. “The General Assembly changed the formula for 2011 taxes to make the increases in the base rate a little smaller.” For 2011 taxes, lawmakers dropped the highest value derived from the 2007 data. But because the 2008 data is higher, it will be dropped, leaving the still-high values of 2007 to factor into the 2012 tax assessments. “Without dropping the highest value, the base rate for 2012 taxes would have been $1,670.” DeBoer said. “The calculation change reduced the base rate by about 10 percent.” Because there is a four-year lag in the formula and all of the data from 2009 and 2010 and most from 2011 are available, DeBoer said it is possible to project what will happen to the base rate for the next few years. The Department of Local Government Finance used data from 2004-2009 for the 2013 calculation of $1,630, DeBoer said. Because commodity prices have remained high and interest rates low, the base rate for taxes in 2014 will be about $1,760. For taxes in 2015, it will be about $2,030. The six-year average and four-year lag also mean the high commodity prices and low interest rates in 2012 will first enter the tax formula in 2016 and will not drop out until 2022. “The base rate is likely to increase and remain high for a long, long time,” DeBoer said.

Martin County

JOURNAL

p.o. Box 148 loogootee, in 47553 courtney@martincountyjournal.com

Purdue to offer training workshops in Jasper BY JUDItH BARRA AUStIN Purdue University News Service Purdue University Manufacturing Extension Partnership will offer training workshops in Jasper beginning this month. Topics include energy savings, lean product development, root cause analysis and risk management. Energy Savings 101 will be from 8 a.m. to noon February 17. This program provides real-world case studies and the tools necessary for industrial facility personnel to incorporate energy efficiency into financial decision-making. Participants will learn how to analyze an electric utility bill, identify the major components of a mechanical system, and develop long-term energy savings strategies. Lean Product Development will be from 1-5 p.m. April 11. Participants will learn how to apply Lean Product Development to the product design process. LPD offers tools and methods to reduce waste and improve results in product development. Root Cause Analysis will be from 1-5 p.m. June 7. Root cause analysis is one of the essential problem-solving steps. Root

cause is the fundamental, underlying reason for a problem. Participants will learn how to identify the cause of a problem, solve it and prevent it from occurring again, saving an organization time, money and resources. Risk Management will be from 1-5 p.m. August 16. Risk management is a process to identify, assess, reduce, accept and control risks in a systematic, proactive, comprehensive and cost-effective manner. The process runs throughout a company’s business, is led by top management and is embedded into corporate culture. All of the courses will be held at Vincennes University-Jasper, 850 College Avenue, Jasper. Each course costs $99 and registration information is available at http://www.mep.purdue.edu/events. The Manufacturing Extension Partnership Center provides technical skills development and implementation services to manufacturers that want to increase productivity and profitability, enhance customer satisfaction and advance workforce skills. Areas of expertise include advanced manufacturing processes, lean implementation, quality management systems, Six Sigma, green enterprise development and energy efficiency.

Boating Safety Education course to be held in Jasper Indiana Conservation Officers, will be conducting a Boating Safety Education course at the Jasper Moose Family Center, 2507 N. Newton Street Jasper, on Saturday, February 18. Class will begin at 9 a.m. and will end at 4 p.m. The Boater Education class is open to the public and graduates of this course will receive the Indiana Boater Safety Education certificate. This certification will enable those that are 15 years of age with an identification

Hunter education course An Indiana Hunter Education Course will be offered Friday, February 24, from 6 to 10 p.m. and Saturday, February 25 from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Faith Baptist Church located at 205 E. Main Street in Loogootee. Hunter Education certification is required for all persons born after December 31, 1986 who wish to purchase an Indiana hunting license. There is no charge for attending the class. To register, call 812-295-2412. The course is sponsored by Martin County 4-H Shooting Sports and Faith Baptist Church.

card, to operate a motorboat on Indiana waters. Students must attend all sessions and pass a final examination in order to obtain the certificate. Course topics include: rules of the road, emergencies, boating laws, personal watercraft operation and rules, and personal flotation devices There is no charge for the class and preregistration can be made by contacting Indiana Conservation Officers District 7 Headquarters at 812-789-9538.


page 12

Martin County Journal

Indiana wheat ‘excellent’ despite wet planting season BY JENNIFER StEWARt Purdue University News Service Indiana’s winter wheat crop is healthy and right on track despite wet weather at planting time last fall that slightly reduced the state’s acreage, a Purdue University agronomist said. Indiana farmers planted about 430,000 acres of winter wheat for 2012, compared with the nearly 460,000 acres planted for 2011. But according to Herb Ohm, the state’s crop looks “beautiful” to this point. “The wet fall delayed planting a bit, so the wheat had just emerged before it started getting cold,” he said. “But because of the mild winter we’ve had, there’s been no substantial winter kill. We haven’t had many heavy rains that would have led to ponding in the fields. The wheat is in excellent condition.” Ohm said if the weather stays warm for the remainder of winter, wheat could soon come out of winter dormancy and start to grow again. The early awakening would give the crop plenty of time to tiller - something it didn’t have time to do last fall. But the mild weather might also have a downside. Ohm said farmers could see higher incidences of foliar diseases, such as septoria leaf blotch, stagonospora glume blotch and powdery mildew. “Foliar diseases, including leaf and glume blotch, were likely established and active into December. Whether or not they become a problem will depend on the weather because both like warm, wet conditions,” Ohm said. “Powdery mildew will establish early in the spring, but by May it’s likely to fizzle because it likes cool, wet weather.” What has Ohm most concerned, however, is fusarium - a fungus that not only causes yield loss but also produces a vomitoxin

that renders the grain useless for human or animal consumption. Fusarium grows in corn, where it’s more commonly referred to as “giberella,” and can overwinter in the corn stubble left in the fields in no-till systems. Wheat planted into that stubble, or planted in neighboring fields, can become susceptible to the fungus. “Wheat growers need to scout their fields and pay close attention to corn stubble in those fields or nearby fields,” Ohm said. “If they’re seeing a lot of black in the corn stalks, it’s likely at least some of that black is fusarium.” The fungus thrives in humid, wet conditions - especially in April to June when wheat is flowering. It can be successfully treated with fungicides, but the application window is very small. “Fusarium affects wheat when the crop is flowering, and that’s the time when farmers need to apply fungicides,” Ohm said. Part of what makes fusarium tricky is that growers won’t see symptoms in their wheat crop until after the disease is established. That’s why Ohm recommends farmers start to scout fields for foliar diseases before the early boot stage, and, if significant disease is developing, apply the appropriate fungicides. If the weather is warm and humid around the time the crop starts to flower, growers need to apply a fungicide specifically for control of fusarium head blight. “If the weather is cool and dry at flowering, fusarium will be less likely,” he said. One thing that shouldn’t be a problem this year is the Hessian fly, a pest that can severely damage winter wheat, especially when it is planted early. “Hessian fly isn’t a serious concern at this point this year because most wheat in Indiana was planted late,” he said.

“talk to an Expert” launches on facebook with conservation officers Facebook followers of the Indiana DNR can “talk” online with different people from the Department of Natural Resources once a month, during a new program starting February 9. The “Talk to an Expert” series features DNR experts on scheduled topics for one hour a month on the DNR facebook page. Topics and experts will change every 3-4 weeks. The series is an opportunity to ask DNR personnel questions. Those who don’t have a specific question will have the chance to learn from others or clear up misconceptions. The first program on February 9, from 2

to 3 p.m., will feature two conservation officers: Lt.William Browne (public relations) and Lt. Larry Morrison (outdoor education). These conservation officers will answer questions about DNR conservation laws. Future topics, instructions on how to join a conversation on facebook and commenting guidelines are posted at dnr.IN.gov/7315.htm. To join in the chats, go to the Indiana Department of Natural Resources facebook wall, facebook.com/INdnr, and click “like” (if you are not already a “friend”). You may begin typing in questions during the hour and the DNR experts will answer questions as time allows.

New Purina program eases adoption woes Pets adopted from the Dubois County Humane Society are part of a new program designed to help ease the transition to and from the shelter, thanks to a new program in partnership with Purina Veterinary Diets®. The FortiFlora® Good Move™ Program aims to reach more than 600 Animal Welfare Organizations (AWOs) similar to Dubois County Humane Society, in locations across the United States this year. It supports shelter pets during stressful transition periods by providing the shelter with free Purina Veterinary Diets® FortiFlora® Canine and Feline Nutritional Supplements. It is not uncommon for pets to experience stress-related gastrointestinal (GI) issues when they transition to and from animal shelters. Stress diarrhea and other GI issues may result in accidents in the house and can sometimes be misinterpreted as behavioral issues negatively effecting a successful pet adoption. Veterinarians and/or staff decide if a pet that has been brought into one of the designated Good Move Program shelters should be given a 30-day supply. Sprinkled on a dog’s or cat’s food, FortiFlora Canine or

FortiFlora Feline Nutritional Supplement Formula promotes normal intestinal and a strong immune system. Based on individual needs, some pets moving to adoptive homes within 30 days may take the remaining supply with them. Coupons are also provided for adopted pets to make it easier for owners to continue FortiFlora as part of their pet’s transition to a forever home. “Along with easing their transition, we hope the program also encourages new owners to consult with their veterinarian regarding GI problems and questions,” states Grace Long, DVM, MS, MBA, director of technical marketing for Purina Veterinary Diets. “Recent research tells us that the majority of owners whose pets have GI issues do not seek veterinary care, because they either assume nothing can be done or because they believe they need to wait out the problem.” Veterinary services and products are a valuable resource to all pet owners. Dubois County Humane Society, Inc. adoption hours are Wednesdays 4:30-6:30 p.m. and Saturdays 11 a.m.-1 p.m. at 426 Wernsing Road in Jasper. Contact at 812482-7387 or dchsmail@yahoo.com. You can also visit www.duboiscountyhumane.org.

Wednesday, February 8, 2012

OPINION

My Point of

VIEW By Courtney Hughett Owner/Publisher, MCJ

Friday at noon is the deadline for anyone wishing to throw their name in the hat for the 2012 Primary Election. As many of you know from reading my columns in the past, I love elections! I love the whole process of choosing who will lead. The problem that I have seen, locally at least, is that many of the races go unopposed – meaning only one person runs for an office. So far, the following Primary races in Martin County are single-candidate: treasurer, auditor, commissioner district three, coroner, surveyor, and all three county council at-large seats. The only contested races as of today, are for recorder and commissioner district one. So far, there is one Republican and one Democrat signed up for each race but more can file. There are also many Republican precinct committee seats without a candidate. What is a precinct committeeman? I asked that same question and this is how I understood it. A precinct committeeman is responsible for getting voters to cast their ballot for their respective party – through registering people to vote, absentee ballot, etc. A precinct committeeman could also be called upon to appoint someone to replace an elected official who has left office early. For instance, when Noel Harty was elected as Loogootee Mayor his seat as Perry Township Trustee was left vacant. Because Noel is a Democrat, the Democrat Precinct Committeemen voted in the person to replace him. In this election, only Republican candidates are up for election, Democrats will be in two more years. If no one runs in a particular precinct, the Republican Chairman will appoint someone. Anyone with a genuine love for Martin County and obviously the time for public service should consider filing to run. There is no prerequisite in my opinion – just a desire to make a difference. Elected positions such as recorder, treasurer, coroner, auditor, and surveyor naturally require prior knowledge of the specific job, but that doesn’t mean you need a master’s degree or a doctorate. County council would all but require you to have decent knowledge of numbers – specifically money and budgets – as the council is the fiscal body of our county. Commissioners go over everything from bridges to ambulance service to employee insurance to tractors. One thing I have noticed about the commissioners I have watched in action is they all have very good knowledge of Martin County and where

everything is located, mainly bridges, cemeteries, and roads. Commissioners meet every two weeks in Shoals and the county council meets once a month aside from budget time which is usually a one or two-day event twice a year. Council and commissioners’ positions are paid and county insurance is offered. The county council has three at-large seats open. This means that anyone in the county, regardless of your location, can run for one of these seats. They are voted on county-wide. If 10 people file to run, voters will pick their three favorites in the primary according to political party declared. If you are considering filing to run, you must do so by this Friday at noon. Not sure what your district is or do you have other questions? Call the clerk’s office at 812247-3651 and they will help you. You can also contact me at courtney@martincountyjournal.com. I may not know the answer to your question but I will find it.

LEttER tO ~tHE EDItOR~ Consequences – my take

To the editor of the Martin County Journal, In our daily lives there are consequences in the activities that we pursue - both good and bad consequences. For example, if we were to jump off of a building roof, head first, the resulting consequence would probably be bad. That relates to a physical law. However, there are also moral laws that have consequences- both good and bad. One of our political parties has taken it upon itself to remove the resulting consequences of our moral decisions. For example, now we can abort our unborn babies with no immediate bad consequence. There is also an effort to remove the bad consequence of not paying our personal debts (i.e. mortgage and school loans). In my opinion, these are efforts to “buy” votes. They are an effort to take us away from the religious teachings that have been the basis for the unprecedented success of this country, the United States of America. One of the founding Fathers of this nation said that, based upon the constitution, the United States would succeed only as long as its people were a moral people. Do you agree with the removal of these consequences? Dennis Jones Shoals, Indiana

Journal 020812  

Martin County Journal February 8, 2012 issue

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