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“Celebrating the rich history of Martin County and the people who make it great”

Martin County

JOURNAL

Year Three, Issue Two

Wednesday, January 11, 2012

11 Pages

Loogootee Council keeps meeting day same as the past BY COURTNEY HUGHETT Martin County Journal Publisher

It’s a beautiful morning . . .

-Photo by Jessica Lampert

Loogootee resident Jessica Lampert captured the descending moon above on Monday morning as she looked out her window. She said the moon moved very quickly through the horizon.

County council wants to lower comp hours, give more to employee insurance BY COURTNEY HUGHETT Martin County Journal Publisher Auditor Nancy Steiner gave the Martin County Council a report on comp hours at their meeting Monday night, January 9. She said that the highway department had more than 2,000 comp hours accumulated or $34,000 if paid out today. Comp hours are built up for employees’ overtime work. The council then discussed the need to put together policies eliminating such a large volume of comp time and what is rolled over year after year. Council member Randy Wininger said that when he was a commissioner they brought down the amount of comp time. “It was never supposed to get out of hand like this again,” he said. The council told Commis-

sioner Dan Gregory, in the audience, that the commissioners needed to establish a uniform policy and have every department abide by it. Highway Superintendent Jim Williams said he tries to call in those with fewer comp hours but when it comes to taking care of roads in the winter, everyone is called in. The highway department has 13 employees. It was also discussed that the custodian has 701 accumulated comp hours. Auditor Steiner explained that the custodian used to be in charge of coming back each evening to check the door locks but that was changed in 2010. Nine hours have been accumulated since then but she said she is unaware of what this is from. Commissioner Gregory then gave the council an update on the employee insur-

Martin County Animal Control Commission looking at next step BY COURTNEY HUGHETT Martin County Journal Publisher The Martin County Animal Control Commission met for the first time Tuesday night, January 10, since the passing of the revised animal control ordinance. Only three of the seven-member board was in attendance – Don Greene, Phyllis Parker and Courtney Hughett. Due to the lack of members present, the three members briefly discussed the need to work with local law enforcement personnel to see about enforcing fines in the ordinance. According to Greene, he is receiving several calls from residents frustrated about the lack

of cooperation with getting the sheriff’s department to respond to complaints. Greene suggested inviting all local law enforcement leaders along with city, town, and county government boards to attend the next animal control commission meeting. It was decided to send out letters to the law enforcement and elected officials to attend a meeting on February 20 at 6 p.m. in the city council chambers of the Loogootee Municipal Building. The meeting will also be open to the public. The board discussed the fact that without support from local law enforcement personnel, the ordinance and the animal control commission are pointless.

ance. Gregory said that to continue with the same insurance as in the past, along with the annual premium increase from the provider, the county would be paying $743,000. Under the newly-designed plan the cost will be $349,000. He said that 25 employees opted out of taking the health insurance and took the buyout of $5,000. Only nine employees opted out last year. Pat King, in the audience, told the council that during the employee meetings with commissioners discussing the new insurance, she was under the impression, along with others, that whatever money the county ended up saving on insurance, with buyouts, would be split up and put back into employees’ health savings accounts. Commissioner Gregory replied that yes, this was discussed, but until the LOIT (Local Option Income Tax) started coming in, they were unsure how much extra money would be available, if any. He said that this will be looked at again down the road. Council member Lynn Gee said that by that time it may be too late as she knows of some employees who are already looking for other jobs due to the decrease in the health savings account contributions and the increased deductibles. She said that with the amount budgeted of $370,000 the difference should be divided up and put back into employees’ health savings accounts. Gregory replied that he would be afraid to do that because some employees who took the buy-out may want back in changing the total cost substantially. “No, I don’t think so,” replied Gee. She said that she believes that the employees (See ‘COUNTY’ on page two)

New Loogootee Mayor Noel Harty presided over his first city council meeting Monday night, January 9. He was joined by new council members Ron Gilbert, John Fraley, and Fred Dupps. In unfinished business, Mayor Harty brought up the issue of possibly changing the day of the monthly council meetings. The meetings have been held on the second Monday of every month. According to new council member Ron Gilbert, he had a conflict with church meetings on this night. He mentioned the fact that council member Dupps also had a conflict. Dupps replied that his conflict has been resolved. Council member Rich Taylor said that the council meetings have always been held on the second Monday and he doesn’t see why it would need to be changed. Gilbert replied that he didn’t want to miss his church meetings held on the same night. “Didn’t you know that when you put your name on the ballot,” asked Taylor who then made a motion to keep the meeting dates the same. With a second by Rick Norris, all members were in favor except for Gilbert who voted against. The council voted to approve the fire protection agreement with Perry Township in two payments totaling $8,000. Clerk-Treasurer Nancy Jones reported that the city has $6,534,000 in debt which will be paid off in 2022. The council approved a building permit for Kelly Rayhill at 295 Byron Street for a swimming pool. Rick Norris was voted to serve as council president for the next year. The mayor made the following 2012 ap(See ‘LOOGOOTEE’ on page two)

Bridges vandalized on Deep Cut Lake Road Meeting minutes provided by Auditor Nancy Steiner The Martin County Commissioners met for their first meeting of the year last night, Tuesday, January 10. Paul George was retained as president of the commissioners with Dan Gregory kept as vice-president. Randy Smith of 39 Degrees North, the County’s eGIS provider, gave his annual update on usage. He said there was 49.80 percent more usage in 2011 over 2010. He will be conducting an on-site seminar in the near future on the products his company offers for all county offices now. Highway Superintendent Jim Williams presented his two-week work schedule. The bridge inspector found two more bridges with vandalism. The bridges are #50 and #46 on Deep Cut Lake Road. Individual(s) tried to cut a main support wire and a metal beam. The commissioners stated this could be a very dangerous public safety hazard and will not be tolerated. A reward may be offered. The guilty party will be prosecuted to the fullest extent when caught. Williams also reported that the bridge on Jackman Bridge Road has been repaired (See ‘BRIDGES’ on page two)

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COUNTY (Continued from page one) looking for other jobs would stay and see if things got better next year. Many other council members agreed that if available, more money should be put back into health savings accounts. Gregory said he is unsure how much money will be available and it will be relooked at later. “I’d like to design a plan that can be sustainable and not have to mess with this every year,” he said.

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Martin County Journal

In other business, Council member John Stoll said he had several phone calls regarding the $25 user fee the solid waste district wants to implement. Stoll read to the council a list of money given out by the solid waste district over the years to different entities in the county. Council member Hawkins told Stoll that the list he read was money given back to the community when the recycling center was doing well and spanned over the last seven years at least. Council member Rich Summers, who also serves on the solid waste board, told Stoll that he is unsure where he got the information but the solid waste board meets the third Wednesday of every month and the meetings are open to the public if anyone wants to find out what is approved. Council member Hawkins suggested that the council and commissioners work together to write a letter to the state asking for Martin County’s share of the $300 million that was recently found after an accounting error. Commissioner Gregory and Hawkins decided to find out more information and report back. Council member Stoll brought up an issue that he has had at several past meetings regarding the detail of the meeting minutes written by Auditor Steiner. He said that according to the state statute the auditor does have say-so in what information is included in the minutes, at what detail, however he noted that he also read that any two council members can vote to have more added if need be. Auditor Steiner replied that every

time Stoll has had an issue with what she had listed in the minutes, she has always asked him what needed to be corrected but he never gave her anything to change or add. “Well, the last time I checked it wasn’t my job to take the minutes,” said Stoll. “No, I take the minutes,” replied Steiner. “No but if you got something specific you want in there then it’s your job to tell her what specific you want in there,” said Council member Albright. “If it’s something that’s missing.” Judge Lynne Ellis was questioned about an additional appropriation that is to come at the next council meeting for public defender fees. She said she was only given $20,000 in the budget. Council member Hawkins noted that this was only January 9 and the money she budgeted was for all of 2012. Ellis explained that she is working with the lawyers to get bills together, some dating back to 2009 that have never been paid. Hawkins said that if there are outstanding bills from 2009, she may want to ask the lawyer who gave the services to come to a council meeting. Ellis said she has the bills from the lawyers and believes that they are charging for work actually performed. “I’m required by the constitution to appoint public defenders. If you have a problem with my public defender fees you need to talk to the prosecutor,” said Ellis. Hawkins replied, “From 2009, I got a problem paying a bill from 2009.” “Well, you can take a look at that bill then,” replied Ellis. She added that she has

(Continued from page one) and is now open. Another dump truck has the transmission out and the older grader has an oil seal leak and will be repaired soon. The grader is still under warranty. The highway department will be installing a culvert tomorrow in Lost River Township. Judge Lynne Ellis came before the commissioners to report on the accomplishments her department had attained in 2011. An evening traffic court is now offered once a month. She has increased the amount of bonds. The sheriff and prosecutor have been very accommodating with reports and court. An alcohol/drug program in cooperation with Orange County has been started. She is working on an employee handbook for her department. The Google Apps and the contract with RTC Communications are in the works. There are new benches in the courtroom and new flooring downstairs. Surplus items and needed storage space was discussed. Commissioner Gregory gave an update on the county’s health insurance for 2012. Full-time employees have the option of two deductibles with corresponding health savings accounts. The commissioners will review the budget in approximately 60 to 90 days to see if the health savings accounts and buy-outs can be adjusted. Auditor Steiner reported on the compensation hours for 2011. There were 3,131.01 hours reported for 2011 compared to 2,945.31 in 2010. The Commissioners signed a State Covered Bridge Certification stating Martin County has no covered bridges. The Commissioners signed an $8,500 bond for Prosecutor C. Michael Steiner with Western Surety Company. Commissioner Gregory reported on the slow progress of the repairs on the security center.

Appointments for 2012 are as follows: Southern Indiana Development Commission-Dan J. Gregory (1-1-12 to 12-31-12) Alcoholic Beverage Board-William Shaw (1-1-12 to 12-31-12) Martin County Redevelopment Commission-All three Commissioners (1-1-12 to 12-31-12). Samaritan Advisory Board-Tammy Gore. Auditor Steiner will check on the length of the term and report back. County Attorney-J. David Lett (1-1-12 to 12-31-12). Veteran Service Officer-Eugene Wilcoxen will accept the position until a replacement can be found. Auditor Steiner will advertise the position. Commissioner Gregory said one requirement is six months of active duty. Custodian-John Jones (1-1-12 to 12-3112). Highway Superintendent-Jim Williams. The motion was made by Commissioner Gregory and seconded by President George. Both were in favor and Commissioner Wininger voted against it. The majority carried.

BRIDGES

Wilson honored by Midwestern Engineers The Directors of Midwestern Engineers, Inc. recently presented the Gordon R. Bough Distinguished Service Award to Karen L. Wilson at the company’s annual Christmas Dinner at the Spring Mill Inn. This award is given in recognition of exceptional service, superior work ethic, and loyalty to the firm in the tradition of the late Gordon R. Bough. Wilson has been with Midwestern Engineers since 1981 and continues to serve as the company’s Accounts Clerk.

Wednesday, January 11, 2012

been told by a Daviess Circuit Court judge that he is having problems getting lawyers to work Martin County cases because they haven’t been paid. Ellis said that the former Martin County Judge told lawyers not to submit a bill until the case was finished. She said many cases last a long time and she is working to stop this method of billing. She said she is working on getting the old bills taken care of so she can start putting together future contracts for the public defenders. For the county council’s reorganization, Rich Summers was kept on as council president with Randy Wininger as vice president. The council made the following appointments: -Warren Albright was approved to serve on the Community Corrections Advisory Board. -Leroy Allbright was approved to serve on the Alcoholic Beverage Board -Randy Wininger was approved to service on the SIDC Board -Warren Albright and Randy Wininger were approved to serve on the Martin County Redevelopment Commission. -Warren Albright was approved to serve on the Economic Development Commission. -Rich Summers was approved to serve on the Solid Waste Board.

LOOGOOTEE (Continued from page one) pointments: Mark Jones, city attorney; Fred Dupps and Ron Gilbert, board of works and safety; Kelly Rayhill, chief of police; Morgan Huebner, chief of the volunteer fire department; Donald Grindstaff, utilities superintendent, city hall custodian, and parks and recreation superintendent; Nancy Spaulding, utility clerk; Linda Ledgerwood Ellis, mayoral administrative assistant; Mayor Harty, and Rick Norris, solid waste district board; and Tim Strange, Indiana Alcoholic Beverage Board. Mayor Harty noted that the parks and recreation board appointed Ann Ackerman to serve as president and Sue Carrico, Mark Ellis, and Samantha Nelson to serve on the board. Clerk-Treasurer Nancy Jones appointed Kay Summers to once again serve as her deputy. German American, Old National Bank, and Crane Credit Union were approved to serve as the city’s banks of depository. During public comment, Don Greene asked the council if they knew what was happening with Stimulus Engineering who is currently leasing the former Elementary East building from the school. He said that there have been two instances where people have witnessed box trucks removing items from the building. He also noted that the parking lot has only had 10-15 cars for the past several months. Stimulus is almost one year into a two-year lease with Loogootee Schools at $13,000 a month. The council, last year, approved paying $5,000 toward the paving of the East parking lot to accommodate the 200-plus people estimated to be coming to Loogootee for training at Stimulus. Mayor Harty nor the council knew of anything happening but said they would look into it. During the board of works meeting a bad debt write off for water and sewer was approved for $467.59 for a customer bankruptcy.


3 Wednesday, January 11, 2012

OBITUARIES

ROSE “WILMA” SpAULDING Rose “Wilma” Spaulding went home to be with the Lord at 11:35 a.m. Monday, January 9, 2012 at Memorial Hospital and Healthcare Center in Jasper. A resident of Montgomery, she was 89. She was born February 8, 1922, in Daviess County; the daughter of Charles and Mary (Walker) Duncheon. A 1941 graduate of Montgomery High School, she was a member of St. Peter Catholic Church in Montgomery and Daughters of Isabella. She retired from Washington Catholic School. Wilma was a loving mother and a homemaker. Her grandchildren were the love of her life. She is survived by three sons, Glenn and Lee Spaulding, both of Montgomery, and Robert (Nancy) Spaulding of Loogootee; three daughters, Barbara (Virgil) Knepp of Montgomery, Linda (Terry) Riggins of Can-

nelburg, Susan (Calvin) Persohn of Greenwood; one brother, Bernard Duncheon of Montgomery; sister-in-law, Justina Duncheon of Evansville; 10 grandchildren, Melissa (Aaron) Holman, Matt (Amy) Persohn, Clinton (Jo Ann) Spaulding, Kendra (Joshua) Parks, Rodney (Eve) Knepp, Scott (Jamie) Knepp, Ryan (Sarah) Knepp, Jackson Spaulding, Stephanie (Troy) Ainscough, Garrett (Chrissy) Gingerich; and 16 great-grandchildren. Her husband, Jack E. Spaulding, died in 1961. Her parents; a granddaughter, Melanie Gingerich; a brother, Raymond Duncheon; and two sisters, Julia Greenwell and Margaret Feagans, are also deceased. A Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated at 10 a.m. Friday, January 13 at St. Peter Catholic Church in Montgomery, with Rev. James Koressel as celebrant. Burial will be in St. Peter Cemetery in Mont-

Schoolhouse partners prints directory of grants for K-12 educational organizations Educational leaders seeking grant sources for elementary schools, school districts, educators, adult education programs, alternative education and Pre K-12 educational organizations have a new resource from a Purdue Research Park-based company. Schoolhouse Partners LLC has published the ninth edition of Funding Sources for K12 Education. The directory can be purchased directly from Schoolhouse Partners or through YBP Library Services, Ingram Books, EBSCO Information Services and Barnes & Noble bookstores. The information also is available on GrantSelect, Schoolhouse Partners’ subscription-based online database. Louis S. Schafer, editorial director, said educational leaders can meet a variety of needs through the grant opportunities listed in the directory. “Users will find grants for building construction and renovation, cultural education programs, curriculum and teacher development, equipment acquisition and other needs,” he said. “The ninth edition of Funding Sources for K-12 Education includes more than 2,800 grant opportunities from U.S. and foreign foundations, corporations and government agencies. This is an increase of 300 opportunities over the eighth edition.” Each record is listed in three indices: by subject, program type and geography. Records include the grant title; amount of funding; description; application requirements; application deadline; contact infor-

Schoolhouse partners LLC has published the ninth edition of Funding Sources for K-12 Education, which includes more than 2,800 grant opportunities from U.S. and foreign foundations, corporations and government agencies. It can be purchased from the company or YBp Library Services, Ingram Books, EBSCO Information Services and Barnes & Noble bookstores. (Schoolhouse partners photo) mation, including Internet address, email, phone number, fax, sponsor name and physical address; and samples of awarded grants, when available.

Martin County

JOURNAL

p.o. Box 148 loogootee, in 47553 courtney@martincountyjournal.com gomery. Visitation is from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. Thursday, January 12 at the church, with a Daughters of Isabella rosary at 4 p.m. Preferred memorials are to American Red Cross, P.O. Box 350, Washington, IN 47501

or to St. Peter Catholic Church. Arrangements are being made through Ed Lee Mortuary. Condolences may be sent to the family online at www.edleemortuary.com.

Tickets now on sale for Skelton Center events Comedy, country music, and a journey of hope will be featured in January at Vincennes University’s Red Skelton Performing Arts Center. When required, tickets can be purchased online in advance at www.vinu.edu/redskelton or at the Skelton Center box office, 812-888-4039. Comedian Arvin Mitchell will perform on January 12, 8 p.m. (EST). Tickets cost $8 for adults and $5 for non-VU students and seniors. Mitchell hit the comedy scene running after his debut on BET’s Coming to the Stage. His runner-up status on the comedy reality show turned him into a household name with audiences both young and not so young. His clean comedic style and his hilarious impressions have made him a force to be reckoned with. As the former bartender and co-host of BET’s Club ComicView and host of Spring Bling 21 Questions, Mitchell has attracted fans in the U.S. and abroad. His television appearances have helped him become one of the hottest comedians on the college circuit. Country music artist DJ Miller will perform on January 19, 8 p.m. Tickets cost $10 for adults and $8 for non-VU students and seniors. According to Miller, an artist’s ability to entertain a crowd is the single most important part of today’s country music experience. Being able to deliver an unforgettable stage show for fans is often what separates the stars from the superstars.

That’s just one of the reasons why audiences shouldn’t be surprised to find the enthusiastic young singer from Idaville, Indiana, racing through the crowd during one of his sets, or hanging out with a group of fans in the middle of a show. He’s even been known to get down on one knee and dedicate a touching love song face-to-face to one of his many female fans. DJ Miller & “Between Sundays” Nominated for “Best New Artist Video” by Yallwire.com “From Child Soldier to Child Activist The Journey to Hope” will be the focus of a presentation by Michel Chikwanine on January 24 at 7 p.m. Admission is free. This former child soldier has endured and overcome unimaginable pain and struggles. His passion and belief in the possibility for change makes him a truly remarkable individual and humanitarian. Born in the Democratic Republic of Congo, Chikwanine grew up amid the terror of the Great War of Africa. He witnessed the torture of his father, who was singled out for his political beliefs, the rape of his mother, and endured torture of his own. Much of his childhood was ravaged by the death and decay of a war that claimed the lives of 5.8 million people. Forced to leave his home as a refugee at the age of 11, Chikwanine has since travelled to many African countries, witnessing first-hand the problems facing the developing world, but also the beauty of the communities and people who live there.

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4 Wednesday, January 11, 2012

PUBLIC NOTICES

Martin County

JOURNAL

p.o. Box 148 loogootee, in 47553 courtney@martincountyjournal.com

Martin County Sheriff’s Department log MONDAY, JANUARY 2 8:55 a.m. - Received a call regarding a theft. 12:24 p.m. - Received a call regarding stolen rock on Abel Hill Road. 3:33 p.m. - Received a call regarding slick road conditions on U.S. 231, south of Loogootee. 5:46 p.m. - Received a call regarding a property damage accident on U.S. 50, just east of the fairgrounds. 5:47 p.m. - Received a call regarding a slide off on U.S. 231, north of Bramble. 5:51 p.m. - Received several calls regarding slick road conditions. 6:53 p.m. - Received a request for an ambulance in Loogootee. The subject was transported to Daviess Community Hospital. 7:02 p.m. - Received a report of a slide of on U.S. 231, north of Loogootee. 7:15 p.m. - Received a report of a slide off on S.R. 450 near Hickory Ridge Hill. 8:12 p.m. - Received a report of an abandoned vehicle on Spout Springs Road. 8:39 p.m. - Received a report of a slide off on Hickory Ridge Hill. 9:54 p.m. - Received a report of a slide off on Lynwood Street in Shoals. 9:56 p.m. - Received a report of an accident on U.S. 50, east of the Martin State Forest. TUESDAY, JANUARY 3 5:55 a.m. - Received a residential burglar alarm on Boyd Hollow Road. 8:32 a.m. - Received a request to assist the G and M Wrecker Service with traffic on U.S. 231, north of Bramble in reference to removing a vehicle from an accident that occurred last night. 9:46 a.m. - Received a complaint of an aggressive dog on Emmons Lane. 12:22 p.m. - A female caller advised of vandalism to the tires on her vehicle. 2:40 p.m. - Received a report of a possible violation of protective order. 5:04 p.m. - Received a request for an ambulance in Loogootee. The subject was transported to Jasper Memorial Hospital. 5:09 p.m. - Received a request for a welfare check east of Loogootee. 5:57 p.m. - Received a complaint regarding ATVs on private property on Chicken Farm Road. 10:18 p.m. - Received a report of possible child abuse. 10:20 p.m. - Received a commercial bur-

glar alarm in Loogootee. WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 4 1:32 a.m. - Received a report of a possible impaired driver in Loogootee. 2:33 a.m. - Received a commercial burglar alarm east of Loogootee. 7:47 a.m. - Received a request for an ambulance in Loogootee. The subject was transported to Jasper Memorial Hospital. 9:10 a.m. - Received a report of vandalism to a vehicle in Shoals. 10:30 a.m. - Received a report of a controlled burn in the Bear Hill Road area. 12:48 p.m. - Received a report of vandalism to a bridge on Deep Cut Lake Road. 3:13 p.m. - Received a call requesting assistance with a locked vehicle on Ironton Road. 4:44 p.m. - Received a request for an ambulance at the Loogootee Nursing Center. The patient was transported to Daviess Community Hospital. 6:45 p.m. - Received a report of racing vehicles on U.S. 50, near Buffalo Bottoms. 7:20 p.m. - Received a request for a welfare check on children at a residence in Shoals. 8:07 p.m. - Received a report of a possible impaired driver eastbound from Loogootee on U.S. 50. THURSDAY, JANUARY 5 12:18 a.m. - Received a request for an ambulance in Loogootee. The subject was transported to Good Samaritan Hospital in Vincennes. 1:49 a.m. - Received a request for an ambulance south of Loogootee, off of U.S. 231. The subject was transported to Daviess Community Hospital. 2:56 a.m. - Received a request for an ambulance in Loogootee. The subject was transported to Jasper Memorial Hospital. 5:40 a.m. - Received a report of an accident on Spout Springs Road. 7:15 a.m. - Received a report of erratic driving eastbound from Shoals on U.S. 50. 10:10 a.m. - Received a call from the driver of an accident last night. 11:07 a.m. - Received a request for an ambulance in Loogootee. The subject was transported to Daviess Community Hospital. 12:10 p.m. - Received a report of an incident with a patron at the JayC Store in Shoals. 4:05 p.m. - Received a report of a subject burning tires on U.S. 231, south of Loogootee.

4:55 p.m. - Received a request for a vehicle check on Sherfick School Road. 5:56 p.m. - Received a request for an ambulance in Loogootee. The subject was transported to Jasper Memorial Hospital. 7:38 p.m. - Received a call regarding possible violation of protective order. 9:07 p.m. - Received a report of a suspicious male at the shelter house at the boat landing in Shoals. 10:56 p.m. - Received a report of a theft from a residence outside of Shoals. 11:16 p.m. - Received a request for an ambulance in Shoals. No transport was necessary. FRIDAY, JANUARY 6 6:00 a.m. - Received a request for an ambulance at the U.S. Gypsum plant. No transport was necessary. 6:22 a.m. - Received a report of a car off of the roadway on U.S. 150, just east of the Natchez Church. 8:37 a.m. - A female caller reported that she had run off the roadway and did some damage to a yard in Loogootee. 10:12 a.m. - Received a request for a vehicle inspection on Country Pines Road. 10:26 a.m. - Received a request for an ambulance on Dover Hill Road. The subject was transported to Jasper Memorial Hospital. 4:23 p.m. - A male caller reported threats made by his landlord. 4:58 p.m. - Received a report of an accident on 350N at the junction of 1200E. Daviess County was contacted. 6:33 p.m. - Received a call regarding an unruly child. 7:09 p.m. - Received a request for an ambulance on U.S. 231 near Bramble. The subject was transported to Dunn Hospital in Bedford. 8:38 p.m. - Received a report of a deer accident on U.S. 50, near the state highway garage. 9:52 p.m. - Received a request for an ambulance in Shoals. The subject was transported to Jasper Memorial Hospital. 11:45 p.m. - A caller advised of a fight on Main Street in Shoals. SATURDAY, JANUARY 7 7:56 a.m. - A male caller reported harassment. 8:54 a.m. - Received a report of an accident on U.S. 150, just outside of Shoals. 11:50 a.m. - Received a report of an open sewer in Loogootee that was stopped up. 3:30 p.m. - Received a call from a store

in Shoals regarding banning a subject from their property. 3:50 p.m. - Received a report of a possible impaired driver on U.S. 231, south of Loogootee. 4:14 p.m. - Received a call regarding a stray dog. 4:48 p.m. - Received a request for an ambulance in Shoals. The subject was transported to Jasper Memorial Hospital. 5:08 p.m. - Received a report of an accident in Loogootee. 8:34 p.m. - Received a call regarding a possible prowler. 8:39 p.m. - Received a request for an ambulance in Loogootee. The subject was transported to Jasper Memorial Hospital. 9:14 p.m. - Received a report of possible shots heard on E 250S. Daviess County Sheriff’s Department was contacted. 9:24 p.m. - Received a request for an ambulance in Loogootee. No transport was necessary. SUNDAY, JANUARY 8 12:00 a.m. - Received a report of suspicious activity by teenagers on Lynch Road. Lawrence County Sheriff’s Department was contacted. 4:05 a.m. - Received a report from a business in Loogootee of suspicious items found in a dumpster. 5:20 a.m. - Received a request for an ambulance on McBride’s Bluff Road. The subject was transported to IU Health. 10:20 a.m. - Received a report of harassment. 11:45 a.m. - Received a request for an ambulance on S.R. 450. The subject was transported to Jasper Memorial Hospital. 3:05 p.m. - A male caller reported threats made against his son and wife. 4:15 p.m. - Received a call regarding suspicious activity and possible illegal entry into a residence. 4:37 p.m. - Received a request for an ambulance on U.S. 231, south of Loogootee. The subject was transported to Jasper Memorial Hospital. 4:47 p.m. - Received a vehicle check request on Reinhart Road. 6:41 p.m. - Received a call regarding a possible impaired driver on U.S. 231, northbound from Whitfield. MONDAY, JANUARY 9 3:18 a.m. - Received a call regarding a possible attempted break-in at a residence in Loogootee. 5:00 a.m. - Received information reference a runaway juvenile from Washington. The attempt to locate was cancelled at 6:37 a.m.


Wednesday, January 11, 2012

Martin County Journal

page 5

Loogootee police log Martin County Court News MONDAY, JANUARY 2 7:10 p.m. - First responders were requested at Shady Estates Trailer Court for lifting assistance. TUESDAY, JANUARY 3 11:30 a.m. - Female caller requested an officer to come to Shady Estates regarding a domestic dispute. Chief Rayhill went to the location. 5:01 p.m. - First responders requested at 800 North Line Street for a subject having trouble breathing. WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 4 7:00 p.m. - Female caller reported a possible intoxicated driver. Sgt. Hennette was given the information. THURSDAY, JANUARY 5 2:22 am. - Martin County Sheriff’s Department reported a 911 hang up on North Oak Street. Sgt. Hennette went to the address everything checked ok. They had been having problems with the phone. 11:10 a.m. - Female came to the Loogootee Police Department requesting an ambulance. Contacted Martin County for an ambulance. 10:43 a.m. - Male came on station to talk with an officer about a protective order. Chief Rayhill talked to him. 12:40 p.m. - Lee Funeral Home requested an officer for assistance with a funeral de-

tail. Chief Rayhill assisted. FRIDAY, JANUARY 6 9:58 a.m. - Male came on station to report phone harassment. Chief Rayhill talked with him. 12:43 p.m. - Female caller requested assistance in getting her personal property. Chief Rayhill went to the location. 7:32 p.m. - Martin County Sheriff’s Department requested first responders for lift assist on US 231 north, for the ambulance service. 7:37 p.m. - Male caller reported a disturbance at Red Wing Trailer Court. Capt. Akles went to the location and talked with the parties involved. SATURDAY, JANUARY 7 Unknown time - Martin County Sheriff’s Department reported a sewer problem on Southwest 2nd Street. Contacted on-call water personnel. 2:31 p.m. - Female caller reported her daughter was being harassed on facebook. Capt. Akles talked with the caller. 3:52 p.m. - Martin County Sheriff’s Department reported a possible intoxicated driver northbound on US 231. Capt. Akles was given the information. 9:20 p.m. - Request for an ambulance at Sunset Trailer Court. Contacted Martin County.

Persons listed on criminals charges are innocent until proven guilty in a court of law. CRIMINAL COURT New Charges Filed January 3 Logan D. Knepp, operating a vehicle with an ACE of .08 or more, a Class C Misdemeanor. CIvIL COURT New Suits Filed December 28 LVNV Funding LLC vs. Debbie Hayes, civil collection. Freedom Bank vs. Matthew Parker, Jennifer Qualkenbush, Discover, and Treasurer of Martin County, mortgage foreclosure. December 29 Jayliene Marie Baylis vs. Jason Wayne Baylis, petition for dissolution of marriage. CIvIL COURT JUDGMENTS January 2 Judgment in favor of the plaintiff Asset Acquisition Group, LLC and against the defendant Gregory Halcomb in the amount of $37,806.26. Judgment in favor of the plaintiff American Express Travel and against the defendant Raydar and Associates in the amount of $24,378.81. Judgment in favor of the plaintiff Indiana

Martin County real estate transfers Thomas F. Strange, of Martin County, Indiana to Thomas F. Strange and virginia Sue Strange, of Martin County, Indiana, a part of the southwest quarter of Section 19, Township 3 North, Range 4 West, and containing .42 acres, more or less. Gerald D. Wilcher and Margaret H. (Niedenthal) Wilcher, of Martin County, Indiana to Michelle Harbison, of Martin County, Indiana, part of the north half of Section 6, Township 3 North, Range 3 West, in Martin County, Indiana, and containing 37.155 acres, more or less. Also, part of the northwest quarter of Section 6, Township 3 North, Range 3 West, and containing 5 acres, more or less. Robert John Hoffman and Carla Claire Hoffman, of Martin County, Indiana to Challenger Farms LLC, of Martin County, Indiana. Tract I: A part of the southwest quarter of Section 2, Township 1 North, Range 4 West, and a part of the east part of the northwest fractional Section 11, Township 1 North, Range 4 West, containing 82.64 acres, more or less. Also, a part of the northwest quarter, also a part of the northeast quarter of Section 3, Township 1 North, Range 4 West, containing in all 33.35 acres, more or less. Tract II: Part of the southeast quarter of Section 3 (45.8 acres): part of the southwest quarter of fractional Section 2 (20.2 acres); and part of fractional Section 11 (6.9 acres), all in Township 1 North, Range 4 West and containing 72.9 acres, more or less. Tract III: The east half of the east half of the southeast quarter of the northeast quarter of Section 4, Township 1 North, Range 4 West, containing 10 acres, more or less. Tract IV: Beginning at the northwest corner of the

northeast quarter of the northwest quarter of Section 3, Township 1 North, Range 4 West, containing 9 ¼ acres, more or less. Tract V: A part of Section 2 and Section 3, Township 1 North, Range 4 West, Rutherford Township, Martin County, Indiana and containing 232.15 acres. Tract VI: A part of the southeast quarter of the southwest quarter of Section 34, Township 2 North, Range 4 West, Rutherford Township, Martin County, Indiana containing 7.08 acres. Tract VII: The following real estate located in Section 3, Township 1 North, Range 4 West, 10 acres of even width off of the west side of the east half of the southeast quarter; 61.5 acres off the north side of Section 10, Township 1 North, Range 4 West. Except a part of the north half of Section 10, Township 1 North, Range 4 West, Martin County, Indiana, containing 61.5 acres, more or less. Also except a part of the south half of Section 3, Township 1 North, Range 4 West, containing 154.5 acres, more or less. Also except a part of the south one-half of Section 3, Township 1 North, Range 4 West containing 18.73 acres, more or less. Also except a part of the south one-half of Section 3, Township 1 North, Range 4 West, containing 17.15 acres, more or less. Containing in all after said exceptions 121.12 acres, more or less. David Ray Graber and Edna Rose Graber, of Daviess County, Indiana to Indian Creek Quarries, Inc., of Adams County, Indiana. Tract I: A tract of land in Section 1, Township 4 North, Range 3 West, containing 1 ¾ acres, more or less. Tract II: A part of the northeast quarter of the southeast quarter and a part of the northwest quarter of the southeast quarter of Section 1, Township 4 North, Range 3 West, containing 3 acres, more or less. Tract III: Part

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of the northeast quarter of the southwest quarter and also being part of the northwest quarter of the southeast quarter, all in Section 1, Township 4 North, Range 3 West, Martin County, Indiana, containing 18.046 acres, more or less. Tract IV: Part of the south half of the southeast quarter of Section 1, Township 4 North, Range 3 West, Martin County, Indiana, containing 10.920 acres, more or less. Tract V: A part of the north half of the southeast quarter of Section 1, Township 4 North, Range 3 West, containing 10 acres, more or less. Tract VI: A part of the southeast quarter of Section 1, Township 4 North, Range 3 West, containing 28 acres.

Farm Bureau Insurance and against the defendant Margaret A. Shubert, civil plenary in the amount of $10,312.75. SMALL CLAIMS COURT New Filings December 28 Hoosier Accounts Service vs. David and Brandi Gilbert, complaint. Hoosier Accounts Service vs. Arnold R. Nugent, complaint. Hoosier Accounts Service vs. Christopher M. Parsons, complaint. Hoosier Accounts Service vs. Rickie L. Spurgeon, complaint. December 29 Hoosier Accounts Service vs. Karen M. Greer, complaint. Hoosier Accounts Service vs. Melanie Truelove, complaint. SMALL CLAIMS DISMISSED Hoosier Accounts Service vs. Kirby McGuire, complaint, dismissed. Hoosier Accounts Service vs. Charles and Mary Tharp, complaint, dismissed. TRAFFIC TICKETS pAID December 28 – January 3 Gregory Drew, Jasonville, speeding 63 in a 50, $120. John Jones, Loogootee, operating an offroad vehicle on public highway without a valid motor vehicle driver’s license; operating an unregistered off-road vehicle on public property, $125. John Simmons, Loogootee, failure of occupant to use seatbelt, $25. Tyler Tuttle, Shoals, failure of occupant to use seatbelt, $25.

Jail bookings TUESDAY, JANUARY 3 10:04 p.m. - Eric King, 29, of Loogootee, was arrested and charged with habitual traffic violator and false informing. FRIDAY, JANUARY 6 11:52 p.m. - Robert Hawkins, 29, of Shoals, was arrested and charged with public intoxication and possession of marijuana. SATURDAY, JANUARY 7 3:32 p.m. - Michael Richards, 51, of Bedford, was arrested and charged with operating while intoxicated and habitual traffic violator. 4:00 p.m. - Donald Gibson, 36, of Shoals, was arrested and charged with trespassing. 7:08 p.m. - Isabella Goodpaster, 44, of West Baden Springs, was arrested and charged with operating while intoxicated. 7:08 p.m. - Joseph Favre, 51, of West Terre Haute, was arrested and charged with an Illinois warrant for aggravated home repair fraud. SUNDAY, JANUARY 8 1:05 a.m. - Robert Wraley, 55, of Shoals, was arrested and charged with operating while intoxicated. 1:05 a.m. - Brian E. Clifton, 37, of Shoals, was also arrested and charged with public intoxication. 6:25 p.m. - Courtney Hillier, 20, of Mitchell, was arrested and charged with failure to appear. TUESDAY, JANUARY 10 2:20 p.m. - Dustin Baker, 27, of Bedford, was arrested and charged with theft and railroad mischief. 8:06 p.m. - Shane D. Norrell, 21, of Loogootee was arrested by Loogootee Police and charged with domestic battery.


page 6

Martin County Journal

New Beginnings Church W eekly M essage

BY ERNIE CANELL Pastor, New Beginnings Church Give me three steps Romans 8:12-17 There is an old saying, “I go two steps forward and three steps back”. This morning in the 2nd of the series on Moving forward, I want to talk to you about how we will move three steps forward all the time even if sometimes we take two steps back. Setting our mind on the Spirit helps us to walk forward. We want to do forward moving things to come closer to the presence of God. Setting your mind on the flesh steps you backwards and away from God. The promise here is that if you walk in the Spirit you will have life and peace. The feeling that things will never go your way is not the way God wants you to think because with the presence of God, the Holy Spirit in you will give you peace about whatever the circumstance. Three things that will help you move forward with God this year. Simple stuff- we know what we need to do if we want to walk in the Spirit. Isn’t it strange that we know sometimes what we need to do, know it works yet we don’t do it or try it for a little while then quit, like eating right, and exercising. Being a musician I want to use an acronym - AMPS. AMPS are those things that amplify what you put into it. We want to amplify the Spirit working in our lives to keep us moving forward. A is for Audacious Prayer- I don’t mean the kind of prayer we find in a crisis. HELP ME Lord with this issue or illness or this situation. It’s the kind of prayer that says, God your will be done; forgiving prayer, expecting prayer, receiving prayer, persistent prayer. Stepping forward is having the faith that when we pray God hears. We pray without doubt that it is God’s will and when we do that, he hears us and answers. Sometimes it seems we pray without really expecting to receive an answer. M is for Meaningful Bible Input. The prayer without the word of God that tells His will for us has no power, only desire. Praying, joining your prayer with the promises of God’s word brings power. The word of God is good for teaching, reproof, correction and training. The Word is God speaking to us. IT’s His words. Faith comes from hearing and hearing

through the word of God. If we don’t read the word we are not listening to God. But if we take the word and put it into our lives, then we will move in that direction. WE will step forward in a way that God desires and we will receive His blessings. When we read the word, put it into our prayers and act on it, it speaks into our lives. It fills our mind with God instead of ourselves. Stepping forward is easy when the word is in you. Col. 3:16: ‘Let the word of Christ dwell in you richly.’ Everything Jesus was tempted with by the devil in the dessert, His response with “It is written”. P is for Powerful Fellowship. Two fellows in a ship trying to get to God’s presence. It’s like the man with no legs trying to take a step, when you are trying to do it by yourself. The Christian walk was never meant to be by your self. God said it is not good for man to be alone. If you don’t have fellowship with other believers there are so many things that will cause you to go backward. The Body of church is not the body without you. You want to take three steps forward? How about no steps back? Let’s become overwhelmed with God this year. Let’s not only take steps but run forward in our walk with the Spirit. Being lead by the very Spirit of God. That’s where the S comes in. S is for the Spirit of God. The Bible says in Ephesians 5:18, ‘Be filled with the Holy Spirit’. I think we are like this big bucket. Our life is filled with stuff and when we become a Christian we are filled with the Holy Spirit. But something happens; we punch holes in our buckets when we live without the presence of God. Things come our way that stab holes in it. We become like a sieve. Eze 36:27, ‘And I will put my Spirit within you and cause you to walk in My statues.’ 1 Co 3:16, ‘Do you not know that you are a temple of God and that the Spirit of God dwells in you.’ Acts 13:52, ‘And the disciples were continually filled with joy and with the Holy Spirit.’ If we are going to go forward this year we have to have AMPS. If we will do that, we will take three steps forward. God will do great things in your life. Sunday was an awesome time; the place was filled with God’s presence. Everyone was hungry for the great things that God is going to do this year. The youth met on Monday and are making plans to help with a homeless shelter in Louisville and raising fund to go to Acquire the Fire in March. On February 10 we are planning a Valentine’s dinner with a movie to any couple that wants to come. If you want to know more, call Pastor Ernie at 709-0258. Come join in the New Spirit that you will find at New Beginnings, 10:30 a.m. Sunday. You have to check out what’s inside!

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%%("$ !3 (,%- +!.0(,"-1,04)-1.,!* "-+ 222 +!.0(,"-1,04)-1.,!* "-+ This nice looking basset hound is looking for his owner. He was picked up by the Martin County Humane Society around the Shoals area. If you are looking for this dog call Sandy at 295-3388 or Don at 296-0952.

Wednesday, January 11, 2012

Calendar of Events Shoals School Board The Shoals School Board will meet tomorrow night, Thursday, January 12 at 5 p.m. in the central administration office. The meeting is open to the public. Loogootee School Board The Loogootee School Board will meet Tuesday, January 17 at 7 p.m. in the meeting room off the superintendent’s office. The meeting is open to the public. Chamber meetings The Martin County Chamber of Commerce will not meet in January. The annual dinner will take the place of the meeting during the month of February. The date for the annual dinner is Thursday, February 2 at 6 p.m. The next monthly meeting is scheduled for Wednesday, March 14 at noon at Stoll’s Lakeview Restaurant. Election Board meeting The Martin County Election Board will meet Thursday, January 19 at 10 a.m. in the commissioners’ room at the courthouse. They will be discussing combining polling sites in order to cut costs. The public is invited. Loogootee post prom Loogootee Post Prom parents will be selling cheeseburgers and chances on two gift baskets in the high school cafeteria during the boys’ basketball game against BarrReeve on January 14. The next post prom meeting will be January 17 at 6:30 p.m. in the high school cafeteria for any junior parent wanting to attend. Special Talk to a Lawyer Clinic The Volunteer Lawyer Program of South-

WvUT Meet Your Legislators program is Sat., January 28 “Meet Your Legislators” will be broadcast on January 28 at 9 a.m. (EST) on WVUTTV. The live broadcast from Vincennes University’s Davis Hall, Studio B, will feature legislators discussing issues in the recently concluded session of the Indiana General Assembly. The public is invited. Legislators invited to attend include Rep. Bruce Borders of Dist. 45, Rep. Kreg Battles of Dist. 64, Rep. Mark Messmer of Dist. 63, Sen. Lindel Hume of Dist. 48, and Sen. John Waterman of Dist. 39. The event is co-sponsored by the Knox County Chamber of Commerce, League of Women Voters of Knox County, and Pace Community Action, Inc. Viewers can phone-in questions the day of the show to 812-888-5334 or email questions in advance to wvut@vinu.edu. In addition to the live morning broadcast, the program will be repeated at 5 p.m. the same day. Upcoming “Meet Your Legislators” broadcast dates are scheduled for February 25 and March 31.

western Indiana, Inc. announced that it will hold a special Talk to a Lawyer telephone clinic to commemorate Martin Luther King Jr. birthday on Monday, January 16, 2012. This special talk to a lawyer clinic will take place between the hours of 10 a.m. and noon CST. For those in the Eastern Time zone, the hours are 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. While this clinic will be available for anyone who might have a general legal question, the emphasis will be on individuals who find themselves victims of domestic violence or in a shelter. During the clinic, lawyers will be present to answer general legal questions and give general legal advice. To access the clinic, call 618-4845 or toll free 888-594-3449. The Volunteer Lawyer Program of Southwestern Indiana serves 13 counties in southwestern Indiana and receives funding from the Indiana Bar Foundation and Evansville Bar Foundation. This special clinic is in collaboration with the Indiana State Bar Association, Pro Bono Committee. Humane society meetings The Martin County Humane Society meets on the third Tuesday of the month at Loogootee Municipal Building, at 7 p.m. To become a member, contact Martin County Humane Society, P. O. Box 537, Shoals, Indiana 47581, call Don at 2960952. Youth football meetings Martin County Youth Football League meets on the first Wednesday of the month at Pizza Junction at 7 p.m. Questions, call Audrey Robinson at 295-4773. Tourism meetings The MCCC Tourism Committee meets on the second Wednesday of each month at 7 p.m. in the Martin County Community Learning Center on the fairgrounds. Soil and Water meetings The Martin County SWCD meets the third Monday of the month at the SWCD office located at Martin County Learning Center. Office hours for the district are 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. weekdays except Thursdays when it is closed. Visit www.martinswcd. com or call at 295-3149.

post delivers meals

Members of VFW Post 9395 served meals to 30 participants of the Meals on Wheels Program. On January 3, the local post prepared and delivered hot meals to local participants of the program. The menu consisted of Sauerkraut and sausage, scalloped potatoes, corn, yeast roll, and a brownie. For several months the post has been preparing a monthly meal. Those participating were: Diane Bauer, chairperson, Suzie Chanley, Taylor Gould, Kim Wagoner, Pam Fellers, and Sara and Madison Waggoner. Next month’s menu will consist of meatloaf, scalloped cabbage, peas, bread and cookies.


7 Wednesday, January 11, 2012

STATE GOVERNMENT

Martin County

JOURNAL

p.o. Box 148 loogootee, in 47553 courtney@martincountyjournal.com

Indiana and Amazon.com Messmer Report reach sales tax agreement The By District 63 State Representative Governor Mitch Daniels announced Monday that the state has reached an agreement with Indiana’s largest online retailer, Amazon.com, Inc., to begin collecting Indiana sales tax on internet purchases. Indiana will become the fourth state to reach such an agreement with Amazon, but the governor said he will continue to push for federal action to fairly address the issue. “The only complete answer to this problem is a federal solution that treats all retailers and all states the same. But for now, Amazon has helped us address the largest single piece of the shortfall, and we appreciate the company working with us to find a solution,” said Daniels. According to the agreement between

Amazon and the Department of Revenue (DOR), the company will voluntarily begin to collect and remit Indiana sales tax beginning January 1, 2014 or 90 days from the enactment of federal legislation, whichever is earlier. The state will not assess the company for sales tax for other periods. Estimates of uncollected online sales taxes are about $75 million each year. Of that, the State Budget Agency and DOR estimate that revenue from sales tax remittal by Amazon would be approximately $20 million to $25 million per year. Audio from Monday’s press conference may be found at: www.in.gov/gov/files/ Audio/2012/010912audio.mp3

National employment situation for December Nonfarm payroll employment rose by 200,000 in December, and the unemployment rate, at 8.5 percent, continued to trend down, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported last week. Job gains occurred in transportation and warehousing, retail trade, manufacturing, health care, and mining. Household Survey Data Both the number of unemployed persons (13.1 million) and the unemployment rate (8.5 percent) continued to trend down in December. The unemployment rate has declined by 0.6 percentage point since August. Among the major worker groups, the unemployment rate for adult men decreased to 8.0 percent in December. The jobless rates for adult women (7.9 percent), teenagers (23.1 percent), whites (7.5 percent), blacks (15.8 percent), and Hispanics (11.0 percent) showed little change. The jobless rate for Asians was 6.8 percent, not seasonally adjusted. The number of long-term unemployed (those jobless for 27 weeks or more) was little changed at 5.6 million and accounted for 42.5 percent of the unemployed. The civilian labor force participation rate (64.0 percent) and the employment-population ratio (58.5 percent) were both unchanged over the month. ( The number of persons employed part time for economic reasons (sometimes referred to as involuntary part-time workers) declined by 371,000 to 8.1 million in December. These individuals were working part time because their hours had been cut back or because they were unable to find a full-time job. About 2.5 million persons were marginally attached to the labor force in December, little different from a year earlier. (The data are not seasonally adjusted.) These individuals were not in the labor force, wanted and were available for work, and had looked for a job sometime in the prior 12 months. They were not counted as unemployed because they had not searched for work in the 4 weeks preceding the survey. Among the marginally attached, there were 945,000 discouraged workers in December, a decrease of 373,000 from a year earlier. (The data are not seasonally adjusted.) Discouraged workers are persons not currently looking for work because they believe no jobs are available for them. The remaining 1.6 million persons marginally attached to the labor force in December had not searched for work in the 4 weeks preceding the survey for reasons such as school attendance or family responsibilities. Establishment Survey Data Total nonfarm payroll employment increased by 200,000 in December. Over the past 12 months, nonfarm payroll employment has risen by 1.6 million. Employment in the private sector rose by 212,000 in December and by 1.9 million over the year. Government employment changed little over the month but fell by 280,000 over the year. Employment in transportation and ware-

housing rose sharply in December (+50,000). Almost all of the gain occurred in the couriers and messengers industry (+42,000); seasonal hiring was particularly strong in December. Retail trade continued to add jobs in December, with a gain of 28,000. Employment in the industry has increased by 240,000 over the past 12 months. Over the month, job gains continued in general merchandise stores (+13,000) and in clothing and clothing accessories stores (+11,000). Employment in sporting goods, hobby, book, and music stores fell by 10,000. In December, manufacturing employment expanded by 23,000, following 4 months of little change. Employment increased in December in transportation equipment (+9,000), fabricated metals (+6,000), and machinery (+5,000). Mining employment rose by 7,000 over the month. Over the year, mining added 89,000 jobs. Health care continued to add jobs in December (+23,000); employment in hospitals increased by 10,000. Over the year, health care employment has risen by 315,000. Within leisure and hospitality, employment in food services and drinking places continued to trend up in December (+24,000). Over the year, food services and drinking places has added 230,000 jobs. Construction employment changed little in December. Within the industry, nonresidential specialty trade contractors added 20,000 jobs over the month, mostly offsetting losses over the prior 2 months. Employment in professional and business services changed little in December for the second month in a row. The industry added 42,000 jobs per month, on average, during the first 10 months of 2011. Government employment changed little in December but was down by 280,000 over the year. Job losses in 2011 occurred in local government; state government, excluding education; and the U.S. Postal Service. The average workweek for all employees on private nonfarm payrolls increased by 0.1 hour to 34.4 hours in December. The manufacturing workweek increased by 0.1 hour to 40.5 hours. Factory overtime decreased by 0.1 hour to 3.2 hours. The average workweek for production and nonsupervisory employees on private nonfarm payrolls edged up by 0.1 hour to 33.7 hours. In December, average hourly earnings for all employees on private nonfarm payrolls rose by 4 cents, or 0.2 percent, to $23.24. Over the past 12 months, average hourly earnings have increased by 2.1 percent. In December, average hourly earnings of private-sector production and nonsupervisory employees were unchanged at $19.54. The change in total nonfarm payroll employment for October was revised from +100,000 to +112,000, and the change for November was revised from +120,000 to +100,000.

Mark Messmer All Hoosiers’ voices stifled by House Minority no-show Wednesday, January 4 marked the first day of the 2012 Legislative Session, but the House has yet to be able to begin its business. Due to the fact that most of the House minority party has chosen not to be present on the House floor and do the job they were elected to do, a bill list has not been handed down to be assigned to committees. In order for the House to begin conducting business this session a quorum, or 67 members, must be present on the House floor. This is a very unfortunate delay in the state’s business. Bills that will help Hoosier families, veterans and will continue to boost Indiana’s economy are being postponed. It is not until a bill is assigned to a committee that their meetings can begin. These meetings allow the public to voice their concerns, and also allow the members of the committee to learn more about the purpose of the bill. We were elected to represent our constituents by proposing ideas, discussing those ideas, compromising where we can, and eventually voting on the issues. Currently, not one Hoosier is being represented and that is unfair to hardworking taxpayers. It is our job to represent our entire district, not stifle the voices of those who are not part of a special interest group or a member of an opposing party. This is a short session, it must end by March 14, and that gives us little time to carry out our work. I look forward to being able to move forward, and openly discuss and debate the pieces of legislation that come

before us in the House. I appreciate your feedback and support. Please feel free to contact me about both local and state issues by phone at 317-2329671 or by email at H63@in.gov.

Rep. Messmer’s remarks on State of the State address The following is State Rep. Mark Messmer’s (R-Jasper) response to Gov. Daniels’ State of the State address. “Since Gov. Daniels took office in 2005, his vision and plans to create a prosperous and stronger state for all Hoosiers have been very successful. One of his biggest accomplishments that has directly benefited our community is the extension of I-69 that will better connect local businesses, including Crane Naval Base, to Evansville and Indianapolis. Building the extension has created hundreds of jobs for Hoosiers and, upon its completion, will continue to provide a great boost to our economy. “Gov. Daniels has been able to execute all of his plans without raising taxes on Hoosiers, which is something many states in the nation have not been able to do. Through the Indiana Economic Development Corporation, we have also been able to create more than 140,000 jobs and those businesses have invested $27.9 billion in their Indiana operations. Indiana is in great shape fiscally and continues to lead the nation in job creation. I applaud Gov. Daniels on his continued commitment to Hoosiers and his work which has allowed Indiana to lead the nation in so many respects.”

Senator Holdman: Give counties choice on local government structure State Sen. Travis Holdman (R-Markle) announced last Wednesday he will author legislation during the Indiana General Assembly’s 2012 session to give counties the option of restructuring the offices of county commissioner and council. “I believe these changes would bring greater efficiency and fairer representation to county government, along with the potential for cost savings,” Holdman said. “Indianapolis should not make that decision for the counties; the local citizens should be able to make it for themselves. Not all Hoosier communities are the same, and they don’t all need to follow the same structure for their local governments.” The bill Holdman plans to introduce would allow counties to establish one county commissioner to replace the existing multiple-member boards. The bill would also let counties create a uniform makeup for their county councils by electing all members to represent equal districts, instead of some members representing districts and others representing the county at-large. Accompanying these changes – which could only be enacted together – would be the transfer of the county commissioner’s legislative duties to the council, to maintain appropriate checks and balances in local government. Holdman said his legislation stems from state leaders’ continued focus on streamlining and modernizing local government in Indiana. He said the proposed alternate arrangements for county commissioners and council members reflect the recommendations of many current county officials. “My experience in town and county government leads me to favor the one-commissioner concept,” said Grant County Commissioner Mike Burton. “It makes the

officeholder more accountable to the public. I also support the idea that counties get to decide whether to retain the current system or change to one commissioner.” “I’ve never been a fan of the state telling counties how they should be run,” said Kevin Woodward, president of the Wells County Commissioners. “I believe the voters should make that decision.” Holdman’s bill is based on time-tested systems that have worked at other levels of government. “This idea is the basis for our nation’s presidency, states’ governorships, the mayors of hundreds of cities and countless company CEO positions.” Holdman added that his proposed option for restructuring county councils would create more equitable representation for all residents of a county. “Electing all county council members by districts would level the playing field so each member’s vote represents a similar number of citizens – just like in the U.S. House of Representatives or here in the General Assembly,” Holdman said. “When some council members represent an entire county and others represent only part of that county, it can leave rural residents at an electoral disadvantage and create the appearance that certain members’ opinions carry more weight than others.” Holdman said his bill would give counties three avenues by which they could change their government’s structure: a 3-0 vote by the county commissioners, a 2-1 vote by the commissioners triggering a voter referendum, or a voter referendum started by petition. “This bill represents a great opportunity for Indiana,” Holdman said. “Hoosier voters would have more say in what their local government looks like.”


page 8

Martin County Journal

Wednesday, January 11, 2012

Governor Daniels’ State of the State Address The following is Governor Mitch Daniels’ State of the State address from last night Tuesday, January 10. Members of the General Assembly, honored guests, fellow citizens. For an eighth time, and the final time, you afford me the unrivaled privilege of this podium. As it’s my last such chance to express my appreciation for the public service you each perform, and to Hoosiers for hiring me twice so I could try to perform my own, I’ll start with a heartfelt thank you. But the time for reminiscing will come later, much later. Tonight, and all nights in today’s Indiana, must be about the future, where we are and where we are going. A reporter asked recently, “What keeps you up at night?” I replied that I generally sleep well, but if I ever do have trouble, I don’t have to count sheep. I count all the states I’m glad I’m not the governor of. Around the time I first took office, a radio caller expressed a fairly common sentiment. He said “I like what you say you stand for, but Republicans, Democrats, nothing ever changes. Nothing’s ever different.” I recall responding, “Sir, I’m careful not to promise what I’m not sure can be delivered. But I’ll promise you one thing. In a few years, you may disagree with decisions we’ve made, or actions we’ve taken. But you will not think nothing’s different.” I’m pretty sure that good man would agree tonight that things are very different in Indiana now. Then, we were broke and other states were flush. Tonight, while states elsewhere twist in financial agony, Indiana has an honestly balanced budget, a strong, protective reserve in our state savings account, and the first AAA credit rating in state history, one of just a handful left in America. Our credit is better – imagine this – than that of the federal government. Another host of states raised taxes again last year, while Hoosiers are taxed at the lowest levels in a long time, thanks in part to the lowest property taxes in the nation. While other state governments stiff their vendors, close parks, delay tax refunds, and ignore unacceptably poor service levels, Indiana state employees are setting national standards for efficiency. Tonight, Hoosiers are served by provably the most productive government workers anywhere. Indiana has the fewest state employees per capita in the country, the fewest we’ve had since 1975. And yet our parks have never been in better shape, your tax refund comes back twice as quickly as it used to, and the average customer got in and out of a license branch last month in less than 14 minutes. I’m not the only one to notice. In a national survey last summer, 77 percent of Hoosiers described their state government as “efficient,” far above most states and the secondhighest rating in the nation. Uniquely in public sector America, Indiana now pays state workers on a performance basis, so those doing the best job are properly rewarded for their superior efforts. But I know that the reward they value as much as money is simple recognition from the citizens they serve, and I hope you’ll show them right now that you value them and their hard work as much as I do. Careful stewardship of the taxpayer’s dollar, and ceaseless efforts to improve public services, are matters of duty, and basic good government. But they are not the fundamental goals of public life. They are just means to the real goal, which is to make of our state a place of opportunity, and upward mobility, and a better standard of living. A place where young people, and people not so young, know that they can start with nothing and make a good life. From our administration’s first day, this has been the central objective around which everything else was organized. We have worked relentlessly to move Indiana up the list of great places to do business. We set out to build the best sandbox in America, a place where men and women of enterprise knew that, if they risked a buck on their idea or their dream, they would have the best possible chance to get it back, with

something left over they could use to hire the next Hoosier. We have made steady progress, coming from nowhere to the top tier in every ranking: No. 6 according to the nation’s site selectors, No. 6 according to CEO Magazine, No. 5 according to real estate decision makers. But it isn’t nearly enough. It was our ironic bad luck to create a top economic climate just as the nation plunged into its worst modern recession, and business investment slowed to a crawl: we became the prettiest girl in school the year they called off the prom. Despite these headwinds, our recently strong state revenues show that something positive is happening to Hoosier incomes. In 2010, the most recent data we have, Indiana incomes grew at the eighth fastest rate in the country. Here’s another encouraging sign: more people are moving into Indiana than moving out. Our population is growing at the fastest rate from Iowa to Maine. Maybe best of all, thousands more college graduates moved into our state last year than moved out. There is no better indicator of economic promise in today’s world than success at attracting top talent, and we are. We are not where we want to be, nowhere close. But with a welcoming business climate, enormous investments in new public infrastructure, and a stable fiscal picture, we are poised for more progress, and better days. Beyond the statistics lies a more basic difference in the Indiana of today: we are now, indisputably, seen as a leader. In hundreds of articles about fiscal prudence, economics, transportation, corrections, child protection, we are cited constantly now as an example for others to examine. From Cleveland: “Ohio should follow Indiana’s lead and dive in.” From Detroit: “Indiana has many of the answers…as seen in Indiana it certainly is possible.” From North Carolina: “Fortunately, there’s no need to speculate about how a state might proceed...Indiana has already done it.” It’s more than words. We now experience the sincerest flattery all the time: our Economic Development Corporation has been copied by Ohio, Wisconsin, Michigan, Iowa among others; our corrections programs by Oregon; our employee health care by Oklahoma, Missouri, and Florida; our performance-based personnel policies by Tennessee and Wyoming; our air quality modeling and permitting by Kentucky and South Carolina; our online university, WGU Indiana, by Texas and Washington. And, at every governors meeting, someone says “If only we could pull off a deal half as good as Indiana did with its Toll Road.” The latest realm in which Indiana is now a leader is perhaps the most important. From coast to coast, others are praising our reforms of public education. One national magazine wrote that Indiana has gone “from the backwaters of education reform in America to the front.” The Fordham Institute said “No one has been more successful in providing a comprehensive reform plan for a system that is failing America’s children.” And then there’s this, from even further away: the Daily Telegraph of London wrote that in education, “England would do well to follow Indiana’s lead.” The days when education debates started and stopped at dollar signs are over, and high time. From President Obama down, everyone now recognizes that leaders in education are defined not by what they put in but by what they get out. But just for the record, and despite frequent misrepresentations to the contrary, Indiana is a leader in what we put in. With this year’s spending increases, plus the additional funds we requested for full day kindergarten, K-12 spending is now 56 percent of the entire state budget, the highest percentage of any state in the nation. No state anywhere devotes more of its state funds to education. But that’s not why others are following Indiana. It’s our new commitment to rewarding

the best teachers, liberating principals and superintendents, and providing low- and middle-income parents the same choices as their wealthier neighbors; that’s what has caught the world’s attention. And this year, when we end the cruel, defeatist practice of passing children who cannot read into fourth grade, and when our most diligent students begin to graduate from high school in 11 years, and get a head start on college costs with the dollars they earned through their hard work, others will take notice of Indiana yet again. There are few subjects more studied, or more intriguing, than leadership. Leaders come in many forms and often from unexpected directions. But some qualities are common among them, and one is that leaders never loaf. They never slip into complacency, settle for things as they are, or stop pursuing innovation and excellence of result. If they do, leadership will pass, and new leaders surpass. Leaders who loaf aren’t leaders for long. Along with all the accolades, Indiana now bears this burden of leadership, the duty to keep pressing ahead. This administration will not loaf. We have made out a long list of self-assignments for our eighth and final year. Our Economic Development Corporation captured a record 219 new jobs transactions in 2011; we have raised the bar to 250 for the year ahead. We will press hard to accelerate further the ahead-of-schedule, under-budget delivery of our Major Moves transportation program. In 2012, we will invest $1.2 billion in road and bridge construction, the sixth straight recordsetting year. The last contract on the Hoosier Heartland Corridor will be let next summer and the entire project finished by 2013. The last contracts on U.S. 31 from South Bend through Kokomo will be let this year, and we have accelerated completion of the entire corridor into 2015. I-69 will be open for traffic from Evansville to Crane, as will the entire Fort to Port highway in Northeast Indiana. The Sherman-Minton Bridge will be rebuilt and reopened by March and, upriver, an agreement on a new bridge from Utica to Louisville will be in place, cementing Indiana’s place at the forefront of the public-private partnership movement. We will build the state’s 3,000th mile of bike and hiking trails, and reach our goal of a trail within 15 minutes of every Hoosier. Unknown to most citizens, the air and water of Indiana is now the cleanest in living memory. In 2011, every Indiana community met all national air quality standards for the first time in the history of the Clean Air Act. Last year, we wiped out the last of a 550case backlog of old, and therefore less strict, environmental permits, and are now the only state completely current. Our goal for 2012 is to maintain this status and, if national limits are lowered yet again, to find a way to meet those standards, too. We will complete our successful overhaul of what was once America’s worst welfare system when, in February, the 10th and final region is converted to our reformed, publicprivate system. Backlogs have been slashed by 80 percent, timeliness and accuracy have soared above national averages, and last October the program earned a cash bonus and an award for most improved in the nation. We have set high targets for continued improvement in 2012. The same is true of our campaign to conserve Indiana’s natural heritage. The last seven years have seen new records for protection of wetlands and habitats, 50,000 acres by the end of this year, highlighted by the largest such project ever at Goose Pond. In 2011, we launched new waterways conservation projects the size of three Goose Ponds in the Muscatatuck Bottoms, and five Goose Ponds along the Wabash Corridor. Before long, Hoosiers will be able to travel over 100 miles down our state’s signature river and never leave a protected wetlands. Our coming Bicentennial gives us an ideal opportunity to extend this historic era of reverence for the beauty God bestowed on Indi-

ana. I have appointed a commission of a dozen illustrious citizens, led by my partner Becky Skillman, and by the legendary Congressman Lee Hamilton, to guide the great celebrations to come. As a first initiative, I have asked them to oversee a Bicentennial Nature Trust, a statewide project to protect still more of our most precious natural spaces. On our 100th birthday, Indiana launched its state park system. A statewide conservation initiative is a fitting sequel and bequest from our second century to our third. We have identified state funding, within existing resources, of $20 million, but that must be just a beginning. The Trust is intended to inspire others, and to match their donations of land or dollars in a continuing statewide surge of conservation. The Commission joins me in challenging citizens, businesses, and in particular our unique network of county community foundations, to identify and fund local projects that will safeguard places of beauty for future generations. In this Assembly, you too must set big goals. We should, at long last, enact a law to protect workers and patrons across Indiana from the hazards of second-hand smoke. Public support has grown, and so has the evidence of health risk to workers. It is time to move this long-sought objective to the finish line. We should – no, we must – strengthen our laws against the horrid practice of human trafficking, and we must do it in time for the Super Bowl, the kind of event at which the exploitation of young women is rampant in the absence of such a tough law. We should assist students with the cost of higher education by empowering our Higher Ed Commission to limit the “credit creep” which unduly increases both time to graduation and student expense. Undoubtedly, some degrees will continue to justify more than the traditional 120 credit hours. But schools requiring 126 hours for a degree in sociology, or 138 hours in special education, or 141 hours in music education, should have to explain why all that time and student expense is necessary, especially when other colleges offer high quality programs in less time and cost. We should deepen the state’s response to the terrible tragedy that befell so many at last summer’s Indiana State Fair. A catastrophe so singular merits unique treatment, and I hope you will augment the amounts already provided the victims and their families by the state and private donors. And we should trust the people of Central Indiana with the decision whether to raise local dollars for mass transit if they believe it crucial to their future quality of life. Within weeks, one of the great public careers, and perhaps the greatest judicial career, our state has known will come to a close. Chief Justice Randy Shepard, let tonight be one of many occasions on which a grateful and fortunate state thanks you for a quarter century of fairness, firmness, and farsightedness on our highest bench. Part of Justice Shepard’s legacy will be the landmark report that he and former Governor Joe Kernan co-authored, proposing overdue modernization of our pioneer days structures of local government. One way to honor this great public servant will be to advance more of the sensible and needed reforms set forth by the Kernan-Shepard Commission. I ask this Assembly to do so, on their own merits but also in recognition of this historic public servant. Because economic opportunity, and building America’s best home for jobs, is the central goal of all we do, every year should include a bold stroke to enhance it. This year, the choice of actions has become obvious. In survey after survey, by margins of 2 to 1 or more, Hoosiers support the principle known as Right to Work. After a year of studying the proposal, I agree. The idea, that no worker should be forced to pay union dues as a condition of keeping a job, is simple, and just. But the benefits in new jobs would be large: a third or more of (See ‘DANIELS’ on page nine)


Wednesday, January 11, 2012

Martin County Journal

DANIELS

(Continued from page 8) growing or relocating businesses will not consider a state that does not provide workers this protection. Almost half our fellow states have right to work laws. As a group, they are adding jobs faster, growing worker income faster, and enjoying lower unemployment rates than those of us without a law. In those ratings of business attractiveness I mentioned, the only states ahead of us are right to work states. What every economic development expert has testified to, we have learned from firsthand experience: over seven years and well over a thousand job competitions, we have found that, when Indiana gets a chance to compete, we win two out of three times. But too often we never get a chance, because a right to work law is a requirement. Especially in this poor national economy, a state needs every edge it can get. Everyone knows that, among the minority favoring the status quo, passion on this issue is strong, and I respect that. I did not come lightly, or quickly, to the stance I take now. If this proposal limited in any way the right to organize, I would not support it. But we just cannot go on missing out on the middle class jobs our state needs, just because of this one issue. For the sake of those without jobs, and those young people just beginning the ascent of life’s ladder, I ask you to remove this obstacle and make Indiana the 23rd state to protect the right to work. I have a new prized possession. It is a letter, written to his parents by a young clerk named A.B. Carpenter, on February 12, 1861. Amid updates about haircuts, colds, and headaches, young Mr. Carpenter reported the following: “There is…considerable excitement concerning a couple of

legislators who went to Kentucky to fight a duel. Mr. Heffern, a Democrat, slandered and abused Mr. Moody, a Republican in a speech and Moody challenged him. He accepted and choosed bowie knives. They went to Kentucky last Friday night and have not been heard from since.” And we think we have disagreements! When we do, I hope we’ll keep them not only in state, but also in this Chamber, where the people’s business is supposed to be settled. Mr. Carpenter’s letter wasn’t mainly about duels or haircuts. He wrote it because he had gone to see the newly-elected President, Abraham Lincoln, who had spent that day, his 52nd birthday, in Indianapolis. Young Carpenter described Lincoln’s arrival at Lafayette Road, the procession down Washington, Pennsylvania, Ohio and Illinois Streets to the Bates House hotel. Seeing the new President filled Carpenter with hope, he said, that “(S)oon our government will be remodeled.“ I like the term. These measures I have mentioned are part of our continuing remodeling project. In three weeks, the entire world will fix its eyes on this city, and our state. It should be a magic moment, I hope a matter of pride to every Hoosier everywhere. But the Super Bowl didn’t get here overnight. Indy’s selection followed decades of constant striving, and building, and reforms to make our capital the vibrant, livable model city it has now become. No one leader, or group of leaders, made it happen. The work was passed from hand to hand, administration to administration, generation to generation, and in no era did the people of Indianapolis rest, or settle, or loaf. So it will have to be with the construction of the great Indiana we are determined to achieve.

page 9

I carried here from its place on my desk an atomic clock, given me by a friend who served a sister state as governor with great distinction. It sits directly in front of me each day, counting down the days, hours, minutes, and seconds until I turn over these duties and return to private life. It is there to remind me to use every moment as well as I can to make Indiana a place of greater promise and prosperity. Silently, it challenges me to search each day for the next improvement, the next efficiency, the next breakthrough, the next stroke of Indiana leadership. Yes, these nights are about the future, but I do look back at past speeches, if only to avoid repeating myself. In one, I recounted telling an East Coast CEO who wondered what Indiana was known for that one day he wouldn’t have to ask. Tonight, he doesn’t. In another, I said I hoped we would become bolder in our embrace of change, take our motto from the inspiring athletes of the Special Olympics, and be a braver state. Tonight, we are. In the very first of these meetings, I invited you and every Hoosier listening to join us in rejecting mediocrity, demanding excellence, aiming higher. Tonight, we do. In a column titled “Indiana promises a better future,” a young graduate student, a lifelong resident of a neighboring state, wrote to the Indianapolis Star that she had made a critical life decision. She would take her new degree and move to Indiana. She cited our “fiscally responsible choices,” our “economic integrity,” our avoidance of the “outof-control spending we see in so many other states.” She concluded by predicting that more talented young people would make “that short drive down I-69 to a more promising future.” That is the state we have dreamed of. A

state that magnetizes people of talent, and the risk-taking capital that seeks to employ them. A state of growth. A state of hope. A state of promising futures. We are not yet fully that state. But we are so much closer to it. We have leapfrogged other places, passed more competitors than Tony Stewart at Homestead. We are certainly, irrefutably, different. Until it became real, I never imagined that, for eight fulfilling years, I would be given the chance to help make Indiana different. On the night it became real, I resolved to use every day, take every action, make every change that might make our state a place of promising futures. I now have 369 days, __hours, ___minutes, and __seconds left as the people’s employee. I pledge to use every one of them, as wisely as I can, in the service of those who sent us to this chamber. I ask you to do likewise, to be the kind of leaders the new leadership state of Indiana now expects us to be. God bless this Assembly and this great state.

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10 Wednesday, January 11, 2012

SCHOOL & SPORTS

Martin County

JOURNAL

p.o. Box 148 loogootee, in 47553 courtney@martincountyjournal.com

Loogootee and Shoals

SChool lUNCh MENUS

SHOALS SCHOOLS Breakfast THURSDAY, JANUARY 12 Cereal, peanut butter graham crackers, juice, milk FRIDAY, JANUARY 13 Yogurt parfait, juice, milk MONDAY, JANUARY 16 Egg and cheese sandwich, fresh fruit, juice, milk TUESDAY, JANUARY 17 Cereal, cheese bites, juice, milk WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 18 French toast, sausage, juice, milk Lunch THURSDAY, JANUARY 12 Soft shell taco, corn, salad, refried beans, fruit, milk FRIDAY, JANUARY 13 Cheese breadsticks, brown rice, broccoli, fruit, juice, milk MONDAY, JANUARY 16 Chicken strip wrap, green beans, fruit, milk TUESDAY, JANUARY 17 Country fried steak, mashed potatoes, cooked carrots, fresh fruit, roll, milk; choice 4th-12th: pizza WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 18 Chicken taco, corn, refried beans, apple crisp, milk; choice 4th-12th: corndog LOOGOOTEE ELEMENTARY Breakfast THURSDAY, JANUARY 12 Cereal, sausage link, applesauce, juice, milk FRIDAY, JANUARY 13 Egg, sausage, biscuit, fruit, milk MONDAY, JANUARY 16 French toast, sausage, fruit, juice, milk TUESDAY, JANUARY 17 Breakfast pizza, egg, fruit, juice, milk WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 18 Biscuit and gravy, sausage, fruit, juice, milk Lunch THURSDAY, JANUARY 12 Bologna and cheese sandwich, baked beans, pineapple, cottage cheese

FRIDAY, JANUARY 13 Pepperoni pizza, green beans, pears, milk MONDAY, JANUARY 16 BBQ rib sandwich, tossed salad, pears, milk TUESDAY, JANUARY 17 Sloppy Joe, corn, peach crisp, milk WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 18 Macaroni and cheese, peas and carrots, applesauce, bread, milk LOOGOOTEE INTERMEDIATE AND JR./SR. HIGH SCHOOL Lunch THURSDAY, JANUARY 12 Spaghetti or pizza, tossed salad, peas, fruit, salad plate, milk FRIDAY, JANUARY 13 BBQ chicken or pizza, mixed vegetables, fruit, twice baked potatoes, salad plate, milk MONDAY, JANUARY 16 Grilled chicken or pizza, baked potato, broccoli and cheese, fruit, salad plate, milk TUESDAY, JANUARY 17 Salisbury steak or pizza, mashed potatoes, green beans, fruit, salad plate, milk WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 18 Potato soup or pizza, grilled cheese, fruit, salad plate, milk

Cheering on . . .

Lion boys take down number one

FIFTH GRADE High Honors Ayden Aiman, Nikki Arvin, Kirk Bratton, Kalli Britton, Nick Bowman, Courtney Burch, Kashten Burch, Chloe Carrico, Jake Carrico, Max Christmas, Sheldon Christmas, Wyatt Crane, Bailey Dearwester, Hope Fischer, Jacob Hollihan, Konner Lyon, Skyler Padgett, Amber Page, Maddie Strange, Crystal Tolbert, Madisyn Wade, Alex Wagler, Roseann Wagler, John Wagoner, Ashlynn Wathen, Olivia Wininger, and Ethan Ziegler Honor Roll Jacob Arvin, Mallory Berry, Sarah Bussinger, Kendall Berry, Cruse Bridgewater, Maddie Cropp, Collin Dant, Sydney Davis, Haley Erwin, Daniel Gingerich, Charles Graber, Grace Hadley, Maelee Hawkins, Leonna Hedrick, Chase Hembree, Becca Hollaway, Kaedon Holt, Katie Hupp, Jayden Seitz, Tyler Swartzentruber, Jace Toy, Jaycobson Wagoner, Jayleigh Wagoner, and Jaymison Wagoner perfect Attendance Chloe Carrico, Daniel Gingerich, Alex Wagler, and John Wagoner SIxTH GRADE High Honors Ross Adams, Dylan Arthur, Luke Callison, Anaya Carrico, Candice Clark, Joshua Cook, Monica Cowin, Cora Hedrick, Lane Keller, Zach Lythgoe, Kristin Norris, Car-

Last Friday night the Loogootee Lions Boys’ Basketball team took down the No. 1 North Daviess Cougars 45-37 at home. The Lions (#3) only scored 14 points in the first half and were down by four points at halftime. The Lions battled back in the third scoring 18 points to the Cougars’ 10 and set the pace for the rest of the game. Bryant Ackerman scored a game-high 16 points followed by Colin Nelson with 12 off the bench. Conner Wittmer contributed seven points, Aaron Howell finished with six, and Austin Bradley with four points. The team moved to 9-1 on the season and will host Barr-Reeve Saturday night.

Kylie Sims, daughter of Mark and Krista Sims of Loogootee, is now a cheerleader for the vincennes University Trailblazers. Kylie is in general studies, working toward her nursing degree. The vU Cheerleaders perform at men’s and women’s home basketball games. Kylie is a 2011 graduate of Loogootee High School. -Photos provided

Loogootee Intermediate honor roll and perfect attendance son Rayhill, Kenadi Rumble, Jody Seals, Halle Sheetz, Elizabeth Stoll, and Jayden Wagoner Honor Roll Brandon Armstrong, Taiya Armstrong, Julianne Bell, Estralia Brewer, Haley Burch, Shayln Bruner, Justin Clark, Adam Greene, Brandon Eckerle, MKaden Gregory, Chris Hager, Cole Harmon, Corbin Henninger, Zachary Koenig, Savannah McAtee, Dylan Ritchie, Leighton Seals, Katie Sims, Megan Street, Kayla Taylor, Taylin Trambaugh, Emily Whitworth, Cade Wilcoxen, and Karika Young perfect Attendance Julianne Bell, Anaya Carrico, Justin Clark, Joshua Cook, Joshua Daniels, Corbin Henninger, Dylan Jones, Lane Keller, Zachary Koenig, Carson Rayhill, and Kenadi Rumble

Lady Rox beat WC The Shoals Lady Jug Rox defeated the Washington Catholic Cardinals last Saturday afternoon 51-36. Michaela Brockman led the team with 25 points followed by Rachel Harder with 11, Nicole Harder with seven, Lezlie Hart with five, Ashton Allbright with two, and Caitlyn Sanders with one. The Lady Rox (5-8) will take on North Knox Thursday.

Shoals varsity Girls fall to NE Dubois 57-47 BY RACHEL HARDER Journal Sports Writer

Shoals Students of the Month

-Photo by Shannon Allen

The Shoals Elementary January Students of the Month are shown above. In the front row, from left to right, are Daphne Lindenschmidt, Eli Stoll, Macey Wyman, Jonny payne, Kori Redman, and Anna Stoll. In the second row, from left to right, are Collin Hampton, Mya Miller, Abi Sorrells, Kelton Williams, and Tristen Blackcalf. In the third row, from left to right, are Maggie Shaw, phillip Troutman, Caleb Belcher, Harley Spurgeon, Jeffrey Crowder, and Silas Bauer. Not pictured are Katelyn Conrad and Madison Quinn.

Last Thursday night the Shoals Lady Rox hosted the North East Dubois Jeeps in a conference competition. NE Dubois is ranked 6th in class single girls’ basketball, but that was no intimidation for the Lady Rox, who were able to finish the game losing by only 10 points. Leading scorers for the Rox were senior Michaela Brockman and sophomore Nicole Harder, each with 19 and second leading scorer was senior Rachel Harder who added 6. Nicole Harder was also the leading rebounder for the Rox with 4 and freshman Ashton Albright and

Michaela Brockman each pulled down 3. Shoals’ two point guards were able to avoid having many turnovers during the game, and the team’s offense was very tight. NE Dubois was solid enough however to hold the Rox to 47 points against their 57. Coach Matt Sowders said after the game that, “We got beat, but we didn’t lose. We really played like a unit on both ends of the floor.” FG FT TP Michaela Brockman 7, 2, 19 Nicole Harder 7, 1, 19 Rachel Harder 2, 0, 6 Briana Wagler 1, 0, 2 Caitlin Sanders 0, 1, 1


Wednesday, January 11, 2012

Martin County Journal

page 11

Loogootee Jr./Sr. Honor Roll Classes and programs at the

1ST SEMESTER HONOR ROLL SEvENTH GRADE High Honors Sara Bailey, Katelyn Desch, Mya Hedrick, Eden Jenkins, Nolan Lottes, Meghan Mathies, Mayson Riley, Kirsten Spears, Justin Wagler, Abbie Williams, and Blake Ziegler Honor Roll Abigail Barker, Landon Bell, Sydney Blankenbaker, Emily Brookshire, Chase Carrico, Jordan Clark, Tye Collins, Wilson Hatter, Breanna Hollaway, Marcus Hopkins, Tristan Jones, Breigh LaMar, Megan Lampert, Kaleb Lyon, Tyler Lythgoe, Wyatt Nonte, Tokala Richardson, Clayton Thomas, Brandon Tolbert, and Leah Wagler EIGHTH GRADE High Honors Nicole Ader, Kendall Burch, Renee Burch, Grant Carrico, Logan Carrico, Taylor Hardwick, Justin Horney, Ian Huelsman, Jordan Mann, Kendall Riley, Paige Walton, Renee Whitman, and Reed Ziegler. Honor Roll Emily Bateman, Macey Baxter, Jacob Blackwell, Trysten Booker, Nick Bowling, Bailey Davis, Jurnee Davis, Jess Divine, Nate Duvall, Jonathan Krzesniak, Trenton Neely, Tyler Simmons, Sarah Stoll, Shayna Stuffle, Wyatt Wade, Emma Walters, Robert Wilson, Gavin Wittmer, Landon Wittmer, and Brittany Woody NINTH GRADE High Honors Conner Bailey, Waylee Wagoner, and Malorie Weisheit Honor Roll Addyson Aiman, Tanner Akles, Adalyn Arvin, Jordan Berry, Frank Bratton, Hunter Crays, Cathy Hovis, Ashley Jones, Kylie Leonhard, Ashley Lindauer, Gabe Nolley, Ashleigh Powell, and Allie Walker TENTH GRADE High Honors Emma Graber, Demi Richardson, Kenedi Rohlman, Hannah Walters, and Matt Weitkamp Honor Roll Michala Beasley, Forrest Carroll, David Donnersberger, Dalton Jenkins, Adam Lark, Allison Lythgoe, Matt Mathies, Trevor Resler, Kelsy Seals, Tayler Smith, and Christina Ziegler ELEvENTH GRADE High Honors Tyler Booker, Mandy Koontz, Waylon Mattews, Gabrielle Ritchey, and Curtis Slaubaugh Honor Roll Megan Ader, Kenny Crane, Drew Davis, Alex Frye, Alyssa George, Jesse Horney, Cody Hurt, Alex Leonhard, Miranda Searl, Tyler Spears, Ryan Vaupel, Cam Wagler, and Remington Wagler TWELFTH GRADE High Honors Aaron Bridgewater, Addison Dant, Hannah LaMar, Brooke Nonte, Sarah Richer, Wynter Wagoner, and Mariah Weisheit Honor Roll Bryant Ackerman, Devan Arvin, Austin Bradley, Melissa Gingerich, Luke Jones, Allison Kiser, Christina Powell, Emily Rogers, Jenna Slaubaugh, Taylor Walker, and Lauren

Walton

2ND TERM HONOR ROLL SEvENTH GRADE High Honors Sara Bailey, Mya Hedrick, Eden Jenkins, Nolan Lottes, Meghan Mathies, Mayson Riley, Kirsten Spears, Clayton Thomas, Justin Wagler, Abbie Williams, and Blake Ziegler Honor Roll Abigail Barker, Landon Bell, Sydney Blankenbaker, Chase Carrico, Jordan Clark, Tye Collins, Katelyn Desch, Wilson Hatter, Breanna Hollaway, Marcus Hopkins, Matty Jones, Tristan Jones, Breigh LaMar, Megan Lampert, Kaleb Lyon, Tyler Lythgoe, Wyatt Nonte, Brandon Tolbert, and Leah Wagler EIGHTH GRADE High Honors Nicole Ader, Kendall Burch, Renee Burch, Grant Carrico, Logan Carrico, Justin Horney, Jordan Mann, Kendall Riley, Paige Walton, Renee Whitman, and Reed Ziegler Honor Roll Emily Bateman, Macey Baxter, Jacob Blackwell, Trysten Booker, Nick Bowling, Bailey Davis, Jurnee Davis, Jess Divine, Nate Duvall, Deedra Fields, Taylor Hardwick, Ian Huelsman, Corey Jacobs, Jonathan Krzesniak, Erin Nelson, Wyatt Wade, Emma Walters, Robert Wilson, Gavin Wittmer, Landon Wittmer, and Brittany Woody NINTH GRADE High Honors Conner Bailey, Waylee Wagoner, and Malorie Weisheit Honor Roll Addyson Aiman, Adalyn Arvin, Jordan Berry, Cathy Hovis, Ashley Jones, Ashley Lindauer, Gabe Nolley, Ashleigh Powell, and Allie Walker TENTH GRADE High Honors Emma Graber, Demi Richardson, Kenedi Rohlman, Hannah Walters, and Matt Weitkamp Honor Roll Michala Beasley, Forrest Carroll, Dalton Jenkins, Adam Lark, Allison Lythgoe, Tylan Norris, Trevor Resler, Tyson Sanders, Kelsy Seals, and Tayler Smith ELEvENTH GRADE High Honors Tyler Booker, Mandy Koontz, Waylon Matthews, Gabrielle Ritchey, and Curtis Slaubaugh Honor Roll Megan Ader, Joe Chrisman, Kenny Crane, Drew Davis, Alex Frye, Alyssa George, Jesse Horney, Cody Hurt, Alex Leonhard, Miranda Searl, Tyler Spears, Ryan Vaupel, Kenneth Waggoner, Remington Wagler, Morgan Walker, and Kassie Watkins TWELFTH GRADE High Honors Addison Dant, Brooke Nonte, Christina Powell, Sarah Richer, Wynter Wagoner, Lauren Walton, and Mariah Weisheit Honor Roll Bryant Ackerman, Devan Arvin, Aaron Bridgewater, Ashley Haburne, Luke Jones, Allison Kiser, Hannah LaMar, Kyle Lark, and Emily Rogers

Registration open for summer engineering camp for seniors BY JUDITH BARRA AUSTIN Purdue University News Service Registration is open for next summer’s Purdue University Seminar for Top Engineering Prospects (STEP). STEP is a one-week camp for high school students entering their senior year who are interested in studying engineering. It provides an opportunity to explore disciplines within engineering and the careers for which an engineering degree can prepare a student. Participants are chosen on the basis of academic performance and work on teams using imagination and creativity to solve a multifaceted design challenge. Students will

be involved in collaborative classroom experiences that will help them develop the skills that engineers need. STEP students will tour departments within the College of Engineering and visit local companies where engineers work. The program runs from Sunday afternoon through lunch on Friday. Students stay in campus residence hall rooms. Two sessions are available: July 8-13 and July 15-20. Cost is $680 for those who register by January 27; $725 for those who register between January 28 and March 2; and $780 for those who register after March 2. The application and more information are available at https://engineering.purdue.edu /ENE/InfoFor/FutureStudents/visitUs/STEP.

Martin County Learning Center

Ivy Tech Community College Classes: Introduction to Computers - Explore the world of computers in a safe, fun, and non –threatening environment, even if you don’t know what a computer looks like. We’ll cover computer anxiety, important terms, parts of the computer, keyboard, using the mouse, and moving around the computer to complete different tasks. Textbook is included in course fee. This course will run four Tuesdays, March 27 – April 17, from 6 to 9 p.m. Microsoft Excel: Level 1 - Microsoft Excel is the standard spreadsheet program for today’s working world. You will begin by reviewing the Office interface. By the end of this class, you’ll possess the skills to enter and edit data, select cells and ranges, print worksheets, create formulas and functions, and format cell contents. Prerequisite: Working knowledge of Windows, including saving and moving files. Textbook is included in course fee. This course will run four Wednesdays, February 8-29, from 6 to 9 p.m. For more information on Ivy Tech Community College classes and to register, contact the Center for Lifelong Learning at 812-330-4400 or log on www.ivytech.edu/cll. GED – Adult Basic Education - GED – Adult Basic Education classes will start again on March 27 and run for 12 weeks. Classes are on Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays from 3 to 6 p.m. For infor-

mation, contact Vincennes University at 812-888-5749 or call the learning center. SAT Preparation Workshop - SAT preparation workshop for college-bound high school students will be offered at the center by Karen Whorrall. This class will assist preparing students in securing competitively high scores for placement. This workshop is scheduled on Wednesdays, January 4 through January 25 from 7-9 p.m. Cost for the session is $25. This workshop is sponsored by the Loogootee and Shoals Guidance Counselors Offices. For registration or further information, contact Kris at 812-295-2674. USAJOBS Workshop (Resume Builder) - USAJOBS is the federal government’s official website. USAJOBS provides access to more than 30,000 job listings worldwide and job postings are updated daily. This is an online resume training session and will provide applicants with information and guidance on completing a government style resume for Crane and other federal agencies. The USAJOBS workshop is provided by Bramble Consulting (Darlene Ridgway). The next workshop will be held on Tuesday, January 17 from 6 – 8:30 p.m. Cost is $40. Contact Kris by email or call the learning center to sign up. Learning Center Contact - Kris Beasley, Coordinator, 812-295-2674 or email kbeasley10@ivytech.edu Office Hours - Monday through Thursday 4-9 p.m. and Friday by appointment only.

Lady Lions win two more

-Photo by Jessica Lampert

Christina Ziegler led the Loogootee Lady Lions with a game-high 16 points to a win over pike Central last night at home. The final score was 43-33. The Lions only held a two-point lead at the half but then pulled away in the third and fourth quarters. Wynter Wagoner contributed 10 points followed by Taylor Walker with eight, Brooke Nonte with three, and Lauren Walton, Gabrielle Ritchey, and Allie Walker with two points each. The girls moved to 10-4 on the season and will host vincennes Rivet tomorrow night.Last Saturday, the Loogootee Lady Lions traveled to Bloomfield and came home with a win 57-53. Wynter Wagoner had a career-high 30 points which includes four 3pointers. Allie Walker contributed 15 points followed by Gabrielle Ritchey with six, and Hannah LaMar and Brooke Nonte with two points each. Wagoner is shown above going in for a bucket in the Lions’ win over pike Central last night.

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Journal 011112  

Martin County Journal January 11, 2012 issue

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