Issuu on Google+

STRESS LESS AT WORK THE HUFFINGTON POST MAGAZINE

Don’t Worry, Work Happy Breathe Easier on Your Commute 5 Breakfasts for Busy People Why Your Boss Should Give You More Vacation Destress at Your Desk

PLUS: Healing the Latest

National Heartbreak

APRIL 21, 2013


04.21.13 #45 CONTENTS

NEED TO DESTRESS? HELP IS HERE DATA: All Work, No Balance NATIONAL: PTSD Lingers As a City Unites DANIEL GULATI: Stop Fast-Tracking Your Career LIFESTYLE: Destress Without Leaving Your Desk TECH: 8 On-the-Go Meditation Apps EAT THIS: The 15-Minute Breakfast

FROM TOP: GETTY IMAGES/BLEND IMAGES RM; GERARD BURKHART/GETTY IMAGES

Enter

RESULTS-ONLY WORK ENVIRONMENT Where flexibility reigns. BY LISA BELKIN

POINTERS: ‘We Will Get to the Bottom of This’ ... Pulitzer Winners JASON LINKINS: Looking Forward in Angst Q&A: Susan Sarandon HEADLINES MOVING IMAGE: ‘Every One of Us Stands With You’

Voices DAMIEN ECHOLS: The Story of a Man Wrongly Sentenced to Death JENNIFER 8. LEE: Americanizing Asian Takeout QUOTED

Exit TFU

GREEN EVOLUTION How far have we come since 1970? BY JAMES GERKEN

FROM THE EDITOR: Picturing Boston ON THE COVER: Photograph for

Huffington by Marshall Troy


ADVERTISEMENT

Get the NEW HuffPost App for iPad速 & iPad mini速

Download Now

iPad is a trademark of Apple Inc., registered in the U.S. and other countries. App Store is a service mark of Apple Inc.


LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

HUFFINGTON 04.21.13

Picturing Boston HIS WEEK’S issue tells the story of the tragedy in Boston in pictures — the marathon, the bombing, the aftermath, and the runners, onlookers, and first responders who came together to help one another in one of the city’s darkest hours. As Jaweed Kaleem writes, in addition to physical damage, the bombings heaped emotional distress on countless people. In response, trauma counselors, mental health professionals and spiritual lead-

ART STREIBER

T

ers have been tending to those suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder. “Horrible images are ingrained in people’s minds, and there will be memories and triggers,” says Joyce Maguire Pavao, a Boston psychologist. “But you can manage them better if you have assistance, if you have someone to talk to.” Elsewhere in the issue, Lisa Belkin writes about the Results Only Work Environment program (ROWE), continuing the conversation started by Yahoo’s Melissa Mayer, who earlier this year ended her company’s work-from-home policy. Created by two former

Join the conversation on Twitter and Facebook


LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

Best Buy employees, ROWE’s slogan is “Work whenever you want, wherever you want, as long as the work gets done.” At one time, the program was used by 80 percent of Best Buy’s 3,000 corporate employees. It’s an effort to redefine the workplace at a time when ample evidence shows the current model isn’t working. As Lisa writes, “What’s clear is that the way Americans work is overdue for a change.” According to a new survey, 83 percent of Americans are stressed at work, up from 73 percent last year. And because Monday is Earth Day, we’ve put together a photo essay highlighting key moments in environmental activism going back to the 1970s, along with statistics that show how passions for environmental reform have cooled. Polling shows that Americans have become less environmentally vigilant, with 63 percent considering restoring and enhancing the environment very important in 1971, and 39 percent today. The trend holds true for government spending, with 56 percent of Americans saying the government should spend more on environ-

HUFFINGTON 04.21.13

mental programs in 1971, while today only 29 percent feel that way. Finally, as part of the magazine’s ongoing examination of stress in our lives, we look at how “derushing” our careers can yield many benefits in the long run. We examine some commuter-friendly meditation apps, and give you a

In times of tragedy that elude our understanding, the ability to unplug, recharge and reconnect with ourselves is a gift beyond measure.” few easy ways to de-stress while you’re sitting at your desk. In our hyperconnected lives, and especially in times of tragedy that elude our understanding, the ability to unplug, recharge and reconnect with ourselves is a gift beyond measure. This weekend, I hope you’ll make some time to explore these features and find new ways to do so.

ARIANNA


POINTERS

DON EMMERT/AFP/GETTY IMAGES

Enter

HUFFINGTON 04.21.13

DEADLY 1 BLASTS HIT BOSTON MARATHON

Panic swept through the nation Monday when two bombs exploded seconds apart near the finish line of the Boston Marathon, injuring more than 180 and killing at least three, including an 8-year-old boy waiting for his dad to finish the race. Images of blood-soaked streets and victims with blownoff limbs were immediately splashed online and on television. The chief of emergency services at Massachusetts General Hospital told the AP, “This is something I’ve never seen in my 25 years here ... this amount of carnage in the civilian population.” In a speech reacting to the violence, President Obama said, “We still don’t know who did this or why … But make no mistake — we will get to the bottom of this.” On Thursday, the F.B.I. released images of two men wanted in connection with the bombings.


Enter

2

POINTERS

HUFFINGTON 04.21.13

MITCH McCONNELL INVOKES 9/11 AFTER BOSTON BOMBINGS

FROM TOP: AP PHOTO/J. SCOTT APPLEWHITE; KATPATUKA/WIKIMEDIA; ALEX WONG/GETTY IMAGES

Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) issued a strong statement on Tuesday about the Boston bombings, linking them to the 9/11 attacks. “I think it’s safe to say that, for many, the complacency that prevailed prior to September 11th has actually returned,” he said. “And so we are newly reminded that serious threats to our way of life remain. And today, again, we recommit ourselves to the fight against terrorism at home, and abroad.” Also on Tuesday, Obama said the FBI is investigating the event “as an act of terrorism,” but emphasized it’s still unknown who was behind it.

3

4

PULITZER WINNERS ANNOUNCED

The New York Times topped the list of Pulitzer Prize winners with four awards, while an online nonprofit called InsideClimate News — which has only seven employees — took home the national reporting award for its coverage of pipeline safety and regulation. The Denver Post won in the breaking news category for its coverage of the shooting in Aurora, Colo., that left 12 dead and dozens of others wounded. “The tragedy touches us, but we have a job to do,” news director Kevin Dale told the AP. “It’s great to win the prize, but we’d rather win for a different story.”

SENATORS RELEASE NEW IMMIGRATION PLAN

The bipartisan group of senators tasked with immigration reform unveiled legislation that would allow undocumented immigrants to apply for “provisional” legal status once a plan for border security is proposed. Those immigrants would not be able to apply for permanent residency for another 10 years, after certain benchmarks are met. Pres. Obama said of the proposal, “it is largely consistent with the principles that I have repeatedly laid out for comprehensive reform.”


Enter

5

POINTERS

24 KILLED IN AFGHANISTAN ATTACKS

At least 24 people were killed in Afghanistan in five different attacks this week, the AP reports. Civilians, soldiers, members of a government security force and others were killed by roadside bombs and insurgent attacks. So far this month, 182 people in Afghanistan have been killed from violence, according to the AP, making it the bloodiest month this year.

FROM TOP: NOORULLAH SHIRZADA/AFP/GETTY IMAGES; BRENDAN HOFFMAN/GETTY IMAGES

6

BUSH: I’M ‘COMFORTABLE’ WITH IRAQ WAR DECISIONS

THAT’S VIRAL WHY IS THIS ORTHODOX JEW FLYING IN A PLASTIC BAG?

HUFFINGTON 04.21.13

As George W. Bush prepares for the opening of his presidential library, he reflected on his presidency, and more specifically, the decisions he made regarding the Iraq War. “It’s easy to forget what life was like when the decision was made,” Bush told the Dallas Morning News. “I’m comfortable with what I did. I’m comfortable with who I am.” Both Bush and former Vice President Dick Cheney have faced widespread criticism about the war, most recently during the 10-year anniversary of the invasion of Iraq.

A selection of the week’s most talked-about stories. HEADLINES TO VIEW FULL STORIES

NO NO NO NO NO NO NO

TEACHER RESIGNS CITING FACT THAT HIS PROFESSION ‘NO LONGER EXISTS’

FRENCH STUDY SAYS BRAS ARE A ‘FALSE NECESSITY’

KMART MAKES US SHIP OUR PANTS


All Work, No Balance

Vacations have been shown to benefit sleep, improve mental health and productivity year-round, cut the risk of heart attack and strengthen connections with loved ones — all good reasons to take Stress Awareness Month as a chance to plan one. The problem is, the U.S. doesn’t guarantee its workers any paid vacation time or even paid holidays, making it the only industrialized country not to mandate this basic benefit. With the exception of Japan and Canada, all countries in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) give their workers at least 20 paid days off. Many American workers with higher-paying jobs get vacation time in their compensation packages, of course, but others may not be able to afford to take time off even when they’re sick, let alone to relax. As the U.S. Department of Labor states, “The Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) does not require payment for time not worked, such as vacations, sick leave or federal or other holidays. These benefits are matters of agreement between an employer and an employee.” Not only do many Americans not get paid vacation time, but some who do don’t end up using it, possibly because the recession has left many in fear of losing their jobs. Some companies have decided to minimize this conflict by paying their workers to take vacation time. — Katy Hall

DATA

HUFFINGTON 04.21.13 TAP COUNTRIES FOR ADDIONAL INFO

AUSTRALIA AUSTRIA BELGIUM CANADA DENMARK FINLAND FRANCE

GERMANY GREECE IRELAND ITALY JAPAN NETHERLANDS NEW ZEALAND

NORWAY PORTUGAL SPAIN SWEDEN SWITZERLAND U.K. UNITED STATES

# OF MANDATED DAYS OF PAID VACATION AND HOLIDAYS

Enter

WORK-LIFE BALANCE RATING


PAT GREENHOUSE/THE BOSTON GLOBE VIA GETTY IMAGES

Enter

LOOKING FORWARD IN ANGST

JASON LINKINS

HUFFINGTON 04.21.13

OUR NEVERENDING TESTS OF HUMAN ENDURANCE REALLY DON’T KNOW where to start with Boston. The truth is, the world needs another potentially terrible piece of writing, meditating on an emergency, like it needs an outbreak of avian flu. On the other hand, when you are presented with the opportu-

I

nity to write about whatever you want, and receive compensation for it, you have a responsibility to grapple with recent tragic events. So, I find myself caught between the concern that taking a pass on the tragedy that transpired at this week’s Boston Marathon will mark me as gutless, and the worry that all this typing will lead to something that’s at best mawkish, at worst not helpful.

The women’s elite runners start the 117th Boston Marathon on April 15, 2013.


Enter But having come this far, I guess the die is cast. As always, I’ll remind you that what you are about to read is not oxygen, you do not need it to live, and I respect your decision to swipe past this story and get on with your lives. Maybe check out Charlie Pierce’s piece on this, it’s a home run. I suppose I’ll begin with the obvious. I’m sorry that this happened. My best wishes go out to everyone who is mourning and who is mending, which I suppose includes the entire city of Boston. From what I gather, the running of the Boston Marathon, and Patriots Day in general, is a peak moment for the citizens of one of America’s most legendary cities. I wish that I could sympathize in a more feeling and intimate way with everyone who is now pondering the black hole in the shadow of the Pru, where a celebration was supposed to transpire. The thing about running a marathon is that while it’s properly recognized as an astounding athletic feat and a test of human endurance, it’s also something that’s steeped in ancient history and legend. Historical accounts differ, but the semi-apocryphal story of the first marathon that

LOOKING FORWARD IN ANGST

we all learn in school involves a guy named Pheidippides. Pheidippides was a courier attached to the Greek army during the first Persian invasion of Greece. When the Greeks defeated the Persians in the Battle of Marathon, Pheidippides was sent on a 25-mile run from the battleground to Athens to deliver the message that

The runners who carve their way through the streets of cities ... are participating in an incantation for peace.” the Persians had been beaten, and sent into retreat. So, whether we know it or not, what we are celebrating every time we run a marathon is the end of war. The runners who carve their way through the streets of cities all over the world are participating in an incantation for peace. The spectators who fill the streets to cheer them on are cheering on an end to strife and anxiety. In Boston, Patriots Day celebrates the courage of the men who courageously took up arms for our nation’s

HUFFINGTON 04.21.13


Enter independence, and the acts of endurance that ended the fighting and secured our freedom. But that’s not all we celebrate when we run a marathon. It is also a demonstration of our belief that we as a race are capable of being better tomorrow than we were yesterday. See, Pheidippides, according to legend, dropped dead from exhaustion upon the delivery of his message. That means that the next person to run a marathon was making a bet: This time I won’t die. And the next made a bet that they could run faster than those who ran before. At the elite level of marathon runners, athletes are making a bet that no matter what simple physiology says about the limitations of the human body, they can run the race faster than they have before — perhaps faster than anyone ever has. The top marathon runners in the world are literally driving the evolution of the human species, measured in hardfought fractions of seconds. So there is a lot of holy stuff knit up in every marathon. But the glorious thing about these races is that what’s simple shines just as brightly as what’s sacred. For instance, as breathtaking as the

LOOKING FORWARD IN ANGST

HUFFINGTON 04.21.13

achievements of the best athletes are, the wonderful thing about a marathon is that it’s one of the only athletic competitions where the runner who finishes long after all but the most dedicated spectators have gone home, might have a more interesting story to tell

If you live long enough, you might find yourself in the right place, at the right time, the only person in the world capable of doing the right thing, helping someone else right when they need your help the most.” about the challenges they’ve faced and overcome than the winner. For most of the people who run these races, the desire is only to finish. Ezra Klein, writing from the point of view of a spectator, says that the “finish line at a marathon is a small marvel of fellowship.” Alana Horowitz, who writes from the perspective of a runner, says, “crossing the finish line is supposed to be purely euphoric.” As she notes, simply, about the tragedy in Bos-


AP PHOTO/STEW MILNE

Enter

ton, “someone turned a symbol of human achievement into one of terror and loss.” Many lives were interrupted, some ceased. On a day where people gathered to celebrate both the immortal hopes of humanity and the joys of discrete accomplishment, we were instead reminded that the end of our lives can come at an all-too-arbitrary moment, and that the euphoria we experience at the end of a race is not what we experience at the end of

LOOKING FORWARD IN ANGST

HUFFINGTON 04.21.13

We were reminded that the euphoria we experience at the end of a race is not what we experience at the end of a life.” a life. Very few of us are trying to race toward that finish line. Most of us, when we arrive there, will wish we had more time. What’s especially sad about this is the fact that if we live a long enough, we will have to live through experiences much like Boston again and again. It seems like in a very short period of time,

Runners commence the Boston Marathon, in Hopkinton, Mass., on Monday.


Enter we’ve witnessed cities on fire and college campuses torn apart by violence and children gunned down and lives wrecked by disaster. Sooner or later, life is going to dial up another painful experience to endure, whether it’s one we face together or suffer through privately. In the meantime, there are still wars that never seem to end and crises that never seem to abate and much to be cynical about. But at the same time, if you live long enough, all those bets we are making that we can be better will nevertheless continue to pay off, even if the dividends seem small. No matter what you’ve already been amazed by, there are more amazing things coming. Just when you think that Lionel Messi has done every dazzling thing that can be done with a soccer ball, he will do something that once again takes your breath away. Just when you think Maru has done the most adorable thing a cat can do on YouTube, he will find a way to outpace his previous achievements in adorableness. No matter how good the last movie you saw was, or the last book you read, or the last joke you heard, someone right now is working on something more ex-

LOOKING FORWARD IN ANGST

HUFFINGTON 04.21.13

citing, more gripping, much funnier, and they will succeed. No matter how well you are living right now, someday you are going to do something that surprises you. If you live long enough, you might even find yourself in the right place, at the right time, the only person in the world capable of doing the right thing, helping someone else right when they need your help the most. I don’t

Whether we know it or not, what we are celebrating every time we run a marathon is the end of war.” bet against that, because it keeps on happening. So maybe next time no one dies. Maybe the next time the war ends. If you’ve made it this far, I’ll just tell you that I sincerely hope it happens for you. I hope that you live long enough to finish whatever it is you’re doing. I hope that along the way, you help someone else finish whatever task they’ve taken up as well. Like I said from the outset, I really don’t know where to start. But start anyway.


Q&A

FROM TOP: JIM SPELLMAN/WIREIMAGE/GETTY IMAGES; BARRY WETCHER/LIONSGATE

Enter

HUFFINGTON 04.21.13

Susan Sarandon on Capital Punishment After Boston “People who think that when they in some way punish someone who’s taken someone from them that they love are very disappointed at the end of the day when it still leaves that huge hole.”

Above: Susan Sarandon attends the 39th Annual Chaplin Award gala in New York. Below: Katherine Heigl (left) and Sarandon in The Big Wedding, in theaters April 26.

FOR THE FULL INTERVIEW, VISIT HUFFPOST LIVE


HEADLINES

Enter

HUFFINGTON 04.21.13

The Week That Was CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: SHUTTERSTOCK; AP PHOTO/WBZTV; MANDEL NGAN/AFP/GETTY IMAGES; BUYENLARGE/GETTY IMAGES

TAP IMAGE TO ENLARGE, TAP EACH DATE FOR FULL ARTICLE ON THE HUFFINGTON POST

04.13.13

04.15.13

04.12.13

04.11.13


MOVING IMAGE

Enter

HUFFINGTON 04.21.13

DAVID L. RYAN/THE BOSTON GLOBE VIA GETTY IMAGES

“Every One of Us Stands With You” — Pres. Barack Obama

A second explosion goes off near the finish line of the 117th Boston Marathon on April 15.

PHOTO OR ILLUSTRATION CREDIT TK


JIM ROGASH/GETTY IMAGES

Enter

A man is loaded into an ambulance after he was injured by one of the two bombs that exploded near Copley Square. PHOTO OR ILLUSTRATION CREDIT TK

MOVING IMAGE

HUFFINGTON 04.21.13


DARREN MCCOLLESTER/GETTY IMAGES

Enter

Carlos Arredondo, who was at the finish line when two explosives detonated, leaves the scene. PHOTO OR ILLUSTRATION CREDIT TK

MOVING IMAGE

HUFFINGTON 04.21.13


JOHN TLUMACKI/THE BOSTON GLOBE VIA GETTY IMAGES

Police officers with their guns drawn hear the second explosion down the street. The first explosion knocked down a runner at the finish line.

PHOTO OR ILLUSTRATION CREDIT TK


JOHN TLUMACKI/THE BOSTON GLOBE VIA GETTY IMAGES

Enter

A woman kneels and prays at the scene of the first explosion on Boylston Street. PHOTO OR ILLUSTRATION CREDIT TK

MOVING IMAGE

HUFFINGTON 04.21.13


KELVIN MA/BLOOMBERG VIA GETTY IMAGES

Enter

A runner and a woman embrace on Boston Common. PHOTO OR ILLUSTRATION CREDIT TK

MOVING IMAGE

HUFFINGTON 04.21.13


SPENCER PLATT/GETTY IMAGES

Enter

Boston police stand near the scene of the twin bombings. Cities around the country have heightened security, cancelling many professional sporting events, as authorities seek the motive for the violence. PHOTO OR ILLUSTRATION CREDIT TK

MOVING IMAGE

HUFFINGTON 04.21.13


JIM ROGASH/GETTY IMAGES

A woman looks ahead as she is loaded into an ambulance after being injured.

PHOTO OR ILLUSTRATION CREDIT TK


KATHERINE FREY/THE WASHINGTON POST VIA GETTY IMAGES

Enter

Heightened security by transit police is evident at the Metro Center station in Washington, D.C., after the bombings in Boston. PHOTO OR ILLUSTRATION CREDIT TK

MOVING IMAGE

HUFFINGTON 04.21.13


JOHN TLUMACKI/THE BOSTON GLOBE VIA GETTY IMAGES

An injured boy is pushed in a wheelchair by a Boston police officer at the scene of the first explosion. PHOTO OR ILLUSTRATION CREDIT TK


CHIP SOMODEVILLA/GETTY IMAGES

Enter

A U.S. Capitol Police K-9 team works at the entrance of the Capitol South Metro station during rush hour in Washington, D.C. PHOTO OR ILLUSTRATION CREDIT TK

MOVING IMAGE

HUFFINGTON 04.21.13


AP PHOTO/WINSLOW TOWNSON

Enter

An unidentified Boston Marathon runner leaves the course crying near Copley Square. PHOTO OR ILLUSTRATION CREDIT TK

MOVING IMAGE

HUFFINGTON 04.21.13


Enter

NATIONAL

HUFFINGTON 04.21.13

POST-TRAUMATIC STRESS LINGERS AS A CITY UNITES JARED WICKERHAM/GETTY IMAGES

BY JAWEED KALEEM

THE MORNING AFTER the deadly Boston Marathon explosions, Joyce Maguire Pavao called local hospitals and the Red Cross, rushing to find victims. Family and friends who had been near the attack were un-

scathed, but Pavao, a psychologist who usually works in child welfare, was looking for something else: people who needed help recovering from trauma. “It’s like an experience in a war zone, a bomb on a sidewalk,” said Pavao. “It’s traumatic for the people that were involved, for those hurt, for those who

Mourners gather for a candlelit vigil for 8-yearold Martin Richard, one of the three people killed during the bombings.


Enter saw them get hurt, for the people that helped afterwards.” After two bombs packed with pellets exploded near the finish line of the city’s marathon Monday, killing three people and injuring more than 170, the recovery continues. The streets are being cleaned of debris, hospitals are tending to victims with burns and severed limbs, and law authorities are investigating a terrorist act. But as Boston slowly returns to normal, people like Pavao are tending to an often less visible effect of disaster: post-traumatic stress disorder and mental health issues that can emerge in weeks, months and years after the trauma. “There is so much we know about PTSD these days, and there are so many instances in our world that are traumatic. If we acknowledge them and find the best way to address them, we can save people from having residual, difficult problems,” said Pavao. “Horrible images are ingrained in people’s minds, and there will be memories and triggers. But you can manage them better if you have assistance, if you have someone to talk to.” Across Boston, trauma counselors, disaster chaplains and mental

NATIONAL

HUFFINGTON 04.21.13

health professionals were dispatched to hospitals, churches and recovery resource centers to help those who are spiritually and emotionally drained, and in shock. Not far from the blast sites is the Park Plaza Castle, a historic Victorian building that’s become a makeshift resource center for victims, where Boston officials are offering shelter to displaced residents and information on

Horrible images are ingrained in people’s minds, and there will be memories and triggers. But you can manage them better if you have assistance, if you have someone to talk to.” counseling. In New York and across several states, the federal Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration has a 24-hour, toll-free “disaster distress helpline” (1-800-9855990). Call volume had doubled between Monday and Tuesday, officials said. “Trauma is a completely natural response to an unnatural event, and most people are resilient,”


JARED WICKERHAM/GETTY IMAGES

Enter

said Lloyd Sederer, medical director of the New York State Office of Mental Health. “But you need to help people understand what happened, that these are predictable symptoms and that there are ways to take care of yourself.” Sederer, who administered mental health programs in New York City after Sept. 11 and is currently organizing similar resources for Hurricane Sandy victims, said many witnesses to the Boston attack may have trauma symptoms in the days and pos-

PTSD

HUFFINGTON 04.21.13

Sometimes it has taken people up to two years to realize they are not feeling or acting like themselves.” sibly weeks after the bombings, including a general sense of fear, mental replays of the experience and nightmares. But he cautioned that a minority could develop longer-lasting PTSD and related symptoms, such sudden debilitating flashbacks, anxiety, social isolation and drug and alcohol abuse. “The (physically) closer you are to the experience, the more it is potentially life-threatening to you

A girl cries with her mother during the vigil for Martin Richard on April 16 at Garvey Park in Boston.


Enter or the closer you get to witnessing a life-threatening or deadly event, the more likely you will remember it indelibly,” he said. “The most important resources are your own family and community. It helps to talk to someone to understand what you have gone through.” That’s one of the reasons for the disaster distress hotline, said Anne Mathews-Younes, who directs mental health services for Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. The administration, which also runs National Suicide Prevention Hotline, first launched the disaster line during the BP oil spill. It’s been manned continuously since then, but has seen a spike since Monday. “We know from experience with Hurricane Katrina that sometimes we don’t immediately experience our stress or distress. Sometimes it has taken people up to two years to realize they are not feeling or acting like themselves,” said Mathews-Younes. “It can be as simple as people lacking energy or not sleeping enough. We train people to give reassurance.” Experts said isolation is one of the worst things for those who have experienced the tragedy. They point to the candlelight vigils and

NATIONAL

HUFFINGTON 04.21.13

prayer gatherings in the Boston region throughout the week as immediate, organized ways to cope. Boston resident Charlotte Robinson, whose family left the marathon uninjured, described herself as “dazed” by the attack and mourned at a memorial service at the Israeli consulate Tuesday evening. After she saw dozens of ambulances rush by her home in the Jamaica Plain neighborhood

It’s like an experience in a warzone, a bomb on a side-walk. It’s traumatic for the people that were involved, for those hurt, for those who saw them get hurt, for the people that helped afterwards.” to aid victims on Monday, Robinson said she felt as though she was in a “horrible nightmare.” But recounting the experience with her partner, Marilyn, has helped her process it, she said, and Robinson was comforted by reflecting with other residents. “It’s a somber time and it’s tough to see your city like this,” she said, “but it feels better if we come together.”


COURTESY OF SUNDANCE CHANNEL

Voices

DAMIEN ECHOLS

HUFFINGTON 04.21.13

The Story of a Man Wrongly Sentenced to Death (From Someone Who’s Been There) FIRST, I SHOULD probably say that I’m not a big fan of prison shows. Or cop shows. Or lawyer shows. Or courtroom drama shows of any sort. I guess that’s one of

the side effects of being sentenced to death for a crime I didn’t commit. In 1993 I was unfortunate enough to see what the inside of the American judicial machine is truly like when I was tried, convicted, and sentenced to death for three counts of capital murder.

Aden Young stars as Daniel Holden in Sundance Channel’s new drama, Rectify, premiering April 22.


Voices One thing I learned is that almost everything you see on television shows is complete and absolute fiction. Perry Mason is no more realistic than Superman. So when I was first asked to watch a new show called Rectify, I was wary. Rectify is the story of a man who was sentenced to death for a crime he didn’t commit, and spent 19 years on death row before getting out. Much like in my own real-life case, the local politicians refuse to admit he’s innocent even after D.N.A. testing points towards someone else. In fact, there was so much about this show that mirrored my own life I began to wonder how much of my story had crept into the script. The writer of the show, Ray McKinnon, was somewhat familiar with my case. His late wife, Lisa Blount was a friend of mine. She and I exchanged letters while I was on death row in Arkansas, and she even sang at a concert in Arkansas, along with Eddie Vedder, Patti Smith, and Johnny Depp, to help raise awareness about my plight. I heard that McKinnon also did research into the cases of other men who had been on death row and had been released or exon-

DAMIEN ECHOLS

HUFFINGTON 04.21.13

erated. It paid off. I can tell you from firsthand experience that Rectify is a very realistic show. The main character is a man named Daniel. When you look at his eyes, you’re looking into the eyes of a man who has seen Hell. There are moments when he looks like he’s about to begin screaming at any second, and never stop. The first time you see this is in episode one, when he’s about to

In 1993 I was unfortunate enough to see what the inside of the American judicial machine is truly like when I was tried, convicted, and sentenced to death for three counts of capital murder.” leave the prison. The guard is treating him like a human being, and it’s evident this hasn’t happened in an extremely long time. You see the confusion on his face as he wrestles with suddenly being treated decently by the same people who have treated him like an animal for years. He can’t quite process it. I know that look well. As he’s about to leave the prison, the guard helps him tie his neck-


COURTESY OF SUNDANCE CHANNEL

Voices tie, as he can no longer remember how to do it himself. It reminded me of my very last day in prison, as I was dressing to leave. I was putting on real clothes for the first time in nearly 20 years, as were the two other men being released — Jason Baldwin and Jessie Miskelley. I looked over to see one of the guards tying Jessie’s tie. He was doing it gently, as if he wanted Jessie to look good on his first day of freedom. It was odd, thinking back on how I’d been beaten, starved and treated as something subhuman by prison guards for years. Most people have nothing in their frame of reference that would allow them to understand what an impact that has on a person’s psyche — but somehow McKinnon manages to capture it. Another thing McKinnon captures is the shock and trauma of someone just released after nearly 20 years on death row. The main character falls asleep on the ride home from the prison, and then falls asleep again as his sister drives him around to see how the town has changed. When I first walked off of death row I was so deeply in shock and traumatized that for nearly three months I couldn’t watch a movie,

DAMIEN ECHOLS

HUFFINGTON 04.21.13

There was so much about this show that mirrored my own life I began to wonder how much of my story had crept into the script.” a television show, read a book, or take a car ride without falling into a deep, dark sleep that didn’t seem to refresh me much when I awakened. All I wanted to do was go out and walk the streets of New York City at all hours of the day and night. I would walk until I was so exhausted I’d stumble over my own feet like a drunk — and I was drunk. I was drunk on the river of human energy that flowed all around me, over me and through me. The human interaction and energy I’d been starved of for almost 20 years. One other thing McKinnon manages to capture is the wonder a man experiences once he’s re-

Adelaide Clemens (left) stars as Tawney Talbot, a devout Christian who shares a spiritual connection with Daniel (right), much to her husband’s chagrin.


Voices turned from the land of the dead. The main character walks through a convenience store, staring at the hot dog rack like it’s a minor miracle. And to him, it is. For me, it was Chinatown. I would walk up and down the streets of Chinatown staring at all the flotsam and jetsam being sold on the sidewalks in awe. They were the most beautiful things I’d ever seen — colors, shapes, smells — I couldn’t get enough of it. I could stare for hours at the pigeons everyone else seemed to find revolting. Everything was amazing to me. Everything. I would lie on our balcony in the rain, staring at this beautiful beast of a city that I had fallen head over heels in love with. I would look at the skyline of Manhattan and be so overwhelmed with the monstrous beauty that I wanted to sob and kiss the filthy sidewalks. McKinnon manages to catch something of that energy. One last thing he manages to convey is how flawed the justice system is, and how skewed our belief in it tends to be. Law enforcement and politicians in the show say that despite what DNA testing shows, the lead character would not have confessed if he weren’t guilty. That greatly mir-

DAMIEN ECHOLS

HUFFINGTON 04.21.13

rors the sentiments I’ve heard in the outside world. The reality is that anyone can be so worn down that they’ll eventually confess to anything, no matter how strong they believe themselves to be. And it happens all the time — from people who are killed after con-

You see the confusion on his face as he wrestles with suddenly being treated decently by the same people who have treated him like an animal for years.” fessing to practicing witchcraft, to people sentenced to lethal injection even though the crime scene bears no resemblance to the confession tortured out of them. All in all, I’d say Rectify is a powerful and realistic show that more than holds the viewer’s attention. But will I be watching it in the future? No, because it’s all a rerun to me. Damien Echols is one of the West Memphis Three. He spent 18 years on death row until new forensic evidence led to his release in 2011.


DANIEL GULATI

Voices

JUDITH COLLINS / ALAMY

Stop FastTracking Your Career

I

’LL GIVE IT TWO WEEKS. If I don’t sign my first retailer by then, I’ll shut the company down and do something else.” I had asked Sam to lay out his strategy for the new venture he had launched six months earlier. The plan made sense, except that he was trying to cram three months’ worth of important groundwork into a near-impossible, 14-day time frame. ¶ “I want to earn as much money as I can in the next five years, then retire.” I couldn’t help but think that Carol was setting herself up for disappointment and sabotaging her own career with an unrealistic plan to scramble up the investment banking industry ladder.¶ “If the job doesn’t deliver in the first month, I’ll know it’s time to start interviewing.” John, a user-experience designer, spoke fast and looked on edge as he described his four-week career “vision” to me. ¶ Meet Generation Impatient: the growing group of 20- and 30-somethings who are smart, ambitious,

HUFFINGTON 04.21.13


Voices and all-too-eager to quit whatever it is they’re doing right now to get promoted, acquired, or make more money somewhere else. Hating your job on day three? Find something better. Beta launch didn’t work out? Shut it down and move on. These individuals come in different forms — from buttoned-up investment bankers to scrappy entrepreneurs — but one thing is consistent: They just won’t wait. Taking great pride in failing fast and looking for ways to “hack” their success in the shortest possible timeframe, this group tries to exchange predictable linear career growth for an exponential trajectory. After meeting hundreds of these individuals, I attributed their seemingly schizophrenic behavior to three underlying factors. The first is the digital comparison trap. As our Facebook friends post status updates on their new jobs, promotions and sports cars, we are left to recalibrate our own definition of success and, in the process, invite a profound sense of inadequacy into our lives. The way we usually respond? By participating in the social arms race: posting the top 1 percent of our accomplishments and conveniently discarding the rest. Second, information is now

DANIEL GULATI

HUFFINGTON 04.21.13

ubiquitous. If you’re fed up with your job, you can download a resignation letter now, learn to code this afternoon, and read about how Bill Gates made billions before bedtime. Through the sea of free reports and tools available online, supersonic career success seems more achievable than ever. Finally, years of uninterrupted economic growth leave millennials less financially paranoid than previous generations. Our research in Passion & Purpose found that intellectual stimulaIf you tion is now the most climb too fast important factor when without solid millennials are choosgroundwork, ing where to work, you might far outweighing both go into an money and prestige. unintended Where is the fine freefall.” line between calculated job abandonment and downright career recklessness? Quitting early to avoid getting stuck in a rut is smart. But continually shortening your time horizons for career achievement and shirking hard work in the search for immediate silver bullets is a dangerous practice, and may limit your longterm outcomes. If you’re someone who constantly obsesses about becoming an over-


Voices night success, you’re aiming at the wrong target. Recent research describes the negative correlation between rapid adoption and eventual failure in everything from baby names to fashion, music, and social movements. Best-selling books correlate net worth with fewer job movements. The upshot? If you climb too fast without solid groundwork, you might go into an unintended freefall. “De-rushing” your career also improves the odds that you’ll eventually deliver something big because you’ll run into less competition. As Jeff Bezos emphasized when discussing Amazon’s long-term approach: “If everything you do needs to work on a three-year time horizon, then you’re competing against a lot of people. But if you’re willing to invest on a seven-year time horizon, you’re now competing against a fraction of those people ... Just by lengthening the time horizon, you can engage in endeavors that you could never otherwise pursue.” In other words, there is little value in shooting for quick career wins at the expense of a potentially bigger achievement. If capping your downside and increasing your odds of leaving a legacy weren’t enough, being pro-

DANIEL GULATI

HUFFINGTON 04.21.13

fessionally patient will liberate your mind and allow you to enjoy your professional life more deeply. As famed neuroscientist Robert Sapolsky says, our sense of well-being is brought about by the pursuit of happiness, not the attainment of it. Countless psychological studies prove that the anticipation of an experience has a more profoundly positive effect Our sense on our lives than the of well-being experience itself. By is brought rushing too fast to the about by the next promotion, job pursuit of change, or new busihappiness, not ness, you’re shortthe attainment changing yourself on of it.” what’s most enjoyable: the thrill of the chase. As J.G. Holland once remarked, “That which grows fast, withers as rapidly. That which grows slow, endures.” If you’re striving to be this year’s “insta-hit,” stop. Instead, be a marathon runner in a world of sprinters. If you work hard on creating enduring value, not only will you hit bigger milestones, you’ll truly enjoy the time it takes to craft something meaningful. Daniel Gulati is a tech entrepreneur.


Voices

JENNIFER 8. LEE

HUFFINGTON 04.21.13

FOOD

COURTESY OF TED

The Little-Known History of Asian Takeout in America When a dish hits a nerve with the American palate, it can really take off across the entire country, facilitated by food vendors’ freedom to copy good ideas. We saw it happen with General Tso’s chicken. We’re seeing it happen with other Asian-

influenced culinary creations, too. When I was researching my book on Chinese food in America, The Fortune Cookie Chronicles, which was the basis of my TED Talk, it puzzled me why Korean cuisine (unlike many of its Asian brethren) had not gone mainstream yet. Chinese, Japanese, Thai, Indian and Vietnamese restaurants had

JENNIFER 8. LEE discusses Asian food in America at the 2008 Taste3 conference.


Voices all hit critical mass, with footholds in suburban towns. But Korean cuisine remained mostly ensconced within Korean-American communities, with an occasional lone outpost defiantly offering bibimbap. This puzzled me, because Korean savory barbecued meats — short ribs, grilled marinated beef — should be widely appealing to an American palate, which never met a barbecue recipe it didn’t like. But Korean restaurants basically remained serving Korean clientele, with the occasional Chinese family, like mine, that celebrated our Thanksgivings there. I came up with various hypotheses to explain the roadblock: the names of Korean dishes were too strange and not descriptive enough (bulgogi and kalbi versus the very clear “beef and broccoli”). Kim chee had given Korean cuisine a pungent image in American minds. Korean immigrants had been siphoned into groceries and other retail industries. The Koreans who did open restaurants found it easier to sell Japanese or Chinese cuisine. Pho, pad thai, ramen had all lapped jap chae in a race to the American plate. But then boom! Kogi Korean

JENNIFER 8. LEE

BBQ-To-Go in Los Angeles burst into national consciousness in 2009 and developed a cult following with tens of thousands of Twitter followers. The formula was so simple, it was a wonder that it hadn’t been done before: put the yummy Korean meats in Mexican tortillas, and you are ready to roll. Burritos, tacos, quesadillas. It was aided by a charismatic Twitter account and the low overhead of a food truck, and a movement was born. It’s a concept that is truly the product of Los Angeles stir-fry (not melting pot!) in one bite: Korean and Mexican — two immigrant populations that have made Southern California an extension of their native homes. And it was the second generation that dared to make it happen.

TED and The Huffington Post are excited to bring you TEDWeekends, a curated weekend program that introduces a powerful “idea worth spreading” every Friday, anchored in an exceptional TEDTalk. This week’s TEDTalk is accompanied by an original blog post from the featured speaker, along with new op-eds, thoughts and responses from the HuffPost community. Watch the talk above, read the blog post and tell us your thoughts below. Become part of the conversation!

HUFFINGTON 04.21.13


Like General Tso’s chicken, the concept spread because of distributed open-source copying through a network of food vendors. It’s been echoed by dozens upon dozens of food trucks nationwide, from Korilla BBQ in New York, to Chilantro in Austin, Marination Mobile in Seattle. “Korean taco” now has its own Wikipedia page. This blending of Asian and other regional cuisines has become entertaining to watch over the last half decade. Vietnamese banh mi sandwiches (themselves already a product of French colonial presence in South East Asia), have developed sloppy joe and catfish versions (at Baoguette in New York), as well as a Vietnamese-Polish edition made with kielbasa. And you can chimp on banh mi sliders and banh mi tacos at The Peached Tortilla in Austin. Now I’m waiting for another Asian-Latino concept to take the country by storm: sushirittos, bur-

MORE ON TED WEEKENDS THE WATERMELON STEREOTYPE

HUFFINGTON 04.21.13

JENNIFER 8. LEE

Voices

WHAT’S REALLY IN THAT TAKE-OUT BOX?

Now I’m waiting for another Asian-Latino concept to take the country by storm: sushirittos, burrito-sized sushi rolls.” rito-sized sushi rolls. There is the namesake establishment in downtown San Francisco, as well as Jogasaki’s sushi burritos in Los Angeles, and Wrapmi in Boston. My Japanese friends were slightly terrified when they encountered them. It was like encountering a genetic mutation from outer space. Supersizing maki rolls is just so, so American, they said. It’s true. It is so American. That’s what makes it wonderful. Watch for the yummy seaweed logs, they are coming to you.

Jennifer 8. Lee is the cofounder and publisher of Plympton, and author of The Fortune Cookie Chronicles.

A selection of the week’s related blogs HEADLINES TO VIEW BLOGS ABOUT THIS WEEK’S THEME

EDIBLE AMERICANNESS

GENERAL TSO CHICKEN

AS AMERICAN AS TAKE-OUT CHINESE?


QUOTED

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: RICK DIAMOND/WIREIMAGE/GETTY IMAGES; FRANCESCO D’ANDRIA; SPENCER PLATT/GETTY IMAGES; GETTY IMAGES

Voices

HUFFINGTON 04.21.13

“I wasn’t aware that Congress had an indoor pool.”

— HuffPost commenter awarg,

on the plutonium “gate to Hell” discovery in the ancient city of Hierapolis

“I really, honestly think that anybody who is openly gay and visible is powerful.” — Portia de Rossi told Out magazine

“I just spent two minutes watching a cat twitch. It’s time to re-evaluate my time management skills.” — HuffPost commenter NunuDudu, on watching a cat video

“Crippling small business has been a cornerstone of this administration.”

— HuffPost commenter jumpingjackflash, on the delayed health law provision for small businesses


Voices

QUOTED

HUFFINGTON 04.21.13

“We’re in deep doo doo.” — Former Vice President Dick Cheney

CLOCWISE FROM TOP LEFT: BRENDAN HOFFMAN/GETTY IMAGES; NCP/STAR MAX/FILMMAGIC/ GETTY IMAGES; RICHARD SHOTWELL/INVISION/AP; RANDY HOLMES/ABC VIA GETTY IMAGES

warned top GOP lawmakers about the recent threats from North Korea, a Republican leadership aide told CNN

“I was not thinking normal, human thoughts. I was hallucinating! And then I started to hear opera.”

— Rachel McAdams

talked about the first time she got stoned when she dropped by Jimmy Kimmel Live!

“People in the street who feel the right to touch a pregnant woman’s belly ought to be arrested for harassment.”

— Gloria Steinem

defends Kim Kardashian againsts critics in a new interview with US Weekly

“No big deal ... Maybe someday, it won’t be news.”

— HuffPost commenter ohiopositive,

on Magic Johnson’s gay son going public with his boyfriend


GETTY IMAGES

04.21.13 #45 FEATURES YOUR WORK, YOUR RULES

GREEN EVOLUTION


YOUR WORK


YOUR RULES The Results-Only Work Environment Lets You Clock in Whenever, Wherever.

THIS PAGE AND PREVIOUS PAGE: GETTY IMAGES

by Lisa Belkin


On day one of his company’s grand work experiment,

Kyle Pederson found himself more or less alone. Of the 15 full-time employees at Learner’s Edge, a continuing education firm in Minneapolis, only three arrived at the office that first day. And the next day. And the day after that. ¶ “For almost a month, everyone cleared out,” Pederson said of time spent rattling around an empty, silent space. “It was just me, my co-founder and our executive director all wondering, ‘What on earth have we done?’”

What they’d done was adopt a new way of working — one that either symbolizes the future of work in the U.S. or demonstrates the limits of workplace flexibility, depending on who you ask. Specifically, what they’d done was adopt the same program that was recently canceled at Best Buy, but which is being embraced at dozens of other companies around the country. Called ROWE (which stands for Results Only Work Environment) it is an attempt to test the limits of workplace flexibility, and, in the process, redefine

them. What’s clear is that the way Americans work is overdue for a change: gone are the days of pink “While You Were Out” slips, nine-to-five schedules, telephones anchored to desks, and secretaries to type letters for bosses who didn’t know their way around a keyboard. Less clear, however, is what we want to change the system to. What is the purpose of an office when so much of modern work can be done from just about anywhere? In a 24/7 economy, how much work is enough work? To whom does your time belong when you


DONAE COTTON PHOTOGRAPHY/COURTESY OF CALI RESSLER AND JODY THOMPSON

ROWE founders Cali Ressler (left) and Jody Thompson.


YOUR WORK, YOUR RULES

are getting a paycheck? How do you manage employees when you can’t actually see them? Lost in the conversation after the Best Buy cancellation is the fact that ROWE is much more than just permission to work from home once in a while. It is a comprehensive re-evaluation of the goals and methods of work. Created by former Best Buy employees Jody Thompson and Cali Ressler, and, at its peak, being used by 80 percent of the company’s 3000 corporate employees, ROWE’s slogan is “Work whenever you want, wherever you want, as long as the work gets done.” That last clause is important. Want to spend the workday at home in your pajamas? Fine, as long as you can meet your sales quotas while you are there. Want to move to a cabin in Montana and attend meetings at L.A. headquarters via teleconference? Great, as long as your reports are in on time and your clients are happy. Work best if you arrive at your desk at midnight and leave at dawn? No problem, as long as the work gets done. ROWE is based on the belief that managers need to stop measuring an employee’s work by

HUFFINGTON 04.21.13

WORK STRESS ON THE RISE A new poll by the annual Work Stress Survey shows that more than eight in 10 employed Americans are stressed out by at least one thing about their jobs. Poor pay and increasing workloads were top sources of concern reported by American workers. The results showed a marked increase from last year’s survey, which found that 73 percent of Americans were stressed at work. This year, that number jumped to 83 percent.

THE MAJOR STRESSORS: > 14 percent of workers cited poor compensation and an unreasonable workload. Twice as many women (18 percent) as men (10 percent) cited low pay as their primary job-related stressor. > 11 percent cited frustration with coworkers or commutes.

> 8 percent cited working in a job that is not one’s career of choice. > 7 percent cited poor work-life balance. > 6 percent cited lack of opportunity for advancement. > 4 percent cited fear of being fired or laid off.

whether they show up to do it, and start focusing instead on creating clear job descriptions, attainable goals and better methods of measurement — and then letting workers get down to work. Yes, this means that some people will still have to be in a specific place at a certain time — if that is the way to get the job done. And they will still have to come to meetings — if that meeting is required to get the job done. But what most managers learn when they adopt this new approach is that far more meetings are unnecessary and far more jobs can


YOUR WORK, YOUR RULES

be done remotely than they ever would have guessed. “I’d thought I was a pretty hands-off manager,” says Veronica Wooten, president and COO of Kansas-based Suntell, whose 17 employees provide risk management software to the banking industry. “But then we made the transition, and started letting go and letting people make their own decisions, I realized I was a lot more controlling than I perceived myself to be.” Wooten’s “micromanaging,” she’s concluded, kept workers from being as productive as they could be when they set the pace themselves. In the nearly three years since she adopted ROWE, she says, “Our employee count has decreased 20 percent, and our customer base increased 20 percent.” In addition, there are 50 percent fewer meetings, as employees were given the right to vote with their feet and not come to those that they didn’t consider necessary. Her expenses decreased 12 percent, and she used that to give everyone a raise. She expects to move to a smaller office when her current lease expires, because only three of her staff “choose to use the office to meet results. Everyone else

HUFFINGTON 04.21.13

chooses to work elsewhere.” Where does she work? At home two days a week. “My only reason for being in the office, I realized, was to keep an eye on people,” she says, “and I don’t need to do that anymore.” Pederson too, saw an increase in productivity, and also a new

What most managers learn when they adopt this new approach is that far more meetings are unnecessary and far more jobs can be done remotely than they ever would have guessed. awareness among workers of how each of them work best. After about a month of “relishing new-found freedom,” he says, some staff found they missed the structure of an office, and began to return. Others, who missed the camaraderie and connection of “face-time,” but not the desks and the clock, began to find that in new ways — gathering at Starbucks near their homes, or inviting each other for social dinners, just to keep in touch. (He still comes to the office, he says, because he discovered he is too distracted by his toddler to work


PHOTO COURTESY OF LAWSON PHILLIPS, LLC

YOUR WORK, YOUR RULES

from home.) Changing everything is both simple (Wooten says the team had a “fast-track training session” with Jody Thompson and read the book Why Work Sucks, and How to Fix It, before getting started “right away”) and very complicated. Reams of laws and regulations are based on a 9-to-5, inthe-office model. When switching to ROWE, everything from comp time and vacation days (both lose their meaning when you work as much or as little as you need to) and hourly wages (how do you pay someone by the hour if you are not counting their hours) have to be rejiggered. Companies tend to address the first by making the change at the start of a new year and asking employees to use up their remaining time before ROWE starts, and the second by paying everyone, including hourly workers, a 40-hour-a-week rate and allowing them to file for overtime. Managers who spoke with HuffPost said that what seems to be the biggest risk of the program — that workers will take advantage of the new freedom — has not been an issue at all. Leaders stressed that Yahoo, where

HUFFINGTON 04.21.13

“My only reason for being in the office, I realized, was to keep an eye on people, and I don’t need to do that anymore.” Marissa Mayer was reportedly moved to eliminate work-fromhome arrangements in order to rein in employees who had all but stopped producing, never followed a ROWE model. Under ROWE, Thompson says, the employees who so troubled Mayer would

Veronica Wooten, president and COO of Suntell, which switched to the ROWE model.


COURTESY OF KYLE PEDERSON

YOUR WORK, YOUR RULES

have been ousted long ago. The problem was not too much freedom, she says, but rather poorly defined goals. “Employees aren’t kids off playing hookey, doing as they please. They are adults you trust to do a job right.” Thompson and Ressler also argue that ROWE was not the reason Best Buy came upon hard times. While a large percentage of the corporate staff worked in a ROWE, they say, that group accounted for only two percent of the entire Best Buy company. “While we agree that Best Buy must take drastic measures to turn their business around, moving back to a 20th century, paternalistic ‘command and control’ environment is most certainly not the answer,” Ressler and Thompson wrote on their website in response to the company’s decision to cancel the flexibility plan. Wooten agreed. “I think Best Buy has made a change that has nothing to do with where their problems really lie. I think that their decreased earnings and sales on the retail side have nothing to do with the ROWE on the corporate end,” she says. Wouldn’t it have been a statement, she mused, if either compa-

HUFFINGTON 04.21.13

“It has always struck me as paternalistic at its core when management dictates how people work and where they work.” ny had declared that they intended to shake up the culture, and, as a result, had decided to push the edges of flexibility, rather than contracting them? Pederson wonders that as well. “There are practical benefits,” he says. “Better work, higher productivity. But there are also philosophical reasons. It has always struck me as paternalistic at its core when management dictates how people work and where they work. This is a more respectful way to work.”

Kyle Pederson, one of the full-time employees at the education firm Learner’s Edge, which has adopted the ROWE model.


The Green Movement Grows As We Continue to Destroy the Environment

DIVERGING

APRIL 22 MARKS the 43rd observance of Earth Day in the United States. Organized by Sen. Gaylord Nelson (D-Wis.), the first Earth Day saw an estimated 20 million Americans demonstrate in support of the environment. By 2012, more than one billion people in 192 countries took part in Earth Day. Tracing its roots to the 19th-century conservation movement, modern environmentalism — and its accompanying protests — has grown since the first Earth Day, despite disappointing progress on the policy front. The second decade of the 21st century – marked by the nation’s largest oil spill, the hottest year on record for the continental U.S. and a bitterly divisive Keystone pipeline proposal — has already confirmed the growing relevance of environmental issues in America. From dramatically unfurled banners across world landmarks to an underwater government cabinet meeting, the demonstrations captured here reflect a spirit unlikely to wane.

By JAMES GERKEN


NEW YORK, NY / 04.22.77

AP PHOTO

A participant of Earth Day celebrations in Union Square in New York City carries a sign protesting killing. Thousands crowded the square, where official observances were held, and Fifth Avenue all the way to 59th Street, where vehicles powered by internal combustion engines were banned.

CONNECTING THE DOTS ON CLIMATE CHANGE

AResearchers BUMPIERinRIDE? Britain have

found that climate change could bring increased turbulence for transatlantic flights by between 10 and 40 percent by 2050.


PHILADELPHIA, PA / 04.22.70 An estimated 7,000 people jam a quadrangle at the Independence Mall during Earth Week activities celebrating the eve of Earth Day.

AN ITCH YOU CAN’T SCRATCH Research indicates that increased levels of

AP PHOTO

atmospheric carbon dioxide bring larger poison ivy plants. Even worse, climate change will mean that the plant’s irritating oil will also get more potent.


RUHSTORF, GERMANY / 11.11.03

JOCHEN LUEBKE/AFP/GETTY IMAGES)

German riot police watch over some 150 anti-nuclear demonstrators blocking railway tracks in a bid to stop a train transporting radioactive waste material to a storage facility in Gorleben. The 12 containers are coming from the French nuclear treating facility of La Hague.

GATORS IN THE YARD North American alligators require a certain temperature range for

survival and reproduction, traditionally limiting them to the southern U.S. But warming temperatures could open new turf to gators with more sightings further north.

PHOTO OR ILLUSTRATION CREDIT TK


RIO DE JANEIRO, BRAZIL / 09.05.02 Activists from Greenpeace rappel from a statue of Christ the Redeemer in protest of the results of the World Summit on Sustainable Development, or Rio + 10, in Johannesburg. The banner reads: “Rio + 10 = Second Chance.”

NTONIO SCORZA/AFP/GETTY IMAGES

Do you think government spending on programs to enhance and restore our environment should be kept at the present level, increased or decreased?

2012

TAP TO COMPARE

PHOTO OR ILLUSTRATION CREDIT TK

1971


WASHINGTON, D.C. / 02.27.13 35,000 people from 28 states converge in the streets to show President Obama the broad public support for climate solutions, while also challenging him to keep his commitment of making climate action a top priority during his second term. The president has several actions that he alone can take, including rejecting the Keystone XL tar sands pipeline and adopting a strong carbon rule to limit pollution from coal plants.

JOSHUA LOPEZ / PROJECT SURVIVAL MEDIA

How important do you think it is to work to restore and enhance the natural environment?

2012 PHOTO OR ILLUSTRATION CREDIT TK

TAP TO COMPARE

1971


WASHINGTON D.C. / 06.17.10 A police officer escorts protester Diane Wilson out of the hearing room after she disrupted the hearing of BP Chief Executive Tony Hayward on the Gulf Coast oil spill on Capitol Hill.

AP PHOTO/HARAZ N. GHANBARI

NOT A DROP TO DRINK Government research has shown that without

“major adaptation efforts,” parts of the U.S. are likely to see “substantial future water shortages.” Climate change, especially for the Southwest U.S., can both increase water demand and decrease water supply.

PHOTO OR ILLUSTRATION CREDIT TK


WORSENING ALLERGIES The spring 2013 allergy season could be one of the worst ever,

thanks to climate change. Experts say that increased precipitation along with an early spring, late-ending fall and higher levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide may bring more pollen from plants and increased mold and fungal growth.

JUSTIN SULLIVAN/GETTY IMAGES

SACRAMENTO, CA / 07.25.12 A protestor wears face paint during a demonstration against fracking outside of the California EPA headquarters. Dozens of environmental activists staged a “Stop Fracking With California� demonstration.

ATheMIGHTY WIND dramatic and rapid loss of sea ice in recent

years has consequences beyond the Arctic. Scientists have found the melting shifts the position of the Jet Stream, bringing cold Arctic air further south and increasing the odds of intense snow storms and extreme spring weather.

PHOTO OR ILLUSTRATION CREDIT TK


HUMBOLDT COUNTY, CA / 1998

GERARD BURKHART/GETTY IMAGES

Julia “Butterfly” Hill stands in a 200-foot-tall oldgrowth Redwood tree. Hill spent 738 days here in protest of old-growth Redwood logging by the Maxxam Corporation.

MELTING BLITZ IN SOUTH AMERICA High in the Peruvian Andes, parts of the world’s largest tropical ice sheet have melted at an unbelievable pace. Scientists found that significant portions of the Quelccaya Ice Cap that took more than 1,600 years to form have melted in only 25.

PHOTO OR ILLUSTRATION CREDIT TK


COLOR-CHANGING BEARS As Arctic ice melts and polar bears see more of their habitats disappear, the animals could lose their white coats. Researchers have witnessed polar bears hybridizing with their brown cousins, but note it would take thousands of years for them to adapt themselves out of existence.

SAUL LOEB/AFP/GETTY IMAGES

WASHINGTON, D.C. / 08.30.11 A police officer escorts actress Daryl Hannah to a police van as she sneaks a peace sign after being arrested during a protest against the construction of the Keystone XL pipeline, outside the White House. PHOTO OR ILLUSTRATION CREDIT TK


AWithTOUGH TIME FOR MUSHERS climate change already impacting northern latitudes,

AP PHOTO/MOHAMMED SEENEEN

warmer winters in Alaska could mean less than ideal conditions for the famous Iditarod sled dog race. “It definitely has us concerned,” a musher and Iditarod spokeswoman who’s already breeding dogs with thinner coats, told The New York Times.

INDIAN OCEAN / 10.17.09 In this handout picture released by The Maldives Presidency, Fisheries and Agriculture Minister Ibrahim Didi signs the decree of an underwater cabinet meeting off Girifushi Island, staged to highlight the threat of global warming to the lowest-lying nation on earth. PHOTO OR ILLUSTRATION CREDIT TK


ISABELA, PHILIPPINES / 09.30.06 A circle made by local farmers and Greenpeace volunteers on a corn farm planted with a genetically-modified Bt corn. The crop circle, with a slash over the letter “M,� symbolizes farmer rejection of genetically-modified Bt corn crops from Monsanto corporation.

MELVYN CALDERON/AFP/GETTY IMAGES

Which of the things on this list, if any, have you personally done within the past few months to help protect the environment?

Walked or rode bicycle instead of riding in a vehicle

Cut down on the use Decided to of electricity or other stop using chemical forms of energy. pesticides

PHOTO OR ILLUSTRATION CREDIT TK

1971

Ate organically grown food

Decided to stop using disposable or plastic products

TAP TO COMPARE

2012

Switched to Voted for a political Contributed money a low phosphate candidate who supports to an environmental cleaning product the environment organization


WINE TO GO? Along with other agricultural impacts, climate change may have

a dramatic effect on the world’s most-famous winemaking regions in coming decades. Areas suitable for grape cultivation may shrink, and temperatures changes may impact the signature taste of wines from certain regions.

SCOTT BARBOUR/GETTY IMAGES

MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA / 03.03.13 Naked cyclists take part in the World Naked Bike Ride, intended to “peacefully expose the vulnerability of cyclists, humanity and nature in the face of cars, aggression, consumerism and non-renewable energy.” PHOTO OR ILLUSTRATION CREDIT TK

TROUBLE ON THE ICE Warmer winters in northern latitudes could

mean fewer days for outdoor hockey. An online project called RinkWatch aims to collect data on the condition of outdoor winter ice rinks in Canada and the northern U.S. and educate people on the impacts of climate change.


PETER PARKS/AFP/GETTY IMAGES CREDIT_TK

TSING YI, HONG KONG / 03.20.00 Members of Greenpeace hang a banner saying “Stop Dioxin” on a tank at a chemical waste treatment center to protest the Hong Kong government’s plan to burn medical waste at the facility.

PHOTO OR ILLUSTRATION CREDIT TK


BRIGHTON BEACH, ENGLAND / 08.08.01 Members of Surfers Against Sewage hold a “toilet protest,” designed to highlight the fact that Britain’s coastline is one of the most contaminated in Europe, with raw sewage being pumped onto public beaches.

SION TOUHIG/GETTY IMAGES

AExperts DAMPER ON YOUR RAW BAR? speculate warming oceans may have

played a part in a strain of herpes that has killed Pacific oysters in Europe in recent years.

PHOTO OR ILLUSTRATION CREDIT TK


SOUR APPLES Apples produced in one Himalayan state of India are already losing their

taste, experts say. Increased rainfall and erratic weather in the region mean less than ideal conditions for famously sweet Kashmiri apples.

AP PHOTO/JIM URQUHART

SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH / 07.26.11 Environmental activists block an entrance to a courthouse after Tim DeChristopher was sentenced to two years in prison on federal charges for bidding up prices in protest at an oil and gas land lease auction, which he couldn’t afford. PHOTO OR ILLUSTRATION CREDIT TK


Exit

LIFESTYLE

How to Destress Without Leaving Your Desk BY KATE BRATSKEIR

HEN YOU’RE stressed at work, a two-hour deep tissue massage will probably do the trick. Alas, for most of us, a massage is not a feasible corporate expense. Even so, it’s important to keep

GETTY IMAGES

W

our stress in check — especially at the office. A recent survey from the American Psychological Association found that one-third of employees experience chronic stress related to work. Chronic stress has been associated with an increased risk of stroke and heart attack, and can magnify a number of other health problems, including acne,

HUFFINGTON 04.21.13


Exit obesity and depression. “The problem is that no one is pausing in the middle of really busy days,” Jon Wortmann, author of Mastering Communication at Work: How to Lead, Manage, and Influence, told The Huffington Post. “Making space for the normal stress of the day to recede has to happen on a regular basis.” But when you’re so plugged into your work and the endless items on your to-do list, it can be hard to remember to check in with yourself. The solution? Making breaks a scheduled part of your day. “If you’re stuck at your desk, build in five- to 15-minute breaks between meetings and tasks at least three times today,” Wortmann says. It’s

GETTY IMAGES

TAKE A TWO-MINUTE MINI VACATION Choose one of your favorite vacation memories and relive it.”Every single one of us has memories from our favorite places. You can relive the best moment of your life to feel like you did when you were there,” Wortmann says. WHY IT WORKS: It helps you recognize you have a choice in how you feel in a stressful moment.

LIFESTYLE

HUFFINGTON 04.21.13

Without a break, ‘you will be less productive, you will be making mistakes and you will start to feel miserable.’” imperative to make these breaks part of your schedule, just as you would a conference call or a presentation. While three 30-minute mind-clearing breaks a day is ideal, just five minutes can make a difference. Without a break, “you will be less productive, you will be making mistakes and you will start to feel miserable,” he says. Ahead, find 10 tried-and-true techniques that will enhance your productivity and help you feel far less frazzled.


Exit

LIFESTYLE

HUFFINGTON 04.21.13

KEEP ESSENTIAL OILS AT YOUR DESK Essential oils will do more than mimic an escape to the spa: A whiff or two could actually help you relax. Aromatherapy has been shown to decrease stress levels, so shop around for a scent you fancy and get sniffing.

HANDWRITE YOUR TO-DO LIST

GETTY IMAGES (ESSENTIAL OIL, ORANGE)

Think of your handwritten to-do list as a sacred document, kept away from distractions of the inter-webs. You’ll know exactly where to find it when you need to refer back to it since it won’t be lost among the many open tabs of your browser. Plus, the act of physically writing down your tasks may help you organize your thoughts and remember them more clearly, which, in turn, will help you to be more focused and less stressed. Fear you’ll forget your to-dos on your desk one rushed night? Make a point to snap a photo with your phone at the end of each day.

SURF AROUND ON A ZEN-FRIENDLY WEBSITE It might seem counterintuitive to find solace on your screen, but you can do exactly that with the many centering sites out there. Here are 10 of our favorite URLs that inspire us.

TAKE A SCREEN BREAK You’ll have to get up for this one, but it will be worth your while: Just a five-minute break from your desk will have you returning refocused and a little less anxious. Plus, your eyes will appreciate the rest.

SNACK ON AN ORANGE Your co-workers will think you’re just craving a juicy mid-day snack, but besides satisfying tummy grumbles, you’ll be reaping the benefits of the stress-relieving powers of citrus. A 2002 study found that a dose of vitamin C helped people bounce back more easily from a stressful situation.


Exit

LIFESTYLE

HUFFINGTON 04.21.13

DESTRESS CHECKLIST LISTEN To your surroundings, the type of your coworkers’ keys, your breathing.

SWIVEL Since stress is physically exhausting, you might benefit from a little movement for an instant energy lift. An action as small as swiveling in your chair with a couple of deep breaths can help you get back to business, Glamour reports.

COUNT  Wortmann quotes Thomas Jefferson, who definitely had it right: When angry, count to 10 before you speak. If very angry, count to 100.

BOUNCE IT OUT If your employer allows it, you might consider swapping your desk chair for something a little more fun. While there is yet to be conclusive research that a stability ball improves posture, the ball does allow more room for fidgeting — which can wake you up and help get you back in the zone.

GETTY IMAGES (BALL, HEADPHONES)

TURN ON THE TUNES According to a 2012 study, listening to music every day can help keep your stress in check. The (not-sohard-to-fulfill) catch: You have to listen to music that you actually like.

SWEEP Practice a mental sweeping of the chalkboard of your mind. Pause intentionally and visualize an eraser wiping away any overwhelming thoughts.

TRY A BREATHING EXERCISE WebMD cites deep breathing as one of the best ways to lower stress in the body. That’s good news, since it’s an exercise you can perform anywhere, sans candles or gongs.


Exit

TECH

HUFFINGTON 04.21.13

8 On-the-Go Meditation Apps BY CAROLINE GREGOIRE

N OUR NON-STOP contemporary lives, it helps when mindfulness can be practiced on-the-go. Fortunately, you don’t have to carve out a full 30 minutes, twice a day to feel the benefits of cultivating mindfulness through a regular meditation routine. Just a few minutes can go a long way toward lowering stress levels, stabilizing mood and improving focus. In fact, a 2011

PHOTOGRAPHS COURTESY OF SMILING MIND

I

brain imaging study published in the Journal of Neuroscience found that even very brief instruction in mindfulness meditation (four 20-minute sessions) was effective in relieving pain by reducing the brain’s emotional response to painful stimuli. So if you’re looking for a way to incorporate meditation into a jam-packed work schedule, unwind with one of these eight meditation apps for portable serenity, whether you’re on the subway, waiting at the airport or between meetings.


Exit

TECH

HUFFINGTON 04.21.13

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: COURTESY OF BUDDHIFY; COURTESY OF WWW.HEADSPACE.COM; COURTESY OF MINDAPPS; COURTESY OF MEDITATION OASIS APP

HEADSPACE Kickstart your meditation practice with a 10-day starter program from Headspace, a free meditation app. The comprehensive, guided sessions offer clear and straightforward mindfulness instruction for beginners, who can continue to access hours of videos and audio meditations by subscribing for a low monthly fee.

BUDDHIFY This $2.99 app describes itself as “the urban meditation app for modern life,” and was named the number-one health app by The Sun. App Store reviewers rave about the app’s clear, simple design and relaxing guided meditations. Customize your meditation to your location: It offers tailored guides for when you’re at home, walking or at the gym.

SIMPLY BEING Short, guided meditations for relaxation and presence (with or without music and nature sounds) are the focus of this $0.99 app. Perfect for beginners, Simply Being is highly rated for being user-friendly and customizable.

THE MINDFULNESS APP Sometimes, just remembering to be mindful is the hardest part of sticking to a practice. If you need a little nudge to help you stick with your meditation routine, try The Mindfulness App. The biggest perk of this $1.99 program is that you can set location alerts to remind you to stop and meditate at a particular time or day of the week, or even when you enter a certain location.


Exit

HUFFINGTON 04.21.13

TECH

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: COURTESY OF SMILING MIND; COURTESY OF MENTAL WORKOUT INC.; COURTESY OF MEDITATION OASIS ; AMBER STAR/SIMPLETOUCH LLC.

WALKING MEDITATION This app by Meditation Oasis, the makers of Simply Being, is geared toward mediation on-the-go. With three different guided walking meditations, users can plug in their headphones and unwind in transit. The app comes with a diary for users to keep track of their progress.

MINDFULNESS MEDITATION This best-selling iPhone app by Mental Workout, designed by renowned meditation teacher and psychotherapist Stephan Bodian, provides guided meditations for both beginners and more experienced mindfulness practitioners. The app features an eight-week program, inspiration talks, body scans and relaxation instructions. According to one App Store reviewer, the app is the best way to learn mindfulness “short of finding your own personal meditation teacher.”

SMILING MIND Designed specifically for young people, Smiling Mind makes meditation fun, easy and accessible. Created by a team of psychologists who specialize in adolescent therapy, the app offers programs catered to different age groups, from 7-11 years old to adult, and also includes reminders.

MEDITATION TIMER If guided meditation isn’t your thing, try going your own way with a basic meditation timer app that allows you to follow your own practice, either silently or accompanied by bells. The statistics feature also allows users to track their practice and chart progress.


EAT THIS

Exit

Morning Rush? Make Breakfast in 15 (or Less). BY JULIE R. THOMSON

HE MORNINGS are tough. You have to somehow get yourself out of bed. Make yourself presentable to start the day and then actually leave the house to be productive — all before nine o’clock in the morning. On top of that, you’re supposed to find the time to

GETTY IMAGES

T

make and eat the most important meal of the day. With all that other stuff to worry about, breakfast is the first thing to be neglected. But if you could have a delicious and satisfying breakfast made in just 15 minutes or less, wouldn’t you find a way to squeeze that into your morning schedule? We thought so. And with the recipes below, it won’t be hard to find the motivation to do so.

HUFFINGTON 04.21.13


HUFFINGTON 04.21.13

EAT THIS

Exit

1. AÇAI SUPER SMOOTHIE From FOOD & WINE

Brazilian surfers first popularized this freakishly nutritious Amazonian berry. Now it's gone mainstream. This smoothie boosts açai’s healthfulness with pomegranate juice. INGREDIENTS ■ 1   3.5-ounce package

■ ■

■ ■

2. FRIED EGG CHILAQUILES By KEMP MINIFIE

FROM TOP: ANTONIS ACHILLEOS/COURTESY OF FOOD & WINE; FREDDY/FLICKR

INGREDIENTS ■ 1 

■ ■

■ ■

16-ounce jar tomatillo salsa  cup water ½  cup coarsely ¾ chopped cilantro, divided 1 quart coarsely broken, goodquality plain corn tortilla chips, not baked or low-fat  fried eggs 4  cup ¼ sour cream thinned with 1 tablespoon water or milk  cup chopped ¼ white onion  cup crumbled ¼ cotija or feta cheese

DIRECTIONS 1. Combine salsa and water in a medium saucepan and bring to a boil. Stir in ½ cup cilantro. 2. Add chips, stirring to coat with sauce, and cook, stirring gently, until softened but not mushy, about 1 minute. Spread chilaquiles on a platter and top with fried eggs. 3. Drizzle dish with thinned sour cream and sprinkle with white onion, cheese, and remaining ¼ cup cilantro.

frozen unsweetened açai puree   bananas 2 1  cup pomegranate juice 1  cup frozen raspberries 1  tablespoon agave nectar

DIRECTIONS In a blender, combine one 3.5-ounce package frozen unsweetened açai puree with 2 bananas, 1 cup frozen raspberries, 1 cup pomegranate juice and 1 tablespoon agave nectar and blend at high speed until smooth. Serve right away.

It’s hard to imagine that a dish this ridiculously easy to make could be so good, but it really is a winner. A purist would make their own salsa and fry up fresh corn tortillas wedges, but when you’re in a hurry, which most of us are, this quickie version hits the spot.


HUFFINGTON 04.21.13

Exit

FROM TOP: GETTY IMAGES; THE LODGE CAST IRON COOKBOOK. OXMOOR HOUSE, 2012

3. BREAKFAST YOGURT By Georgeanne Brennan

Walnuts are one of the healthy, powerhouse foods, and an easy way to enjoy them is as part of breakfast. INGREDIENTS ■ ½  ■ ■

cup plain yogurt   tablespoons honey 2  -6 walnut halves 4 or ¼ cup chopped walnut meat

DIRECTIONS Spoon the yogurt into a cereal bowl. Add the honey and the walnuts.

4. SHIRRED EGGS With Ham and Tomato From The Lodge Cast Iron Cookbook INGREDIENTS ■ 1   tablespoon  

■ ■

4. SHIRRED EGGS with Ham and Tomato

From Taste, recipe courtesy of The Lodge Cast Iron Cookbook

unsalted butter   slices Black   2 Forest or other cooked ham, trimmed to fit pan   tablespoons to2 mato sauce, homemade or goodquality jarred   extra-large eggs 2 1  tablespoon heavy cream  alt and freshly S ground black pepper 1  teaspoon coarsely chopped fresh herbs (tarragon, chervil, and/or chives — just one herb or a mixture)

DIRECTIONS 1. Preheat the oven to 350. 2. Melt the butter in a 5-inch cast iron skillet over low heat. Remove the skillet from the heat. 3. Place the ham in the bottom of the pan. Spread the tomato sauce evenly over the ham. Carefully break the eggs on top; drizzle the cream over the eggs. Season with salt and pepper to taste (go very light on the salt since the ham is salty). 4. Place the pan in the oven and bake for 5 to 6 minutes, checking occasionally. The whites should be set, but the yolks can still be runny. 5. Sprinkle the eggs with the herbs and serve in the skillet.


EAT THIS

Exit

5. OMEGA-3 OMELET With Spring Greens and Beans From Taste INGREDIENTS

■ 6 

■ ¼ 

■ ■ ■

PHOTO IMAGES GETTY OR ILLUSTRATION CREDIT TK

cup dill  cup fennel ¼  cup flat-leaf parsley ¼  cup spring onions ½  cup fresh fava beans ½  omega-3 egg whites 6

■ ■

omega-3 egg yolks  zucchini squash, grated 4 s ea salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste 1 tablespoon olive oil  cup fat-free cottage ½ cheese

HUFFINGTON 04.21.13

DIRECTIONS 1. Preheat the broiler. Finely chop the dill, fennel, parsley and spring onions. Blanch the beans. 2. Whisk the egg whites until soft peaks form and then fold in the egg yolks. Set aside some of the chopped herbs, then fold the rest into the egg mixture, along with the grated zucchini. Season to taste. 3. Heat the olive oil in a pan over medium heat. Pour the mixture into the pan and cook briefly. Place the pan with the egg mixture under a hot broiler until the top turns slightly golden in color. 4. Spoon over the cottage cheese, scatter with the remaining herbs and serve with the beans on the side.


01

AP PHOTO/CAROLYN KASTER (RYAN); AP PHOTO/KCNA (MISSILE); GETTY IMAGES (WASP); SPENCER PLATT/GETTY IMAGES (AMERICAN FOLK ART MUSEUM); GETTY IMAGES (SEXSOMNIA)

Exit

TFU

HUFFINGTON 04.21.13

Paul Ryan: ‘We Want a Country’ Where Abortion ‘Isn’t Even Considered’

2

Pentagon: North Korea ‘Probably’ Has Nuclear Missile Capacity

3

WASP-INFUSED LIQUOR MIGHT BE THE GROSSEST THING EVER

4

05 MoMA to Raze the ‘Best Building in the World’

Man With ‘Sexsomnia’ Acquitted of Molestation Charges


06 Exit

HUFFINGTON 04.21.13

TFU

GETTY IMAGES (IRS, CONDOMS, DENTIST); AP PHOTO/MOMMYMILK (JEWELRY)

Guy Thinks He’s Buying Toy Poodles, Gets Ferrets on Steroids Instead

7

The IRS Thinks It Doesn’t Need a Warrant to Read Your Email

8

BOSTON COLLEGE WANTS TO BAN FREE CONDOMS

10 9

Breast Milk Jewelry Is a Real Thing

Dentist Pulls All Man’s Teeth Without Permission


ADVERTISEMENT

Get the HuffPost Live App for iPad速 & iPad mini速

Download Now

iPad is a trademark of Apple Inc., registered in the U.S. and other countries. App Store is a service mark of Apple Inc.


Editor-in-Chief:

Arianna Huffington Editor: John Montorio Managing Editor: Gazelle Emami Senior Editor: Adam J. Rose Editor-at-Large: Katy Hall Senior Politics Editor: Sasha Belenky Senior Voices Editor: Stuart Whatley Pointers Editor: Marla Friedman Quoted Editor: Annemarie Dooling Viral Editor: Dean Praetorius Editorial Assistant: Jenny Macksamie Editorial Intern: Emma Diab Creative Director: Josh Klenert Design Director: Andrea Nasca Photography Director: Anna Dickson Associate Photo Editor: Wendy George Designers: Martin Gee, Troy Dunham Production Director: Peter Niceberg AOL MagCore Head of UX and Design: Jeremy LaCroix Product Managers: Mimmie Huang, Gabriel Giordani Architect: Scott Tury Developers: Mike Levine, Carl Haines, Terence Worley, Ron Anderson, Sudheer Agrawal QA: Joyce Wang, Amy Golliver Sales: Mandar Shinde, Jami Lawrence AOL, Inc. Chairman & CEO:

Tim Armstrong

PHOTO OR ILLUSTRATION CREDIT TK


Huffington (Issue #45)