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ORNAMENTALS

Cercis canadensis ‘Forest Pansy’

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A LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

Three-year-old Gigi loves picking flowers and helping her mother in the garden. Lots of little girls all over the world love doing the same thing, except this one has an extra-special garden — a flower farm filled with dahlias like the beautiful peachy coloured Cafe au Lait blooms she’s holding a bunch of on page 53. Gigi’s parents, Janae and Chris Paquin-Bowden, had always liked the idea of growing flowers, but the two school teachers had to first teach themselves how to do it. “I got a book from the library about how to be a flower farmer and on our honeymoon I read it about a hundred times,” Janae says. “The garden came first and we lived in the shed that we built before we were married; bit by bit we started the garden, learning what flowers people want.” Five years later, business is blooming for the couple. Drive past their roadside store in the Daylesford Macedon Ranges on a weekend and you’ll find it filled with freshly cut flowers — and, who knows, some little hands may have helped in the gathering. “Gigi has her own little pair of secateurs and she cuts off the flowers I don’t need — or usually the ones I don’t need!” Someone in my family — who shall remain nameless, and who I hope forgets to read my letter this month — told me last week that they couldn’t find some valuables they usually keep in the oven’s warming drawer. (I hope they don’t turn the oven on too often!) So when I read about the clever Mrs Garry, who once lived at Mylora, the beautiful Southern Tablelands homestead on page 58, I had to laugh, because she probably had the best hiding place I’ve ever heard of. During the 1850s gold rush, when robberies were common in the area, two notorious bushrangers came to Mylora but they left without Mrs Garry’s jewels, as she’d hidden them under a broody hen! I hope you enjoy the issue.

PHOTOGRAPHY DAMIAN BENNETT STYLING LIZ KAVANAGH

Victoria Carey

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CONTRIBUTORS

in this i s s u e . . . B E C K S I M O N

This Melbourne-based stylist travelled to Mylora — a grazing property near Binalong, NSW — for our story about Emma and Angus Graham’s historic home, on page 58.

Arriving at Mylora, Beck was struck by the grandeur of the homestead and its beautiful gardens. “I couldn’t wait to see inside and it didn’t disappoint,” she says. “The modern–classic interior is really quite special and the history of the property is fascinating.” Beck has worked as a freelance stylist for the past seven years and finds it intriguing to visit other people’s houses. “A home reveals quite a lot about a person or family,” she says. “Country people are so welcoming and always have delicious food prepared!” Beck’s love of regional Australia is rooted in a childhood spent in Kyneton, Victoria. “I loved the freedom of bike riding everywhere and the swimming holes. My family still live there, so it’s lovely that I can go back and enjoy it.”

L A U R E N C A M I L L E R I

After studying interior architecture, Lauren decided her passion lay in publishing and pursued a career as a magazine and book designer. A few years ago she bought a Monstera deliciosa to brighten up her inner-city apartment and then became slightly obsessed with indoor plants. “I loved seeing it thrive in the corner of my tiny living room,” she says. “I got excited to grow my indoor jungle and I now live in a bigger apartment that has more plants than furniture!” In 2016 Lauren started Leaf Supply, an online plant store, with Sophia Kaplan, and last year the pair published a book of the same name. Lauren’s top tips for a happy house plant? “Choose plants suited to the conditions and don’t overwater them.”

WORDS SARAH NEIL PHOTOGRAPHY LISA COHEN, LUISA BRIMBLE, MARIJA IVKOVIC STYLING BECK SIMON

Meet the talented designer and co-author of Leaf Supply: A Guide to Keeping Happy Houseplants, who is the new face behind In the Garden on page 92.


www.ara-anz.com


Introducing The Water Monopoly Rockwell Bath in Powder Blue


M a y 2 01 9 | c o n t e n t s

44

20 COVER STORIES

52 Learning curve: The teachers who became 58 80

PHOTOGRAPHY MARNIE HAWSON, ABBIE MELLE STYLING HANNAH BRADY

118

flower farmers Poetic licence: The homestead that inspired Banjo Paterson Sweet dreams: The latest in linen, plus kids’ bedrooms A letter to my daughter: Sibella Court on motherhood

HOMES

44 RAISE THE ROOF

52 58

PEOPLE

20 PUTTING DOWN ROOTS

104

Gianluigi and Lizzie Buscaino of Piccolo Farm in Thirlmere NSW have turned self-sufficiency into a thriving community enterprise. COMING HOME For this young couple living in tropical Darwin, the lure of raising a family on a parcel of land in the NSW Upper Murray region proved irresistible.

32 MY COUNTRY CHILDHOOD

Author Holly Ringland credits her Queensland upbringing for her voracious love of nature, Australian wildlife and the written word.

43 YOU’RE INVITED TO OUR

30TH BIRTHDAY

To celebrate 30 wonderful years of Country Style, we’re throwing an inaugural ball, and you — our loyal readers — are all invited.

A distinctive red barn in the Noosa hinterland is an idyllic escape for interior designer Rachel Luchetti and her young family. BUDDING AMBITION Two newlyweds realise their dreams of living on the land surrounded by livestock and fresh flowers. GOLDEN ERA A young family are adding their own chapter to the rich history of a charming homestead in southern NSW, all while growing their recycled timber business.

DECORATING

73 DREAM SPACE 78

80

Nurture young minds and promote a good night’s sleep with these kids’ bedroom buys. STYLE NOTES From Australian designer Darcy Clarke’s cane pendant light for Sika-Design to John Derian’s fabric collection, see our picks from the latest releases. DOWN TO EARTH Create a calming, restful environment in your bedroom with comfortable linen in seasonal shades.

GARDENS

84 GRAND DESIGNS

A sprawling garden in Hobart follows an elegant palette of greens and whites, and is proving to be a lifetime work in progress for this Tasmanian couple.

MAY 2019 COU NTRY ST Y LE 9


118 MOTHER’S DAY SPECIAL

118 A MOTHER’S LOVE 126

Three women pen heartfelt letters to their children in this extract from new book Grace Mothers. MUCH APPRECIATED Spoil Mum (or yourself) on Mother’s Day with our selection of thoughtful gifts.

BEAUTY

128 WHITE HEART 130

6 12 14 29 132 136 154

110 92 IN THE GARDEN

Expert tips from an orchid specialist, rattan planters and a new gardening book aimed at children.

FOOD

94 ACTS OF KINDNESS 100 102

Cook and author Sophie Hansen shares recipes inspired by the generosity of her rural community. A SPRINKLE IN TIME Joy and generosity were the main ingredients in this Queensland mother and grandmother’s baked goods. FLAVOURS Gift ideas for Mother’s Day, game-changing pipis from South Australia and a milk brand with heart.

JOURNEY

110 ON THE MOVE: EUMUNDI

While tourists come for the markets, Eumundi’s residents value its creative and communal spirit.

REGULAR READING

Contributors Your page: readers’ emails and letters Annabelle Hickson: A Day in the Country A Month in the Country Books Collectables Country Squire

SERVICES

134 SUBSCRIBE TO COUNTRY STYLE FROM JUST 136 137 138 145 146

$79.99 OR PURCHASE AS A GIFT FOR MUM. Stockists Field Guide Country Emporium Home and Garden Emporium Country and Coastal Retreats

OUR COVER

This month we visit a flourishing flower farm and its sustainably built homestead in Lyonville, Victoria (page 52). PHOTOGRAPHY Mark Roper STYLING Lynda Gardener and Belle Hemming

ON THE COVER Janae and Chris PaquinBowden went in search of locally grown, chemical-free flowers for their wedding day, and finding a gap in the market, decided to establish their own flower business. Their chosen parcel of land in the small community of Lyonville in Victoria enjoys rich soil conditions and good rainfall, and is now home to sheep, chickens and the couple’s two young children.

PRIVACY NOTICE This issue of Country Style magazine is published by Bauer Media Pty Ltd (Bauer). Bauer may use and disclose your information in accordance with our Privacy Policy, including to provide you with your requested products or services and to keep you informed of other Bauer publications, products, services and events. Our Privacy Policy is located at bauer-media.com.au/ privacy. It also sets out on how you can access or correct your personal information and lodge a complaint. Bauer may disclose your personal information offshore to its owners, joint venture partners, service providers and agents located throughout the world, including in New Zealand, USA, the Philippines and the European Union. In addition, this issue may contain Reader Offers, being offers, competitions or surveys. Reader Offers may require you to provide personal information to enter or to take part. Personal information collected for Reader Offers may be disclosed by us to service providers assisting Bauer in the conduct of the Reader Offer and to other organisations providing special prizes or offers that are part of the Reader Offer. An opt-out choice is provided with a Reader Offer. Unless you exercise that opt-out choice, personal information collected for Reader Offers may also be disclosed by us to other organisations for use by them to inform you about other products, services or events or to give to other organisations that may use this information for this purpose. If you require further information, please contact Bauer’s Privacy Officer either by email at privacyofficer@bauer-media.com.au or mail at Privacy Officer Bauer Media Pty Ltd, 54 Park Street, Sydney NSW 2000.

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PHOTOGRAPHY LINA HAYES, MARNIE HAWSON, HELENE SANDBERG

94

Fragrances derived from white flowers are a true classic and a popular choice for Mother’s Day — find out why. SEASONAL DELIGHTS Nourish your skin with these cool-weather essentials.


YOUR PAGE

With more than 4000 likes, this shot of Zoe Young’s house was our most popular post on Instagram from the March issue. “A gorgeous and quaint cottage! Love the story behind this cutie.” @ds_interiors “Great issue. Really enjoyed all the stories about artists.” @artistgabriellejones “Our favourite local artist.” @bunya_house_bowral Photography @lisacohenphoto Styling @becksimonstylist

Our annual Art Issue featured Little Acorn, the home of award-winning artist @zoeoliviayoung on the cover. We also visited internationally acclaimed artist @weir_brett who, with the help of two mates, built his dream house and studio in South Gippsland, and painter @colleenguiney, who lives in Port Fairy on Victoria’s Great Ocean Road. Writer Claire Mactaggart spoke to artist Gloria Mengil about her work in the East Kimberley. Photography @lisacohenphoto Styling @becksimonstylist

YOUR PAGE

OUR ANNUAL ART ISSUE INSPIRED MANY READERS, BUT IT WAS THE STORY OF INDIGENOUS ARTIST GLORIA MENGIL THAT REALLY STRUCK A CHORD.

FIRST LOVE

THE STORYTELLER

WINNER

How fabulous that your first article featured an Aboriginal artist, Gloria Mengil. Aboriginal art is the most striking work to be seen in Australian contemporary galleries. It needs to be showcased more, and the connection to country, storytelling and Indigenous life to become mainstream in our media. Sue Shearer, Bradbury, NSW

It’s with much excitement and anticipation that I turn the pages of the Art Issue. I love reading about these creative folk, finding out what inspires them and marvelling at their beautiful work, and I especially love having a peek inside their studios. While the issue was packed with wonderful stories, stunning photographs and artistic images that inspire the creative urge, I have to say that it was your feature on Kimberley artist Gloria Mengil — ‘The Storyteller’ — that epitomised the issue; the spirit of ancient art and story recreated in a most powerful form, and from the heart. Gloria is not only creating extraordinary art, more importantly she is contributing to the preservation of her peoples’ ancient culture and stories. Judith Caine, Donvale, Victoria

I have my magazine delivered and it’s like therapy in an envelope! From stories of hard-working women in outback regions fighting dust and drought to the bloke who welds sculptures from scrap metal. Then there’s the avid gardeners, designing restful green spaces to help families escape stress and worry, and the lucky housewife who has a gorgeous black gelding peering over the back fence to saddle up at any time. It’s entertaining to read about people from all walks of life doing their thing in often trying conditions and circumstances. I often get a good recipe, too, handed down from a special aunt or grandmother. All these beautiful things, available across our land for the price of a magazine. Bernadette Brandes, Batemans Bay, NSW

ART LESSONS As a teacher, I love how Country Style champions and celebrates artists. For decades I have been teaching art to young students and have showcased many of these artists in the classroom. Your feature on Gloria Mengil was particularly poignant. Gloria is very passionate about the power of art and how it brings people together. Unfortunately, Australia gives most media attention to sports stars. Artists receive little or no government funding. By giving these creatives much-deserved acclaim, you are helping to inspire new artists to make their mark. Country Style is more than just a magazine, it’s a journal that adds credibility to any coffee table and indeed, any bookshelf. Your features on Tasmania encouraged me to happily return to the apple isle. The photographs, the words and the design make this publication a must-read every month. Linda Nathaniel, Riverview, NSW

STAMP OF APPROVAL

Congratulations to Bernadette Brandes who has won a selection of Robert Gordon homewares worth $500. The Pakenham-based pottery is still a family business, run by the third generation. Shop online at robertgordonaustralia.com or call (03) 5941 3144. Share your thoughts and experiences with us by writing to Country Style, PO Box 4088, Sydney NSW 1028, or by emailing austcountrystyle@bauer-media.com.au. Please include your address and daytime telephone number. Letters may be edited for reasons of space and clarity.

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w w w. y a r r a t r a i l . c o m . a u


A DAY IN THE COUNTRY

REAL FEELING BOB HICKSON, my husband’s charming uncle from

Dirranbandi, Queensland, almost made it to 90 years of age. A couple of weeks before he died, his daughter observed, “Dad, what’s going on? You’re sleeping a lot.” “I’m just practising being dead,” said Bob, his blue eyes twinkling. A bit later in hospital, his son apologised to him for not being able to keep him at home. “Sorry Dad, we didn’t plan it like this.” Bob reassured his son, saying softly, “Oh, it’s not so bad.” And then, just before he died, he whispered “thank you” to the nurse, gently saluting him from his bed. The next time the nurse came into his room, Bob was dead. Bob Hickson died with humour, resilience and gratitude. I imagine it takes a lot of courage to look death square in the eyes with grace. But that is what he did. Humour, resilience and gratitude. Well, all those three things have been in short supply in my world of late. Karl Ove Knausgaard wrote about the “furious 19thcentury man inside me” as he walked around Stockholm’s streets with a baby in a carrier strapped to his chest. Well, let me just say that there is a very worked up 21st-century woman raging inside me, as I pick up little people’s discarded hair bands and banana ends off the concrete floor. There isn’t a lot of humour in those moments. And when it comes to resilience, I’ve felt myself wavering emotionally about how terribly dry the weather is. It actually feels like it will never rain again and it is only a matter of weeks before the whole world will plunge into a dystopian panic, as water supplies deplete. I can hear whispers in my

14 COU NTRY ST Y LE MAY 2019

head, swirling about with the words “maybe it’s good to make a living doing something other than farming”. And gratitude: Let’s just say that I don’t keep a gratitude journal like Oprah does. I should. On the way home from Uncle Bob’s memorial party, it dawned on me that if he could face death with humour, resilience and gratitude, surely there must be a way that I could bring those things into my daily life, especially when most of my life is fortunate to say the least. So I’ve been looking. Here is what I found today: On the resilience front. My sister-in-law reminded me of the very best Winston Churchill quote: “If you’re going through hell,” Mr Churchill said, “keep going.” On the humour front: My seven-year-old son was sitting at the dinner table and quite unexpectedly said: “Mum, I’m actually growing a beard.” And in regards to gratitude, I have been swamped with orders for my new book (thank you everyone for your support — I am sure there are many Country Style readers in among the orders), so my mum and dad came up from Sydney to help. Today they worked like troopers to help me wrap books and send them out. Dad ingeniously borrowed a supermarket trolley to ferry them to the post office, while Mum expertly wrapped book after book with perfect hospital corners. We all can decide how we want to live our lives. I want to live a life of humour, resilience and gratitude, even if they’re not the first emotions to arrive on the scene. Thank you for the reminder, dear Bob. Annabelle Hickson lives on a pecan farm in the Dumaresq Valley, NSW. Follow @annabellehickson on Instagram.

PHOTOGRAPHY ANNABELLE HICKSON PORTRAIT PHOTOGRAPHY PIP WILLIAMS

ANNABELLE HICKSON EMBRACES A MORE POSITIVE OUTLOOK ON LIFE.


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Editor-in-chief VICTORIA CAREY Creative director JO QUARMBY Deputy editor SARAH NEIL Melbourne editor VIRGINIA IMHOFF Content director STEPHANIE HOPE Senior copy editor TAHLIA ANDERSON Art director ANDREA HEALY Art production/designer MATUS KUNDRAT Junior designer SOPHIE WILSON Stylists LISA BURDEN, NATALIE JOHNSON Homes group production editor TAMARAH PIENAAR Homes group coordinator SARA SLEEMAN (02) 9282 8456 Regular contributors CLAIRE MACTAGGART (Queensland contributing editor) DIXIE ELLIOTT (Food) ANNABELLE HICKSON (A Day in the Country) ROB INGRAM (Country Squire) ANNABEL LAWSON (Books) JOHN McPHEE (Collectables) GEORGINA REID (Gardens) BARBARA SWEENEY (Flavours) JULIETTE WINTER (Health and Beauty) SAMANTHA VAN EGMOND (Writer)

A DV ERT ISI NG & PRODUCT ION

Homes commercial manager RHONDA MAUNDER (02) 9282 8687 Homes manager KIMBERLY ANDERSON (02) 9338 6103 Brand executive JENNIFER BURKE (02) 9288 9145 Advertising production manager KATE ORSBORN (02) 9282 8364 Advertising brand executive SIMONE CREIGHTON (02) 8114 6021 Victoria, SA and WA sales director JACLYN CLEMENTS (03) 9823 6341 Director of sales NSW KAREN HOLMES (02) 9282 8733 Victoria head of direct sales WILL JAMISON (03) 9823 6301 Queensland head of sales JUDY TAYLOR (07) 3101 6636 New Zealand inquiries +61 2 9282 8505 Sales manager, Directories NICK CARSON (02) 9282 8369 General manager, Production services IAN McHUTCHINSON Production coordinator CARLY ZINGA Advertising production controller DOMINIC ROY (02) 9282 8691 Senior event manager CATE GAZAL (02) 8226 9342

M A R K ETING & CIRCU LATION Marketing director JILLIAN HOGAN Circulation manager NICOLE PEARSON

BAU E R M E DI A C OR P OR AT E

Chief executive officer PAUL DYKZEUL Chief financial officer ANDREW STEDWELL Group editor-in-chief LISA GREEN Commercial director PAUL GARDINER Chief marketing officer PAUL WEAVING Acting head of retail & circulation ANDREW COHN General manager, Subscriptions and E-commerce SEAN McLINTOCK Business manager GEORGINA BROMFIELD Syndications SYNDICATION@BAUER-MEDIA.COM.AU

GENER AL EDITORIAL INQUIRIES

Mail Country Style, PO Box 4088, Sydney NSW 1028 Telephone (02) 9282 8456 Email austcountrystyle@bauer-media.com.au Online homestolove.com.au/ country-style Facebook facebook.com/CountryStyleMagazine Instagram instagram.com/countrystylemag Pinterest pinterest.com/countrystylemag

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Telephone 136 116 Web magshop.com.au Post Magshop, GPO Box 5252, Sydney, NSW, 2000, Australia. Published by Bauer Media Pty Limited (ABN 053 273 546), 54 Park Street, Sydney, NSW 2000. The trademark Country Style is the property of Bauer Media Pty Ltd © 2019. All rights reserved. Printed by Ovato, 31-37 Heathcote Road, Moorebank, NSW 2170. National distribution by Gordon and Gotch Australia Pty Ltd. 1300 650 666. ISSN 0004-931X. No material may be reproduced in part or in whole without written consent from the copyright holders. Bauer Media Pty Ltd does not accept responsibility for damage to or loss of freelance material submitted for publication. Allow several weeks for acceptance or return. For enquiries regarding subscriptions, call 136 116, Monday-Friday, 8am–6pm AEST, email magshop@magshop.com.au or mail letters to: Country Style Reply Paid 3508, Sydney, NSW 2001, or subscribe online at magshop.com.au. Subscription rate*: Australia $79.99 (one year, 13 issues); NZ A$99.95 (one year, 13 issues); other countries A$189.95 (one year, 13 issues). All overseas subscriptions sent air speed. *Recommended price, trademark Country Style.


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PEOPLE THIR LMER E NSW Fennel flowers sway in the breeze on Piccolo Farm. FACING PAGE Gianluigi and Lizzie Buscaino with children Georgia and Lukas, and short-haired collie Jimmy.

WHEN LIZZIE BUSCAINO MOVED FROM SWEDEN TO AUSTRALIA, SHE DID NOT EXPECT TO FIND HERSELF GROWING VEGETABLES ON THE NSW SOUTH COAST. WORDS BA R BA R A SW EENEY PHOTOGRAPHY A BBIE MELLE

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PEOPLE THIR LMER E NSW

FOR GIANLUIGI AND LIZZIE Buscaino life revolves around the

weekly harvest of organically grown herbs, vegetables and edible flowers, which are picked to order. Their haul is then delivered to customers in the local area or collected from their property, Piccolo Farm, in the semi-rural township of Thirlmere, NSW. The couple, who describe themselves as “farmers, foodies and permaculturists”, joined the growing self-sufficiency movement when they turned a move to a small rural holding to grow food for their family into an agricultural enterprise that produces vegetables and eggs for sale. “We were both suburban kids and new to farming,” says Lizzie, who was raised in Stockholm, Sweden. “I’m as Swedish as they come, but I felt at home the minute I got here.” Gianluigi, who grew up in Sydney’s south west in a half-Italian, half-English family — “but the nature is very Italian,” he says — had a similar experience. However, both can point to nature, or at least gardening, influences in their childhoods that suggest becoming small-scale, regenerative farmers was not completely out of character. “In Sweden we have a family summerhouse — it’s my happy place — where we would collect mushrooms and berries, licorice root, pine needles and sap from the forest,” says Lizzie, 37. “We chopped wood for fires and smoked fish. My sisters and I were well equipped to live in the country and work hard physically, but I didn’t truly understand the value of this until I lived here.” Gianluigi, 36, remembers when he was five years old telling adults who asked what he wanted to be when he grew up that

he was going to be a farmer. He thinks it may have been memories of his English grandparents who grew their own food in their garden in Scotland that inspired his career aspirations. “I suppose I was naïve,” says Gianluigi. “Until we came here we didn’t really understand the labour and time that goes into producing food.” The pair were young when they met in 2003, working in a large Sydney hotel restaurant — Gianluigi as a chef and Lizzie as a waitress. At 20 and 21, they felt they were too young for marriage, but shared values and a dream of a sustainable farming life were enough to keep Lizzie in Australia. “I don’t think I would have stayed were it not for Gianluigi,” she says. “I feel like we haven’t left each other’s sides since we met.” Five years later they married and moved to Sweden, where they lived, worked and travelled around Europe, before returning to Australia in 2012 with baby Lukas. When Gianluigi and Lizzie decided they wanted to grow food for themselves and their children — Lukas, now seven, and four-year-old Georgia — they threw themselves into a program of self-directed study. Both took a masterclass in market gardening and Lizzie completed a permaculture design certificate course. The pair also immersed themselves in permaculture and organic gardening books and found YouTube videos — uploaded by other generous farmers — to be an invaluable resource. After an intensive 18-month search, the couple found a block of land in Thirlmere, less than 100 kilometres south of Sydney. The former dairy pasture was flat and cleared, so they could get straight into enriching the soil. There was >


CLOCKWISE, FROM TOP LEFT Life on the farm is a family affair; Lukas with a bumper harvest of carrots; Georgia and Gianluigi picking cucumbers; the family grow a wider variety of vegetables; Lizzie with an armful of zucchini; Georgia patting one of the family’s quails; Quay restaurant in Sydney buys quail eggs directly from Piccolo Farm. FACING PAGE Edible flowers are one of the farm’s specialities.

MAY 2019 COU NTRY ST Y LE 23


PEOPLE THIR LMER E NSW Lukas cradling a prized quail. FACING PAGE Piccolo Farm is believed to be the first commercial farm in Australia to raise quail on pasture, and now Lizzie and Gianluigi run workshops teaching others how to do the same.


“While farming might be hard, at least I’m here for the kids.”

MAY 2019 COU NTRY ST Y LE 25


PEOPLE THIR LMER E NSW

enough pasture to feed and move flocks of game birds and chickens, plus the block had good water and a remnant tract of bushland. “It was always going to be multi-faceted,” says Lizzie. “We didn’t come here just to grow one thing.” They named it Piccolo Farm, which means ‘small’ in Italian, the perfect name for a block that barely measures two hectares. Both of them are hands-on farmers, but Lizzie also has a part-time job as the executive officer of Low Carbon Living, a not-for-profit organisation in the Southern Highlands that assists businesses and communities with reducing their carbon footprint. That means it’s often Gianluigi who gets Lukas off to school and Georgia sorted out for day care each morning. “After 15 years working as a chef, I grew to hate it,” he says. “Working in a kitchen is no good for families. While farming might be hard, at least I’m here for the kids — although Lukas still complains that I work too much.” Work involves tending about 72 market-garden beds consisting of ordered rows of vegetables, countless herbs and 40 types of edible flowers — from society garlic to borage — that are eagerly snapped up by cake decorators countrywide (you can order them online). Pollination is helped along by the resident bees; the hives are managed by friends. Lizzie and Gianluigi keep flocks of Isa Brown and Plymouth Rocks hens for eggs. They also raise quail and were the first Australian farmers that they know of to produce pastured

26 COU NTRY ST Y LE MAY 2019

quail, selling directly to acclaimed chef Peter Gilmore at Quay restaurant in Sydney. But it’s the vegetables that have taken off. “We were growing vegetables for ourselves and people started asking if we would grow for them,” says Gianluigi. “We’re too small to sell into the wholesale market, but just the right size to sell direct to the customer.” Lizzie and Gianluigi, who have already achieved so much, are bursting to take on more new projects. It’s an ongoing experiment in the vegie patches with new varieties trialled each season and an almost constant expansion. They’ve planted a children’s garden, too, with Lukas acting as head gardener. Plus, they run gardening and education workshops and there are plans to host a playgroup. “It’s time for us to connect directly with people and teach them about food and farming,” says Lizzie. Her sense of satisfaction runs deep: “Everything in the country is so tangible. It’s incredibly motivating to be able to say, ‘I built this’, ‘I grew this’, ‘I made this’. We live a life of voluntary simplicity.” For more information about Piccolo Farm, telephone 0481 113 395 or visit piccolofarm.com.au

FROM LEFT Lukas has recently taken on the very important role of ‘head gardener’ of Piccolo Farm’s new children’s garden; freshly picked radishes ready to be packed into vegetable boxes; Jimmy the collie laps up Georgia’s affection; Gianluigi and Lizzie get a great deal of satisfaction from their life on the farm.


WINTER 2019 marcopolo.net.au


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WORDS VIRGINA IMHOFF, CLAIRE MACTAGGART, SARAH NEIL PHOTOGRAPHY LISA COHEN

A MONTH IN THE COUNTRY

This month, Queensland’s Goondiwindi showcases its farms, the polo comes to Cable Beach, there’s a film festival in Tasmania and the camels are off and racing in the outback.

Mylora is a beautiful homestead situated on 3200 hectares in Binalong, NSW. To read about the home and its history, turn to page 58. MAY 2019 COU NTRY ST Y LE 29


A MONTH IN THE COUNT RY Scone has a long history of thoroughbred breeding. CLOCKWISE, FROM RIGHT Coonawarra in SA’s south-east is halfway between Melbourne and Adelaide; there are plenty of vineyards to explore in the Clare Valley; Flapper by Margaret Preston is on show at Tweed Regional Gallery.

NSW

Art Deco: The World Turns Modern, May 31st–August 25th Tweed Regional Gallery hosts an exhibition of sculpture, painting, photography, design and fashion from the National Gallery of Australia that includes works by Margaret Preston and Mervyn Napier Waller. Open Wednesday to Sunday, 10am–5pm. Free entry. 2 Mistral Road, Murwillumbah South. (02) 6670 2790; artgallery.tweed.nsw.gov.au Scone Horse Festival, May 3rd–12th Highlights include the Australian Tentpegging Championships, sheepdog trials, farrier displays and stockhorse demonstrations. (02) 6540 1300; sconehorsefestival.com.au

NT

A Taste of Kakadu, May 10th–19th May is a great time to visit World Heritage-listed Kakadu National Park with this 10-day festival, including bush-food cooking demonstrations, weaving, basket making and foraging walks. Entry to the festival park starts at $19. Bowali Visitor Centre, Kakadu National Park. (08) 8938 1120; parksaustralia.gov.au/kakadu/taste

Uluru Camel Cup, May 24th–25th This outback event promises adventure with a chance to bid on your favourite camel at the Friday night Camel Cup Calcutta. On Saturday, it’s the exciting main event. Race day entry is $10 for adults and children under 15 are free. 11am–5pm. Uluru Camel Farm, Yulara. 0428 937 283; ulurucamelracingclub.com

QUEENSLAND

Discover Farming, May 2nd–31st Head to Goondiwindi for agricultural excellence and world-class producers. On-farm experiences and gala dinners

featuring local produce are on offer, as well as farm tours throughout the month. 0402 992 842; discoverfarming.com.au Noosa Food and Wine, May 16th–20th This annual festival features an impressive line-up of renowned chefs. Another highlight is the grand opening of the studio and gallery of acclaimed pop artist Peter Phillips, which showcases six decades of his work. General entry to the Festival Village starts at $34 for adults. Lions Park, Noosa Heads. (07) 5430 5000; noosafoodandwine.com.au

f armers’ market SA Victor Harbor, every Saturday There are many reasons to visit Victor

Harbor, around an hour’s drive south of Adelaide. You’ll be able to sample wines at the area’s many vineyards and there’s also the charming farmers’ market held in the park in the middle of town. Here you’ll find organic vegetables from Virgara’s Garden, hot doughnuts from Dee 4 Desserts and, at this time of year, citrus from the Riverland courtesy of Con and Harry Mantzarapis. The third weekend of the month is also popular when Kangaroo Island Living Honey comes over to the mainland. 8am–12.30pm. Grosvenor Gardens, Victor Harbor. 0438 858 667; victorharborfarmersmarket.com.au


Sheep grazing at Ballakaye in the Pyrenees Ranges. RIGHT Enjoy the Long Table Dinner in Central Victoria with cookbook author Sophie Hansen.

BOOK A TABLE

FLAPPER (1925) BY MARGARET PRESTON, NATIONAL GALLERY OF AUSTRALIA, CANBERRA. PURCHASED WITH THE ASSISTANCE OF THE COOMA-MONARO SNOWY RIVER FUND 1988. © MARGARET ROSE PRESTON ESTATE/COPYRIGHT AGENCY 88.326. BALLAKAYE PHOTOGRAPHY ANDREW HARDY LONG TABLE PHOTOGRAPHY SOPHIE WELTON

Long Table Dinner with Sophie Hansen, May 11th Meet Sophie and celebrate the launch of her second book, A Basket By The Door, at Ballakaye in the rolling hills of the Pyrenees Ranges, an hour’s drive north-west of Ballarat. Enjoy a grazing plate followed by a sit-down meal of delicious homegrown and local fare accompanied by Pyrenees and Grampians wines. Guests receive a copy of the book and a gift from Grounded Pleasures, a return bus trip from Ballarat and a welcome glass of premium local wine. Tickets are $150 per person. 0400 959 863; settlerandsons.com.au Port Douglas Carnivale, May 24th–26th Held in Tropical North Queensland, this year’s celebrations, marking 25 years, include a concert by Eskimo Joe and the Macrossan Street parade. Open 10am–11pm daily. (07) 4099 9474; carnivale.com.au

SA

Clare Valley Gourmet Weekend, May 17th–20th Meet the region’s premier winemakers and enjoy exceptional local fare from more than 35 producers at this special weekend in the valley. (08) 8842 2131; clarevalley.com.au Penola Coonawarra Arts Festival, May 16th–19th The Limestone Coast’s literary and arts heritage, and the region’s famed food and wine, takes centrestage at this event. Co-Opera is performing Mozart’s Don Giovanni and, at the popular Literary Brunch, author Jock Serong is speaking about his latest book, Preservation. (08) 8737 2855; artsfestival.com.au

TASMANIA

Agfest, May 2nd–4th There’s lots to see at the state’s largest agricultural and machinery field day, including art and

craft pavilions, sheepdog trials and a heritage farming equipment display. Entry starts at $20 for adults and $5 for children. Open 8am–5pm. Quercus Rural Youth Park, 415 Oaks Road, Carrick. 1300 243 378; agfest.com.au Breath of Fresh Air Film Festival, May 16th–19th The Launceston leg of Tasmania’s international film festival is filled with must-see movies. Don’t miss A Day on the Kingsway, a street festival held on the Sunday, with stalls from artisan producers. 0407 501 287; breath-of-fresh-air.com.au

WA

Airnorth Cable Beach Polo Carnival, May 18th–19th Australia’s only multi-day beach polo tournament, now in its 10th year, is held on stunning Cable Beach. Enjoy the event for free or buy a ticket to the Cable Beach Polo VIP Marquee, Havana Club Lounge or Polo Beach Bar for a view with some extras. Some tickets also include an invite to the carnival’s premium dining event, A Dinner under the Stars. Tickets for the Polo Beach Bar start at $99. Cable Beach, Broome. (08) 9192 0588; cablebeachpolo.com.au

Unearthed Pemberton, May 3rd–10th Discover local beauty, art and produce at this festival showcasing the Southern Forests region. The festival shop is open every day from 10am–4pm. Brockman Street, Pemberton. (08) 9776 1133; unearthedpemberton.com.au

VICTORIA

Ballarat Heritage Weekend, May 25th–26th Experience Ballarat’s illustrious past with a diverse line-up of events, including a vintage fashion show, a bike ride through the streets in your finest tweed, ghost tours, camp-fire conversations and rides on horse-drawn carriages. (03) 5320 5500; ballaratheritageweekend.com Feast High Country Festival, May 3rd–19th Join the High Country’s best chefs, winemakers, producers and brewers at one of more than 40 events set in the region’s mountains, villages, vineyards and valleys. Chef Patrizia Simone is hosting Patrizia’s Harvest Forage and at Pizzini Wines in the King Valley you can Lunch With Three Italians at this event that showcases Italian food, wine and live opera. feasthighcountry.com.au

MAY 2019 COU NTRY ST Y LE 31


MY COUNTRY CHILDHOOD

BEST-SELLING DEBUT AUTHOR HOLLY RINGLAND SHARES HER EARLY LOVE OF NATURE, BOOKS AND AUSTRALIAN LANDSCAPES. WORDS CLA IR E M ACTAGGA RT

bushland and rainforest kindled her young imagination while books were the power of plants as a small child, another safe haven and escape from barefoot amid her family’s subtropical family difficulties. She says both her garden at Gladstone in Queensland. Her mother, Colleen Ringland, and her grandmother, Joan Corfield, lived in an grandmother instilled a love of reading old Queenslander with a fairy garden of and learning that saw Holly aspiring to roses and bell flowers alongside, protected be a writer from the age of three. from the scorching summer sun. “They both taught me that you cannot “Whenever there was something wrong give up on hope and with hard work in the world, I would be directed to the something will give,” she says. fairy garden and Granny would hold my In 2009, Holly quit her job as a media hand and have me look into the faces of officer at Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park flowers and plants,” the 38-year-old and used her life savings to move to the recalls. “I think she was bringing my UK to study a Master of Arts, Creative awareness to the fact that nature is Writing at the University of Manchester. bigger than we are and what goes on She arrived with a couple of bags and with our feelings and in our head.” a box of books, determined to focus on It’s a theme Holly has woven through her In Granny’s garden in Gladstone, 1986. FACING PAGE Holly now lives between her dream. “My challenge was meeting best-selling debut novel, The Lost Flowers the UK and Australia. myself at the page and coming up against of Alice Hart, published by HarperCollins self-doubt and quite a bit of trauma from male perpetrated in March last year. A language of native flowers helps the young Alice find her voice after tragedy and to face a cycle of violence — I was kind of mute with fear,” she says. “Some days I would show up and write for the people that believed abuse. Over 57,000 copies have been sold in Australia and in me, like my partner Sam, Granny and Mum who taught film producers Bruna Papandrea [credits include HBO me not to squander it, to seize it and not give up.” series Big Little Lies and the films Gone Girl and Wild] and In 2014, Sam’s father passed away and that loss propelled Steve Hutensky [Cold Mountain and The Human Stain] of Holly to complete the first draft from her home in Made Up Stories recently acquired the rights to produce a Manchester. “He was a massive supporter of my craft and television series based on the novel. dreams and that gave me a reality check of how boring and A connection with nature has been constant through fruitless fear is. I rose up and found the courage to try Holly’s own life; after growing up in Gladstone her family — that was the beginning of The Lost Flowers.” > moved south to the Gold Coast when Holly was five. The sea,

32 COU NTRY ST Y LE MAY 2019

PORTRAIT PHOTOGRAPHY GIULIA ZONZA

AUTHOR HOLLY RINGLAND discovered


MY COUNTRY CHIILDHOOD

FROM LEFT “In 1984 on the Gold Coast, where I grew up”; aged 10 or 11, hiking through Lamington National Park in Queensland; in 1982, “on the infamo ouss verandah where I fought a possum m for scraps Mum left out.”

I GREW UP BETWEEN MUM’S and Granny’s gardens in Gladstone

until I was four in the early 1980s. Everyone lived on quite big plots — the classic Australian backyard — but Granny’s garden was another world altogether. She had an ancient mango tree as well as staghorn and bird’s nest ferns and grevillea. My memories of that time oscillate between being in Granny’s garden and in Mum’s, where kookaburras and possums would come on the verandah and she would give them scraps. Mum often tells the story of the time she found me on the verandah wrestling a possum, with a kookaburra watching on! I had this wonderful engagement with the natural world even though I lived in suburbia. In those first four years I would hang out with Granny while my parents were at work. Later, when Mum was in her 50s, after decades working in banking, she went to university, then spent the last 10 years of her working life as a teacher. It was wonderful to have been raised by someone with such a strong work ethic and to see her crest the other side. Mum and Granny both read to me and Granny was constantly storytelling. Mum taught me to read by the time I was three. She’d put labels on things like a chair or door and made me my first book using pictures from magazines and writing the associated noun on the opposite page. By the time we moved to the Gold Coast my imagination was thriving. I grew up a block from the Pacific. It was a wild, barefoot life. If I wanted a swim, I would run the block to the ocean, dive in and run home. It was a magical place to grow up. In primary school I spent a lot of my lunch break with friends but also alone writing my own mash-up version of Snugglepot and Cuddlepie, a little bit of The Rainbow Serpent and Marmaduke the Possum by Pixie O’Harris. Granny bought me The Adventures of Marmaduke the Possum and that story about Margaret befriending the animals, trees and

flowers and the energy of that flora had a profound effect. They gave me the lens to see the world around me and how I engaged with the landscape in a really circular way. We went hiking a lot in Lamington National Park and when I was eight years old I did my first 20-kilometre hike. On the trails I’d notice a little spider’s trapdoor or a bird’s nest. They are lessons you can’t learn unless you are in it; the metaphoric quality of how nature reflects our emotions, which I really drew on when I was making up the language of flowers in The Lost Flowers. The genesis of knowing that came from being a kid either by the sea, rainforest or bush and looking at what nature does, and seeing the metaphor in everything. The school I went to on the Gold Coast was near a creek that led to the sea, and dotted around were paperbarks, gumtrees and ironbarks. I loved school; looking back on my childhood report cards provides great amusement because my teachers were very generous and beautiful and would say, ‘Holly’s forte is English, we might need to work on maths in the future!’ My best friend’s favourite gag is about me handing in a voluntary creative assignment. She would say, ‘Who does voluntary assignments?’ In so far as I remember, I was a pretty good kid and a massive dreamer. As anybody who comes from a difficult family background could probably attest, if you’re lucky enough to have someone to teach you to read, to have books, and if you’re privileged enough to know how to write, then stories provide such safety and escape. I realised that sitting at my desk meant I could go anywhere I wanted. Granny loved learning. She stopped going to school at age 10 so she could sort rotten potatoes from good ones for pennies as a way to support her mum, who brought up six kids on her own. She instilled in me what a gift and privilege learning is and to not squander it. There is freedom and opportunities if you are able to travel and go after your dreams.

GLADSTONE This industrial centre with a population of over 33,000 people is located 450 kilometres north of Brisbane on the coast of Queensland. Often referred to as the ‘engine room’ of the state, the major industries include two of the world’s largest alumina refineries and Queensland’s largest power station and cement plant. The Port of Gladstone handles over 100 million tonnes of cargo each year and is the state’s largest multi-commodity port. For a true sense of the harbour, city and islands, head to the Auckland Hill or Round Hill lookouts for a bird’s-eye vantage point. The Gladstone Harbour Festival is celebrated in April each year, while further afield, the Captain Cook 1770 Festival is held annually in May featuring re-enactments of Cook’s second landing, street food and live music. The East Shores Precinct is a new recreation area with waterpark and boardwalk, while nearby Heron Island is a popular holiday and diving destination.

34 COU NTRY ST Y LE MAY 2019


bring nature indoors

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Celebrating

years of

Join us for the inaugural Country Style ball

PHOTOGRAPHY MUENZ/GETTY IMAGES

Celebrate our milestone birthday and the people who make Australia’s rural areas unique. Join us for an exclusive night of dancing and a three-course menu inspired by the Australian producers, farmers and provedores who have featured in the pages of Country Style. During this special evening, we’ll celebrate 30 influential people who are making a difference in regional Australia and announce six overall winners. DATE Thursday, May 30th, 2019 TIME 7pm until late VENUE Elston Room, Carriageworks, 245 Wilson Street, Eveleigh NSW DRESS CODE Evening cocktail TICKETS $200 per person (plus booking fee)

DON’T MISS THIS SPECIAL NIGHT To purchase tickets, visit countrystyleball.eventbrite.com.au P R O U D LY S U P P O R T E D BY


HOME DOONAN QUEENSLAND The newly renovated kitchen has loads of warmth and character, thanks to timber details and the Havsen farm sink and Glittran kitchen mixer, both from IKEA. FACING PAGE Four-year-old Leonard and two-year-old Walter enjoy roaming in and around the barn in the Noosa Hinterland. For stockist details, see page 136.

RAISE THE ROOF HOW A COUPLE TRANSFORMED A BASIC BARN INTO A FAMILY RETREAT NESTLED IN THE NOOSA HINTERLAND. WORDS SAMANTHA VAN EGMOND PHOTOGRAPHY MARNIE HAWSON STYLING HANNAH BRADY

44 COUNTRY ST Y LE MAY 2019


CLOCKWISE, FROM TOP LEFT The open-plan kitchen, dining and living area features lofty ceilings — much of the furniture was found on Gumtree, while the Jasper sofa is from King Living; Gerard and Rachel relax on the deck; Leonard loves the freedom of rural living; the tapware in the bathroom is from Astra Walker. FACING PAGE The pool from Allcast Precast is the perfect spot to take in views of the hinterland. For stockist details, see page 136.


DOONAN QUEENSLAND HOME

DRIVING THROUGH THE undulating hinterland of Queensland’s

Sunshine Coast, a glimpse of red peeks cheerfully through a clearing in the native bushland. At the side of the road, an eye-catching letterbox provides a touch of whimsy and a tantalising hint of what’s to come. Then, as your wheels crunch through the oval-shaped poinciana seeds that line the driveway, you are rewarded with the cheery sight of Little Red Barn — the much-loved abode of interior designer Rachel Luchetti and her builder husband Gerard Cook, who transformed a kit-home barn into a family retreat. “Arriving at the barn is always such a wonderful feeling,” says Rachel, who takes their two sons, Leonard, aged four, and two-year-old Walter, to visit at every opportunity. “As we live in an inner-city apartment, we crave the open space that it affords us.” The couple bought the picturesque property at Doonan, 19 kilometres south of Noosa, in early 2016, choosing to source as many of the materials and furnishings as they could locally. “As this is a holiday home, we couldn’t justify spending much on it and had to remain quite thrifty,” says Rachel, who looked to the surrounding towns of Yandina, Pomona and Cooroy for suitable second-hand pieces. Rachel would send Gerard “all over the place” to pick up online finds and call into various antique stores. “Gumtree has been great, not only for the barn but also because you get to meet people around the area,” she says. “When I’ve gone to pick something up, I’ve been able to see houses that

you wouldn’t normally see because they’re hidden away from the main road.” Buying in this area had been a dream for a while: “We’ve been coming up to Noosa for a long time,” says 38-year-old Rachel, whose Sydney-based architecture and interior design firm Luchetti Krelle works primarily in the hospitality sector. “The first holiday Ged and I took together was to Noosa, so it’s a special place for us. We were looking at the real estate windows and noticed there was really good value a little further from the coast. We thought we’d come up and do a recce, have a drive around, when we came across this place.” At just under one hectare, the property is perfect for this busy couple, who were looking for something semi-rural but didn’t want the responsibility and upkeep of a farm. “It’s not a lot of maintenance but it also doesn’t feel like we have neighbours,” says Rachel. The pair wasted no time in renovating, moving up while Rachel was on maternity leave and Leonard was just two years old. “When we first bought the place, it was a kit-home barn with one bedroom and a ladder loft,” she says. “It had character and wasn’t overdone, but it definitely needed some updates.” As a builder, 42-year-old Gerard did almost all the work himself, from concreting and laying the tiles to re-lining and insulating the internal walls. “The only tradies we had in were an electrician and a plumber,” says Rachel. >

MAY 2019 COU NTRY ST Y LE 47


The outdoor claw-foot bath was a Gumtree find; the floor-mounted tap with hand shower is from Astra Walker. FACING PAGE Native bushland surrounds the property, creating a sub-tropical oasis. For stockist details, see page 136.

“We go to the beach early in the morning when it’s not too busy or hot, then come back here and hang out all day. It’s our little oasis.”

48 COUNTRY ST Y LE MAY 2019


DOONAN QUEENSLAND HOME

The loft was extended upstairs to include a landing area, and an extra bedroom and bathroom were added downstairs. “There were a couple of weeks when it was unlivable,” says Rachel. “There were gaping holes and it was really dusty.” Today, all signs of dirt and disruption are gone and Rachel says the resulting double-height living space, complete with a wood-burning fireplace and country-style kitchen, were worth any temporary inconvenience. The space now feels luxurious, with fresh white walls and touches of timber to add warmth and character. The family’s existing sofa, which they’d had for a number of years, felt right at home in the new space, while Rachel found many other key furniture items on Gumtree. “It became quite an obsession!” she admits. Her favourite spot is the outdoor bath, accessible through the ensuite that opens onto the verandah through bi-fold doors. “To have a glass of wine in the bath and read a book — that’s my dream!” she says. A steep block meant there was also work to be done outside. “The property is at a 25-degree gradient,” says Rachel. “It had no connection to the garden and was too sloped for the kids to play.” Unperturbed, Gerard brought his bobcat and excavator up from Sydney and got to work building retaining walls and backfilling to create a level

grassy area. He also created a circular driveway out the front, lining it with the long, oval-shaped seeds of poinciana trees that he collected around the neighbourhood. As a holiday home, a swimming pool was high on the wish list but the limitations of the slope meant the couple had to get creative. “We were both worried about the cost of building an in-ground pool on a site like this,” says Rachel, who found their concrete plunge pool at Allcast Precast in nearby Woombye. “We also wanted to get that bridge effect leading from the barn out to the pool — it was definitely a bit of work getting that right.” The pool is now the ideal place to gaze across the hinterland hills, while a nearby pandanus recreates the look of the Sunshine Coast’s beaches where the subtropical tree is iconic and abundant. But though the sandy shores of Noosa are mere minutes away, Rachel says the barn has everything they need for a relaxing holiday at home. “The boys burst through the doors to rediscover cherished toys and get busy with what they describe as ‘builders’ work’ and repairs around the property with their miniature tools,” she says. “We go to the beach early in the morning when it’s not too busy or hot, then come back here and hang out all day. It’s our little oasis.”


HOME DOONAN QUEENSLAND Freshly painted white walls and window frames, and antique bedroom furniture, sourced by Rachel on Gumtree, add to the cosy country feel. The Winchester Spindle bed from Pod Furniture in the UK is dressed with bedlinen from The Beach People. For stockist details, see page 136.

ABOUT THE HOUSE

• As a builder, Gerard was able to complete most of the

work himself. His Sydney-based business, Reconn, works on commercial, residential, hospitality and civil projects. 0413 319 811; reconn.com.au Gerard made the concrete benchtops in the kitchen while the cupboards and sink are from IKEA. ikea.com.au Tapware in the bathrooms is from Astra Walker. “Both the main bathroom and the ensuite bathroom designs are a hybrid of industrial and traditional concepts,” says Rachel. (02) 8838 5100; astrawalker.com.au The Jasper sofa from King Living is a family favourite. “It’s super comfortable and huge,” says Rachel. 1300 546 438; kingliving.com.au The pool is from Allcast Precast, on the Sunshine Coast, which specialises in concrete water tanks and plunge pools. (07) 5442 2522; allcastprecast.com.au Little Red Barn is available to rent as holiday accommodation. To make a booking, visit airbnb.com.au

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Discover the Luxaflex Difference

Window fashions as individual as you If you find yourself with an empty nest, now is the perfect time to reclaim your home with the iconic Softshades collection from LuxaflexÂŽ Window Fashions. Discover our exclusive PirouetteÂŽ Shadings. With softly curved fabric vanes and sheer backing, they provide elegant filtered light when open and complete privacy when closed. For a tailor made solution to suit your lifestyle, visit your local Luxaflex Showroom and discover a new standard in style and service.

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HOME LYON VILLE V ICTOR I A The house beside the Wombat State Forest is wrapped in Colorbond Night Sky and built with recycled bricks. FACING PAGE Three-year-old Gigi has her own secateurs and loves to cut flowers like this Cafe au Lait dahlia for her own posies.

BUDDING AMBITION

THEIR WEDDING IN VICTORIA’S HEPBURN SHIRE SPARKED A COUPLE’S LOVE AFFAIR WITH FLOWERS AND SUSTAINABLE LIVING. WORDS V IRGINI A IMHOFF PHOTOGRAPHY M A R K ROPER ST YLING LY NDA GA R DENER A ND BELLE HEMMING


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JANAE AND CHRIS PAQUIN-BOWDEN had always imagined

growing their own produce on a patch of land, where their children could grow up surrounded by pets and livestock. However, it wasn’t until they got married in Lyonville, just over 100 kilometres north-west of Melbourne, that this grand plan started to take shape. “We both always loved the idea of having our own property, and having animals and a garden of some description,” says Janae. “When we were married [in 2014] we knew we wanted to use local, sustainably grown flowers that were chemical free, but we couldn’t find them anywhere.” As the 36-year-old recalls, it was one of their Suffolk sheep that saved the day. “We found a couple who trade flowers for all kinds of things, so we traded a sheep for wedding flowers. When the buckets arrived they were filled with the most beautiful, cottagey, English-style flowers… that day I fell in love with flowers.” So putting aside plans to build their dream home on the 3.2-hectare parcel of land they had purchased in 2013, Janae and Chris launched into bee-friendly and chemical-free flower farming instead. They established their business, Fleurs de Lyonville, with a large plot of old-fashioned flowers, settling on dahlias as their main crop. They also grow sweet peas, hydrangeas, amaranth, ranunculus and buddleias (butterfly bush), as well as Australian natives such as Billy buttons (woolly heads), waratahs and kangaroo paws. Growing up, 36-year-old Janae spent a lot of time in the garden with her parents — her father Ian Evans is a Bendigobased landscape designer — but she and Chris, 35, had much to learn about growing flowers on a large scale. “I got a book from the library about how to be a flower farmer and on our honeymoon I read it about a hundred times,” she says. “The garden came first and we lived in the shed that we built before we were married; bit by bit we started the garden, learning what flowers people want.” The couple, who met while teaching at a Melbourne school in 2012, were initially drawn to central Victoria to be closer to family. “We started looking for a place to buy near Bendigo because my family is there,” explains Janae, a French teacher currently on maternity leave. “This property just popped up, and it was meant to be.” Lyonville is a small rural community located in the cool fertile highlands between Trentham and Daylesford. The former timber town is renowned for its natural springs and walking trails through the Wombat State Forest, which borders the property that Janae and Chris now own. “It was a beautiful pristine block that somebody had already cleared, with the forest on both sides and the Domino Walking trail at the back of the property,” Janae says. “We thought it was a good amount of land; it had good soil and a good rainfall for growing things, because we knew that’s what we wanted to do. We just had to have it.” After laying the groundwork for the flower farm, they started building the house in 2016, and they now share the home with their children (three-year-old Gigi and Atticus, nine months). The single-storey house, with its facade of >


LYON VILLE V ICTOR I A HOME The Esse wood combustion cooker in Powder Blue is the star of the open-plan kitchen. FACING PAGE, FROM TOP Chris and Janae with Gigi, three, and Atticus, nine months. Peggy, a Scottish terrier and West Highland cross, is never too far away from the family; freshly harvested vegetables in the kitchen sink. For stockist details, see page 136.

ABOUT THE HOUSE

• A wood-combustion Esse 990CH boiler from Pivot

Stove and Heating provides hydronic heating in the concrete slab. 1300 474 868; pivotstove.com.au The roof and rear wall are covered with Colorbond Night Sky corrugated steel. 1800 022 999; colorbond.com Janae’s father Ian Evans did the landscaping. 0418 507 213; ianevanscreativelandscapes.com Leon Beatty from LMB Constructions in Bendigo carried out the building work. 0415 503 875; lmb-constructions.business.site The Salvage Yard in Castlemaine provided the timber beams for the trusses and recycled bowling-alley flooring for the benchtops. 0435 500 112; thesalvageyard.com.au Central Kitchens in Bendigo East made the kitchen cabinets. (03) 5430 2000; centralkitchens.com.au Laminex Black was used for the kitchen cabinetry. 132 136; laminex.com.au

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HOME LYON V ILLE V ICTOR I A

FROM TOP The north-facing windows, brick walls and polished concrete floors provide thermal mass to warm the house in winter; the roadside stall. FACING PAGE, CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT Paddocks full of flowers; the cabinet in the ensuite bathroom came from Vintage etc and the mirror was bought at Campbell’s Creek Collectibles Fair; the family walking down Leishmans Lane to their roadside stall; Janae sourced the striped wallpaper from Select Wallpaper in the UK. For stockist details, see page 136.

second-hand bricks and an envelope of Colorbond wrapping the roof and rear wall, satisfies Janae’s longing to repurpose old materials and the couple’s commitment to sustainability. North-facing glass areas allow the winter sun to warm the home, while a brick wall in the passage and polished concrete floors, hydronically heated by a wood-combustion Esse stove, act as thermal mass. Chris, who currently works as an assistant principal at a local primary school, is Canadian and the house was inspired by his father’s home in Alberta. “We knew we wanted it to be solar passive,” Janae says. “And I really like old things, so while I was pregnant I went around finding old bricks, and beams for the interior trusses that had come out of Castlemaine Woollen Mill.” A trip to Castlemaine’s The Salvage Yard unearthed some former bowling-alley flooring that has been recycled as kitchen benchtops. A wide passage connects the bedrooms and doubles as a space for drying flowers and displaying Janae’s vintage finds and collectables, including some of her grandmother’s framed badge and button collections. The house took a year to build, then Janae’s father Ian landscaped the front terrace, which features recycled brick paving and bluestone flags from the Clunes Town Hall. As for the business, it continues to bloom and currently provides flowers to a number of local florists, cafés and grocers as well as farmers’ markets. “Chris is the nurseryman and does all the germination, seed-sowing and a chunk of the manual labour,” Janae explains. “I do the planning, planting, deadheading and picking, designing bouquets and social media… We are also in the middle of starting up a flower hub with several other flower farmers in the region in order to help floral designers purchase from us, without having to travel to several different farms. And I’m working with two other local growers to supply DIY mixed flower buckets for weddings.” With their dream for a sustainable way of life becoming reality, the couple now grow most of their own food, run a small mob of Suffolk sheep and keep chickens. On weekends, Janae fills her roadside stall with fresh-cut flowers and any surplus organic produce. It’s exactly the lifestyle they imagined for their young family. “The kids don’t go to daycare, so they are at home with me the whole time and come with me when I’m working,” she explains. “Gigi has her own little pair of secateurs and she cuts off the flowers I don’t need — or usually the ones I don’t need! — and then takes them to her sandpit where she paints them or uses them in little mud pies. Atticus is usually on a little crochet rug out among the flowers while I’m doing jobs. They also love the other side of the farm: feeding the animals and picking their own vegies.” An added joy has been discovering that the local Lyonville community shares the same ideals and has supported the venture. “Everybody here wants to keep animals and grow food. It’s a great community and we share things around.” For more information, visit fleursdelyonville.com.au or follow @fleurs_de_lyonville on Instagram.


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BINALONG NSW HOME For their kitchen, homeowners Emma and Angus Graham sourced a marble benchtop for the island from Carrara Marble and Granite in Sydney and Tonalite subway tiles for the splashback from Tiles by Kate. The recycled European oak floorboards are from the couple’s business Woodstock Resources. FACING PAGE The property’s expansive gardens include a pond. For stockist details, see page 136.

g o l d e n e ra

A YOUNG FAMILY IS ADDING THEIR OWN CHAPTER TO THE RICH HISTORY OF THIS GRAND HOMESTEAD IN SOUTHERN NSW. WORDS SKYE MANSON PHOTOGRAPHY LISA COHEN ST YLING BECK SIMON

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CLOCKWISE, FROM TOP LEFT Angus, Hunter, Oliver and Sophie with their horses; the front porch is filled with collected pieces, including two wrought iron chairs; Emma, who is pregnant with her second child, gives horse Graphite a rub; the living room’s original fireplace has been restored with a European oak mantle, while the couches are from Coco Republic. FACING PAGE Angus says the property’s stunning gardens “seem to manage themselves”. For stockist details, see page 136.


BINALONG NSW HOME

A RICH VEIN OF AUSTRALIAN folklore runs through southern

NSW’s Binalong district and Mylora, a historic homestead in the area, features in many tales regaled by locals. It is immortalised in one of Banjo Paterson’s first published poems The Mylora Elopement, based on his memories growing up on the neighbouring property, Illalong. However, the property also has links to less reputable characters, and it’s these stories that often attract the most intrigue. Mylora’s previous owners were the Garry family, whose ancestors were early pioneers of the area. During the 1850s gold rush, hold-ups were common on the Cobb & Co route flanking the outer reaches of the property, as bushrangers sought their fortune with pistols rather than pickaxes. Local legend has it that after robbing a mail coach, notorious outlaws Johnny Gilbert and John Dunn stole two valuable racehorses from Mylora. But Mrs Garry’s jewels remained untouched, cleverly concealed under a brooding hen. For Mylora’s current owners, Angus and Emma Graham, these stories add another layer of history to their already charming home, located about 34 kilometres north-west of Yass. Built in the 1820s, the stately stone house with formal dining room, sitting room and five bedrooms — including a former ballroom, which is now the master bedroom — sits amongst the well-established leafy garden with a tennis court, pool and manicured lawns. The striking

grandeur of the home’s interior is complemented by large antique furniture, including a baby grand piano and a seven-metre-long sideboard from Paris. Emma says local tales added to the allure when she first came to Mylora. “It’s made me fall in love with it even more,” the 36-year-old explains. “The number of people I’ve met who have spoken of the fabulous parties held by the Garry family is just incredible. I feel very lucky to live here.” However, compared to the Garry family Angus and Emma have only lived at Mylora together for a relatively short time. Shortly after their first child Hunter was born in 2016, Emma, a former marketing manager, moved to Mylora full time. About a year later, Angus and Emma were married in the homestead’s impressive garden. “We had six inches of rain but it was the most spectacular day,” says Emma. “It stopped after the ceremony and we were able to have drinks and canapés in the beautiful surrounds before the downpour started again!” Angus, 48, has a longer history with the district, having grown up nearby at his parents’ Galong farm, Argyle. In 1999, he moved to Mylora when his family purchased the 3200-hectare property in partnership with an investor. Angus and Emma are now in the process of acquiring ownership of the property where they run a mixed sheep and cropping operation. >

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HOME BINALONG NSW The bedroom’s reclaimed Woodstock Resources floorboards came from a railway station in Paris. The bedlinen is from Sheridan and the striped cushions are Libeco. The old wicker chair was picked up at auction. FACING PAGE Sophie and Hunter play in the creek. For stockist details, see page 136.

ABOUT THE HOUSE

• The recycled European oak flooring

throughout the house is from Angus and Emma’s business Woodstock Resources. Their main showroom and concept store is in Jugiong, NSW, but they also have showrooms in Surry Hills, Sydney, South Melbourne and a feature display at Suzie Anderson Home at Mossvale in the NSW Southern Highlands. 0439 878 470; woodstockresources.com.au Angus designed the stainless-steel kitchen benchtops and had them made by Aircare Engineering in Young, NSW. (02) 6382 5299; aircareengineering.com.au Emma and Angus transformed the original ballroom into the master bedroom and painted it in Taubmans Blue Blush. 13 16 86; taubmans.com.au Mylora is available to rent as holiday accommodation. Visit airbnb.com.au

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HOME BINALONG NSW

“I’ve lived at Mylora for over 20 years and it’s the place I feel most at peace. I get a strong sense of calm here,” says Angus (or ‘Gus’ for short). “In times of stress I’ll ride to the top of the hills and take it all in.” In between the demands of the farm and his family, which includes two children from his previous marriage, Sophie, 16, and Oliver, 14, and a soon-to-be new baby, Angus still manages to find time for the ongoing restoration of the homestead. “Gus is hands-on and hard yakka but there’s a bit of a romantic side to him in terms of idealism,” says Emma. “We have not used an architect or a designer for anything in the house. It has all been him.” Testament to this passion, Angus was searching for the perfect floorboards for the new open-plan living area a few years ago when he discovered a Sydney business importing reclaimed European oak. He was so taken with the floorboards, and the story behind them, that he ended up buying the business. Today, Woodstock Restoration sells reclaimed timber and other items salvaged from old buildings, barns and railways from France, Belgium, Serbia, the Netherlands and Turkey. “I guess what attracted me was that we don’t really have anything old in Australia by world standards and the fact is these floors can be hundreds and hundreds of years old, and the timber itself could be 700 years old. It gives such a unique character to the product,” he explains. As the business started to grow, Angus began storing oak beams, gates and chandeliers in the sheds at Mylora. “One day he said, ‘We can’t sell a secret,’ and it made complete sense to start thinking about a new retail space closer to home,” says Emma.

In 2017, Woodstock Resources opened a concept store at Jugiong, located on the Hume Highway about 30 minutes’ drive south-west of Mylora. “We envisaged a space that was an experience that people don’t expect to see in a country town,” Emma says. “We created a retail shop using natural materials — leather, wool, linen, oak, stone, antler and glass. People always comment about how great the smell is and how calming the space feels.” Occasionally Mylora serves as a showroom, too. “The living room has been completely opened up and the ceiling lifted, and now it’s this beautiful space,” Emma explains. “Our reclaimed European oak herringbone floor from a barn in Romania runs the entirety of the room and elevates the feeling of expanse.” The family spend most of their time in this eight-by-12metre open-plan space and have found a clever way to capitalise on the beauty of the surrounding creeks by installing mechanical fly-screen blinds to enclose the nearby verandah. “It’s the most perfect spot for a casual summer drink. You can see the creek and hear the sounds of the birds and still get an idea of what’s happening outside,” Emma says. For the children, the property is a natural playground where they can explore with their horses — Candy, Fortune and Graphite — and play on the old river-gum slab table, which also plays a part in the folklore of Mylora. “The Garry family would always invite lots of the community there for a picnic at Easter time and so every June long weekend we h uper-casual bonfire barbecue down there, where anyo ’s around comes along with their kids,” says Emma.

“I’ve lived at Mylora for over 20 years and it’s the place I feel most at peace. I get a strong sense of calm here.”

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CLOCKWISE, FROM TOP LEFT Angus made the hat rack in the boot room from an iron rod and some old horseshoes. An old church pew was found at auction; the house was built in the 1820s; the ram’s head art piece called ‘Stanley’ is by Sarah Bishop; in the lead up to their 2017 wedding, Angus did substantial work to bring the gardens back to their former glory; Angus with Hunter on one of his 15 horses; Graphite, Fortune and Candy graze in a paddock. For stockist details, see page 136.


GET THE LOOK BINALONG NSW The chairs on the enclosed verandah were custom-made by Robert Plumb using Woodstock Resources recycled teak from India, while Angus and Emma’s outdoor chandelier is from Pantry on Pudman in Boorowa. For stockist details, see page 136.

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RECREATE TIMES GONE BY WITH AGED MATERIALS AND CLASSIC PRINTS. PRODUCED BY LISA BURDEN

1 Martha table lamp in Natural, $169.95, from Provincial Home Living. 2 Mercer & Reid ‘Boracay’ cushion in Natural, $49.99, from Adairs. 3 Joseph Giles ‘Organo’ cabinet handles in Dark Bronze, from $105 each, from The English Tapware Company. 4 Atlan nta platter, $145, from Coco Republic. 5 Grove coffee table, $1420, from Canvas+Sasson n. 6 Tavella crackle gloss subway tiles in Verde, $176 per sq m, from Byzantine Design. 7 Osorio Yuan stackable bowls and plates, $295 for 8, from Domo. 8 Vincent Shepparrd ‘Alex’ lounge chair, $1150, and scatter cushions, from $35 each, from Cotswold Furniture. 9 Chambray vintage stripe quilt cover in Dove, $229 for queen, from Aura a Home. 10 Derby rectangle trays, $149.95 for 2, from Oz Design Furniture. 11 Playa recycled glass display hurricane, $104 for medium, from Pottery Barn. 12 Moroccan n woven basket, $59 for low tote, from Pottery Barn. 13 Positano navy outdoor cushion n, ny $50, from No Chintz. 14 Saddle Stitch rug in Duckegg (1.8m x 2.7m), $4900, from Jenny Jones Rugs & Home. For stockist details, see page 136.

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PROMOT ION

SL E E P E A SY Unwind in your dream bedroom with beautiful customised bedroom furniture as part of the new My Design and Venus collections from Snooze.


PROMOT ION

SOF T LY, SOF T LY Transform your bedroom with velvet upholstery and natural linens. The tantalising textures at play in the Venus collection will make you want to stay in bed all day.

Expertly crafted in Australia using premium-quality Warwick fabrics, the Venus bed frame offers the ultimate in contemporary chic. Layer your bedroom with a soft headboard and bed linen in irresistible shades of plum, charcoal or mustard. The Venus bed (exclusive to Snooze) is easy to customise; it’s available in an array of upholstery fabrics, headboard shapes and base options with additional storage. It can be tailored to feature teardrop, tapered or square wings to ensure you bring your dream bed to life.

“Layering colour and texture is essential when it comes to creating comfort. The grey cushion is a great finishing touch here.” VICTORIA CAREY, EDITOR-IN-CHIEF, COUNTRY STYLE

SCANDI-STYLE WARMTH Timber furniture conveys warmth beautifully in the bedroom. My Design narrow bedside table with spindle legs in feature-grade blackbutt veneer in Native Tone. Exclusive to Snooze.


AUSTRALIAN-MADE FLAIR When you buy from Snooze, take comfort in knowing that there are furniture options that have been crafted within Australia, so you’re supporting local manufacturers.

MODERN LOVE A contemporary headboard in an on-trend colour is the very definition of modern. Venus square buttoned headboard with slimline base made in Warwick ‘Lovely Blossom’ fabric. Available as part of the new Venus collection. Exclusive to Snooze.

EMBRACE COLOUR Pair bold hues with luxurious textures for an alluring look. Featured here is the Linen House Blythe queen quilt cover set.

Visit Snooze in-store or online at snooze.com.au to browse the entire Venus and My Design collection.


WELL ROUNDED A curved headboard pairs beautifully with earthy tones to create an understated, relaxed aesthetic. The My Design Ellipse headboard with floating bench-seat base is constructed using a high-quality feature-grade blackbutt veneer, finished in Native Tone stain, and Warwick ‘Vegas Steel’ fabric. Available as part of the new My Design collection. Exclusive to Snooze.

Pairing timber furniture with pale tones and tactile fabrics is the fast route to creating the perennially popular Nordic look. The My Design collection from Snooze offers a broad selection of bed-base combinations and additional storage in an array of stains and finishes. With its gently rounded lines, the Ellipse’s headboard sets a calming tone in any bedroom. It’s teamed with elegant, handle-free bedside furniture for a fuss-free, minimalist aesthetic.

PERFECT MATCH Complete the look with fresh floral linen. Shown here is the Linen House Hannah queen quilt cover set and Belmore Maple throw.

PRACTICAL MAGIC Boost the functionality of your bedroom by embracing the My Design Ellipse bed’s floating bench-seat base. It’s finished in Warwick ‘Vegas Steel’ fabric but can be customised to suit any bedroom. Available as part of the new My Design collection. Exclusive to Snooze.


PROMOT ION

NOR DIC R ET R E AT Tranquillity reigns in the bedroom when you team the relaxed timber pieces of the My Design collection with earthy linens, gentle hues and accessories that bring the outside in.

“Soften your timber floors with a white jute rug to create an inviting, comfortable atmosphere in the bedroom.� CASSIE HUETT, SENIOR ST YLIST, SNOOZE

ORGANIC INSPIRED Timber brings texture and warmth to the bedroom. The My Design narrow bedside table with spindle legs is constructed using feature-grade blackbutt veneer and finished in a Native Tone stain. Coordinate with matching bench which is a stunning addition at the foot end of the bed, against a wall or beneath a window. Available as part of the new My Design collection. Exclusive to Snooze.

Visit Snooze in-store or online at snooze.com.au to browse the entire Venus and My Design collection.


PENDANT POWER Bedside pendants with metallic finishes dial up the luxe factor. Having them suspended from the ceiling is a great space saver, too.

“An upholstered headboard in a dramatic colour is a great starting point when designing your bedroom – it should be the first decision.” VICTORIA CAREY, EDITOR-IN-CHIEF, COUNTRY STYLE

DARK ACCENTS Dark-toned timber provides the foundation for a strong, sophisticated look. My Design narrow bedside table in feature-grade blackbutt veneer, finished with a Charcoal stain and featuring spindle legs. Available as part of the new My Design collection. Exclusive to Snooze.


PROMOT ION

Tactile velvet is the ideal choice for an elegant headboard. Crafted in premium-quality Warwick ‘Regis Navy’ fabric, the Venus extended lowline headboard with standard bed base is timeless perfection. Its navy velvet is complemented by opulent bed linen in

rich plum or glamorous gold. With a selection of upholstery and headboard silhouettes and base options with additional storage, you can customise your bed in any way you desire. The headboard can be tailored to feature studs, buttons or alternative quilting.

V ELV ET LU X E Elegant shapes meet opulent fabrics and precision detailing in the Venus bed. It’s statement furniture that takes comfort to the next level.

STRIKE IT RICH An opulent headboard calls for lavish linen. Featured here is a Linen House Nimes queen quilt cover set in Wine and Belmore Maple throw.

Visit Snooze in-store or online at snooze.com.au to browse the entire Venus and My Design collection.


PROMOT ION

DE SIGN ED BY YOU It’s easy to create bespoke bedroom furniture that reflects your personal style with the new and exclusive Venus and My Design collections from Snooze.

My Design Ellipse headboard and bedside table in feature-grade blackbutt veneer in Native Tone stain.

A bedside table shelf option can be included across the My Design range.

My Design Dane dresser in Tasmanian oak veneer in Straw stain.

Bring the design of your bedroom together with furniture from the My Design collection at Snooze. Expertly crafted in Australia from feature-grade blackbutt veneer, the bespoke furniture range is available in an array of stains and finishes. Achieve a balance between practicality and style with fully customisable bedside tables (in a range of sizes), shelves and handles. Add allure to your bedroom and complete the look with a My Design narrow bedside table in feature-grade blackbutt veneer in Charcoal.

Venus extended lowline headboard in Warwick ‘Regis Nav y’ fabric.

STYLE NOTES 1. Layering is what makes a bedroom blissful. Cushions, throws, rugs and curtains will all work hard for you. 2. Good bedside storage is a great asset to any bedroom. Customise your bedside table to your specific needs with the My Design collection at Snooze. 3. Studs, buttons and quilting add unbeatable opulence to your headboard. Personalise your own design at Snooze.

Visit Snooze in-store or online at snooze.com.au to browse the entire Venus and My Design collection.


K IDS’ BEDROOMS DECOR ATING

PHOTOGRAPHY FELIX FOREST STYLING DANIELLE SELIG

CREATING A NEW BEDROOM FOR A CHILD DOESN’T MEAN A COMPLETE OVERHAUL — A FEW CLEVER DECORATING IDEAS WILL MAKE ALL THE DIFFERENCE.

This children’s bunk room in Quamby Home in Tasmania was custom made, but it’s easy to pull a look like this together yourself. Find out how on page 76 and if you would like to stay in this beautiful home, visit quambyhome.com.au for more information. MAY 2019 COU NTRY ST Y LE 73


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ANIMAL MAGIC WHAT DO LITTLE GIRLS LIKE? A ROOM THAT LOOKS LIKE A PAGE IN A FAIRY TALE. 12

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PRODUCED BY NATALIE JOHNSON

1 Numero 74 mini star garland in Dusty Pink, $54.95, from Nomades Home. 2 Cat Lee ‘Mia Mouse’ art print, $99 for A3 unframed, from Unclebearskin Productions. 3 Crossing by Bernabeifreeman rug (2.4m x 3m), $5400, from Designer Rugs. 4 Collins Pharmacy table lamp, $99, from Early Settler. 5 Numero 74 fairy wings in Rose Pink, $59.95, from Nomades Home. 6 Plantino Engineered Oak Elemental flooring in Rouen, $72.05 per sq m, from Choices Flooring. 7 Zylone Sheen low-sheen acrylic interior paint in Bianca, $84.71 for 4L, from Resene. 8 BigStuffed Original Whale, $235 for Big, from Hello Little Birdie Collective. 9 Città Sove chambray linen quilted blanket in Charcoal, $299, from RJ Living. 10 Sove linen pillowcase in Iced Tea, $69.90 for pair, from Città. 11 Kritter children’s chair, $25, from IKEA. 12 Maileg Angel Mouse ‘Big Sister’, $48.40, from Leo & Bella. 13 Numero 74 suitcase, $85, from Leo & Bella. For stockist details, see page 136.

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PHOTOGRAPHY KARA ROSENLUND

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K IDS’ BEDROOMS DECOR ATING Children’s book author Vicki Wood’s grandchildren love this pretty bedroom she created for them in her home on Queensland’s Sunshine Coast.


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BUNKS ARE GREAT SPACE SAVERS — AND ALL KIDS LOVE A RABBIT! 1 Donna Delaney ‘Bunny Tail 2’ poster print (40cm x 50cm), $89 unframed, from Designstuff. 2 Arstid wall lamp, $29.99, from IKEA. 3 Bondi bunk bed frame, $999 for or single, from Snooze. 4 Zylone Sheen low-sheen acrylic interior paint in Bianca, $84.771 for 4L, from Resene. 5 Linen sheet set in White, $495 for double, from In The Sac. 6 Maileg ‘Janus’ medium rabbit, $128, and ‘Sailor Boy’ mega rabbit, $152, from Nordic Fusion. 7 Raw edge European pillowslips in Winter White, $89 for pair, from Bedtonic. 8 Handwoven striped linen cushion cover in Chalk/Carbon, $49.90, from Città. 9 Harlow bedside table in Simply White, $179, from Pottery Barn Kids. 10 Plantino Engineered Oak Elemental flooring in Lyon, $72.05 per sq m, from Choices Flooring. 11 Ferm Living rabbit storage box, $149, from Designstuff. 12 Night Night blockout blind in Glow (120cm x 18cm), $327, from Wynstan. For stockist details, see page 136 6.

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PHOTOGRAPHY FELIX FOREST STYLING DANIELLE SELIG

PRODUCED BY NATALIE JOHNSON


www.biancalorenne.com freephone au 1800 705 393 nz 0800 242 567


DECORATING STYLE NOTES Two Sika-Design ‘Tangelo’ pendants create a focal point above the Michel dining table in this open-plan space. The Fleur chairs and Luis bench are also by Sika-Design, all available from Domo.

STYLE NOTES THE LATEST INTERIOR TRENDS FROM MAISON & OBJET IN PARIS WORK EQUALLY WELL IN AN AUSTRALIAN SETTING. WORDS V ICTOR IA CAR EY


NATURAL CHOICE Brisbane designer Darcy Clarke’s Tangelo cane pendant (above and opposite) for Danish company Sika-Design was launched at Paris design show Maison & Objet earlier this year. Hang it in a single drop or in a cluster of three for impact. Sika-Design is renowned for its high quality cane furniture, such as the Margret chair (left) and Celia headboard and Romeo trolley (right). Available from domo.com.au

PERFECT PALETTE Loved for his magical decoupage, New York designer John Derian’s range for Designers Guild was on show at Paris Déco Off, an event where the world’s design crowd gather to see the latest textiles and wallpapers. The popular Mixed Tones Canvas in Neutral is pictured below. Available from radfordfurnishings.com.au

ALL WHITE Handmade for Maison Balzac by Mathilde Carron-Astier de Villatte — who co-founded cult ceramics brand Astier de Villatte with her brother in 1996 — the Carron candle, $159, and vase, $349, are collectables. See maisonbalzac.com

SLEEP EASY French design house Ligne Roset — a family run business since 1860 — showed its elegant mustard yellow Clam bed settee at Maison & Objet. It converts into a daybed and then a double bed with just two clicks of a button — handy when you have visitors. This clever design by Leo Dubreil and Baptiste Pilato is available from Domo, along with other Ligne Roset pieces, such as the T vase (above), Garden Pack low table and Tassels rug (both right). See the range at domo.com.au or call (03) 9277 8888. MAY 2019 COUNTRY ST Y LE 79


DECOR ATING BEDDING

DOWN TO EARTH

BRING AUTUMN INDOORS, WITH BED LINEN INSPIRED BY THE RUSSET AND GOLDEN TONES OF THE SEASON. PHOTOGRAPHY NIC GOSSAGE STYLING LISA BURDEN


FROM TOP Jilamara wallpaper in Stone, $175 per metre, from Willie Weston. Luxury velvet cushion in Ginger, $59.95, from Aura Home. Linen cotton cushion cover in Apricot, $25.95, from Macey & Moore. Avenue throw in Mustard, $295, from In the Sac. Pure linen bespoke blanket in Terracotta, $348, from Bedtonic. Burton cushion in Ochre, $88, from L&M Home. Chambray linen throw in Natural, $169, and Maison bed cover in Clay, $299, from Aura Home. Standard pillow cover set in Natural Stripe, $75, from Carlotta + Gee. Rustic elm bench, $799, from Provincial Home Living. Vintage linen cushion in Clay, $69.95, from Aura Home. Weave basket, $99 for medium, from Harpers Project. IN BASKET Avenue coverlet in Putty, $345, from In the Sac. Sashiko embroidered throw in Cinnamon, $460, from Bianca Lorenne. Malawi rug in Oatmeal (1.7m x 2.4m), $1490, from Armadillo & Co. FACING PAGE Luxe French linen curtain set in Natural, $215, from I Love Linen. Jilamara wallpaper, as before. Lake House 1914 artwork, $85, from Vintage Art Emporium. Chalk paint in French Linen, $59.95 for 1L, from Annie Sloan. The Handsome chair, $790, from Huski Studios. ON CHAIR, FROM TOP Chambray fringe European pillowcase in Pink Clay, $49.95, from Aura Home. Circlyn cushion in Mustard, $109.95, from Eadie Lifestyle. Chambray vintage stripe quilt cover in Cinnamon, $229 for queen, from Aura Home. Quilt cover in Natural Stripes, $240 for queen, from Carlotta + Gee. Cloud Study 9 artwork by Min Woo Bang (19cm x 19cm), $950, from Manyung Gallery. Malawi rug, as before. For stockist details, see page 136.

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DECOR ATING BEDDING THIS PAGE Chalk paint in Old Ochre, $59.95 for 1L, from Annie Sloan. ON BED, FROM TOP Maison fringe European pillowcase in Clay, $49.95, from Aura Home. Standard pillowcase set in Silt, $120, from In the Sac. Luchesi cushion in Cinnamon, $161, from Bianca Lorenne. Linen cushion in Oatmeal, $59.95, from By Arna. Maison fringe standard pillowcase in Clay, $39.95, from Aura Home. Linen flat sheet in Chestnut, $180 for queen, from In Bed Store. Maison fringe quilt cover in Clay, $199 for queen, from Aura Home. Mateo side table, $199, from Pottery Barn. On side table Sleep mask, $29.95, from Eadie Lifestyle. Assorted books, from Kinokuniya. Kurinuki tea cup, $55, from The Potter x The Clay. Bump vase in Light Pink, $90, from James Lemon. Florals, from Clementine Posy. Burton throw in Ochre, $220, from L&M Home. Ambra knitted throw, $196, from Bianca Lorenne. FACING PAGE Menlo reclaimed teak storage cabinet, $2299, from Pottery Barn. IN CABINET, TOP SHELF Standard pillowcase set in Mustard, $120, from In the sac. Chambray fringe quilt cover in Pink Clay, $229 for queen, from Aura Home. French linen sheet set in Natural, $499 for queen, from Macey & Moore. SECOND SHELF French linen sheet set in Natural, as before. Standard pillow cover set in Light Pink, $75, from Carlotta + Gee. Luxury velvet European pillowcase in Fig, $69.95, from Aura Home. 100% linen pillowcase set in Tobacco, $85, from In Bed Store. Luxury velvet pillowcase in Mahogany, $49.95, and Luxury velvet European pillowcase in Mahogany, $69.95, from Aura Home. Standard pillowcase set in Clay, $120, from In the Sac. Chambray vintage stripe pillowcase in Cinnamon, $29.95, from Aura Home. 100% pure linen pillowcase in Thick Natural/Milk Stripes, $39.95, from I Love Linen. Triibe X In Bed quilt in Tobacco, $340 for queen, from In Bed Store. Ultra luxurious 100% pure French linen quilt cover in Milk/Natural Thick Stripes, $330 for queen, from I Love Linen. THIRD SHELF Pillowcase in Tobacco, $70 for 2, from Eadie Lifestyle. Luxury velvet pillowcase in Mahogany, $49.95, from Aura Home. Ultra luxurious 100% pure french linen quilt cover in Desert Rose, $295 for queen, from I Love Linen. FOURTH SHELF Quilt sets in Bordeaux and Mustard, $425 each for queen, from In the Sac. French linen sheet set in Natural, $499 for queen, from Macey & Moore. Ultra luxurious 100% pure French linen quilt cover in Natural, $295 for queen, from I Love Linen. Embroidered quilt set in Natural, $495 for queen, from In the Sac. Luxury velvet quilt cover in Fig, $299 for queen, from Aura Home. ON DOOR French linen cotton waffle throw in Apricot, $159.90, from Macey & Moore. ON FLOOR Les mini cushion in Smoke Grey, $50, from Cultiver. Lynette boho cushion, $109.95, from Eadie Lifestyle. Chambray vintage stripe European pillowcase in Cinnamon, $49.95, from Aura Home. Barolo amber cushion, $73, from L&M Home. For stockist details, see page 136.

Layer upon layer of cosy throws, cushions and rugs in a range of earthy tones and natural fibres will amplify the comfort factor in your bedroom.

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GRAND DESIGNS A TASMANIAN COUPLE REINVIGORATED THE SPRAWLING GARDEN OF THEIR HISTORIC FORMER RURAL PROPERTY. WORDS V IRGINI A IMHOFF PHOTOGRAPHY CLA IR E TA K ACS


HOBART TASMANIA GARDEN An original ash tree near an old farm building — now called ‘the garden shed’ — overlooks the rear woodland-style garden where flag irises and white arum lilies feature.

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GARDEN HOBART TASMANIA

FOR MORE THAN 30 YEARS, Angela and Clive Ockenden’s

large garden in southern Tasmania has ebbed and flowed with the demands and rhythm of their family life. From initial plantings when they first returned to take over the 200-year-old family property where Clive was born, the one hectare or so of garden has been, in the way of living things, evolving and constantly changing. “It’s had its ups and downs and there were times within that 30 years when it looked great, and then things would happen and get in the way, our children were busy and we’d go off, and it would get dry and unruly again,” says Angela, a solicitor in a Hobart legal firm. “And then we’d start again. It’s probably only been in the last 10 years that we’ve really got into it again, and maintained it.” When Angela and Clive, an agriculturalist, first took over the property that had been in his family for three generations, there were only two established trees, a mulberry and a large ash. The main house, the original farmhouse dating from 1820, is the largest of three dwellings and, although they have an early photograph showing a carriage sweep, that had long since disappeared. “We wanted to enclose the front garden so it wasn’t all open,” Angela says. They began by planting trees around the perimeter of the garden — peppercorns, Schinus molle, viburnum, groups of birch, ash, ginkgo, magnolia, flowering cherries and weeping brooms, as well as numerous fruit trees that are all well established by now. Along the way there were inevitable challenges, as well as triumphs. “There were so many old pipes here, and one tap, but this soil is beautiful; you can grow an old boot in it because it was farmland and fertile, it’s flat and there are no challenges with banks.” Today, the garden makes a painterly setting, embracing their home and various outbuildings. It’s a lush and soothing palette of shades of green, blue, purple, white and the odd blush pink, with meandering beds shaded by multiple mature trees, and swathes of lawn. For Angela it’s been more about creating an overall ambience that suits the historic formerly rural property, rather than individual plants, features or design themes. “It’s mostly green and white, so you don’t get that colour jarring with loud colours,” she says. “I do have some pink things but I cut the heads off when they’re flowering. Most people who come here say it’s very peaceful.” Even after three decades Angela still regards it as a work in progress, but with their three children — two sons and one daughter — now adults, they have more time on their hands to edge the garden closer to how they want it to be. “We are at the stage where we want it to maintain itself, so we’ve changed a lot of plants, taken out a lot of the roses and put in grasses, and I’ve got nothing really special or delicate,” she says. “It is really just a landscape garden.” Yet it’s been time, or more realistically the lack of it, that has mostly influenced the development of this large garden and, indeed, has encouraged Angela’s practical and somewhat pragmatic approach to it. >

86 COU NTRY ST Y LE MAY 2019


CLOCKWISE, FROM LEFT A narrow pathway weaves among arum lilies and Clematis montana to The Hall, a self-contained cottage; cane chairs on the back verandah look onto the tennis court; Angela and Clive have more time in the garden now their children are grown up; a vista of the front garden; looking back along the path from The Hall towards the main house where Angela and Clive have lived for more than 30 years; a sunroom off the dining room allows the couple to enjoy the fruit of their labours in all seasons; Viburnum opulus, the snowball tree.


88 COU NTRY ST Y LE MAY 2019


HOBART TASMANIA GARDEN Acanthus, artichoke, snowball tree, spiraea (May bush), the occasional pink-flowering geranium, and groundcovers line the meandering paths that link lawn areas.

“It is a unique place — entering the gates is to enter an enclave of otherworldliness.”


CLOCKWISE, FROM TOP LEFT The ornamental grapevine growing along the front verandah is almost as old as the 200-year-old house; the ancient mulberry tree shades mounds of groundcovers and swathes of irises and lilies; a white weeping broom, Genista monosperma, also known as weeping bridal veil; arched doorways in the brick wall open to the house as well as to other sections of the garden; crabapple (Malus floribunda) blossoms; a palette of blue and white blooms creates a peaceful ambience; Solomon’s seal (Polygonatum sp.).


HOBART TASMANIA GARDEN

“I’m not really a gardener,” she somewhat surprisingly says. “I’m a bit ad hoc, but I like things to look nice and so I plant things that look good. If I don’t like it, I take it out. We’ve removed a lot of roses because they are hard to maintain, so now I’ve got olive trees, sage-type things, acanthus and artichokes and plants that don’t worry. It’s a grand-scale garden and if it’s neat it looks good.” If there is a standout feature, it surely must be the flag irises. “In spring they’re beautiful, and at one stage I tried to have a whole lot of different irises, but of course I didn’t look after them so they all reverted back to the old ones,” Angela says. “But that’s fine, I’m happy with them, and not too fussed about anything fancy. So, we have lots of irises...” In 2013 Catherine Shields, from Hobart landscape design company The Alchemy of Gardens, helped the Ockendens reinvigorate and bring a new layer of planting to the garden. “She helped me in various spots around the garden, in other aspects of the property and helped me formulate how it would work,” Angela adds. “She introduced me to grasses and we have planted lots of them.” Over the three years that Catherine worked with them, they removed plants in decline or not in keeping with the look they wanted — in particular golden diosma — and concentrated on planting more evergreen shrubs and ground covers and thickening the boundary plantings for privacy. “It was already a lovely garden with old trees and winding paths connecting open lawn areas,” says Catherine. “We were aiming for an old English style with woodland glades around the lawns and under the shade trees.” Catherine added a sandstone seating wall and paving, more box hedges, grasses to replace agapanthus in the front garden and, in other areas, shrubs, perennials and grasses, including Stipa gigantea, Calamagrostis acutiflora ‘Karl Foerster’, Deschampsia cespitosa and Helictotrichon sempervirens, in “a loose rural style”. “The grasses are a great link between a more contemporary feeling and rural meadow styles,” says Catherine. “It is a unique place — entering the gates is to enter an enclave of otherworldliness — and it was important to retain the feeling generated by the architecture and the existing old trees and planting.” As it has for decades, this serene living canvas will no doubt continue to evolve in tune with Angela and Clive’s busy lives — and sometimes it will be more naturally than by design. “It will change with what survives and what doesn’t,” Angela says. “I don’t really buy plants now — apart from a splurge every now and again.” Even so, they share the lament of many that there’s rarely time to sit and appreciate what they’ve created. “It’s only since the children have moved away that we’ve been able to spend more time doing things in the garden,” Angela says. “Clive is excellent as the workhorse when we’re pottering around the place on weekends.” She adds, “I don’t know that you ever relax in the garden. We’ve got places to sit, but I don’t think I’ve ever sat in them!” For information about The Alchemy of Gardens, call 0419 647 070, or visit thealchemyofgardens.com

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IN THE GARDEN One of Gordon Giles’s beautiful Cymbidium orchids. RIGHT Gordon at home in Dural, NSW.

THE ORCHID WHISPERER

What Gordon Giles doesn’t know about orchids isn’t worth knowing. For more than 45 years this orchid obsessive has lived and worked on a beautiful property on Vineys Lane in Dural, an area that has long been the centre of the nursery industry in NSW. Many years ago, Gordon had a dream to develop a modern greenhouse complex and went about setting up his first glasshouse to grow Phalaenopsis orchids. Initially the flowers were cut and Gordon was the major supplier to the Sydney Flower Market, but changes in technology, trends and the environment meant he needed to adapt. Expanding into indoor foliage and potted orchids has seen Gordon and business partner Keith Wallace continue to thrive. Due to their beautiful blooms and ease of care, Phalaenopsis orchids are a popular indoor plant Gordon says. With bright light and regular fertilising it’s possible to have flowers all year round: simply cut off old flowers at the highest node. Follow @keithwallacenursery on Instagram.

LAUREN CAMILLERI OF LEAF SUPPLY ON WHAT’S HAPPENING IN THE GARDEN WORLD. Follow Lauren on Instagram @leaf_supply EASY PEASY: GARDENING FOR KIDS

BY KIRSTEN BRADLEY (LITTLE GESTALTEN, $29.95)

Looking to inspire a new generation of green fingers, the co-founder of Milkwood permaculture farm has created an interactive gardening book for kids. Activities come to life with colourful illustrations by Romanian artist Aitch, encouraging children (and adults) to create living and sustainable environments in their own homes.

IN SUSPENSE

LOG CABIN

Baby, it’s cold outside. Keep the home fires burning with logs from the sturdy wrought and sheet iron Kingston log holder, $99, from earlysettler.com.au

Printed on transparent film, Floating Leaves are photographs of foliage in various states of decay, designed by Copenhagenbased Norm Architects + Paper Collective especially for the delicate Moebe wooden frame. From $49 for an A4 print, and $79 for an A4 oak and plexiglass frame. designstuff.com.au

HEIRLOOM FRUIT Medlars are trees that reward patience, taking three to five years to bear fruit. Sporting white f lowers in late spring, they’re self-pollinating and resist many pests. The fruit ripens off the tree after harvest in autumn, and has a taste reminiscent of stewed apples. From Fleming’s Nurseries: find stockists at f lemings.com.au 92 COU NTRY ST Y LE MAY 2019

PHOTOGRAPHY LUISA BRIMBLE, GETTY IMAGES

in the garden

DREAM WEAVER Perhaps the mere mention of rattan transports you back to the 1970s. With the continuing popularity of the houseplant (another iconic ’70s trend), it’s no wonder rattan is back in fashion, but now with a decidedly modern aesthetic. Latitude Planters from The Family Love Tree are made from ethically grown rattan and are a groovy retro way of displaying your indoor foliage. Low, $129, Tall, $169, and Wide, $199. (03) 9533 7648; thefamilylovetree.com.au


est. 1990

“Simply pop open the tin, roll up your sleeves and work Chalk Paint® magic into your home.” _

no prep • great coverage • highly pigmented • loves most surfaces


RECIPES AND PHOTOGRAPHY SOPHIE H A NSEN

FACING PAGE, PORTRAIT PHOTOGRAPHY LINA HAYES

IN HER NEW BOOK, COOK AND AUTHOR SOPHIE HANSEN SHARES RECIPES INSPIRED BY THE CARING NATURE AND GENEROSITY OF HER RURAL COMMUNITY.


SOPHIE HANSEN COUNTRY COOK Sophie Hansen loves to spend Sunday afternoons baking. “For me, baking with soft, buttery yeasted doughs is the sweetest of meditations,” she says. FACING PAGE Apple, quince, plum, nectarine and mulberry trees grow in the orchard of the Hansens’ property near Orange in NSW’s Central West.

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inspiration for her new cookbook, A Basket By The Door. When she and husband Tim brought their newborn daughter, Alice, home to their deer farm near Orange, NSW, they were touched to find a basket on the verandah. “It contained a bottle of wine, an apple cake and a tray of lamb shanks ready to be reheated,” recalls Sophie. “I appreciated the fact that dinner was sorted for the next two days. And that someone cared enough to make, pack and deliver these things to our door, well out of town.” As well as ideas for nourishing gifts, the cookbook includes recipes to enjoy with friends and family, such as the delicious sweet wreath (opposite). “There’s something so very comforting about this wreath,” says Sophie. “It’s not a cake, not a bread, just the perfect thing for a soothing breakfast or brunch.” Recently, Sophie was again the grateful recipient of a basket of goodies, when a friend dropped round a lasagne, a loaf of bread and a bottle of wine to wish her luck with her book launch. “It was perfect timing,” says Sophie. “I was heading away for a few days, so that lasagne was dinner for my family the next night, and the bread made a supper of boiled eggs the night after that just a little more special!”

BASIC SWEET DOUGH

This is one of my favourite recipes. The dough is silky smooth and lovely to work with, and it can be made into many delightful forms, including a large twisted wreath (recipe follows), sweet little milk buns and cinnamon scrolls. 1 cup milk 100g butter 3 teaspoons instant dried yeast ¼ cup caster sugar 1 egg 3⅓ cups plain flour pinch of salt

Combine milk and butter in a small saucepan and stir over a medium heat until milk is warm and butter has melted. Remove from heat. Set aside to cool until lukewarm. Place milk mixture in bowl of an electric mixer fitted with a dough hook. Add yeast, caster sugar, egg, flour and salt, and knead for 5 minutes or until dough is smooth and elastic. Turn onto a lightly floured work surface and knead for a further minute or so. (You can do the kneading process by hand if you prefer. Combine the dry ingredients on a clean work surface and make a well in the centre. Add the milk mixture and egg, and use your hands to combine. Knead for 10 minutes or until dough is smooth and elastic.) Place dough in a large, lightly oiled bowl and cover with a tea towel. Place in a warm, draught-free place to prove for 1 hour or until doubled in size.

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SWEET WREATH WITH BLOOD ORANGE CURD Serves 8

This is a really lovely recipe to bake and share on a cold winter’s afternoon. Serve the wreath warm with rhubarb compote and some thick cream, or just a little extra blood orange curd. 1 quantity basic sweet dough 2 oranges, rind finely grated 1 cup blood orange curd (recipe follows) 1 tablespoon pure cream 1 egg icing sugar, for dusting

Make dough according to previous recipe, adding orange rind with flour and other ingredients before kneading. Once dough has risen, gently turn onto a lightly floured work surface. Roll out dough into a large rectangle, then transfer to a tray lined with baking paper. Cover with plastic wrap and place in refrigerator for 1 hour to rest. (This will make the twisting part easier.) Preheat oven to 200°C. Line a large baking tray with baking paper. Spread curd over dough. Starting from a long edge, roll up dough into a sausage, then cut in half lengthways to make 2 long half-cylinders. Place half-cylinders side by side, cut sides up. Twist together to form a braid, pressing ends together to create a wreath. (This can take a bit of practice, but it’s fun and isn’t tricky once you get the idea.) To make an egg wash, whisk cream and egg in a bowl until combined.

Gently transfer wreath to prepared tray and brush with egg wash. Bake for 10 minutes. Reduce heat to 180°C and bake for a further 25 minutes or until wreath is golden brown. Dust with icing sugar and serve warm.

BLOOD ORANGE CURD Makes about 4 cups

This pretty pink curd is gorgeous in the sweet wreath, dolloped into pastry cases, and served on toasted gingerbread. It’s made from whole eggs, which is nice and neat, and aside from asking for a bit of time, it’s super easy to make. You’ll need ¾ cup citrus juice for this recipe. 220g unsalted butter 1⅔ cups caster sugar 3 blood oranges, rind finely grated, juiced 1 lemon, rind finely grated, juiced 6 eggs, lightly beaten

Place butter, caster sugar, blood orange rind and lemon rind in a heatproof bowl set over a saucepan half-filled with simmering water (make sure bowl doesn’t touch water). Cook, stirring often, for 5 minutes or until butter melts and sugar has dissolved. Add egg, blood orange juice and lemon juice. Cook, gently whisking, for 15–20 minutes or until mixture thickens and coats back of a spoon. Transfer curd to sterilised glass jars and set aside to cool. Pop into refrigerator to set and thicken up. Store in refrigerator for up to 1 week. >

This is an edited extract from A Basket By The Door by Sophie Hansen (Murdoch Books, $39.99)

BOOK COVER PHOTOGRAPHY CLANCY PAINE

AN ACT OF KINDNESS Sophie Hansen experienced 12 years ago was the


SOPHIE HANSEN COUNTRY COOK Sweet wreath with blood orange curd. Sophie suggests serving the wreath warm with a little extra blood orange curd or a rhubarb compote and some thick cream.


SOPHIE HANSEN COUNTRY COOK Truffle butter. FACING PAGE, CLOCKWISE, FROM TOP LEFT Autumn poplars at Fish River, a favourite picnic spot near Tarana, NSW; homemade butter is a lovely gift; Monique Lovick at a butter-making workshop; cultured butter, fresh truffle, crusty bread and honeycomb are a great combination.

CULTURED BUTTER Makes about 350g

So easy and so delicious, homemade cultured butter is completely different from butter you buy in the shops. Make sure the cream does not contain thickeners or preservatives — a good non-homogenised cream is ideal, otherwise a carton of thin, pure cream will be fine. 4 cups pure cream ½ cup Greek-style yoghurt with live cultures ½ teaspoon sea salt

Combine cream and yoghurt in bowl of an electric mixer. Cover bowl with plastic wrap and place in refrigerator overnight to develop culture. Fit electric mixer with a whisk attachment. Place bowl on mixer and cover top of bowl with plastic wrap so nothing can splash out. (Don’t skip this step or you’ll regret it when you’re cleaning curd and buttermilk off the ceiling!) Whisk on medium speed until cream mixture begins to separate into butter and buttermilk. Pour buttermilk

into a sterilised bottle and store in refrigerator for up to 3 days. Add salt and bring butter together with your hands. Rinse under cold running water to wash away as much buttermilk as possible. Now ‘work the curds’ on a clean wooden surface. This means rolling and kneading butter between your hands to remove moisture. Shape butter into a log, wrap in baking paper and store in refrigerator for up to 1 week.

FLAVOURED BUTTER

Here are four ideas for turning cultured butter into flavoured (compound) butter. You could divide the cultured butter into four portions and flavour each one as suggested, then wrap up, label and give away with a few serving ideas.

CINNAMON & MAPLE SYRUP BUTTER

Mix 1 tablespoon maple syrup and ½ teaspoon ground cinnamon into 100g softened butter. Serve on waffles or pancakes. Alternatively, peel and

halve a few apples or pears, core and fill with 1 tablespoon of butter. Arrange in a baking dish, add a splash of white wine or water and roast until soft.

SAGE & ORANGE BUTTER

Mix 2 tablespoons finely chopped sage, finely grated rind of 1 orange and a good grinding of black pepper into 100g softened butter. Spread on warm dinner rolls, spoon into baked potatoes, toss with steamed green beans or dollop on top of grilled chicken breasts.

ANCHOVY & CAPER BUTTER

Mix 3 finely chopped anchovies, 3 finely chopped capers and 3 finely chopped garlic cloves into 100g softened butter. Add half a handful each of finely chopped flat-leaf parsley and chives. Serve on barbecued rib-eye or scotch fillet steak, or baked salmon fillet.

TRUFFLE BUTTER

Grate a small black truffle into softened butter, season with sea salt, then form into a gloriously scented log.

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HEIRLOOM R ECIPE

a sprinkle in time

WHETHER IT WAS FOR FUNDRAISING OR FAMILY CELEBRATIONS, THIS QUEENSLAND COOK BAKED WITH JOY AND GENEROSITY. WORDS TR ACEY PLATT PHOTOGRAPHY AND ST YLING CHINA SQUIR R EL

THE KITCHEN OF NORMA PORTER’S home, in the Queensland town of Mackay, was always a hive of activity. “Mum was very community minded,” recalls her youngest daughter, Debbie Brooker. “She ran entire lamington drives from our kitchen. She would have a morning shift of helpers and another shift in the afternoon. In between she would mop the floor as there was sticky mess everywhere!” Debbie and her two sisters, Beryl and Anne, have happy memories of the 1950s-style kitchen that their father, Ed, installed in the old Queenslander they grew up in. “It had a big table in the middle but we never ate there; that was where Mum did all her cooking.” Born in 1928, Norma (pictured above) grew up in Cairns and was 11 when Australia entered World War II. While her older brother signed up for service, Norma and her parents moved to Innisfail. Her father joined the Home Guard before sending Norma and her mother to Charters Towers to protect them from coastal air raids. Post-war, the family lived in Mackay and it was here that she met Ed, who had been a prisoner of war in Changi and

worked on the Burma Railway. “Dad was never a well man after the war, but he lived until he was 89… I’m sure Mum had a lot to do with that,” Debbie says. While Ed followed in his father’s footsteps as a hairdresser, Norma raised their three daughters and indulged her love of baking. “She won prizes for her chocolate fudge and coconut ice at local agricultural shows and church flower shows,” Debbie says, “and she would spend hours baking for school fetes, cake stalls or the RSL.” And her daughters’ birthday parties were the stuff of legend. “There would be butterfly cakes, peach balls [jelly cakes] and, of course, her patty cakes,” says Debbie. Those same patty cakes, topped with pink icing and hundreds and thousands, later became the star attraction at her seven grandchildren’s parties and school events. Sadly, Norma passed away last year at the age of 89, but the little cakes are the lasting legacy of a talented cook who loved her family and her community. “I’ve got the recipe and her tins, but somehow mine never taste quite the same,” says. “The important thing is they remind us of her.”


PATTY CAKES Makes about 32

FOOD PREPARATION AND RECIPE TESTING CHINA SQUIRREL

125g butter, softened 1 cup caster sugar 1 teaspoon vanilla essence 2 eggs, at room temperature 2 cups self-raising flour, sifted ¾ cup milk hundreds and thousands, to decorate

ICING:

3 cups icing sugar mixture, sifted 2 teaspoons softened butter 3–4 tablespoons hot milk few drops of pink food colouring

Preheat oven to 180˚C. Line thirty-two 40ml (2 tablespoon-capacity) flat-based patty pans with paper cases. Using an electric mixer, beat butter, caster sugar and vanilla for 6 minutes or until pale and creamy. Add eggs, 1 at a time, beating well after each addition until well combined. Alternately fold in flour and milk until combined. Spoon 2 heaped teaspoonfuls of mixture into each paper case. Bake

for 12–15 minutes or until cakes are just firm to touch. Stand in pans for 3 minutes, then transfer to a wire rack to cool completely. To make icing, place icing sugar and butter in a large mixing bowl. Gradually add hot milk, stirring until a smooth paste forms. Add a few drops of pink food colouring and mix until well combined. Using a round-bladed knife, spread icing over tops of cakes. Decorate with hundreds and thousands while icing is still wet.

SHARE YOUR FAMILY FAVOURITES Do you have a recipe that has been passed down through generations? Send us your recipe, the story behind it and a photograph (preferably a copy or scan) of the relative who passed it on. Remember to include a daytime telephone number. Email Sarah Neil at sneil@bauer-media.com.au or send a letter to Heirloom Recipe, Country Style, PO Box 4088, Sydney NSW 1028.

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FLAVOURS Gippsland Jersey founders Steve Ronalds and Sallie Jones started their Victorian milk company to support local dairy farmers.

KICK START

f lavours

BARBARA SWEENEY ON TREATS FOR MOTHER’S DAY, FRESH SA PIPIS AND MILK WITH A CONSCIENCE.

Chef Darren Purchese has done it again. In this, the third of his series of Chefs Eat… books, Darren waxes lyrical about another of his food loves — breakfast. In Chefs Eat Breakfast Too (Hardie Grant Books, $29.99), Darren’s enthusiasm for the most important meal of the day is infectious. The Weet-Bix will soon be languishing in the cupboard while you perfect a boiled egg, chicken congee or surprise your mother with the impressive chocolate streusel brioche.

HEALTH BOWL FARMER JO, THE BYRON BAY-BASE MUESLI COMPAN BELIEVES MUESLI SHOULD TASTE GOOD AND BE GOOD FOR YOU. IN AN AUSTRALIAN FIRST, THEY’VE ADDED A PROBIOTIC TO THEIR MUESLI. THE NEW RANGE, FROM $7.99, IS ALSO VEGAN AND PALEO, PLUS LOW IN SUGAR — LESS THAN FIVE GRAMS PER SERVE. FARMERJO.COM.AU

GOOD MORNING

Breakfast in bed on Mother’s Day is common in many households, so the Ovvio Mini Must Have Tea Box, $48, is a great gift for May 12th. The six organic teas include crowd favourites and come in a sleek matte black box. ovvioorganics.com.au

Follow Barbara on Instagram @foodandwords

MEET THE PRODUCERS

Victorian milk brand Gippsland Jersey is deeply personal for Sallie Jones, the daughter of a dairy farmer, and her friend and co-founder, fourth-generation dairy farmer Steve Ronalds. “It’s an honour project,” says Sallie. “The idea came in 2016 after my father Michael Bowen committed suicide and Steve lost $180,000 when the milk processor Murray Goulburn slashed the price they paid farmers for their milk.” The pair hit on the idea of starting their own milk brand. The milk from Steve’s 450-strong herd of jersey cows in Jindivick is processed on the Bowen family farm in Lakes Entrance and sold locally. “It’s about paying a fair price to farmers, smashing the stigma of mental health, creating change in rural communities and being kind,” Sallie says. “We sold 2000 litres on our first day of trading, which blew our minds. The Gippsland community have backed our brand. Dad would be proud.” 0435 757 047; gippslandjersey.com.au

MADE WITH LOVE Inspired by the forests of this Victorian town, Robert Gordon’s Gembrook dinner plates, $57.95, and large carousel cup, $45.95, are ideal for the consummate host or coffee run. robertgordonaustralia.com

OPE EN UP

The sashimi-grade pipis from Goolwa PipiCo, a hand-harvest fishery on the Coorong in SA, are a world first. Here they ‘pasteurise’ the pipis with high-pressure technology that alters the texture, creating a sweet, plump morsel that can be served raw with a dash of Tabasco. Or with fermented chilli and roasted fennel as they do at Spanish eatery Bomba in Melbourne. (08) 8554 3706; goolwapipico.com

CHAI TIME Masala chai tea is an aromatic warm milk drink. To make four cups, cookbook author Tessa Kiros adds 12 cardamon pods, one teaspoon of peppercorns, three cloves and 15 grams of fresh ginger to 600ml of warm milk and steeps for 20 minutes. Meanwhile, add one and a half tablespoons of black tea to 300ml of boiling water, combine with milk and sweeten with four teaspoons of sugar. 102 COUNTRY ST Y LE MAY 2019

GIPPSLAND DAIRY PORTRAIT SIMONE SOUTH, LITTLE SEASIDE STORIES GOOLWA PIPICO JACQUI WAY PHOTOGRAPHY FARMER JO QUINTON MARAIS

Sallie Jones and Steve Ronalds, Gippsland Jersey, Warragul, Victoria


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COMING HOME AFTER MEETING IN DARWIN, THIS COUPLE RETURNED SOUTH TO A TINY VILLAGE SO THEIR KIDS COULD ENJOY A COUNTRY CHILDHOOD. WORDS BA R BA R A SW EENEY PHOTOGRAPHY K A R A ROSENLUND


TOOM A NSW PEOPLE Leigh and Sarah McColl with three of their children — Fletcher, Charlotte and Maddelyn — at Kooyong, their property in NSW’s Upper Murray. The couple have since shifted their focus from eggs to sheep and cattle.

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PEOPLE TOOM A NSW

Isa browns roaming free on the 1000-hectare farm. FACING PAGE, CLOCKWISE, FROM LEFT Leigh and Sarah wanted their children to experience a country childhood; there were once 2000 chickens on the property; the couple sold their egg business in 2018; Sasha the Maremma guarding the chickens. SARAH AND LEIGH MCCOLL MET AT a touch football game in

Darwin in 2010. Sarah was on the winning team, Leigh was a spectator. An electrician from Gippsland, Leigh had been lured to the Northern Territory on the promise of a job and good fishing. For Sarah, the draw was family — her sister Pippa lived there. There was a lot to love about living and working in the tropics but when their first child was due they felt the pull of home, fuelled by the desire for their children to enjoy the freedom of a country childhood. Today they live with their four children — Maddelyn, five, Charlotte, four, Fletcher, two, and five-month-old Evelyn — on Kooyong, a 1000-hectare cattle property at Tooma in NSW. This tiny village in the Upper Murray near the NSW and Victoria border has a population of 104. Give or take. Kooyong is the last farm in a valley of undulating hills. The road in follows Mannus Creek, the water clear and voluble as it rushes over rocks; and home is a white timber cottage surrounded by shade and fruit trees. Their neighbour is the 9500 hectare Bogandyera Nature Reserve and if you look to the south-east, you see the snow-capped mountains of Kosciuszko National Park in the distance.

Sarah, 33, and Leigh, 34, moved onto the farm in 2013, forming a partnership with Sarah’s parents Robert and Yola Cox, who also both live there (Yola with her partner John Williams). “Home was always going to be my path,” says Sarah. “I always had a dream, probably from when I was about 12, to be back here on this farm.” Like her parents before them, Sarah and Leigh run cattle and sheep but are looking to add another business to sustain all three generations into the future. Last year they sold their free-range egg operation to concentrate on a Wagyu F1 cattle program, crossing Angus cattle with Wagyu. “It’s been good to focus on doing one project well,” Leigh says. But both Sarah and Leigh agree that the project that they take most pride in is raising their family. The children accompany their parents on all of their farm duties and the idea of Maddelyn travelling on a bus for three hours a day to get to school prompted the couple to turn the former egg shed into a schoolroom, where Maddelyn is now homeschooled by her mother. “Our friends call it McColl College,” Sarah says with a laugh. “Some have even asked when we’re going to start taking enrolments.”

Sarah and Leigh run cattle and sheep but are looking to add another business to sustain all three generations into the future.

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SARAH “My childhood was pretty much what my kids have now, a life of freedom. We’d be down at the creek playing and yes, there were horses — horses all the time — and we were hands on helping Mum and Dad. We didn’t have any motorised vehicles so we were always included in on the work. It’s the same with our kids. They all love horse riding and helping Leigh move cattle. My parents bought the place in 1978. Dad was from Mansfield [a town in the foothills of the Victorian Alps] and studying agriculture when he did a student placement at Mount Falcon Station near here, which is how he found it. The minute they saw the place they loved it and knew they wanted to live here. I went to boarding school in Albury when I was 12 and then went to New Zealand at 18 and ended up doing an agricultural science degree in Christchurch. Then I went to Darwin where I did my teacher training and worked as a relief teacher in Aboriginal communities and in different schools around Darwin. I also

worked in the mines with Leigh — he was a mine electrician and I worked on the environmental team. I loved that job. I went from mixing with the Aboriginal elders to making fires, back burning and water testing. It was hands on and physical, and I met a really good friend through it who has been down to visit us on the farm. I was away for 10 years but it was easy to come home and it was like I’d never left. Same people, same old faces. My generation is coming back to the family farm, like us, or starting up something completely different because it’s where home is for a lot of people. I didn’t plan on home schooling, but couldn’t imagine sending Maddy off early in the morning and not seeing her again until five o’clock in the afternoon. Last year, we did Maddy’s first year of kindergarten and we’ve just started her first year of school. The kids ride their ponies to the schoolroom in the morning… They love it and even want to go to the schoolhouse on the weekend.” >


LEIGH “I’m from Gippsland [in south-east Victoria], off a farm down there that’s a very similar size to this operation. When I grew up I was told if I wanted to be on the farm I would need to get a trade first, so I’m an electrician. Even from childhood I was obsessed with tools and building things, and understanding how mechanics worked. I’ve learned how to apply that to any job — whether it’s building a fence or fixing the tractor. I’d rather build something than buy it. I went to Darwin in 2007. A friend got me a job with an electrician who also had a fishing charter business so we were electriciansslash-fishing guys. Three years later, Sarah and I met at a touch football game, and a few years after that, we were both working in the mines when we decided to come home. Setting up a partnership with Robert and Yola was easy. Everyone was looking forward to where the property was heading. They didn’t want to sell, yet they were getting to the age where they didn’t want to run it either. Our goal is to keep Kooyong going as a sheep and cattle farm but also to diversify for an extra

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income, as well as improvements to property and soil. We’re out of sheep at the moment because we were losing 40 animals a night to wild dogs. It’s a problem throughout the whole area and I’m building a fence to try and keep them controlled a bit. We ran our free-range egg business for two years. We had 2000 chickens and no fences to keep them restrained, and they’d venture out as far as they wanted to go. The focus is now on cattle. We run Angus breeders and last year started with the Wagyu F1 program and now have calves on the ground. Hopefully we’ve done the research and have the right breeding to get that quality marbled product at the other end. The biggest challenge over the last few years was becoming a parent. But in saying that, it’s a pleasure spending time with the kids while you’re working. I’ve had an unbelievable welcome to this community and made lots of friends. I’ve never experienced anything like it. Everyone talks to each other, waves to each other when you pass in the car. When you have a baby, neighbours drop in meals.”


TOOM A NSW PEOPLE

CLOCKWISE, FROM TOP LEFT Trigger, a piebald pony; the school house; Leigh in the yards; the picturesque Mannus Creek; one of the pleasures of working on the land is having afternoon tea as a family. FACING PAGE Leigh hopes to have more sheep once he’s installed a dog-proof fence.


ON THE MOVE

EUMUNDI

THIS TOWN’S ICONIC MARKET PROMPTS AN INFLUX OF VISITORS, BUT LOCALS LOVE THE STRONG COMMUNITY SPIRIT. WORDS SAMANTHA VAN EGMOND PHOTOGRAPHY MARNIE HAWSON ILLUSTRATION DANIELLA GERMAIN

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EUMUNDI QUEENSLAND ON THE MOVE Local producers Jamie and Melody lovingly bake organic sourdough from their farm kitchen. FACING PAGE The iconic Imperial Hotel (also home to the Eumundi Brewery) has been welcoming locals and tourists since 1911.

Jamie and Melody Flood

OWNERS OF TEN ACRES SOURDOUGH

Ninderry residents for 14 years.


ON THE MOVE EUMUNDI QUEENSLAND

A ramshackle country shed adds to the area’s charms. FACING PAGE, CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT The first Eumundi market day was held in the CWA Community Hall, with just three stalls and eight visitors; farm fresh produce is available from the markets year round; grab a coffee and something for home from The Store; artist Amy Clarke grew up in the area.

ASK EUMUNDI LOCALS WHAT THEY LOVE about their quaint

Queensland village, set in the Sunshine Coast hinterland 21 kilometres south-west of Noosa, and the words ‘creative’ and ‘community’ are sure to keep cropping up. With its wide main street lined with historic weatherboards now home to cosy cafés and artisan wares, the former timber centre of 2200 residents is today best known for its bustling twice-weekly markets and strong community spirit. Artist Amy Clarke was drawn to Eumundi’s creative energy when she moved there with her husband Ross and two young children Charlie and Coco in 2006, following a long stint in Sydney and a year of renting nearby on the coast while house hunting. “I used to visit often and loved the lifestyle here,” says Amy, who grew up in the area. “The markets have been running for 40 years and they really are the essence of the town… In addition to that, I’m very inspired by the natural beauty and just felt like I’d find my people here.” Amy credits Eumundi State School’s impressive reputation as being a major drawcard for young families. “The school has a very well-run performing arts program and a fantastic kitchen garden,” she says. Outside of the schoolyard, Amy says there are plenty of other opportunities to meet locals. “Contributing and volunteering are great ways to get involved,” she says, noting that the Eumundi Combined

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Community Organisation is a useful resource for those wanting information on community groups and initiatives, as is Eumundi’s fortnightly magazine The Green. There’s also no shortage of sporting activities to partake in. “Ross meets some of the other dads and their kids at the showground one afternoon each week for a game of ultimate frisbee,” says Amy. “My daughter Coco has tennis lessons at the local courts… there’s always plenty going on.” In addition to arts and crafts, Eumundi has a thriving produce scene. Long renowned as a dairying and fruitgrowing region, it boasts an abundance of fresh fruit and vegetables, eggs, cheese and honey from surrounding small-scale farms – much of it organically and sustainably grown and produced. Melody and Jamie Flood, who own sourdough business Ten Acres, have built up a loyal local following since holding their first market stall in April 2017. “It took a good year, but now we have weekly regulars as well as the passing tourist trade,” says Melody, whose bakery is located on site at their small Ninderry farm 10 minutes’ drive from Eumundi. “It’s nice to see the same friendly faces each week and, while the markets really make the town come alive, Eumundi still manages to keep its small-town feel.” > For more information, visit experienceeumundi.com.au


REASONS TO VISIT

THE ORIGINAL EUMUNDI MARKETS

Each Wednesday and Saturday, Memorial Drive in the centre of town is abuzz with locally made handicrafts, fresh produce and colourful characters. (07) 5442 7106; eumundimarkets.com.au ARTISANS GALLERY An art space showcasing local timber works as well as guest exhibitors. Open Wednesday to Friday 10am–4pm, Saturdays 9am–3pm. 43 Caplick Way. 0409 848 098; artisanseumundi.com SCENIC DRIVES Take a leisurely 1.5-hour drive to hinterland hub Maleny via the pretty town of Montville to enjoy rainforest views and quaint cafés.

REASONS TO STAY

LIFESTYLE Locals enjoy living among

the undulating hinterland, while Noosa’s Main Beach is a 15-minute drive away. COMMUNITY SPIRIT Supporting one another is what it’s all about in Eumundi, whether that’s shopping locally or stopping in the street for a friendly chat. Get involved with the local CWA or various arts, sporting and social groups. FRESH PRODUCE A number of local small-scale producers supply eggs, milk, honey, bread, fruit and vegetables to cafés, co-ops and markets. Visit The Store Eumundi on Memorial Drive to stock up on Ten Acres sourdough, Maleny Dairies milk and local organic produce. EUMUNDI SCHOOL OF ARTS This charming hall built in 1908 is used for community activities and can be booked for weddings, conferences and workshops. Corner of Gridley Street and Memorial Drive. (07) 5442 8762; eumundihistoricalassn.org

Amy Clarke ARTIST

Eumundi local since 2006.

THE ESSENTIALS

Eumundi is 120 kilometres north of Brisbane via the M1 and 21 kilometres south-west of Noosa. Sunshine Coast Airport, approximately 30 kilometres from Eumundi, has daily flights to and from Sydney and Melbourne via Virgin, Jetstar and Qantas. Jetstar also offers three weekly services between the Sunshine Coast and Adelaide. sunshinecoastairport.com.au


EAT AND DRINK

HUMDRUM ESPRESSO Cosy

OPPORTUNITY CALLS

A thriving creative scene draws artists, writers, makers and craftspeople to the area and makes Eumundi a hub for small business, with the markets attracting an average of 1.6 million visitors each year. Small-scale growers and producers are also burgeoning, selling their goods at the markets as well as local co-ops and cafés. Construction, health, education and hospitality are other main areas of employment in the region.

interiors, outdoor armchairs and great coffee from Noosa-based roastery Clandestino make this little gem the place locals go for their morning brew. 100 Memorial Drive. (07) 5442 7191; facebook.com/humdrumespresso THE STORE EUMUNDI Fill your market basket with fresh fruit and vegetables, condiments, flowers and homewares at this friendly café and grocer. 97A Memorial Drive. 0421 794 066; facebook.com/97thestore IL MIO POSTO A family-friendly Italian restaurant serving dinner from Tuesday to Saturday. 1/104 Memorial Drive. (07) 5442 7026; il-mio-posto.business.site THE IMPERIAL HOTEL This colourful venue is favoured by locals for its weekly live music and classic pub fare. 1 Etheridge Street. (07) 5442 8811; imperialhoteleumundi.com.au

SHOP

BERKELOUW BOOK BARN This

bookstore and café features rare and second-hand books alongside the latest coffee-table reads and homewares. 87 Memorial Drive. (07) 5442 8366; berkelouw.com.au/stores/eumundi EUMUNDI EMPORIUM Find locally made wares in this weatherboard building in the heart of town, including clothing, jewellery, art and leather goods. Sunshine Coast designer Kelsey Collective’s classic linen designs are top sellers. 88 Memorial Drive. (07) 5442 7340; facebook.com/eumundiemporium HEAVENLY BLOOMS At this environmentally conscious florist, tucked away at the back of Humdrum Espresso, you’ll find jam jars and tea cups brimming with foraged and fragrant finds. Open Wednesday to Saturday. 100 Memorial Drive. 0439 542 170; heavenlyblooms.com.au ZEPHYR A gorgeous array of womenswear made from high-quality fabrics. Open Wednesday, Friday and Saturday 8am–1.30pm. Eumundi Market Square, Napier Road. 1800 804 776; zephyrloungewear.com 

STAY

THE EUMUNDI DAIRY Sleeping

14 guests between the homestead and renovated milking shed, this former dairy farm offers a rural retreat less than five minutes’ drive from town. Grasstree Road; eumundidairy.com.au RV STOPOVER Eumundi prides itself on being RV-friendly and this large site accommodates RVs and caravans for $16 per night. Limited powered sites are available for an additional $5, and all visitors have access to free hot showers and barbecue facilities. Napier Road and Albert Street; eumundicco.com.au


EUMUNDI QUEENSLAND ON THE MOVE

CLOCKWISE, FROM TOP LEFT Street parking is at a premium on market days; an old railroad sign; what was once the historic Eumundi Trading Post is now home to Berkelouw Book Barn; the smoothies at The Store taste as good as they look; rolling hills just minutes out of town. FACING PAGE, CLOCKWISE, FROM TOP LEFT Fresh produce at The Store; the breakfast bowls are also worth a sample; get your caffeine fix at Humdrum Espresso.

MEDIAN HOUSE PRICE $745,000 for a 4-bedroom house. MEDIAN RENTAL PRICE $570 per week for a 4-bedroom home. MARKET WATCH Prices in Eumundi have moved upwards in the past few years, with rentals in high demand. “Many people move here and rent while they look for somewhere to buy,” says Carol Dolan, principal at Noosa Hinterland Realty. “You can still get something for less than $600,000, although they’re proving harder to find.” PROPERTY Carol says Eumundi draws a diverse range of people, from artists and craftspeople to professionals and retirees. “Most people are looking for larger blocks or small acreage so they can enjoy a more relaxing lifestyle and escape the frenzy of city life.” She also notes that small one or two-bed studios that are second dwellings on larger properties are proving popular. “Owners of acreage want an income while still living in their home.”

FAMILY FOCUS Eumundi State School offers education from prep to Year 6. It has an

on-site Environmental Centre encouraging hands-on learning outdoors, with a kitchen garden, worm farm and chicken coop. Many students continue to Noosa District State High School, which has three campuses at nearby Pomona, Cooroy and Mimburi, however, there are a number of public and private options. Eumundi has an aquatic centre and recreation park, as well as a medical centre that is open on weekdays. Dick Caplick Park on Memorial Drive is a much-loved picnic spot for families, with a children’s playground nestled under a canopy of fig trees.

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JUNE ISSUE ON SALE MAY 16

To celebrate our 30th birthday, we meet progressive grazier Charlie Arnott and his family, experience the ancient landscape of the East Kimberley and reveal Australia’s 30 most influential people on the land.

PHOTOGRAPHY ABBIE MELLE

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PHOTOGRAPHY HELENE SANDBERG

I S E SUCCESS CAME FROM HAVING THE COURAGE TO SLOW DOWN.


MOTHER’S DAY SPECIAL Fiona Jolly’s Wiltshire property is home to a menagerie of dogs, cats and ponies.


MOTHER’S DAY SPECIAL Poppy and Harryo spend endless hours playing happily outdoors. FACING PAGE Fiona, Poppy and Harryo, with Blue, their Vizsla, in the beautiful manicured gardens of their country home.

“I look forward to you both going out into the world and seeing the wonders it holds for you as women.”


FIONA JOLLY CHILDREN’S FURNITURE DESIGNER, M OT H E R TO T W I N S P O P PY A N D H A R RYO

PHOTOGRAPHY HELENE SANDBERG

A former international make-up artist to the stars, Fiona turned her attention to life in the country on her property in Wiltshire, UK, once her twin girls came along.

Darling Poppy and Harryo, It is hard to believe sometimes when I look at you that for most of my life you didn’t exist. You two gorgeously complicated individuals weren’t even alive yet. More extraordinary still is when I listen to you talking to me as if my only reason for existence is you. At the airport yesterday, we stood together, waiting for Daddy to organise the rental car. Poppy, you looked at me with your big, beautiful eyes and exclaimed, “Mummy, you are so lucky you have Daddy. If you didn’t, you wouldn’t be able to travel.” So, I explained to you and Harryo about how I had travelled the world on my own, from the age of 18, with my super-heavy black box of make-up, painting the faces of some of the world’s most glamorous women and men. I told you all about the things you can do on your own. Girls can be anything they want to be — strong, independent and, most important, free. I look forward to you both going out there into the world and seeing the wonders it holds for you as women.

Of all the things I would wish you to have, and in my opinion the key to a happy life, is a good sense of humour! The ability to laugh at life even when it’s serving you lemons. The skill in finding the funny even when it may be a hard situation. Gravitate towards like-minded people, for life will be a lot more fun with them beside you. Surround yourself with them — work with them, eat with them and, later on, date them and marry them. Because with those people in your life, it will be more fun and more positive. They will help make sense of the world. Whatever the problems, together you will find that thin thread of humour and follow it until it becomes a belly laugh. It’s hard sometimes for you both, with a father [Jamie Curtis, a screenwriter] who writes comedy and a mother who’s pushing a little to lighten you up. I know it sometimes feels like teasing, but I want to try and lighten the situation. I know you may have just fallen off your chair that only had three legs, but you did look very funny the moment you remembered, too late, that it was the chair not to sit on. I want so many things for you both, of course: to be successful in everything you want to do, to find your own interests, to be enthusiastic and work hard. But to do all of this and more in order to end up living a good life filled with fun and laughter. There’s a picture outside your bedroom door of a dog wearing shades, sitting in a tiny boat, with his paws behind his head and a smile on his face. He’s bobbing along in what looks like the middle of an ocean. Under the picture in huge type are the words: ‘He knows not where he’s going, for the ocean will decide — it’s not the destination... but the glory of the ride.’ The dog’s got it right. Love, Mummy xxxx >

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MOTHER’S DAY SPECIAL

EMMA LANE C O - O W N E R O F T H E FA R M AT B Y R O N B AY, MOTHER TO CHARLIE , GEORGE , M AT I L D A A N D L U L U

Driven by the desire to teach their children about real food and a love of the land, Emma and her husband Tom gave up city life to live on 50 hectares in the Byron Bay hinterland.

Dear beautiful offspring, Charlie, George, Matilda and Lulu, I sit here while I pen this letter, looking out across the rolling hills of Byron Bay with a full heart, reflecting on motherhood and life. I acknowledge the part you play in this ancestry adventure. I thank you for trusting me to steer you across the temperamental waters of growing up and for your part in crafting the mother in me. From you, I have learnt so much about so many things. You’ve taught me patience and kindness, about uncertainty and, of course, about the power of unconditional love. Among these words, I offer you some thoughts and insights on what I’ve learnt so far, in life and as a mother. I hope you choose what you need to take with you through your life. My maternal instinct didn’t kick in early and I often wonder if that was due to losing my own mother at the age of nine (your age now, my dear Matilda). She was only 32 when a boating accident took away her last breath on a return trip

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from France. I often wonder what kind of mother she would have been, what insights I would have gained from her nurturing and what I inherited naturally from her. Was I like her? What would she have done in my maternal shoes? Questions popped up regularly in the early mothering years, until one day I tapped into my intuition — the universal mothering instinct. In this space, I discovered that I already had the answers within me; I just needed to trust myself. I continue to learn as much from you as I hope you do from me. I have sometimes relied on others for support, when four little people running around became overwhelming, and that’s okay. There are many people in life from whom we can learn. You don’t have to learn all the lessons yourselves. My little loves, this life is here to enjoy. So, seize it with both hands and your whole being. It’s with lightness we want to travel on this life journey, locking away any unnecessary emotional baggage in the smallest suitcase. Somehow, if we can stay connected to our inner child, we can remain playful and live abundantly, open to enjoying all the beautiful qualities of happiness. Laugh, be silly, jump, skip, be creative and the inevitable burdens of life will not keep you down for long. You continue to show me the joy of this innocent playfulness. Looking through yours, I see again with beginner’s eyes. I thank you for all this, and for the tears of both frustration and joy in motherhood. Most of all, I thank you for helping me stay connected to the child in me, because that little person in all of us is born happy and to be loved. It really is very simple. With motherhood, everything has changed and I am more me than I have ever been. I thank you all for those blessings, my little loves. Forever your mother, I love you. x >

PHOTOGRAPHY BRIDGET WOOD

‘Grow. Feed. Educate. Give Back’ is the motto of The Farm in Byron Bay and has translated in an idyllic family life for Emma Lane’s family, including her sons George and Charlie. FACING PAGE Emma and her daughter Lulu.


“With motherhood, everything has changed and I am more me than I have ever been.�


MOTHER’S DAY SPECIAL

Sibella Court at home with Silver. FACING PAGE “When I was living in New York, my mother sent me Lighthousekeeping by Jeanette Winterson. The opening sentence is: ‘My mother called me Silver. I was born part precious metal part pirate.’ She suggested this would be a perfect name for my first baby,” says Sibella.

“I’d hoped we’d become really good friends, and we have.”


SIBELLA COURT INTERIOR DESIGNER, STYLIST AND A U T H O R , M O T H E R T O S I LV E R

PHOTOGRAPHY JULIE ADAMS

At age 41, Sibella had a new role to add to her list, her most important one to date ... she became a mother. She currently divides her time between Sydney and Byron Bay.

Dear Silver, Sitting on the couch last night with your dad, we reminisced over a picture of you when you were a baby. Your foot was so tiny, barely the size of his thumb. That time after you were born was so precious. We spent a while at our beautiful beach shack in Byron Bay, where I’d sit on the deck at nighttime, breastfeeding and looking out to the moon. When you first arrived, it was quite the juggle. I was relaxing into my new role as mother while running a company and shooting a television show for the ABC called Restoration Australia. I recommenced work when you were six weeks old and carried you around with me in a sling while I was filming. Work has always been such a joy for me. I’ve loved every single day of my career, whether it’s been challenging or smooth sailing. When you spend so much time working, making sure you are passionate about what you do is one of the most important lessons in life. Pick something you love and follow your dreams. You don’t have to do it the way other

people do it. Have the confidence to think outside the box. I started my own company at the age of 21. It just happened very organically, and as someone who didn’t have a program or systems in place, I very much flew by the seat of my pants. Your grandfather was a builder who ran his business from home, so I watched him work and saw that it was possible. I endeavour to be an available mum to you. And fun, although your dad says I’m probably too much fun! But most importantly, available for you, so you can always be open with me, no matter what you’re going through. I hope I’m always a sounding board throughout your life. It’s not always a straight path, but there’s a lot of adventure and enjoyment that can come through the ebb and flow of life. Think of life as a lovely moving journey, like a beautiful river through a landscape with bends and curves. Expect the unexpected and as much as you put into it, you’ll get out of it. There’s something really lovely about wondering what’s going to happen next. I never knew if I’d become a mother. Now I am one, I couldn’t imagine my life differently. When I was pregnant, I’d hoped we’d become really good friends, and we have. We have each other forever. You have absolutely charmed me. Right now, you’re my little cub, who’s going to follow me around until you’re ready to go out on your own. I hope you’ll come back time and time again. I often tell you that we will be best friends forever. Love, Mum This is an edited extract from Grace Mothers: Letters to our Children by Georgie Abay, Julie Adams and Claire Brayford (Bauer Media Books, $65).

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SHOPPING MOTHER’S DAY

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M U CH APPRECIATED SPOIL YOUR MUM ON HER SPECIAL DAY WITH ONE OF THESE THOUGHTFUL GIFTS.

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1 Abstract print scarf, $59.95, from Yarra Trail. 2 Jet Set wrap in Nut and Nougat, $345, from Everyday Cashmere. 3 Lomme wallet in Latte, $165, from Elk. 4 JS Ceramics Mist Collection oil burner, about $44*, from Paper Plane Store. 5 Vintage linen throw in Clay, $149, from Aura Home. 6 Ring sling bag in Taupe, $89.99, from Black Pepper. 7 Rosewater Hydration Moisture Balance day cream, $19.95, from Natio. 8 Harley boots, $279.95, from Ziera. 9 Leather cosmetic pouch in Sage, $99.95, from Country Road. 10 Breathe Floral facial steam, $29.95, from Theseeke. 11 Diptyque ‘Do Son’ fragrance, $132, from Mecca. 12 Tassel scarf in Ash, $59.95, from Marco Polo. 13 Basu market basket, $58 for small, from Provider Store. 14 Byredo ‘Flowerhead’ fragrance, $192 for 50ml, from Mecca. 15 Edina bat bathrobe, $79.95, from Pillow Talk. 16 It’s A Keeper cup in Coast, $15, from Few & Far. 17 J Joni cushion cover, $69.90, from Città. For stockist details, see page 136.

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WHITE HEART

GARDENIA, LILY AND JASMINE ARE FRAGRANCE CLASSICS. JULIETTE WINTER EXPLAINS WHY WHITE FLOWERS ARE ALWAYS BESTSELLERS. LAST YEAR, CELEBRATED FRAGRANCE CREATOR and

Grandiflora florist, Saskia Havekes, offered one colour choice for Mother’s Day blooms in her Potts Point atelier: white. “White flowers are classic,” she says, adding that white blooms are by far the most popular choice for Mother’s Day. “I find them very serene and full of calm. They always represent purity and elegance, and most people are in favour of white and its simplicity.” That captivating simplicity can extend to fragrances that are based on white flowers, too. For example, Grandiflora Madagascan Jasmine eau de parfum beautifully embodies the glory and intensity of this native Madagascan flower that blooms for only a few short days. Notes of green banana, dark green leaves and musk ground this heady floral. Equally charming is Le Labo Lys 41 eau de parfum, a fresh, whitefloral blend of jasmine, tuberose absolute and lily that, like all Le Labo perfumes, is hand-blended in small batches. Jill Timms, founder of fragrance store Peony Melbourne, says florals are still the best sellers for Mother’s Day, even in niche perfumery. “Everyone loves flowers,” explains Jill. Bursting with blooms, Tory Burch eau de parfum is the first fragrance for the American fashion designer. It combines luxurious jasmine sambac and tuberose with crisp grapefruit and tangy cassis to give the feminine white florals a down-to-earth edge. D.S. & Durga White Peacock Lily eau de parfum is also graceful but slightly moodier. Designed to evoke fog-covered, forest-lined islands, it balances notes of jasmine, white lily and blossoming oleander to create an almost dreamlike creamy floral. Choosing a fragrance can be a tough decision, one that Jill says is made easier if you “feel” the scent first. “Perfume is such an emotional choice,” she says. For Saskia, the process of creating a perfume is very much an emotional experience, too. Currently working on her sixth scent (a collaboration with perfume master Christophe Laudamiel to coincide with Grandiflora’s 25th anniversary next year) Saskia starts by noting the feelings associated with each chosen flower. “Gardenia is captivating, intoxicating and sultry on a summer’s evening,” she says, when asked about this

popular white floral. “Lily of the valley is very feminine and graceful, while jasmine is an aphrodisiac, a shiny white flower with a sweet amber. It is calming, like valium, and can help to overcome stress and improve one’s mood.” For a floral symphony of gardenia, jasmine and lily of the valley, try the opulent Amouage Honour Woman eau de parfum. Warm base notes of leather, vetiver, amber and frankincense add a dramatic complexity that befits its muse — Madama Butterfly. If you prefer something lighter and brighter, there are some wonderful summery white florals, such as Aerin Gardenia Rattan eau de parfum. It blends gardenia, tuberose and tiaré (Tahitian gardenia) with amber to recreate the perfect summer evening, that moment before the soft warmth of the last rays of sunshine disappear on the horizon. Or there is the utterly joyful Jo Malone Frangipani Flower cologne, which pays homage to the sweet, sunny scent of the frangipani. While it stays close to the natural scent of this pretty flower, jasmine notes add a little luminosity, sandalwood a hint of creaminess and lemon gives the scent a fresh twist at the top. According to Jill, it’s not just the way a fragrance makes you feel, but also what it can do for others or the environment that sways our perfume choices. “We are seeing brands that are ethically sourcing their raw materials and giving back to communities, driving social change and empowering individuals,” she says. “There is also a growing trend for natural and organic perfumery.” Ellis Brooklyn Fawn eau de parfum, for example, is free from phthalates and parabens, and embodies the new eco chic — it’s clean and green, but also classy. Classic florals like magnolia oil and lily of the valley are given a summery sunkissed twist thanks to hints of coconut milk and vanilla. If you can’t decide which fragrance your mum will love best, there is a safe option. “Ask for a travel set, which have become extremely popular,” says Saskia. “These are smaller vials to test the range without such a big commitment. Everyone has a different idea of what they’ll gravitate towards when taken through a fragrance range. It’s an extremely personal thing.”

“Lily of the valley is very feminine and graceful, while jasmine is an aphrodisiac, a shiny white flower.”

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HEALT H AND BEAUTY

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1 Aerin Gardenia Rattan eau de parfum, $180 for 50ml. 2 Amouage Honour Woman eau de parfum, $399 for 100ml. 3 Jo Malone Frangipani Flower cologne, $198 for 100ml. 4 D.S. & Durga White Peacock Lily eau de parfum, $268 for 50ml. 5 Tory Burch eau de parfum, $195 for 100ml. 6 Ellis Brooklyn Fawn eau de parfum, $153 for 50ml. 7 Le Labo Lys 41 eau de parfum, $282 for 50ml. 8 Grandiflora Madagascan Jasmine eau de parfum, $145 for 50ml. For stockist details, see page 136. MAY 2019 COU NTRY ST Y LE 129


HEALTH AND BEAUTY

SEASONAL DELIGHTS

FROM ENZYME MASKS TO ORGANIC FACE OILS, NOURISH YOUR SKIN WITH THESE LATEST COOL-WEATHER BEAUTY ESSENTIALS.

1. Feeling flat? Warm up your complexion with a hint of bronze with Natio Bronze Glow Perfecting Primer ($16.95 for 50g), which can be used under foundation, or on its own for a hint of colour. 2. Given six months to live with a brain tumour that doctors thought could be environmentally derived, Indie Lee got through her surgery successfully and decided to embark on a mission to educate people about what they are putting on their skin while launching her own range of clean, ethical products. Try Indie Lee Brightening Cleanser ($49 for 125ml) with strawberry seed and coconut oils, and Indie Lee CoQ-10 Toner ($49 for 125ml) with antioxidants and flower and fruit extracts to calm and protect. 3. New Australian beauty company Ipsum is created in the beautiful Byron Bay hinterland using blends of nourishing organic oils for your face and body. Formulated for speedy absorption, Ipsum Best Skin Vetiverr Citrus Body Oil ($35 for 100ml) and Ipsum Best Skin Nourishing Face Oil ($48 for 30ml) are rich in vitamins and antioxidants. Founder Janet Hayward explains the range only uses oils from plants that are cultivated in their natural habitat. “This is important as it ensures the oils offer the best possible benefits for skin,” says Janet. 4. Revolutionising make-up removal is Face Halo, an Australian-designed pad that only needs a dash of water to remove an entire face of make-up — even mascara. Face Halo Pro ($30 0 for 3) for thick or stubborn make-up, and Original ($30 for 3) use stran that are 100 times finer than hu hair to swipe away make-up, and the reusable pads can be washed up to 200 times, so it’s great for your skin and the planet.

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5. Not only does congested skin look dull, it also can’t absorb the products you apply on it. Change up your skincare regime by adding a pumpkiner Fridays Overtime Mask ($67 for 64g) with vitamin- and mineral-packed pumpkin extract and apricot seed powder to reinvigorate your skin. 6. Another option to brighten your skin is the Peter Thomas Roth Pumpkin Enzyme Mask ($80 for 150ml). It exfoliates with pumpkin, peels with AHAs and polishes so your skin will be refreshed in a flash. 7. Long, luscious lashes are a simple swipe away with a nourishing eyelash p imer like the latest Marc Jacobs Ve et Primer ($39 for 10ml) that you ply before your regular mascara app lengthen, thicken and define while also a stopping your mascara from flaking. It can also be used as an overnight treatment to condition and soften lashes. 8. Youth To The People is a vegan skincare brand that harnesses the power of superfoods to keep your complexion happy and healthy. Treat your skin in this fragrance-free Adaptogen Deep Moisture Cream ($82 for 59ml) that’s healing, nourishing and calming on sensitive skin. 9. When one of the world’s top make-up artists launches a new line it’s a great excuse to update your beauty kit. Westman Atelier is the creation of Gucci Westman and showcases her make-up style, which is synonymous with healthy, radiant skin. The six-piece collection features easy-to-wear shades and luxurious textures. Our favourites include the Vital Skin Foundation Stick in Atelier 1 ($104) with buildable coverage and nourishing ingredients, and Baby Cheeks Blush Stick in Petal ($76) in pretty shades of pink, rose and peach that suit all skin tones.


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BOOKS

BOOK CLUB I PROMISED A BOOK EVEN MORE ELECTRIFYING THAN LAST MONTH’S THE GLOBOTICS UPHEAVAL AND HERE IT IS. REVIEWS ANNABEL LAWSON

AI SUPERPOWERS Kai-Fu Lee, Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, $29.99 In Beijing, beggars display two QR codes: one for WeChat; one for Alipay. Passing commuters scan with their phones. Fifteen cents passes from commuter to beggar. No transaction fees, no bank involved. At lunchtime the beggar can afford to take the rest of the day off. Commuter feels good. China’s social security providers, no doubt, feel even better. This I learnt watching a half-hour interview with Kai-Fu Lee. He manages venture capital worth US$1.7 billion. He was born in Taiwan, moved to the US, and in the 1970s developed speech recognition devices. By 1980 he was ready to roll out the actual product and expected it to be on sale by 1985. We didn’t get it until 2005. That’s the West for you. Silicon Valley lacks entrepreneurs. The fourth wave of artificial intelligence (AI) development has happened in the past two years. China harvests vast amounts of data. Entrepreneurs steal, adapt, compete and update continuously. They used to steal from the US, creating local versions of Google, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and Uber. Now they steal from one another. The combination of data to feed into artificial intelligence development and the practical testing and refining going on at street level has positioned China to become world leader any time between next year and 2030 depending on which statistics you refer to. Kai-Fu Lee spells out the history of AI. Basically there are two sorts. One is task oriented. You use it to analyse and recommend within a specific area. The other — DeepMind — has one directive: to learn. In science fiction this leads to clever AI

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— for example, killing off all humans. Result: no more global warming. Kai-Fu Lee calms our fears. He discusses the almost completed New Areas like Xiong’an where cells in the tarmac pick up traffic flow and automated vehicles spin along safely and very fast. He explains how AI benefits medicine, construction, agriculture, and education. There is a downside. Massive job loss. And the rubric that other new ways of working and earning will take up the slack are moonshine. Suddenly he sidetracks to tell us about his battle with lymphoma. Relevant because it turned his attention from software and robots to social capital. Solutions to job loss such as guaranteed universal basic income (UBI) lead to subsidised people who aren’t needed any more, so how will they have any political power? Kai-Fu Lee’s alternative vision is a version of the ‘social credits’ that we’re currently hearing about. China plans to reward citizens for helpful behaviour and withhold rewards from antisocial individuals. Lee, on the other hand, proposes volunteering. The trickiest, but not impossible, tasks for AI are comfort, consolation, and tender care. Jobless communities can dispense to one another the specifically human qualities which in our present world we’re often too tired to express; a cultural shift, not one regulated by government. Stay tuned.

THE GIRLS’ BOOK OF PRIESTHOOD Louise Rowland, Muswell Press, $29.99 Margot is a mere six months away from being ordained as a minister in the Church of England. The powers-that-be set her down in Highbury Fields, not the most savoury corner of London. St Mark’s, the church in which she will

serve, has a couple of old-school diehards who seethe with vitriolic hatred of women in anything but a domestic and subservient role. Her best friend is affectionate but wayward, a danger to Margot’s reputation. The vicar’s on her side and so is one old fellow close to death in the local hospice. Love? Surely she’s entitled, she hasn’t taken a vow of celibacy, yet a false step could expunge four years of dedicated study and unselfishness. She has a delightful mentor in Cambridge, an ex-Manhattan attorney, and those shoes, neatly twinkling beneath her desk, are they Louboutins? Margot’s father’s fiancée is into patchouli and spirit guides. Margot blenches but they meet one another halfway. Underneath the humour of this wonderful novel is a dead straight summing up of where we are today with respect to honesty, accountability, tolerance and basic animal instincts. A vastly entertaining and thoroughly thought-provoking book.

A BASKET BY THE DOOR Sophie Hansen, Murdoch Books, $39.99 The overall concept of this cookery book is attractive. New neighbours move in and to welcome them you set down a basket on their front step. Your wicker trug (or container with lid) is loaded with, say, Blackberry and Rosemary Loaf, Apple Butter, Filo, Spinach and Dill Tart, a sturdy Wholemeal Apple and Marmalade Cake and a flask of smoothie. Hansen’s book features food that you cannot wait to replicate and share. She’s bursting with ideas and old favourites take on a new persona, for example, the shocking Buttermilk Scones. A NSW farmer with young children and a generous pantry has created with her books and blogs a nexus for friendship. Pitch in.


BOOKS

MIDNIGHT CHICKEN Ella Risbridger, Bloomsbury, $39.99 This is one of those cookery books in which recipes weave in and out of a life story. Ella’s is full of romance — a truckle bed in London back before bedsits were replaced by hideously expensive tourist accommodation. Then the Tall Man swept into a clueless 18 year old’s life and made it a whole lot better. But on to the food — squidgy leeks bathed in a patentable sauce, salmon sitting on a bed of sticky rice and Wicked Stepmother Black Bread. It contains cocoa, instant coffee and carrots — you’d never guess, I absolutely adore it. This is real-life eating, in front of the television, mopping round the bowl and no-one’s counting calories.

THIRTY THOUSAND BOTTLES OF WINE AND A PIG CALLED HELGA Todd Alexander, Simon & Schuster, $32.99

FOUR RESPECTABLE LADIES SEEK THE MEANING OF WIFE Barbara Toner, Bantam, $32.99 Toner sets her tale in rural NSW in the 1930s. It might as well be the far side of the moon. Yes, the ladies of the title are recognisable with their petty ambitions and a strange combination of capability and inexplicable helplessness. There’s no mass communication of course. They are barely aware of the wider world. They have to make their own rules. As always, there’s a certain type of human who prevails and the rest are mere accomplices. Men feature. And,

indeed, the most evil of them gets his way. But he takes the troublemaker, she of the wasp waist and doe eyes, off to live in a grand hotel so as far as everyone else is concerned he’s paid his dues. Witty and spiteful.

TO THE LIONS Holly Watt, Raven Books, $29.99 You identify immediately with the main character (lissom, gorgeous, quick-witted). Casey Benedict is an investigative reporter with a London newspaper. When she accidentally hears mention of a secret organisation that enables very rich men to kill not only lion, elephant, rhinoceros, leopard and cape buffalo but a sixth exotic and forbidden prey, she’s off to Bond Street to frock up for an undercover job starting in the south of France. All at the paper’s expense. Then, very quickly the glamour is gone and it’s mortar fire and desert predators. Holly Watt writes from direct experience. As a journalist with the London’s The Sunday Times, she exposed cheats and scoundrels in the UK expenses scandal, and experienced mortal danger in Libya and Afghanistan. They should set this book for the HSC. Pace, suspense, surprise, the English language doing cartwheels.

PHOTOGRAPHY KRISTINA SOLJO STYLING LISA BURDEN

This is a true story. Two guys found, bought, reconceptualised and sold three Sydney homes. The profits were enormous yet something was missing in their lives. The turning point was Boxing Day 2016. The previous year, scores had

come flooding through the door to their ‘open house’. A year later, not one. Time to quit fickle city life. After a brief visit to the Barossa where they stayed at a B&B booked out to the end of the year but lacking in comfort, cleanliness and goodwill, they decided they could do a better job. They bought property in the Hunter Valley. In their new enterprise they made wine and surrounded themselves with animals, notably a pig too lovable to turn into bacon. Cautiously they added holiday accommodation. And No-One Came. It took a while but by now business is booming. A hilarious and honest look at a tree change.

Rustic elm bench, $799, from Provincial Home Living. Nozomi mug and Shibui platter, $50 each, from The Potter x The Clay. For stockist details, see page 136.


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JOHN McPHEE EVALUATES READERS’ PRECIOUS OBJECTS. AS A CHILD in the 1960s I recall there were three of these glass vases and their colour was a definite musk pink. Sadly, the colour has faded over time and one of the vases broke — the broken one was fractionally larger. I have not seen others similar and hope you have some idea of their age and providence. Dianne Burling, Sutherland, NSW These vases are the survivors of what might have originally been a set of four — the two others being a pair of larger vases. They were intended to be used as decorative items and not to hold flowers. The vases date from early in the 20th century, perhaps as late as the 1920s. They would be described as Bohemian glass with hand-painted decoration and gilding, and were probably made in modern-day Czechoslovakia. The tradition of making high-quality glass and crystal in Bohemia dates back to the Renaissance, but these vases are fine examples of the delicate glass — decorative and utilitarian — exported around the world throughout the 20th century.

I RECENTLY BOUGHT this Price Kensington English cottage teapot in Launceston for $40. It’s slightly kitsch but that’s what I love about it. What can you tell me about the teapot and the company that made it? Linda Gregoriou, Alexandria, NSW In the 1950s, cottage teapots could be found in almost every display cabinet, and almost all second-hand dealers offered them for sale. From the 1920s to the 1950s, when they were most fashionable, they were an indication of a desire to return to a simple life after the world wars. A typical set included teapot, milk jug and sugar basin, but extended sets featured honey pots, toast racks and trays. Every tea table could become a village! Price and Kensington Potteries in Staffordshire was formed in 1962, indicating that your teapot was made after that date. It is a wonderful example of nostalgia. John McPhee is an art historian who has worked in art museums for 30 years and was curator of Australian Decorative Arts at the National Gallery of Australia. If you have a precious (or simply mysterious) object that puzzles you, send your inquiry, along with a colour print or high-resolution digital image, your suburb or town, and your daytime telephone number, to austcountrystyle@bauer-media.com.au. The photographs must be clear and show the whole object against a white background. Photographs will not be returned, even if they are not published.

136 COU NTRY ST Y LE MAY 2019 MAY 2019

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FIELD GUIDE

FIELD GUIDE

*SEE IN STORE AND ONLINE FOR FULL TERMS AND CONDITIONS. BACKGROUND PHOTOGRAPHY GUY BAILEY STYLING ANNA DELPRAT

BROWSE OUR ADVERTISERS’ PRODUCTS AND SERVIC CES.

SEASONAL CHANGE

THAT ARA FEELING

I A FLAP IN

Enjoy catch-ups with friends, all while looking fabulous in Black Pepper’s newest winter collection. blackpepper.com.au

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Get ready for winter with this Relaxed Zip sweater. The wool and alpaca blend is extra-soft, with a modern turned down collar for an edgy look. marcopolo.net.au

A FINE ART

SOMETHING SPECIAL

PRINTS CHARMING

Learn to paint blooms with awardwinning art teacher Jacqueline Coates. Book in for her upcoming Melbourne class at artscreativehub.com/workshops

These original rose-cut diamond drop earrings are from the latest antique collection at Lannah Dunn Fine Jewellery. (07) 3221 1588; lannahdunn.com

Get cushions, fabrics, and interior decorating services at No Chintz in Mosman, Willoughby, Woollahra and Thirroul. (02) 9969 7509; nochintz.com


COUNTRY EMPORIUM

Originals Windsor Chairs @temperaturedesign

For all retail sales enquiries contact the Australian distributor of ercol at temperaturedesign.com.au or on (61) 3 9419 1447

Australian made knitwear E: info@uimi.com.au | T: 03 9495 1746 | uimi.com.au

TO ADVERTISE CALL 02 9282 8369


Trusted by Generations A selection of fine antique, Victorian, Edwardian & Art-Deco Jewels

Celebrating The 2019 Shortlisted Artists

Julie Bartholomew

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COUNTRY EMPORIUM

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Exhibition: 22 June – 1 September 2019 Award Announcement 21 June 2019 The only ones in the world Major Sponsor and Principal Partner

Exhibiting Sydney Antique Fairs 2019 175 Margaret Street, Toowoomba • (07) 4632 8670

70 Welsford Street, Shepparton VIC 3630 p + 61 5832 9861 e art.museum@shepparton.vic.gov.au w sheppartonartmuseum.com.au

Shop 7, Tattersall’s Arcade, Brisbane • (07) 3221 1588

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Hand picked range of Australia and International Designers NOW IN ORANGE

cint_boutique

cintboutique

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Dee Jackson Australian artist, Dee Jackson, creates beautiful watercolour portraits. Commissions Welcome.

Dee Jackson T: 02 9416 2265 | M: 0439 986 452 E: deejackson@deejackson.com.au www.deejackson.com.au

HOMESTOLOVE.COM.AU/DIRECTORIES

100% Pure French Linen For You And Your Home West Australian Designed // Shipped Worldwide

www.bedtonic.com MAY 2019 COU NTRY ST Y LE 139


COUNTRY EMPORIUM

Elements Jewellery

Australian Organic Jewellery

Authentic French styled market baskets for all your carrying needs. 100% sustainable Australian made materials

elementsjewellery.com.au

2ducktrading.com.au 02 9380 2672

Mellissa Read-Devine Paintings, Commissions

0413 960 031

www.readdevine.com

ingridmansleyinteriordesign@gmail.com U N E A R T H E D H O M E WA R E S . C O M

Boston sofa set, available as 3.5, 2.5, armchair and ottoman

catsmeowinteriors.com.au Deliveries arrange across Australia

TO ADVERTISE CALL 02 9282 8369

The Cat’s Meow 181 Leura Mall, Leura NSW 2780 catsmeow@leuramall.com (02) 4784 2640


COUNTRY EMPORIUM

PJ MILLER F

The DLUX collection is made from the finest natural fibres, including Australian Merino Wool, cashmere, silk, linen and coon

www.d-lux.com.au

Pure cotton boxer shorts, nightshirts & sleepwear Pretty French Country nighties, dressing gowns & bed jackets, sizes 8 - 24

www.bowralboxers.com.au Phone (02) 4862 2520

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In time for Mother’s day

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Ted & Olive Boutique Wagga Wagga provides a personal approach to fashion, style and luxury from exclusive labels from Australian and International Designers. TEDANDOLIVE.COM.AU ted_olive_boutique

AMANDA BROOKS ARTIST

Hay paddocks at sunset 0417 071 336

info@artbybrooks.com.au www.ar tbybrooks.com.au

RITZYROCKS

Beautiful clothing for women through all ages and stages of life www.zephyrloungewear.com 1800 804 776 Zephyrloungewear

Possum Merino Knitwear

Australian Designed & Handmade Jewellery Specialising in Venetian Glass. Express post & special gift on order. www.ritzyrocks.com.au

FLINDERS GENERAL STORE

For all your food and liquor needs 48 Cook Street, Flinders, VIC | Ph: 03 5989 0207

www.flindersgeneralstore.com.au HOMESTOLOVE.COM.AU/DIRECTORIES

24 Camp St. Beechworth 3747, Victoria 03 5728 2625

Soft, superfine merino wraps in travel pouches – For wherever life takes her

Made in Australia

www.glamwrap.com.au

Ph 0408 819 007

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COUNTRY EMPORIUM

The sequel to Jeannie Morgan’s RTK\GYKPPKPIƂTUVPQXGN Absence of Manners is out now.

BOOKTOPIA.COM.AU

Handmade ceramics from Spain

Australian Merino ETHICAL, SUSTAINABLE & COLLECTABLE USE CODE CSMAY19 TO GET 10% OFF YOUR NEXT PURCHASE

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TO ADVERTISE CALL 02 9282 8369

www.sunpots.com.au 02 4847 5052 info@sunpots.com.au


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COUNTRY EMPORIUM

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Pure Cotton Nightwear

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Bedspread / Coverelt Genuine Heavy Weight Pure French Linen Lifestyle beanbag Linen Fashion

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www.macey.store HOMESTOLOVE.COM.AU/DIRECTORIES

MAY 2019 COU NTRY ST Y LE 143


COUNTRY EMPORIUM

Stylish Country Clothing, Boots & Accessories Originals by

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www.pearlsforgirls.com.au

Sage & Leaves

DOG PORTRAITS

THE TOP SADDLERY An eclectic blend of past & present

www.sageandleaves.com

Katherine Terrace, Katherine, NT info@topsaddlery.com.au | 08 89723161

A-F FULGENCE

www.topsaddlery.com.au

www.affulgence.com.au

FREE SHIPPING* for April/May code ACM100

W LUXURIOUS KNITWEAR LOOKBOOK AVAILABLE NOW: 1800 153 820 SHOP ONLINE: www.thewoolcompany.co.nz

TO ADVERTISE CALL 02 9282 8369

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An extensive range of authentic antique and vintage collectables. From pottery to silver and other quirky pieces, we pride ourselves in being able to offer affordable and quality items that will be enjoyed for years to come.

0408 270 289 • marpleantiques.com.au


Celebrating Lost & Forgotten Arts, Crafts & Trades /Goatsandlionsart goatsandlionsart@gmail.com 0422 705 462 / 0498 005 170 7377 Great Alpine Rd, Bright Vic 3741

IRONING BOARD COVERS Great new range of colours and designs, new products all ready for Christmas

FLEXIBLE STEEL GARDEN EDGING WHICH BENDS TO VIRTUALLY ANY SHAPE FOR LAWNS, DRIVES, PATHS, FLOWER AND VEGETABLE BEDS. EverEdge® is easy to install (no extra pegs or joiners), suits all soil types and is available in a variety of colours and depths. EverEdge is made from 1.6 mm gauge PLOGVWHHOJDOYDQLVHGDQGSRZGHUFRDWHGRUZLWKD&RU7HQUXVWHGƓQLVK

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Australian Natural Handmade Bath & Body Products

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HOME AND GARDEN EMPORIUM

Artists & Blacksmiths Interactive Studio & Gallery

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WHEN YOU NEED A HELPING HAND To remove heat marks, water rings or cloudy haze. To repair fine scratches and blemishes. To boost colour or correct fade.

REACH FOR RESTOR-A-FINISH

The finest Cotton shirts made in the Old Jermyn Street Tradition both Made to Measure and Ready Made

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MAY 2019 COU NTRY ST Y LE 145


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Prestige Property | New South Wales

Gentrified Country Living - Sunshine Coast

• 15 minutes to Noosa Beaches • 4 Living Areas • Resort Style Pool • Relaxed Lifestyle Change • Fabulous Entertaining 5

3

1

4

Price: $ 1,995,000

280 EUMUNDI RANGE ROAD, EUMUNDI, QLD “Ventana” on the Sunshine Coast Hinterland, is an elegant, master built, large family home with fabulous entertaining and glorious mountain views. The property sits on 10 Acres of prestine land, 5 minutes from Eumundi, 20 minutes to Noosa and 1.5 hours to Brisbane.

Contact: Linda Shore-Perez 0427 378 687 linda@villarealestate.com.au

villarealestate.com.au

SOUTHBOUND ESCAPES NAROOMA, NSW

Experience a luxury retreat staying in a three-bedroom apartment with stunning views over the Wagonga Inlet in the beautiful coastal town of Narooma, NSW. The perfect place to immerse yourself in nature, enjoy local produce including the oysters its famous for, and marvel at the breathtaking scenery. 02 8667 5353 bookings@southboundescapes.com www.southboundescapes.com

harboursideapartments.com.au Tel + 61 2 9963 4300

LUXURY RETREAT 0417 045 671

www.mthay.com.au

Unique, private and ultra exclusive. A remarkable boutique escape, only 2 hours from Sydney. Spectacular suites with panoramic views over Berry, plus wildlife, private gardens, extravagant bathrooms and a 33m heated indoor pool & spa.

TO ADVERTISE CALL 02 9282 8401


Beach Serai is a tranquil, spacious, beautifully appointed, fully self contained studio, with a private deck, leafy garden area, and private entrance. Located just 5 minutes walk from local beaches and 10 minutes from local shops and restaurants. 02 6582 2628 info@beachserai.com beachseraibnb.business.site

Enjoy ultimate luxury and relaxation, allow yourself to be pampered with delectable treats and stunning wines from our region and breathe in the aroma of utter peace. It’s the little things that count at bishop’s court estate. Bishop’s Court Estate 226 Seymour St Bathurst NSW 2795 Ph: 02 6332 4447

www.bishopscourtestate.com.au

INN SCONE

RUSSLEY RURAL RETREAT

Historic (c.1837) cattle station offering luxury accommodation in the heart of Northern NSW. A rare private retreat with well-appointed accommodation options. A memorable experience for friends and family.

Boutique self-contained accommodation situated in a refurbished historic building in the centre of Scone. Enjoy the best of the Hunter Valley wineries, or visit the world renowned horse studs, an easy stroll to the local restaurants and facilities.

Charming homestead set on 17 acres on the Hunter River. 5 private rooms of period design with a funky twist. Shared lounge with open fire. BBQ, swimming pool & river access. Separate Cottage fully self-contained sleeps 6. Wrap around verandas, open fire, BBQ.

02 6545 3848 info@innscone.com.au www.innscone.com.au

0419 976 852 www.russleyruralretreat.com.au

NEW ENGLAND DISTRICT, NSW

0439 791 923 enquiries@waterloo-station.com.au waterloocountryaccommodation www.waterloo-station.com.au

SCONE, NSW

SCONE, NSW

New South Wales

WATERLOO STATION

COUN TRY A ND COA STA L R ETR E ATS

BEACH SERAI

PORT MACQUARIE, NSW

THE FUTURE IS EXCITING FOR SCONE, INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITIES ABOUND AND A RELAXED AND AFFORDABLE RURAL LIFESTYLE AWAITS.

WWW.LIVEWORKINVESTSCONE.COM.AU

MAY 2019 COU NTRY ST Y LE 147


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Barefoot Springs B&B

APARTMENTS ON GREY GLEN INNES, NSW

Relax and unwind in this luxurious and peaceful rural retreat with breathtaking panoramic views across the Shoalhaven coastline as far as Jervis Bay. Close to Kangaroo Valley, Berry and beaches, yet only a couple of hours drive from Canberra and Sydney. Studio Spa Cottages have double spa bathroom, log fire, TV/DVD, AC, well equipped kitchenette and queen or King bed. Set in lovely gardens and paddocks abounding with wombats, wallabies, echidnas and magnificent birdlife. 155 Carrington Rd, Beaumont (Cambewarra Mountain) Tel:02 4446 0509 • info@barefootsprings.com.au

www.barefootsprings.com.au

Apartments on Grey are two exceptional apartments best suited to independent travellers exploring the local region of the Northern Tablelands. Guests love the proximity to quality cafes and restaurants. Everything is provided to make your apartment a home away from home. 0427 736 437 reception@apartmentsongrey.com.au www.apartmentsongrey.com.au

MISSION BEACH

New South Wales | Queensland

holidays

Where to stay... What to do in tropical paradise

RIVERSDALE ESTATE CAMBRIDGE, TAS

French provincial styled cottages on private country Estate, set amongst award winning vineyard and olive grove. 1 queen and 2 singles. Panoramic water views, rolling countryside, rambling walks & private beach. Families welcome! 03 6248 5666 | 0448 701 447 wendy@riversdaleestate.com.au 222 Denholms Rd, Cambridge www.riversdaleestate.com.au

Ph: (07) 4088 6699 www.missionbeachholidays.com.au

#GoondiwindiRegion

Country Culture

Agricultural Excellence

GOONDIWINDI REGION Visitor information: 07 4671 7474 www.grc.qld.gov.au

TO ADVERTISE CALL 02 9282 8401

Rich History


Try my no fail Jacqueline Coates Blooms Painting Method®, a system anyone can apply to get amazing results, even if you don’t have a creative bone in your body. I’ve taught thousands of students for 16 years with my ORIGINAL created from scratch teaching methods that unlock painting and colour, and how to handle your paint. Lean on 30 years of painting experience and a compassionate approach. Paint for pleasure or paint for profit. I help you get your confidence and creativity going!

BLOOMS WORKSHOP DATES 2019 Learn all about acrylic paint. Includes art materials and catering. Transform your creative abilities.

MELBOURNE – Glen Iris 4 Day Painting Workshop $2450 pp July 3rd – 9th including the evening of the 2nd – Paint two midsize canvas in acrylics.

4 Day Blooms Painting Workshop $2350 pp Evening of August 2. Then Aug 3-6 inclusive

HAMILTON, NEW ZEALAND 4 Day Painting Workshop $2450pp Evening of Nov 25, then 26-29th inclusive daily.

BAROSSA VALLEY – SA

PAINT BLOOMS USA – Downtown Arts District, LA

4 Day Painting Workshop $2350 pp Evening Nov 1 then Nov 2-5 inclusive daily

Visit www.paintbloomsusa.com for details of the workshop October 23-27, 2019

SYDNEY – Willoughby

FRANCE - DELUXE ART IMMERSION

4 Day Painting Workshop $2350 pp Evening July 14, then July 15-18, 2019 daily inclusive – Paint two midsize canvases in acrylics.

Visit artscreativehub.com/art-workshops-events/france/ blooms-painting-workshop-france/ for more info and bookings September 11- 20, 2019

Perth – Midland Junction Art Centre

VOTED South Australia’s MOST INNOVATIVE ARTIST 2017 APAC Awards Most Outstanding Artist South Australia APAC AWARDS 2017 Most Outstanding Artist South Australia GLOBAL TOP 100 AWARDS 2017 Best in E-Learning Artisty by Global Insight Business Awards Sept 2018 Most Innovative Artist 2018- South Australia

4 Day Blooms Workshop $2350 pp Evening Feb 28, 2020 from 5.30-9pm Then daily from Feb 29 to March 3 – Paint 2 large canvases in acrylics.

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PAINT AND TOUR IN FRANCE IN 2019 Enjoy a fabulous inspirational creative reboot when you join me on French Art School. Be inspired by the work of the French Impressionists up close and travel in their footsteps as you tour and paint in France with host and art tutor Jacqueline Coates. Small personalised groups, our own painting atelier and art supplies, private chef and chauffeur plus own room throughout. Visit the most beautiful villages and stunning locations. Paint where Monet painted en plein air! Loosen your painting style. Paris & The Limousin May 8-20th, 2019 Cote D’Azur & The Limousin May 30-June 11th, 2019. For 2019 tour details, dates and itineraries please visit

www.frenchartschool.blogspot.com.au

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artscreativehub.com/workshops • Phone 0412 587 438 or 0429 100 929

South Australia | Tasmania

2 Day Painting Workshop $1350 pp Evening of July 11, then July 12 and 13 – Paint two midsize canvas in acrylics.

BRISBANE – Metro Arts

COUN TRY A ND COA STA L R ETR E ATS

Create a Masterpiece

NO PREVIOUS EXPERIENCE NECESSARY

COAST HOUSE TASMANIA

Treat yourself to a totally private, tranquil waterfront retreat yet just a few minutes to the village of Cygnet. Far away from city distractions. Visit local restaurants, galleries, wineries, cheese farms, blueberries and saffron or just stay and relax. “We have been astounded by the beauty and tranquillity, superb accommodation and sublime location at Coast House”

www.coasthousetasmania.com | stay@coasthousetasmania.com | Tel: 0409 446 290

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COUN TRY A ND COA STA L R ETR E ATS

Tasmania

RECOGNISED for his commitment and contribution to quality food and wine in Tasmania, Josef Chromy OAM has owned and developed some of Tasmania’s leading wineries. Josef Chromy Wines is the culmination of his experience in Tasmania’s Tamar Valley and this shines through in the quality of the wines, food and hospitality offered at his cellar door and restaurant. As a foundation member of the Ultimate Winery Experiences of Australia, guests can go behind the scenes and tour the Josef Chromy Winery, learn how to make traditional-method sparkling wine, fly fish on its lakes or helicopter in for lunch at its hatted restaurant and share in one of Australia’s most memorable food and wine experiences. THE RESTAURANT is at the forefront of contemporary Tasmanian cuisine. Through forging a deep connection to the Tasmanian farmers that surround this beautiful restaurant setting, as well as using the restaurant’s unique market gardens, chef Nick Raitt serves his globally influenced food style in a menu driven from the ground up. Josef Chromy is an unrivalled dining destination, where visitors can experience thoughtfully crafted dishes paired to perfection with award- winning cool-climate wines.

Open seven days, cellar door 10am-5pm, restaurant 11:45am-2:30pm 370 Relbia Road, Relbia, Tasmania

(03) 6335 8700 | josefchromy.com.au

TO ADVERTISE CALL 02 9282 8401


Experience Autumn in Tasmania. Join us for one of our cooking classes or experience our rustic dining showcasing local produce and wines. Why not take a package to include accommodation, restaurant and free entry into our beautiful National Trust Properties nearby. Luxury guest house and unique cooking school just minutes from Launceston. www.redfeatherinn.com.au

@frenchmansrivercygnet

The changing of the seasons. Snuggle up at Frenchman’s River. Time to light the fire.

Tasmania | Victoria

“I found my bliss. Open fire, a glass of wine and a good book…a really, really beautiful place.”

COUN TRY A ND COA STA L R ETR E ATS

experience autumn with a Tasmanian gourmet foodie indulgence

ww ww.frenchmansriver.com.au • Kate/Posie 0466 790 142 • book@frenchmansriver.com.au

A unique truffle experience Enjoy a luxury farm stay in Northern Tasmania whilst hunting for the highly prized perigord black truffle. Then enjoy dinner highlighted by the days truffles with the best produce Tasmania has to offer. These exclusive packages are held during the peak of the truffle season mid May until August. Visit us online to book the ultimate truffle farm to plate experience. @oldforestvalefarmstay

www.oldforestvalefarm.com

PETER RABBIT™ GARDEN CAMBRIDGE, TAS

Take an enchanting stroll through Peter Rabbit’s™ garden, the only one in Australia. Also see, Jemima Puddle-Duck™, Jeremy Fisher™, Benjamin Bunny™, Mr Todd™, Two Bad Mice™, Mrs.Tiggy-Winkle™ & Tailor of Gloucester™. 03 6248 5555 Riversdale Estate, 222 Denholms Rd, Cambridge www.thepeterrabbitgarden.com.au

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Victoria | Escape & Explore

LIVE LIFE OUTSIDE Outside of the city life and not far from Mt. Baw Baw rests serenely private Gracefield Estate. Home to idyllic Gracefield Cottage & Gracefield House you’ll find the good life and your connection to nature throughout our sustainably and ethically run 100 acres. Reconnect to the great outdoors and yourself. Reconnect to the great life at Gracefield Estate.

KANANOOK HERITAGE HOUSE BAIRNSDALE, VIC

Only 1.5 hrs from Melbourne

Nestled above the Mitchell River-flats this Grand 1880’s Homestead of Historic Lindenow Races famed “Kananook Plate” has 270 degree panoramic sunset views over green orchard wildlife from our sun drenched expansive deck with wraparound verandas. Explore natural beach, alpine and waterway wonders, then retreat, reboot, revitalise and reconnect.

www.gracefield.co gracefield@bultegroup.com

www.kananookheritagehouse.com

Autumn 2019 Tour 2 October – 17 October 2019 Private, guided tour of Poland’s art, culture & food.

Neerim South - 03.8772.9230

Discover Persia

GIRLS ON TOUR Women-only, small groups, fully escorted tours

CHOOSE BETWEEN 10 TO 30 DAYS TOUR IN OCT/NOV

experiencepoland.net/autumn-2019

Persian Jewels 10 days - $5,570 Taste of Persia (FOOD TOUR) 12 days - $6,250 Persian Veils (WOMEN'S TOUR) 14 days -$6,560 Persian Discovery 16 days - $6,770 Persian Dreams (choose between a 19, 25 or 30-day tour For a FREE Info Pack contact your Kiwi/Iranian guide Mehdi

THE REAL TRANSYLVANIA - 29 DAYS

Departing 6th Oct 2019 Cost – $14,520 pp twin share Single supplement $2,120 (Including airfares ex Australia) Explore 14th century towns, castles and villages with breathtaking sights including the castle where the legend of the gothic tale of “Dracula” all began.

1800 778 694 • hello@travelandtour.com.au

www.travelandtour.com.au

WWW.GIRLSONTOUR.COM.AU / 0409 057 417

Sri Lanka by private train 7 - 21 November • With Scott McGregor Colombo • Trincomalee • Batticaloa Dambulla • N.eliya • Kandy • Galle

Walking in Southern Tuscany Get off the beaten track to be immersed in the natural & cultural experiences of the true Tuscan country life. Join our fully supported walk carrying a small daypack. Walking through beautiful chestnut woods, vineyards, olive groves and little medieval towns. Enjoy exploring with a small group of like-minded women. 13 days commencing 1st September 2019 Inspire your adventurous spirit. Call 1300 883 475

www.womensownadventure.com.au

TO ADVERTISE CALL 02 9282 8401

• Seven scenic train trips right across the country in your own exclusive private charter of the regal Viceroy Special • Luxury coach connections and transfers • Many multiple nights in iconic luxury hotels • Visit 8 amazing World Heritage sites • All meals and numerous special dinners • Transfers, tipping, visas and all luggage handling


HISTORY | NATURE | CULTURE | INDULGENCE

Escape & Explore

My small group tours of stunning Sri Lanka encompass all that this beautiful green island has to offer. Join us for a lifetime of memories.

COUN TRY A ND COA STA L R ETR E ATS

NINA’S PATHWAYS

Next Adventure 1st October 2019 0419 213 327 | www.ninaspathways.com.au |

/ninaspathways

Discover the heart and soul of Puglia with ITALIAN TOURS!

17 – 30 September 2019 PUGLIA - THE ROAD LESS TRAVELLED TOUR

17 DAY POP UP ITALIAN BELLISSIMO Departing 6 October 2019 $12,799 pp twin share $15,269 single

Slow down and experience the best of Puglia on this truly small group tour. Book now! 02 9358 4923 | ciao@italiantours.com.au | italiantours.com.au

Fully Escorted, Small Groups, Personal Service Venice, Florence, Verona, Rome & The Amalfi Coast including return flights ex Melbourne (other departure cities available on request).

1300 885 255 w w w. s i s t e r h o o d w o m e n s t r a v e l . c o m . a u

MAY 2019 COU NTRY ST Y LE 153


OUT OF STEP

IT TURNED OUT THAT ROB INGRAM’S ROMANTIC NOTION OF A WALK IN THE COUNTRY WAS NOTHING LIKE REALITY. with or without Mr Darcy. Jane Eyre’s Jane walked in the country. As did The French Lieutenant’s Woman. William Wordsworth was forever walking in the country… as lonely as a cloud, as I recall. And if we’d seen a cloud out here recently, it would have been a very lonely one indeed. When The Chosen One and I made our migration to the sticks, we didn’t know much about the country, except that you walked in it. So we got oilskin jackets, beanies, stout shoes and staffs and an even stouter dog, and we started to walk. Now I don’t recall Elizabeth or Jane having this problem, but before our body mass indexes had even noticed we were walking, white Toyota utes were pulling over. “Can I give ya a lift somewhere?” “No thanks, just getting a bit of exercise.” “Well… if you’re sure. I’m goin‘ your way.” Or, “You need any help?” “No thanks, just enjoying the walk.” the New Age of walking. Their walk was more a chance to put “Thought you must’ve run out of fuel.” their arses into gear than to put their brains into neutral. They Characters in romantic novels and actors in romantic movies walk in the country. New-to-the-country people walk bore all the blemishes of people who get angry and anxious and depressed if they miss out on their walk… victims of in the country. People whose cars have broken down walk in a compulsive exercise disorder. the country. But not the genuine country person. Country They wore geo-mesh leggings and hyper-dry hybrid baselayer people don’t walk anywhere. They’ll take a quad bike to go tops, and their walking boots were of flexible and breathable to the outside loo. They’ll fire up the tractor to check the construction with knitted uppers, metallic mesh tongues, mailbox. They’ll kick-start the ag bike to get the washing padded heel collars and in. Dogs don’t even walk in the ’T DON gel-cushioning sole technology. country. They ride on the back COUNTRY PEOPLE of the ag bike. WALK ANY WHERE. THE Y’LL FIRE They had stopped to analyse the data from their Fitbit step-counters Having to explain why you’re UP THE TRACTOR TO CHECK and calorie-counting apps to see walking in the country robs it of THE MAILBOX. if they were having a good time or its mindlessness. When you hear not. New-Age walkers feel thwarted and frustrated unless they a vehicle approaching, you’re already rehearsing clock up 10,000 steps — or around eight kilometres — a day. your responses. They regarded me in my budget boots from Rivers, baggy “No, really, just getting some exercise.” strides and football jersey with some alarm — a response “No thanks, taking the dog for a walk.” later explained to me by veteran country walker Tom Fox. “Nice of you to ask, but just taking a wander.” “The country walker who has a beard must also have The joy and romance of the country walk used to be about a dog,” he explained. “If you suddenly encounter a bearded restoring the soul. A walk in the countryside gave the mind man without a dog in a remote field, it’s reasonable to permission to indulge in a bit of contemplation. It reduced assume that he’s burying a corpse.” stress and anxiety, and allowed us the time to put the So my walking days are behind me now, and I’m feeling much jigsaw pieces of our thoughts back in the right places. more like a genuine countryman. The walk in the country was It was a calmative — someone once said a short temper only a way of filling in the time between Landline and Match of is best improved by a long walk. the Day anyway, and I’ve found I can do that just as well by lying This seems to be an alien concept to the people who walk today. On my last walk, I encountered a couple who represented down. It’s a bit like a nanna nap, only more masculine.

154 COU NTRY ST Y LE MAY 2019

PORTRAIT PHOTOGRAPHY MICHAEL WEE BACKGROUND PHOTOGRAPHY SAM McADAM-COOPER STYLING PHOEBE McEVOY

PRIDE AND PREJUDICE’S ELIZABETH walked in the country…


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