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VOL. 3 | ISSUE 38 | EDITORIAL@THEHUDSONVALLEYNEWS.COM

DECEMBER 28, 2011 - JANUARY 3, 2012

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INSIDE: 2012 PREDICTIONS | THE LAST THUG-O-METER (WE HOPE) | SPINZIA WINS IN RHINEBECK | THIS WEEK’S WEATHER: MID-40S h

VOL. 2 | ISSUE 39 | EDITORIAL@THEHUDSONVALLEYNEWS.COM

JANUARY 5-11, 2011

VOL. 2 | ISSUE 40 | EDITORIAL@THEHUDSONVALLEYNEWS.COM

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INSIDE: MOLINARO ON ETHICS REFORM; RHINEBECK SAVINGS DONATES TO LOCAL SHELTERS; DOWNHILL IN STANFORD

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JANUARY 12-18, 2011

IN THE NEW YEAR

MOLINARO MOVING UP IN ALBANY

KAMPF KOMMENTS DEBUTS IN SPORTS:

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DAYTOP DRAMA PERSISTS

Things picked up about where they left off last year with Supervisor Tom Martino and the Hyde Park Town Board. At a sparsely attended reorganization meeting New Year’s Day, 42 resolutions were presented for consideration and almost immediately the meeting devolved into a confrontation between Martino and Councilwoman Sue Serino. At issue was Serino’s objection to being asked to vote on appointments and candidates for town positions she had never been made aware of. Martino has long been at odds with fellow Republican Serino and has made a practice of depriving Serino of information he makes available to the other three board members.

“How can I be expected to vote intelligently on candidates I don’t know or resumes I’ve never seen? When someone applies for a position with the board, every board member should be given pertinent information upon which to make an informed decision,” Serino told Hudson Valley News. As a result, Serino stated while she did not necessarily object to individual candidates, she would abstain in protest and principle for not having been given the opportunity to vet the various candidates. One of those up for re-appointment was Herbert Sweet, a longtime member of the Zoning Board of Appeals and an 18-year volunteer in Hyde Park. Sweet told Hudson Valley News he

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Hudson Valley

had sent Martino a letter articulating his willingness to serve another term but never received the courtesy of a reply. Sweet asked Serino to read a short statement into the record and was told she couldn’t by Martino. Serino looked in Martino’s direction and asked sarcastically, “Tom, isn’t 18 years of service worthy of a few minutes?” After an uncomfortable silence, Councilman Michael Athanas seconded the motion and Sweet’s statement was read into the record. Neither Martino, Taylor, Monks or Athanas thanked Sweet for his years of service. Ironically, the police/court advisory committee, a group that never met, was thanked by Martino for its service. Sweet told Hudson Valley News, “I was

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CELEBRATING LOCAL: MUSIC, THEATER, ART, FILM AND MORE

WHAT’S HAPPENING THIS WEEK:

HVNEWS SPORTS:

RED HOOK LADY RAIDERS ON A ROLL

AUTISM DINNER RETURNS IN RHINEBECK

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BY HV NEWS STAFF

No sooner than word of the senseless shooting of Arizona Congresswoman Gabrielle Giffords and the killing of six others hit the airwaves, people began wondering if a similar incident could happen here. The shooter – and we feel no obligation to attach the word “alleged” – was yet another in a long line of lone-wolf assassins with a troubled history. As is true with most of these gunmen, he somehow managed to make a public of¿cial the object of his rage and frustrations.

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FEBRUARY 2-8, 2011

MARTINO AND TAYLOR

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USUALLY RIGHT:

IS TEA PARTY TO BLAME IN ARIZONA SHOOTING?

After an ironic moment of silence for the victims of the Arizona shootings, Supervisor Tom Martino and Councilman Michael Taylor launched an unprovoked personal and political attack on fellow

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Hudson Valley

board member Sue Serino at Monday’s Hyde Park Town Board meeting. Martino and Taylor have long displayed short fuses with regard to anyone who might disagree with them,

but Monday’s outburst took political discourse and civility to a new low. At the conclusion of a fairly routine meeting, Taylor asked if he could

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RED HOOK TRIVIA CONTEST

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CELEBRATING LOCAL: MUSIC, THEATER, ART, FILM AND MORE

{P. 13} GIBSON BROTHERS MAKE A SWEET BLUEGRASS SOUND {P. 14} MODFEST ARRIVES WITH A NEW OPERA {PLUS} ART IN MILLBROOK, SELF-HELP BOOKS FOR THE NEW YEAR

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BOYS AND GIRLS HOOPS AT FDR

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HVNEWS SPORTS:

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FEBRUARY 23-MARCH 1, 2011

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INSIDE: THE CAPPILLINO GOLF TOURNEY; STEINHAUS ADDRESSES CHAMBER; BONE MARROW DRIVE; FDR ICE HOCKEY

MARTINO AND DOYLE:

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RHINEBECK VS. FDR BASKETBALL; LITTLE LEAGUE SIGN-UPS

MAY HAVE TO RUN AS INDEPENDENTS; COUNCILMEN MONKS AND ATHANAS UNLIKELY TO SEEK RE-ELECTION FULL STORY ON PAGE 2

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HYDE PARK POLICE/ COURT BIDS PICKED

{P.28} CELEBRATING FDR’S 129TH BIRTHDAY

THIS WEEK’S WEATHER: Deep freeze

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Hudson Valley

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WHAT’S HAPPENING THIS WEEK:

{P. 10} ‘BYE BYE BIRDIE’ SINGS IN RHINEBECK {P. 14} STICHIN’! GET A START TO YOUR LAZY CRAFTING {PLUS} CREATIVE RESOLUTIONS; GIFT TO THE CITY CONCERT

HVNEWS SPORTS:

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BY JIM LANGAN

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THIS WEEK’S WEATHER: It’s January.

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INSIDE: RONALD REAGAN AT 100; ARRESTED DEVELOPMENTS; LOCAL GRAD’S WHITE HOUSE JOB; IN CASE YOU MISSED IT

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VOL. 2 | ISSUE 46 | EDITORIAL@THEHUDSONVALLEYNEWS.COM

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COMMUNITY GRIEVES AND HONORS FALLEN POLICE OFFICER

Audit requested of Hyde Park’s finances

Photo: Pima County Sheriff Forensics Unit

The common denominator appears to be personal failure and the desire to ascribe blame to someone else. Too often, those people are public of¿cials and, in some cases, celebrities. The question now becomes whether our state and federal of¿cials are in any real danger. After all, Giffords was not considered an especially controversial legislator, yet she became the focus of an unbalanced man. It is still unclear why the shooter, Jared Loughner, targeted Giffords.

MARTINO, TAYLOR LAUNCH HATEFUL ATTACK ON SERINO

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THIS WEEK’S WEATHER: SNOWY SATURDAY?

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JANUARY 19-25, 2011

INSIDE: NEW RECEIVER OF TAXES?; HARLEM WIZARDS COMING TO MILLBROOK; RED HOOK WOMAN BACK IN THE SADDLE

PARTY’S OVER

HOW MANY MORE ARE THERE?

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Hudson Valley

FULL STORY ON PAGE 2

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CELEBRATING LOCAL: MUSIC, THEATER, ART, FILM AND MORE

VOL. 2 | ISSUE 47 | EDITORIAL@THEHUDSONVALLEYNEWS.COM

MARCH 2-8, 2011

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Hudson Valley

FULL STORY PAGE 3

Photo by Jim Langan.

FIND US ONLINE: WWW.THEHUDSONVALLEYNEWS.COM

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{P. 10} VASSAR REPERTORY DANCE THEATRE GALA {P. 14} ‘LETTICE AND LOVAGE’ BENEFITS MAPLE GROVE {PLUS} WATSON LEADS THE REVOLT; CARING FOR LACE AND MORE

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MARCH 9-15, 2011

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INSIDE: MARIST MAAC CHAMPS AGAIN; BRUTAL TEEN BRAWL; PINE PLAINS, RED HOOK HOOPS; IN CASE YOU MISSED IT

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LEGO League tourney at DCC

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Steinhaus retirement sets off political scramble

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Hunting for a Cure in Poughkeepsie

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Recent financial statements missing

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CELEBRATING LOCAL: MUSIC, THEATER, ART, FILM AND MORE

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VOL. 3 | ISSUE 11 | EDITORIAL@THEHUDSONVALLEYNEWS.COM

VOL. 2 | ISSUE 48 | EDITORIAL@THEHUDSONVALLEYNEWS.COM

YOUR SOURCE FOR LOCAL NEWS AND EVENTS.

INSIDE: LINDA RICCARDULLI’S SISTER ON DOMESTIC VIOLENCE; MARIST MARCH MADNESS; RHINEBECK’S SHODDY SIDEWALKS

For the birds in Clinton

THIS WEEK’S WEATHER: NOT SPRING YET

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WHAT’S HAPPENING THIS WEEK:

{P. 10} CAREY HARRISON BRINGS ‘MAGUS’ TO RHINEBECK {P. 15} MR. BROWN RETURNS TO MOUNT GULIAN {PLUS} ‘THE LION IN WINTER;’ ‘100 ARTISTS/100 DREAMS’ AND MORE

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Highway superintendent holds his ground

weekend

WHAT’S HAPPENING THIS WEEK:

{P. 10} SIMA PIANO TRIP IN SAUGERTIES {P. 14} ‘TEEN VISIONS’ OPEN IN POUGHKEEPSIE {PLUS} THEATER AND ART OPPORTUNITIES; FESTIVAL LINE-UPS

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from Galleria pet store

THIS WEEK’S WEATHER: GROUNDHOG DAY

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WHAT’S HAPPENING THIS WEEK:

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{P.2} SPCA rescues puppies

Photo by Nicole DeLawder.

EVANS, FDR COACH SAVOR FOOTBALL SUCCESS

PRICE: $1.00

VOL. 2 | ISSUE 43 | EDITORIAL@THEHUDSONVALLEYNEWS.COM

DO OUR ELECTED OFFICIALS HAVE ANYTHING TO FEAR?

BY HV NEWS STAFF

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YOUR SOURCE FOR LOCAL NEWS AND EVENTS.

INSIDE: FIRESIDE CHATS IN HYDE PARK; GIBSON TO JOIN IN OBAMACARE REPEAL; RESTAURATEUR REMEMBERED

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{P.28} MILLBROOK RINGS

VOL. 2 | ISSUE 41 | EDITORIAL@THEHUDSONVALLEYNEWS.COM

JUNE 22-28, 2011

INSIDE: LESSONS FROM WEINERGATE | HYDE PARK DEM NOMINEES | TOWN HISTORIAN STARTS OWN POLITICAL PARTY

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CRIME CHECKS IN AT THE HYDE PARK INN Police cite disturbing statistics stemming from local motel

PAGE 3

VOL. 2 | ISSUE 50 | EDITORIAL@THEHUDSONVALLEYNEWS.COM

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MARCH 23-29, 2011

FIRST FORE

Karley Nichols was one of the first to tee it up shortly after the opening of the driving range at Gilbert Farms in Hyde Park. The Hudson Valley Community College student will also be working there this summer. Full story on page 19.

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INSIDE: MARIST LOSES TO DUKE; PISTOL-PACKING ELEANOR ROOSEVELT; BENEFIT FOR THADDEUS; RHINEBECK DOG PARK? PRICE: $1.00

STUCK AT THE ALTAR Marriage Equality Bill could hinge on Saland vote

Hyde Park Police lead homicide investigation

Sen. Steve Saland with then-Attorney General Cuomo at a 2009 press conference highlighting the need for public pension reform. Photo from Sen. Saland’s official Facebook page.

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Stalker stabs St. Francis employee

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Staatsburg Library dedicates expansion

A diamond in the rough page 19

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Sad farewell to Det. John Falcone

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Hudson Valley

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APRIL 20-26, 2011

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Hudson Valley

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WHAT’S HAPPENING THIS WEEK: {P. 10} “THE DROWSY CHAPERONE” IN RHINEBECK {P. 15} MARK BOLGER IS BACK IN THE MORNING {PLUS} GHOST BUSTING; CUPCAKES FOR A CAUSE AND MORE

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MAY 11-17, 2011

APRIL 27-MAY 3, 2011

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ARMED STANDOFF IN HYDE PARK

Local woman isn’t buying Trumped up Manchurian candidate rap

Hudson Valley legislatures hold joint summit

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Molinaro makes it official

Taste of Rhinebeck attracts record crowd

Lately, Donald Trump has been promoting himself and the idea that President Barack Obama is something of a Manchurian candidate whose very presidency might be illegal. Trump is on record as saying, “Nobody ever knew the guy or who paid for his education.” We mentioned some of that a few weeks ago and it got the attention of a Hudson Valley News reader. That reader told us about a local woman who had, in fact, gone to grade school in Hawaii with Obama and suggested we contact her. We did and in short order, Gretchen Scott met us at Bread Alone in Rhinebeck with her high school yearbook in hand. rst and foremost a very Scott is ¿ ¿rst accomplished equine professional with extensive experience riding and competing in both combined training and dressage.

Doris Kelly lauded by party

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Grange Week in Stanford

Barry Obama (center) in a picture from Saugerties resident Gretchen Scott’s (inset) Punahou School yearbook.

She currently works at the Rivendell Riding Academy as well as Beaverkill Farms teaching and training horses. Scott grew up in Honolulu and attended the prestigious Punahou School, which boasts among its alumni such

SPRING S PR RIN ING PE PEEPS EEPS THROUGH

CELEBRATING CELE CEL ELEBRATING EBRATING BRATING ATING LOCAL: LO L CAL: L: MUSIC, MUSIC MU C, THEATER, TH HEATER, ART, AR FILM AND D MORE SHE SHEEP AN A AND ND W WOOL OOL S SHOWCASE HOWCASE ASE AT CLERM CLERMONT RMONT MIDDLE MIDDL ES CHOOLE CH ERS SM AKE KE A ART FOR A GOOD OOD C CAU SE SCHOOLERS MAKE CAUSE ‘PO POU UGHK KE EEPSIE:: T HEN AND ND NOW’ NO OPENS ‘POUGHKEEPSIE: THEN GR RACE S MITH H OUSE SE; LOCAL OCAL READER R SPRING READS GRACE SMITH HOUSE;

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Red Hook Apple Blossom Day

The Hyde Park Democratic Committee honored one of its own with the committee’s prestigious Chairman’s Award at its annual dinner. Recipient Doris Kelly, a retired school teacher, was honored for her contributions to the Hyde Park town and planning boards. In 2004, Kelly was a candidate for a U.S. Congressional seat. Speakers at the dinner ceremony praised Kelly for her continuing activism for peace, human rights and dignity for the aging. Organizers said they were pleasantly taken aback by the number of attendees and amount of money raised during the dinner. “Frankly, we were a bit astonished by the level of generosity,” said party Chairwoman Pat Dreveny. “But I think this shows very clearly that Hyde Park residents are ready for a change this fall.” > continued on next page

{P P.3} OVERREACTION IN HYDE PARK?

MURDER?

GRUESOME MURDERSUICIDE TRIGGERS SOUL SEARCHING BY JIM LANGAN Hyde Park Police received a call from the daughter of Linda and Anthony Riccardulli at 4:05 a.m. Thursday morning saying her father had just shot her mother. Anthony Riccardulli had been released Tuesday on $25,000 bail and was under a “Stay Away” order of protection to avoid any contact with his wife. Riccardulli had been arrested for assaulting his wife, Linda, on June 27 at their home on 46 South Quaker Lane. He was charged with first-degree attempted assault, second-degree assault and three counts of unlawful imprisonment, all felonies. Hyde Park Police Chief Charles Broe told Hudson Valley News police also confiscated two rifles, a shotgun and assorted hunting knives from Riccardulli at the time of his arrest.

{P P.5} Victim’s sister slams weekend county response to domestic violence

GESUNDHEIT

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PRICE: $1.00

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County wants your prescription meds

DA Grady says he will not release results; ‘Confidentiality of information is critical’ BY Y JIM JIIM L LANGAN AN ANGA GAN

Hudson Valley

Flowers are placed off Route 9G, entrance to the Greentree Drive North neighborhood. Photo by Caroline Carey; Katie Filiberti. Photo submitted.

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CELEBRATING LOCAL: MUSIC, THEATER, ART, FILM AND MORE

{P. 14} BIRDS OF PREY DEMONSTRATION AT THE HYDE PARK DRIVE-IN {P. 15} SHOPPING FOR A CAUSE: NEW HORIZONS RESOURCES {PLUS} STRING WINNERS; ART FUND KICK OFF AND MORE

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YOUR SOURCE FOR LOCAL NEWS AND EVENTS

BY JIM LANGAN

Officials say secrecy is justified BY CHRISTOPHER LENNON Hyde Park Police Chief Charles Broe is hoping to set the record straight regarding the investigation into the killing of 18-year-old Katie Filiberti. Broe said while he realizes the lack of information made public thus far is frustrating members of the public, he believes withholding this information is justi¿ ¿able. > continued on page 3

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MAY 25-31, 2011

Chief, DA discuss Filiberti murder

The investigation into the murder of 18-year-old Katie Filiberti took an unusual turn late last week when Dutchess County District Attorney William Grady instructed the Medical Examiner’s Of¿ f¿ce not to release the results of Filiberti’s autopsy. Earlier, Grady and investigators had indicated the results would be made public as soon as they were available. Filiberti’s body was found in a creek adjacent to a small park off Greentree Drive North in Hyde Park March 19. At first, police called the death suspicious but soon after said they were investigating the young girl’s death as a homicide. After an initial period of intense activity that included numerous ground searches, the case appears to have gone quiet, although Hyde Park Police Chief Charles Broe has consistently said the investigation is “very active and very sensitive.” Reaction in the community has run the gamut, from patience to frustration, but this latest twist has many residents wondering why authorities refuse to release the autopsy in an apparent contravention of procedure.

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{P. 10} MILLBROOK MIL LLBR ROOK B BOOK OOK F FESTIVAL ESTIV VAL THIS SATURDAY P. 13} GRIM MMS S’ FA AIR RYTAL TALE C OMES TO LIFE IN RHINEBE ECK {P GRIMMS’ FAIRYTALE COMES RHINEBECK P. 15} MAR RIST FA ASHIO ON S TUDENTS ON THE CATWALK {P MARIST FASHION STUDENTS OR,’ KOR KO REAN C HIL LDREN’S S LORE AND MORE {PLUS}} ‘THO ‘THOR,’ KOREAN CHILDREN’S

softball season

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INSIDE: PLANNING BOARD FAST TRACKS NEW MEDICAL BUILDING | ARMY-MARINE SOFTBALL SHOWDOWN | ‘ARE WE DEAD YET?’ PRICE: $1.00

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CELEBRATING LO LOCAL: MORE CA MUSIC, THEATER, THEATE ER, ART, ART, FILM FILM AND AND M ORE

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THIS WEEK’S WEATHER: HOLD THE SUN BLOCK

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VOL. 3 | ISSUE 7 | EDITORIAL@THEHUDSONVALLEYNEWS.COM

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marriage in 2009, have indicated they are considering voting in favor of the measure. Saland is certainly feeling the pressure, as some have said this could be one of the de¿ning moments in his 30-year career as a state legislator. Rallies in support of marriage equality have

CHIEF DEFENDS DECISION WAS THE SYSTEM AN ACCOMPLICE

Ward 3 candidate Bill Truitt, receiver of taxes candidate Melissa Milligan, 2011 honoree Doris Kelly, Ward 1 candidate Emily Svenson, supervisor candidate Aileen Rohr, Town Justice David Steinberg and county executive candidate Dan French attend the Hyde Park Democratic Committee’s annual Chairman’s Award ceremony. Photo submitted.

NO COMPLAINTS

Monday came and went without a highly anticipated vote in the state Senate on whether same-sex couples will be allowed to legally marry in New York. As of press time Tuesday, the 62-member Senate is reportedly divided, though some Republican senators, including Sen. Steve Saland of Poughkeepsie, who voted against legalizing same-sex

starting on page 7 OPENING THIS WEEKEND: Powerhouse Theater DIRECTOR’S CUT: Hudson Valley Shakespeare Festival Kids events at Clermont • Readings for a restoration Clear the clutter • Art notes • Local Reader and more

INSIDE: PLEASANT VALLEY BOOK SALE | MURDER INVESTIGATION IN POUGHKEEPSIE | FDR BASEBALL, SOFTBALL

IN LINDA RICCARDULLI’S

BY JIM LAN LANGAN LANGA AN

BY B Y JIM IM LANGAN LA

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READY FOR 2011

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Starlight, star bright in Rhinebeck page 28 THIS WEEK’S WEATHER:

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VOL. 4 | ISSUE 5 | EDITORIAL@THEHUDSONVALLEYNEWS.COM

INSIDE: ST. JAMES CHURCH HONORED BY DC LEGISLATURE | DUTCHESS HISTORIAN DEBATE | LOURDES CREW TOPS FDR

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CELEBRATING LOCAL: MUSIC, THEATER, ART, FILM AND MORE

HYDE PARK DEMS {P P.3}

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WHAT’S HAPPENING THIS WEEK:

YOUR SOURCE FOR LOCAL NEWS AND EVENTS PRICE: $1.00

Photo by Jim Langan.

THIS WEEK’S WEATHER: OFFICALLY MUD SEASON

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{P. 10} NATALIE MERCHANT AT BARD {P. 14} THE ERIN HOBSON COMPACT’S NEW CD {PLUS} MOLLY KATZ HONORED; COMEDY AT DCC AND MORE

VOL. 3 | ISSUE 3 | EDITORIAL@THEHUDSONVALLEYNEWS.COM

INSIDE: RHINEBECK TEA PARTY | DUTCH HERITAGE CELEBRATION | NEW SITE DIRECTOR AT MILLS | THE GREAT RACE

Jazmine Cappillino

Police and Coast Guard officials attempt to raise the plane from the icy Hudson River on Sunday. Photo by Todd Gay.

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Lady Presidents {P.21} more than ready for

{P.28} Big K of C turnout for

Dr. Michael Feraldi was transporting vintage aircraft to air show. Full story on page 2.

THIS WEEK’S WEATHER: ALMOST MUD SEASON

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Martino’s nephew

On May 15, 2010, 11-year-old Nick Guercio was rounding ¿rst base for his Dairy Queen Little League team when he suddenly dropped to the in¿ n¿eld. Coaches and spectators knew this was no ordinary stumble. Something was very wrong and they all rushed Creek Road ¿ eld. ¿eld. An athletic young boy lay motionless with no discernable pulse. Nick had suffered a cardiac event, which had stopped his heart. Within seconds, an extraordinary conÀ nÀuence of forethought, quick thinking, training and heroism began the process of saving little Nick’s life. Off-duty Dutchess County Sheriff’s Deputy Mike Fauci charged the ¿eld and immediately began CPR as a spectator raced to the concession stand, where he knew an automated external de¿ ¿brillator hung on the wall. He sprinted back to the stricken boy and gave the AED to Fauci. By all accounts, Nick was clinically dead. Shortly after, Fauci was able to restart Nick’s heart, and Nick was transported to St. Francis Hospital and quickly Àown to Westchester Medical Center, where doctors installed a pacemaker/de¿ ¿brillator. Within days, Nick was back in his Hyde Park home with his parents, Carla, and Phil, surrounded by his siblings, Anna, 25, Frank, 27, and Marissa, 17. Upon returning

we would almost certainly have lost Nick. It’s important people understand you’ve only got three minutes after a heart attack. CPR is important but most heart attacks are electrical in nature. An AED is the only thing that can restart your heart.” Guercio also expressed her family’s gratitude to Hyde Park resident Mark Grimaldi for having donated the AED to the Little League complex. In an ironic twist of fate, Guercio said she was scheduled to begin working for the American Heart Association three weeks dent. before Nick’s incident. port Guercio is a support a ays coordinator and sa says on her brother’s situation situatio he makes her work at the ul AHA more meaningfu meaningful n-and has her campaign campaigning for more manda-d tory CPR training and AED availability. In the course of talking to Guercio, she said the only real disappointment he fact in Nick’s life was the doctors told him he could no longer participate in Little League. His uncle, Andy Spadaro, has been taking Nick gol¿ ¿ng, but concedes baseball is his true love. “I’m having a special club made for him so we can play more golf,” he said. Nick has been struggling with not being able to play Little League.

Send check to P.O. Box 268, Hyde Park, NY 12538 $42 in county/year $56 out of county/year

Nick N Guercio at last month’s little league opening day. Photo submitted.

“Nick’s back to being Nick, but it’s tough,” Guercio said. “He recited the Little League oath on Opening Day at Cardinal Road ¿eld, but you could tell he wanted to be on the ¿eld.” But here is where this story takes a fantastic turn. A day after talking to Guercio, we received an email from her telling us > continued on next page

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starting st tarttin ng o on n PA PAGE AGE 7

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TREE T REE PLANTING NTING AND AND T TAG AG S SALES ALES USO TRANSIBERIAN ORCHESTRA U SO AT T FDR DR • TRA TR NSIIBERIA AN ORCHES ORCHESTR RA ART: A RT: RU RURAL URAL AL LIFE LIF AN AND ND ‘‘CONSUMPTION’ CONSUMPTION MPTION’

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VOL. 3 | ISSUE 15 | EDITORIAL@THEHUDSONVALLEYNEWS.COM

JULY 20-27, 2011

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FILIBERTI BOYFRIEND’S MOTHER CALLS OUT MARTINO ‘Stand up for my son and Katie as well as cops’ BY JIM LANGAN The mother of the young man questioned early on in the death of Katie Filiberti has reached the boiling point with Hyde Park Supervisor Tom Martino regarding recent comments he made attacking reports that two Hyde Park Police of¿cers had been asked to submit DNA as part of the murder investigation. The mercurial Martino used the term “bomb throwers” in reference to media and Internet speculation about the of¿cers involved.

VOL. 3 | ISSUE 25 | EDITORIAL@THEHUDSONVALLEYNEWS.COM

SEPTEMBER 28-OCTOBER 4, 2011

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INSIDE: TEENS ATTACKED IN HYDE PARK | STANFORD DEMS NAME SLATE | RED HOOK CHILDREN’S LIBRARY OPENS

FILIBERTI’S FATHER FOUND DEAD OF APPARENT SUICIDE

The father of murder victim Katie Filiberti was found dead in Poughkeepsie on Sunday. Police believe he committed suicide. According to Town of Poughkeepsie Police, neighborhood children called 911 after ¿nding the dead body of a man slumped over in the driver’s seat of a Verizon truck in the parking lot of the Verizon maintenance building at 181 VanWagner Rd. in Poughkeepsie. The victim has been identi¿ed as John J. Filiberti, 48, of Hyde Park.

Staatsburg woman will water ski around NYC for injured veterans

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Chinese firm purchases former IBM west campus

Why were they asked for DNA?

SUN SHINES ON HUDSON VALLEY

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Milan Community Day

Celebrating Tivoli Tivo olii Page 19

THIS WEEK’S WEATHER:

HOTTER THAN HARRY POTTER

She obviously got the hang of it and before long, she was on the Hudson. At some point, the 54-year-old Kocy thought it might be fun to water ski the 33 miles around the island of Manhattan. “While I thought it would be an interesting challenge, it also felt very self indulgent,” she said. “I didn’t want this to be about me. So I began to think about doing it for a worthy cause.” On Sept. 18, Kocy will attempt to water ski around Manhattan to bene¿t veterans who have suffered traumatic brain injuries.

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In an odd conÀuence of circumstance, a friend of hers at the renowned Rusk Institute (no relation) talked to her about the important work the institute was doing in the area of traumatic brain injuries (TBI) and the many Iraq and Afghan veterans affected. “TBI doesn’t go away,” she said. “Look at what Congressman Gabrielle Giffords is going through or ABC’s Bob Woodruff. So we decided to do this to raise enough money to fund a pilot program for 60 injured veterans. The pilot study can hopefully be

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TABLE TOP BENEFIT: Local chefs serve up for a worthy cause THE BARD & DUCK TRIUMP: Reviews from Hudson Valley Shakespeare Festival and Bard’s SummerScape Summer fun for Wilderstein supporters, Soundpainting and more! PLUS: Art, entertainment and community events through July 27

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We are the champions THIS WEEK’S WEATHER HER

BACK TO FALLL

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Kocy goes west for the quest

Photo by Nicole DeLawder.

BY JIM LANGAN

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BY HV NEWS STAFF

The investigation into the unsolved murder of Katie Filiberti took another unusual turn when Dutchess County District Attorney William Grady issued a press release last week stating, “The district attorney’s of¿ce would like to take this opportunity to reassure the members of the community that no of¿cer of the Hyde Park Police Department is now, or has ever been, a suspect in Ms. Filiberti’s death.”

Update on Staatsburg woman’s journey to water ski around NYC Page 2

page 19 Photo by Jim Langan.

BY JIM LANGAN A year or so ago, Mary Kocy and her husband, John Rusk, bought an old motorboat from their friends, Bob and Judy Linville of Staatsburg. As their company, Rusk Renovations, is one of the premier high-end residential contractors in New York, refurbishing an old boat didn’t faze them. Shortly thereafter, John Rusk bought a pair of water skis and the couple took to Lake Copake to try them out. Kocy freely admits she had never water skied before and “It took me quite a while to get up on the lake.”

In an announcement made Friday at the Marist College boathouse, a Chinese solar technology manufacturing company said it plans on investing $100 million in the Hudson Valley and hiring up to 1,000 people. Linuo Solar Group plans to create up to 150 permanent jobs at its factory, which will be located at the former IBM west campus in East Fishkill, in 2012. Additional jobs will be created as Linuo begins production of its ¿rst solar products in early 2013.

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Of the $100 million Linuo plans to invest here, approximitely $40 million will go toward production equipment, $30 million will be spent for building renovations and $20 million on working capital. Linuo is currently China’s largest producer of borosilicate 3.3 glass materials and produces a wide range of technical and laboratorial products. The Linuo Group was founded in 1994 and is a $1.3 billion company with more than 13,000 employees worldwide.

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“We are thrilled that this exciting project is becoming a reality for Dutchess County,” said John MacEnroe, president of the Dutchess County Economic Development Corporation. Among those cited for their help moving this project forward were County Executive Bill Steinhaus, Assemblyman Marc Molinaro, Fishkill Supervisor John Hickman, Sen. Steve Saland and U.S. Rep. Maurice Hinchey. > continued on page 3

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LEAPS OF FAITH - Dusan Tynek Dance Theatre at Kaatsbaan SWEET STRUMS - Rhinebeck Chamber Music Society kicks off season with Susanne Schoeppe MAKE YOUR MARK - Local artists team up for Our Hudson events

Photo by Robert Sage.

SEAL OF APPROVAL Rare gray seal getting comfortable in Hyde Park BY CHRISTOPHER LENNON

ONE YEAR LATER Rhinebeck after the Clintons, p page g 23 THIS WEEK’S WEATHER:

WON’T SNOW

The folks at the Rogers Point Boating Association in Hyde Park have been getting regular visits from a large seal that apparently swam up the Hudson River sometime last week. As harbor seal sightings are relatively common in the river, local residents have named the animal Harbie.

Well, it appears Harbie’s name is a bit misleading. Kim Durham, rescue program director with the Long Island-based Riverhead Foundation, has determined through photographs of the animal that Harbie is not a harbor seal, but a gray seal. Thomas Lake, a naturalist with the Department of Environmental Conservation’s Hudson River Estuary Program, said gray seal sightings in the Hudson Valley are quite rare.

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MASTER AND APPRENTICE Creative teams behind Powerhouse River Valley Rep’s perfect harmony Entertainment and community events July 27 through Aug. 2

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CELEBRATING THE HUDSON VALLEY Field Notes and Highlights from 2011 NATURE PRESERVED - Scenic Hudson secures land near Burroughs’ “Slabsides” PLUS: Art, entertainment and community listings through January

“The only previous gray seal that we are aware of in the estuary was March 2004 at the base of the Verrazano-Narrows Bridge,” he said. “There may have been others that we have missed, but none that we know of.” According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, gray seals are found in the western Atlantic Ocean, from eastern Canada to the northeastern Unites States, among other places.


In the Village of Rhinebeck, local real estate company Century 21 Anita Ferri Realty made news when it refused to remove a flat-screen TV from its storefront window when a local zoning-enforcement officer claimed it violated local laws. Tragedy struck in Poughkeepsie in February, when Officer John Falcone was gunned down in front of the Poughkeepsie train station by 27-year-old Lee M. Welch, who had just killed his estranged wife. Welch shot and killed himself after firing the gunshot that killed Falcone. Falcone was given a hero’s farewell when he was laid to rest in Carmel, and he was posthumously promoted to detective.

BY CHRISTOPHER LENNON With New Year’s just a few days away, Hudson Valley News decided to take a look back at some of the people, places and events that made headlines in 2011.

JANUARY

2011 kicked off with the swearing in of the men and women who prevailed in the 2010 elections, including Congressman Chris Gibson and Congresswoman Nan Hayworth. Familiar faces, including state Sen. Stephen Saland and Assembly members Marc Molinaro, Joel Miller and Kevin Cahill, also fended off challenges in the 2010 races. There was a fair amount of contention in many Dutchess County communities during the first month of 2011. In Rhinebeck, many were still frightened and angry over a late-2010 home-invasion robbery; in Poughkeepsie, residents claimed some elected officials had violated ethics rules; and in Hyde Park, Councilwoman Sue Serino found herself at odds with the rest of the board. Rhinebeck residents packed Town Hall in January for meetings on Daytop, the local drug rehabilitation facility that 22-year-old Justin Tadiello broke out of in September 2010 before breaking into and burglarizing a local home. The incident sparked an impassioned debate on Daytop’s role in the community and whether convicted felons should be mandated to seek treatment in a residential neighborhood. In Poughkeepsie, some local residents asked their town’s ethics board to investigate conduct by councilmen

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The Hyde Park Town Board. File photo.

Richard Lecker, Joseph Conte, Michael Cifone, Stephan Krakower and Todd Tancredi, who were accused of accepting money from a developer hoping to lease a property to the town. Hyde Park was the site of much conflict in January. The month kicked off with a battle between Serino and Supervisor Tom Martino over the board’s 2011 appointments, which Serino claimed she was not given advance notice of. News also came that Martino and his fellow board members might have to seek the Independence nomination if they wanted to be re-elected because of infighting in the Republican Party that supported them in 2009. Also, newly elected Gov. Andrew Cuomo made a stop at Marist College

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in January to outline some of his plans, saying, “A strong governor gets his strength from a galvanized population behind him or her. We need a government that is as good as the people of this state. If you speak up, we’re going to do it.” In happier news, The Local in Rhinebeck hosted The Return of Bob Kirwood’s Famous Benefit Dinner, raising more than $5,000 for the Center for Spectrum Services, and in Hyde Park, Sgt. Robert Benson and Officer Brad Moore were promoted to lieutenant and sergeant respectively.

FEBRUARY

February saw what began as a spat between Hyde Park Supervisor Tom Martino and Highway Superintendent Walk Doyle over unpaid bills devolve into an all-out war. Doyle had claimed that because of Martino’s mismanagement of the town’s funds, his vendors had not been paid in a timely fashion. Also in Hyde Park, Michele Zagorski was appointed comptroller following the departure of Darlene Deary, who resigned somewhat suddenly, citing health problems. In Rhinebeck, more than 150 guests attended the annual Hearts Across the Table Dinner, which raised funds for the Rhinebeck-Rheinbach Exchange Program. In 2012, local music students will visit Rheinbach, Germany to perform concerts and get a taste of German culture while living with German host families thanks to this program.

Officer John Falcone. File photo.

Late in February, Dr. Michael Faraldi was killed when the BAC-Strikemaster he was piloting crashed into the icy Hudson River.

MARCH

With the arrival of March came news that County Executive William Steinhaus would retire at the end of the year. This announcement ignited speculation about who would seek the county executive seat, with much focus on Republican Assemblyman Marc Molinaro and Democratic Beekman Supervisor Dan French. As it turned out, Molinaro and French won their respective parties’ endorsements and faced off in November. The March 9 issue of Hudson Valley News featured a story on The Inn at Hyde Park, which houses a number of Social Services recipients, some of whom were implicated in property crimes in the town. At the time, police said nearly a third of the burglaries that had occurred over the past 22 months had occurred within walking distance of the motel. Also in Hyde Park, the body of 18-yearold Katie Filiberti was discovered in a > continued on next page


annual Walk a Mile in Her Shoes walk-athon to benefit the Family Services’ Crime Victims Assistance Program. April was punctuated with the arrest of 62-year-old Constance Palmer, who refused to leave her home when she was being evicted and allegedly pointed a BB gun at a sheriff’s deputy. The incident caused armies of police, many in full SWAT gear, to swarm Palmer’s Hyde Park neighborhood.

MAY

Pictured: Marc Molinaro (top) and Dan French announced they would run for Dutchess County executive in April. File photos.

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small park in the Greentree neighborhood on March 19. The subsequent investigation into the murder of the popular Dutchess Community College student sparked outrage and a number of rumors, with a great deal of misinformation being spread on Internet message boards. Filiberti was laid to rest later that month, and attention shifted to the police investigation. Officers and other officials could be seen combing the Greentree neighborhood for days, and residents

Police combed the park in the Greentree neighborhood looking for clues in the murder of Katie Filiberti. File photo.

began to speculate what investigators were searching for. Also, impromptu memorials to Filiberti could be found throughout the neighborhood. Also in March, local village elections were held. In Tivoli, Bryan Cranna was elected mayor; Jim Reardon was re-elected mayor of Rhinebeck; and Ed Blundell was elected mayor of Red Hook.

APRIL

With little official information coming from police, rumors regarding the murder of 18-year-old Katie Filiberti began to spread like wildfire. Initially, Filiberti’s boyfriend was questioned by police, but eventually he was cleared. Speculation also centered on who Filiberti was with and where she was prior to her death. Also in April, the Town of Hyde Park broke ground on its new police/court facility, which had been approved by voters in 2009. Both Assemblyman Marc Molinaro and Beekman Supervisor Dan French officially announced they would run for county executive in April, sparking a spirited and often contentious seven-month debate over who would be best qualified to lead the county. A fundraiser for 2-year-old Staatsburg resident Thaddeus Harklerode, who suffers from Ohtahra Syndrome, was held on April 1, and in Rhinebeck, local Boy and Girl Scouts helped stock food pantry shelves during their annual Scouting For Food event on April 9. On April 30, dozens of men donned pink flip-flops and high heels at Marist College for the

The month started out with a contentious meeting of the Hyde Park Republican Committee, during which committee leaders amended bylaws to authorize the expulsion of any member proven to be disparaging fellow Republicans. The move was made following the mailing of anonymous postcards, believed to have been sent by Supervisor Tom Martino and other members of the board, attacking fellow board member Sue Serino. The meeting reportedly devolved into an ugly battle between a few Republicans loyal to Martino and the Republican Committee leadership. Later in the month, Serino announced she would not seek re-election to her town board seat, but would instead run for Dutchess County Legislature. The Rhinebeck Jewish Center announced it purchased a new building in May, and after being swindled out of money by a local real estate agent a few years prior, local agent David Borenstein donated his commission back to the Jewish Center. Red Hook’s annual Apple Blossom Day was held in May. Residents and visitors packed the streets of downtown Red Hook for the event, which featured fresh-made foods, live entertainment and

games for children. On the county level, there was a bit of a dust up over the lack of an official historian in Dutchess County. The Legislature and many in the public had asked County Executive William Steinhaus to fund the position, but Steinhaus refused, saying, “Beware, voters and taxpayers! Silly season has arrived.” Also in May, District Attorney William Grady announced he had asked the medical examiner’s office to withhold Katie Filiberti’s autopsy results from the public, further fueling rumors and speculation.

JUNE

In June, Hudson Valley News featured an article on Terry Gipson, a Rhinebeck village trustee, who had announced he would run for state Senate in 2012. Since then, Gipson has been campaigning hard and has made appearances at a number of events throughout the 41st Senate District. Later in the month, Hyde Park Supervisor Tom Martino and other Republicans filed a lawsuit against the same Hyde Park Republican Committee that endorsed Martino in 2009 after the committee refused to endorse him again in 2011. The committee opted for an entirely new slate, led by supervisor candidate Joe Kakish. Meanwhile, Democrats picked supervisor candidate Aileen Rohr to lead their ticket. Sen. Stephen Saland made national news when he cast one of the deciding votes legalizing same-sex marriage in New York. “My vote on this bill is going to disappoint a significant number of people, but I can say my intellectual and emotional journey has ended here today, and I have to define doing the right thing as treating all persons with equality, and that equality includes within the definition of marriage,” Saland said. “I fear that to do otherwise would fly in the face of my upbringing.” In Red Hook, Councilwoman Micki Strawinski announced she would not seek re-election and would instead challenge Ben Traudt for his county Legislature seat. Former Mets and Yankees star Doc Gooden signed autographs in Poughkeepsie for $25 a pop, and “Saturday Night Live” alumna Denny Dillon and her improv comedy group performed at Rhinebeck High School in June. Also in June, Northern Dutchess Hospital honored Dr. Alfred Frontera and Ken Giek during its annual Starlight Ball at the Dutchess County Fairgrounds.

> continued on next page Thaddeus Harklerode and mom Alicia. File photo. Hudson valley news | editorial@thehudsonvalleynews.com | December 28, 2011 {3}


YEAR IN REVIEW

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JULY

Damage in Rhinebeck and Hyde Park from Hurricane Irene in late August. File photos.

July saw a number of new rumors begin to swirl in the Katie Filiberti murder investigation. At one point, there were rumors that a Hyde Park Police officer had been arrested for her killing, and it was later confirmed that two local officers had been asked to submit DNA samples but that no officers were considered suspects. On July 10, four people were killed and two were seriously injured in what was called the worst Hudson River boating accident in recent memory. Police said reckless operation and alcohol were probably contributing factors in the accident, which occurred near Tivoli. Also in July, the lawsuit brought against the Hyde Park Republican Committee by Supervisor Tom Martino and others was dismissed by Dutchess County Supreme Court Judge James Brands, who ruled, “The respondents point to a long and uninterrupted existence of the Hyde Park Republican Committee. Indeed, the petitioner, supervisor of Hyde Park, had successfully sought support from this committee in the past.” After much debate, Red Hook’s Centers and Greenspaces Plan, which drastically changed zoning laws, was approved. The plan aimed to concentrate development in village-like districts and maintain the town’s rural character. Also in July, Hudson Valley News readers were introduced to Staatsburg’s Mary Kocy, who had begun training to water ski around the island of Manhattan. The Walkway Over the Hudson celebrated its millionth visitor in July, the Red Hook Public Library officially opened

Walkway’s millionth visitor. File photo.

its new children’s wing, seven cats and a kitten were rescued by the SPCA from a condemned building in Poughkeepsie, and in Hyde Park, a rare grey seal decided to make his home in the Hudson River.

AUGUST

Early in the month, it was revealed that due to a missed filing deadline, county executive candidate Marc Molinaro, along with County Clerk Brad Kendall, District Attorney William Grady and Sheriff Adrian “Butch” Anderson, would not appear on the Conservative line in the upcoming November election. Hyde Park Republicans denied incumbents Tom Martino, Mike Athanas, Michael Taylor and Jim Monks nomination at their caucus in August, and focus shifted to the Independence Party primary election, which would be the incumbent board members’ last opportunity to appear on the November ballot. Also in August, Rhinebeck Councilwoman Gina Fox, a Democrat, officially announced her intention to challenge Supervisor Tom Traudt in the November election. Democrats also endorsed Elizabeth Spinzia, who ran for supervisor in 2009, for town council. Meanwhile, Rhinebeck Republicans announced they were backing Traudt for > continued on next page Hyde Park’s gray seal, Harbie. File photo.

{4} December 28, 2011 | editorial@thehudsonvalleynews.com | Hudson valley news


from the Dutchess County Agricultural Society to close the 2011 Dutchess County Fair two days early. “It would have been a record year,” said Fairgrounds Manager Bob Grems. “We took a tough blow.” Also in August, Councilman Joe Gelb and other Rhinebeck board members secured NYSERDA grants to install solar energy systems on municipal buildings, County Legislator Joel Tyner announced he would challenge Congressman Chris Gibson in 2012, and Alyssa Kogon announced she would challenge Assemblyman Joel Miller in 2012.

SEPTEMBER

Stephen D. Shand. File photo. < continued from previous page

supervisor, as well as incumbent Bruce Washburn and newcomer Debbi Mimoso for town council. The big news in August, though, was the arrest of 23-year-old Stephen D. Shand in connection with the rape and murder of Katie Filiberti. Police said they found DNA evidence implicating Shand, a Jamaican immigrant living in Hyde Park, in the murder. Police believe Shand, a newspaper deliveryman, crossed paths with Filiberti while delivering the Poughkeepsie Journal on March 19. They claim he then raped and killed her by drowning her in a stream. Towards the end of August, Hurricane Irene hit the region. Though it had been downgraded to a tropical storm before hitting the Hudson Valley, Irene still managed to cause a great deal of flooding and damage, as well as widespread power outages through much of the county. Hurricane Irene also prompted officials

Dutchess County Fairgrounds Manager Bob Grems announces the early closing of the fair due to Hurricane Irene. File photo.

In September, students from across the county went back to school, and many local towns and villages commemorated the 10-year anniversary of the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001.

Firefighters from the Rhinebeck, Rhinecliff and Hillside fire departments line up at the beginning of the 9/11 memorial ceremony in Rhinebeck. File photo.

Accused killer Stephen Shand’s pets – two cats and a rabbit – were taken by the Dutchess County SPCA and put up for adoption. Executive Director Joyce Garrity said, “The animals are, of course, innocent little animals and they deserve a great home.” The father of Katie Filiberti was found dead from an apparently selfinflicted gunshot wound to the head later in September. John J. Filiberti was 48 years old. The Town of Clinton made headlines when the town’s finances were questioned by local residents, who also criticized the board for an expensive town hall expansion project. Supervisor Jeff Burns said at the time that he had called a meeting with employees to let them know the town might have to lay off some workers in 2011. In Hyde Park, Supervisor Tom Martino, along with board members Mike Athanas, Michael Taylor and Jim Monks, lost the Independence primary to the candidates endorsed by the Republican Party, and Sue Serino beat Robert Clearwater in a primary for the Republican nomination in

Mary Kocy successfully water skis around the island of Manhattan to raise funds and awareness for veterans suffering from traumatic brain injuries in September. File photo.

a county Legislature race. On Saturday, Sept. 17, Staatsburg’s Mary Kocy successfully water skied around Manhattan to raise funds and awareness for veterans suffering from traumatic brain injuries. In Pleasant Valley, the annual Pleasant Valley Weekend celebration was moved to Helen Aldrich Park because of damage from Hurricane Irene, and Red Hook’s Hardscrabble Day featured a live performance by Robert Randolph & The Family Band.

OCTOBER

October was a big month for the men and women seeking elected office in November. Candidates made their final pushes, and all eyes were on the two men fighting for the county executive seat, Marc Molinaro and Dan French. In Hyde Park, Don Goddard, a former lieutenant and acting chief of the Hyde

Park Police Department, announced he was suing the town, along with Supervisor Tom Martino and councilmen Michael Taylor, Michael Athanas and James Monks, claiming they violated his rights by eliminating his position with the police department in an effort to oust him from the department. Also in October, Hyde Park Highway Superintendent Walt Doyle was honored by Dutchess County Republicans with the Canale Award. In accepting the award, Doyle said, “This is a pretty big deal for a kid from a small town.” Also, the towns of Clinton and Hyde Park voted to override the state’s mandated 2% property tax cap in anticipation of tax hikes in their 2012 budgets. The month ended with a surprise snowstorm that blanketed the area and caused power outages and damage reminiscent of Hurricane Irene. > continued on page 8

An late-October snowstorm covers political signs in Rhinebeck. File photo. Hudson valley news | weekend@thehudsonvalleynews.com | December 28, 2011 {5}


OPINION

send letters to the editor to: editorial@thehudsonvalleynews.com

TO THE EDITOR:

Most Americans are sick and tired of the bickering in Congress over who to tax and how much to tax them. When all is said and done, the rich will get richer and the rest of us will pay more. There is a tax bill in Congress now (HR25 and S13) that would end all of this nonsense. It would get rid of the Communist-socialist-inspired income tax. By changing the way our government collects taxes to a consumption tax, businesses and individuals would be free of all federal income taxes and the IRS. There is a hidden 22% federal tax in everything produced in this country, crippling our industry’s chance to even compete on the shelves of our own Walmart and Target. It should be easy to see how this tax change will make us a world manufacturing and economic power again. This means jobs! The average family of four making $50,000 per year will pay only 11% total federal taxes, even less if they buy used items. No American will pay any federal taxes up to a level decided by the Health and Human Services, controlled only by the number of dependents. The rich will pay more than anyone else but never more than 23%. The politically powerful and connected and those lobbyists who are gaming the system to their own advantage will have to find a new game. The politicians love it because they can hand out favors to their friends. Please join AFFT (Americans For Fair Taxation) at Fairtax.org to help me and thousands of others push our legislators to pass the Fairtax Bill in the House and in the Senate. William T. Reilly Hyde Park

EXPRESS YOURSELF. Have a reaction to one of our stories or columnists? Let us know. Write us at editorial@thehudsonvalleynews.com.

THUG-O-METER MARTINO DECLARES MARTIAL LAW

11-3-09 NEW HYDE PARK TOWN BOARD ELECTED

THE THUG-O-METER IS A SERVICE OF HV NEWS INTENDED TO GAUGE THE LEVEL OF THUGGISH ACTIVITY OF THE TOWN BOARD IN ANY GIVEN WEEK.

Alas, this would appear to be the final Thug-O as our long municipal nightmare comes to an end Sunday. The Thug-O has shone a bright light on the shenanigans and incompetence of the Martino board for two long years and of that we’re extremely proud. We hope never to have to use it again but we will if warranted. Let’s hope this new 5-0 board doesn’t succumb to the arrogance and secretiveness of an unchallenged majority. So far, the promised transparency and communication have been sorely lacking. But for now, the Thug-O bids everyone a fond farewell.

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DAYS UNTIL THE NEW HYDE PARK TOWN BOARD

support local news and businesses each week. subscribe or advertise today. (845) 233-4651 subscriptions are $42 in Dutchess, $56 out of county. Send a check to P.O. Box 268 Hyde Park, NY 12538. {6} December 28, 2011 | editorial@thehudsonvalleynews.com | Hudson valley news

how this can really hurt you. Are you in any immediate physical harm? Will it kill you? If the answer is no, then there is time. Focus on the solution, not the problem. OPINION Never compromise your true self. Be I DON’T AGREE honest, even when it is difficult. Honesty WITH ANY OF YOU is your greatest ally and I think that you will find that when applied genuinely, most BY LARISSA CARSON people are very forgiving of the mistakes of others. Likewise, if you have been honest Don’t sweat the small stuff with someone and they can’t handle it, As 2011 winds to a close, I can’t help perhaps it is time to reassess that relationship but look back at what an eventful year it has in your life. When you are honest, you’re true been in every respect. Great political, social to yourself; if they can’t handle that, there is a and economic change across the world has much greater compatibility issue. the inception of 2012 looking very different Count on yourself. In the end, you are the from the last time that ball dropped. As we only one in your life who can change anything ready ourselves to embrace the challenges for you. As much as we would all like to pin the New Year will present, it seems that the our poor decisions and moments of weakness best way to figure out where we are going is on other people, it is important to recognize to look at where we have been. that you, and you alone, are responsible for This life is not your actions. If you without its challenges. Perhaps we would make a bad decision, We human beings have own up to it. You aren’t be better off a distinct ability, one the first person to make we share with no other building hospitals a mistake; anyone who living creature on the would make you feel planet. That is the ability and homes instead that way isn’t worth to learn from others’ of bombs. your time. mistakes. It seems it is Open your heart to about time to take advantage of this skill. In strangers. Sometimes the most important my time so far, here is what I’ve learned. I lessons in life are learned from someone you offer it to you in good faith. may only ever share a few minutes, or none Eat good food. If there is one thing that at all, with. can change your mood and outlook it is diet. Share. Be conscious of what you are putting in your Don’t forget to have fun. If you aren’t body. What you put in directly corresponds getting happier and having more fun as you with what you get out of it. If you can afford get older, then something has to change. one, get a good juicer (do your homework, Respect resources. Remember that all juicers were not created equal). The health the monetary system was created to benefits are too many to list. represent resources. I think it is time for Sleep. A good night’s rest can make all us as a species to look at the way we waste the difference. Don’t ignore your body if it resources. How silly of us is it to bomb is telling you it is tired. It isn’t a false alarm. another country with our resources, to Your body is the most amazing thing that you destroy their resources and then use more own; respect and take care of it. You can’t of the same resource to rebuild them? live without it. Perhaps we would be better off building Exercise. The endorphins released during hospitals and homes instead of bombs. this process should be enough of a reason, Finally, don’t ever date someone who but if it isn’t, consider the health of your body doesn’t use his or her signal when driving. preventative maintenance. You share the road with thousands of people Don’t sweat the small stuff. Hone your a day and there is absolutely no good excuse coping mechanisms. Stress is one of the not to use a turn signal. It takes almost no most harmful things you can bring into your effort to turn on, and they turn themselves own life. An inability to cope with everyday off! Serial offenders have no excuse; they tasks and challenges will leave you worn are either lazy or cocky and both are good out. Prolonged stress will even make you reasons to start this New Year focusing on ill. One of the simplest coping mechanisms you. After all, the answers are all out there; is to process your way all the way through you just have to look for them. a problem. Many people think of the worstcase scenario and plateau there, worrying Larissa Carson is a life-long resident of about a growing problem they have just the Hudson Valley. To respond to this column, created in their own minds. Instead, think of email editorial@thehudsonvalleynews.com


editorial@thehudsonvalleynews.com

together. A Penn State flack will say they were just getting a leg up on scouting some young boys with potential. Paterno will return to football as a head coach in OPINION the Lingerie League in an attempt to tamp down pedophile rumors. Tom Martino, Michael Athanas and Jim Monks will star in a gripping remake of BY JIM LANGAN “Grumpy Old Men.” The plot will center on how much damage three angry old 2012 PREDICTIONS guys with anger management issues can It’s that time of year again when I get do to a lovely town. Tom Martino will to make predictions that will have the play a Tea Party fanatic who’s been fired staying power of that ugly sweater your from every place but Cape Canaveral. Aunt Mabel gave you for Christmas. So The movie will be set in any number with tongue firmly planted in cheek, here of storefronts shuttered during their goes for 2012. disastrous administration. County Executive Marc Molinaro will To recapture revenue lost in last year’s name County Legislator Joel Tyner to washout, the Dutchess County Fair will the newly created position of Dutchess introduce a stripper tent this summer. County Ambassador to Outer Mongolia: Tuesday and Wednesday will be amateur “Hey, it keeps him away from the sixth night with the pros and hos working the floor and they might actually listen to him pole the rest of the week. Senior admission over there.” will be half off. The commander of The Red Sox will the U.S.S. Roosevelt run away with the will notify Hyde Park American League East that he and his crew as the aging New York have decided not to Tom Martino will Yankees focus on their attend this year’s play a Tea Party AARP membership Memorial Day parade: benefits plan. Mariano “I just can’t take one fanatic who’s been Rivera begins using a more email from that chair to come fired from every scooter Billy Conn guy. Hasn’t in from the bullpen he ever heard of spellplace but and Derek Jeter starts check?” No word one at shortstop. Cape Canaveral. using on whether Conn’s Manager Joe Girardi speaking privileges at says, “Hey, they called town board meetings Phil Rizzuto ‘Scooter,’ will be reinstated didn’t they?” now that Martino’s gone. His incoherent A massive blizzard will bury Hyde Park ramblings and hobo-chic outfits were and the Hudson Valley in early February. always hilarious in past years. While accepting the grateful kudos of Sen. Steve Saland will be presented the town, Highway Superintendent Walt with the prestigious “Thin Skin” award Doyle will tell the press, “Every road is by the Dermatologist Association for his plowed and cleared except for one off ability to nurse a grudge over even the Route 9G. It appears we lost the proper most innocuous observation relating to procedure paperwork on that one.” him. Association President Dr. Ivan Itch Now let’s try a few more serious said, “Steve is the only person other than predictions. Billy Martin who could hear someone give On the big stage of presidential politics, him the finger.” Mitt Romney will get the Republican With the ratings for the former “Live nomination and persuade New Jersey With Regis and Kelly” plummeting with Gov. Chris Christie to be his running mate. Regis’s departure, ABC will fire Kelly That will work for both of them. Christie Ripa and hire all three Kardashian sisters. is hugely popular and can get around his A spokesman for ABC will cite the fact pledge not to run by saying he didn’t run, they won’t have to pay for guests as the he was asked to serve. Romney-Christie sisters can simply talk about themselves crush Obama-Biden in November. It for an hour. also makes Christie the heir apparent for A Pennsylvania prosecutor will produce Republicans, win or lose, going forward. evidence that Joe Paterno and Jerry On the state level, the world’s most Sandusky took regular trips to Thailand fortuitous senator, Kirsten Gillibrand, will

USUALLY RIGHT

not survive a big Republican year and will be defeated by a well-financed Republican unknown. Think Scott Murphy’s thumping by Chris Gibson. Rhinebeck Village Mayor Jim Reardon will make peace with the events code legislation and the fair will be bigger and better. Last year’s rained-out Chubby Checker show will be back on in 2012.

OPINION

While the incoming Hyde Park Town Board won’t be bringing David Halberstam back from the dead, residents will begin emerging from their Martino bomb shelters in hopes of a better life. Here’s wishing everyone a prosperous and happy 2012. Jim Langan can be reached at editorial@thehudsonvalleynews.com.

QUOTE OF THE WEEK

New Year’s Day is the accepted time to make your annual good resolutions. Next week you can begin paving hell with them as usual. –Mark Twain

Three generations of Langans – Jim, Jay and Oliver – enjoy Palm Beach last week. Hudson valley news | editorial@thehudsonvalleynews.com | December 28, 2011 {7}


U O Y E S A C N I

MISSED IT

< continued from page 5

NOVEMBER

The big news in November was the local elections. Republican Marc Molinaro defeated Democrat Dan French for county executive, Democrats swept in Hyde Park, Republican Supervisor Tom Traudt won re-election in Rhinebeck and Republican Supervisor Sue Crane, who did not face a challenger this year, was re-elected in Red Hook. Also, new supervisors were elected in Stanford and Pleasant Valley, and Republicans kept their majority in the Dutchess County Legislature. Clinton residents packed Town Hall for budget meetings after it was learned the board was considering raising taxes 29%. The board eventually lowered the increase to 10.5% before adopting a budget in November. In Rhinebeck, November was all about Sinterklaas. A party at the Rhinecliff Dock was held in anticipation of Sinterklaas’s arrival, and a week later, on Dec. 1, the annual Sinterklaas festival was held in downtown Rhinebeck.

Sinterklaas festival in Rhinebeck. File photo.

Also in November, food was in the news: Rhinebeck Lions delivered free turkey dinners for Thanksgiving, and Walter Scheib, former executive chef of the White House from 1994 to 2005, prepared dinner for local residents at a Premier Cares Foundation fundraiser.

DECEMBER

Tivoli celebrated the season with its annual Winterfest celebration, featuring all sorts of cold-weather activities and a visit from Santa Claus. Santa was also spotted during events in Poughkeepsie, Red Hook, Hyde Park and Rhinebeck this year. After only 20 months at the helm of the Hyde Park Police Department, Chief Charles Broe announced in December that he was resigning to take a job in the private sector. After years of trials and tribulations, Hyde Park’s new police/court facility was unveiled to the public during a ceremony at the Cardinal Road building. During the event, local residents John and Gloria Golden were honored for their donation of the land the facility was built on.

Hyde Park Police Chief Charles Broe speaks during the unveiling of the town’s new police/ court facility. File photo.

• Did he think it was one of Santa’s reindeer? In a suburb of Rochester, 29-year-old Andrew Caswell was arrested for DUI after being stopped for speeding. Responding officers discovered Caswell had a badly injured deer in the back seat. Caswell’s car had hit the deer and Caswell told officers he was taking the deer to a local hospital. The deer died and police took Caswell to the drunk tank. • Things got a little crazy at the Strikers Family Sports Center in Rock Hill, South Carolina. It appears Omar Stevenson took a shine to a woman as they both bowled in adjacent lanes. Omar repeatedly offered to buy her drinks and the woman refused. Not taking no for an answer, Omar threw a 12-pound bowling ball at the woman, striking her in the forehead. The woman required stitches and medical treatment and Omar was charged with attempted murder. So much for bowling night. • Our California spies report that Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa was spotted on a date with Bo Derek at Giorgio Baldi’s in Santa Monica. We’re also told Bo still looks pretty hot for 55. No surprise there. Also in the restaurant were Pierce Brosnan and singer Rhianna (at separate tables). • Remember all the self-congratulatory backslapping coming from the Hyde Park planning and town boards about Dunkin Donuts relocating a half mile south of its current location? I still can’t figure out why that was considered an accomplishment. Well, Dunkin Donuts is staying put. They’re buying that medical building behind them and that will be the new drivethru. Word is between the town and some internal issues, moving to the new location was too much of a hassle. We also hear the anchor tenants for that new medical building on Route 9 had a falling out and it’s back to square one for the owner. • Jimmy Carter was true to form last week, sending his condolences to Kim Jong Un on the death of his father, Kim Jong Il. Nothing like the death of a creepy madman to get Jimmy Carter weepy.

{8} December 28, 2011 | editorial@thehudsonvalleynews.com | Hudson valley news

• Looks like the long knives are out for Newt Gingrich. I’m surprised it took this long, but they all started going after him when he surged in the polls.

At the end of the day, it will be Romney. Love the Democrats professing disgust that Newt may have cheated on his second wife, but it was OK for Bill Clinton to womanize 24/7. • Down in West Monroe, Louisiana, a bunch of drunk 20-somethings decided to play bumper cars with handicapped scooters at a Walmart at 2:30 a.m. Everyone escaped except 22-year-old Christopher Butler, who was nabbed by police as he motored around the aisles. • Wisconsin Congressman Jim Sensenbrenner got himself in hot water last week after being overheard discussing Michelle Obama’s sizable derriere. The congressman was heard saying, “She’s always lecturing us on eating right but meanwhile she’s has a large posterior.” A spokesman for the congressman says the conversation was not intended for public dissemination but apologized to the first lady. • Well, it didn’t take long for a return to business as usual in Iraq. A day after the last U.S. troops left, a coordinated series of bomb blasts killed 68 and injured hundreds. Watch for the Shiites and the Sunnis to rip the country apart now that we’re gone. Such a waste of blood and treasure. • Mitt Romney was on a Boston radio program last week and said he’d deport Onyango Obama if he were president. Onyango is Barack Obama’s uncle and has been living in the U.S. illegally for two decades. He was recently arrested for DUI in Massachusetts. • A 7-pound Weiner was born to disgraced former Congressman Anthony Weiner and his doormat wife Huma last week. The little Weiner was immediately placed on a warm bun and swaddled in wax paper. We’re assuming photos of his little Weiner will be forthcoming from the proud father. • A special shout-out to Bob Delarm and his posse for once again decorating the light poles and fixtures in Hyde Park for Christmas. Also, thanks to Roger Larsen of Cranberry’s for the nice job he did decorating the area around his restaurant. It was a nice touch. • How about the moron from Poughkeepsie who was arrested for having a set of brass knuckles in his luggage as he attempted to board a flight to Orlando from Westchester? Stebbings Muhammad, 21, said the brass knuckles were a Christmas gift for his wife. Must be quite a lady, that Mrs. Muhammad. I’m assuming they left their pit bull chained to a pipe in their apartment while they were away.


Images from 2011 Hudson Valley Weekend cover feature stories. File photos.

starting on page 12

Hudson valley news | weekend@thehudsonvalleynews.com | December 28, 2011 {9}


event listings throughout the Hudson Valley e-mail us your events: weekend@thehudsonvalleynews.com. Deadline is noon on Thursday. Listings are accurate as of press time but be sure to confirm details before you go.

THIS WEEK (DEC. 28-JAN. 1) ‘Cathedral to Carol: A Holiday Celebration’; Dec. 29 and 30; 8 p.m. both days; The Center for Performing Arts at Rhinebeck, 661 Route 308, Rhinebeck; George Conrad and accompanist Joel Flowers perform their first holiday concert at The Center, proceeds will be used to repair damages from Hurricane Irene; $18; 845-876-3080.

Getting Motivated with Marion; Tuesday, Jan. 3; 6-7 p.m.; Grinnell Library, 2642 East Main St., Wappingers Falls; Learn how changing your thoughts can give you a more positive outlook and change your life; 845-297-3428.

UPCOMING Teen Study Group; Wednesday, Jan. 4; 6-8 p.m.; Grinnell Library, 2642 East Main St., Wappingers Falls; Focus on science, technology, engineering and mathematics; Free; 845-297-3428. S Screening of ‘The One Percent’; Thursday, JJan. 5; 7 p.m.; Crafted Kup, 44 Raymond Ave., Poughkeepsie; Screening of film followed by P audience discussion; Free; 845-876-7906. a

Reiki Circle; Friday, Dec. 30; 7 p.m.; Partners in Massage, 4415 Albany Post Rd., Hyde Park; 845-229-9133. Dutchess Peace Meeting; Monday, Jan. 2; 7-8:30 p.m.; Unitarian Fellowship, 67 South Randolph Ave., Poughkeespie; All interested in peace, social justice, and the revolution of the 99% are invited; Free; 845-876-7906.

Opening Reception for ‘Outside In: The View From Where I Am’; Friday, Jan. 6; 6-8 p.m.; Morton Memorial Library, 82 Kelly St., Rhinecliff; Photographs, paintings and sketches by Ginger Long Glynn, on display through Jan. 31; 845876-2903. ‘American Buffalo’; Friday, Jan. 6 and Saturday, Jan. 7, 8 p.m.; Sunday, Jan. 8, 3 p.m.; The > continued on next page

Wine tastings every Saturday starting at noon.

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Scenic Hudson secures naturalist site

BY HVN WEEKEND STAFF Following in the steps of Thoreau, essayist and American naturalist John Burroughs was a monumental figure in the conservation movement in the United States during the turn of the 20th century. Fittingly, on Dec. 22, 600 acres just south of Burroughs’ Nature Sanctuary in Esopus was purchased by the state Department of Environmental Conservation for $1.29 million from Scenic Hudson. The land purchased by the environmental advocacy group was dedicated as the Black Creek State Forest and includes a trail system and Burroughs’ cabin, “Slabsides.” John Burroughs State Environmental Commissioner Joseph Martens said, “The ecological significance and recreational opportunities provided by the Black Creek and its surrounding land makes this property a conservation priority for DEC’s Hudson River Estuary program. “The property will conserve the natural habitats, creeks, woods and scenery that John Burroughs introduced to national audiences with his renowned essays, allowing future generations to use and enjoy this precious ecosystem forever,” Martens continued. Scenic Hudson President Ned Sullivan added, “This land will connect people with nature, provide opportunities for exercise and recreation and protect habitats essential for eagles and endangered species.” Burroughs would often write about the Old Clump Mountain in the Catskills, where he grew up on his family farm. In 1874, Burroughs bought the 9-acre estate in West Park, saying, “Life has a different flavor here” in his essay “Far and Near.” A year later, he bought additional land where he wrote and hosted many visitors, including students from Vassar College, Walt Witman, Thomas Edison and President Teddy Roosevelt.

Historic announcements at Olana

BY HVN WEEKEND STAFF The 200-acre home of famed Hudson River School painter Frederic Edwin Church, Olana State Historic Site in Hudson, has announced that Kimberly Flook will take over as site manager in its 44th visitor season. After an almost 40-year museum career with New York State, Linda McLean has announced her retirement from Olana. McLean completed a master’s thesis on the photograph collection at Olana, working with then-Director Richard Slavin. Prior to Olana, McLean was the director at the John Jay Homestead State Historic Site in Westchester. McLean’s successor Flook recently tenured at the Philipse Manor Hall State Historic Site in Yonkers where she cultivated many local partnerships, developed a series of programming for all ages and has established a consistent web and social media presence. Last week, Gov. Andrew Cuomo announced a $62.7 million Capital Economic Development Council program, including a a $274,000 grant awarded to The Olana Partnership towards landscape restoration. The program is designed to jump-start the region’s economy and make its respective communities globally competitive. For more information, visit Olana at www.olana.org.


from 2011 and learn about Cocoon; Free; 845876-6470. e-mail us your events: weekend@thehudsonvalleynews.com < continued from previous page Center for Performing Arts at Rhinebeck, 661 Route 308, Rhinebeck; David Mamet’s story of a pair of two-bit criminals’ efforts to steal a coin collection; Adults $20, seniors $18; 845876-3080. Annie Leibovitz Signing and Discussion; Saturday, Jan. 7; 4 p.m.; Oblong Books & Music, 6422 Montgomery St., Rhinebeck; Photographer to discuss and sign copies of new book “Pilgrimage”; 845-876-0500.

WEEKEND ART

Japan, naturally

Scrapbooking Workshop; Saturday, Jan. 7; 1:30-3 p.m.; Grinnell Library, 2642 East Main St., Wappingers Falls; Attendees must bring six to eight photos of the same theme to use in their project; Free; 845-297-3428.

Through Dec. 31, share a love of Japan and natural materials with artists Keiko Sono and Kazuma Oshita at the Unison Gallery in New Paltz. Sono is a multi-media artist who believes in art as our evolutionary trait – as critical as the ability to stand upright. She explores this deep relationship using a wide range of platforms, from visual art to community projects. Oshita reveals his deep affinity for various elements, such as wood, metal, paper and charcoal, in his elegant yet powerful, sometimes whimsical sculptures and drawings.

Senior Citizen ID Cards; Wednesday, Jan. 11; 9:30-11 a.m.; Dutchess County Division of Aging Services, First Floor Conference Room, 27 High St., Poughkeepsie; For residents age 60 and older, bring driver’s license or birth certificate; $2; 845-486-2555. Family Game Night; Friday, Jan. 13; 7-9 p.m.; Grinnell Library, 2642 East Main St., Wappingers Falls; Join other families for a night of video games on the big screen; Free; 845-297-3428.

weekend e-mail us: weekend@thehudsonvalleynews.com y opporunities for artists in the Hudson Valley Nominations are still open for local Hudson Valley women for the 2012 Martha Washington Woman of History Award. This award, given by Washington’s Headquarters State Historic Site each March, acknowledges the accomplishments of a local female who has contributed in her own special way towards bringing a greater awareness, appreciation and acceptance of Hudson Valley history to the forefront. The closing date for submission of applications is Friday, January 6. The 2012 award will be presented at “The General’s Lady” on Saturday, March 31. For more information, call 845-562-1195. Beacon Open Studios is accepting submissions for The Big Draw, an open submission art show culminating in a gala party and live drawing rally. 6”x8” works on paper in any media including (but not limited to) drawing, painting, collage, photography and mixed media. Deadline is January 10. See www. beaconopenstudios.org for details.

Dutchess County residents working in all choreographic styles, including mixed-media or multi-genre performance works can apply for Dutchess County Arts Council’s Fellowship Program. Both professional and emerging artists are invited to apply. Those artists who demonstrate a developed technique and vision, as well as perseverance in building a career as a professional artist, will be given greater consideration. Complete eligibility, guidelines and application can be found at www.artsmidhudson.org. For more information or to RSVP, contact Eve Madalengoitia at 845454-3222 or email evem@artsmidhudson.org. Deadline to apply for the 2012 Individual Artists’ Fellowship in Choregraphy is Monday, January 23 at 2 p.m.

‘Annie’; Jan. 13-Feb. 5; 8 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays, 3 p.m. Sundays; The Center for Performing Arts at Rhinebeck, 661 Route 308, Rhinebeck; Tony Award-winning family favorite directed by AnnChris Warren, opening night benefits DCSPCA; Adults $26, seniors and children $22; 845-876-3080. ‘Scenes from Past Productions’; Saturday, Jan. 14; Noon; Cocoon Theatre, 6384 Mill St. (Route 9), Rhinebeck; Enjoy theater and dance

Annual State of Rhinebeck Dinner; Thursday, Jan. 19; 6 p.m.; The Tavern at the Beekman Arms, Route 9, Rhinebeck; Hosted by the Rhinebeck Area Chamber of Commerce, includes dinner and cash bar; Non-members $75, members prepaid $55, members at door $65; 845-876-5904. His Humble Majesty: The Artistry of Marco Maggi Opening Reception and Lecture; Friday, Jan. 20; 5:30 p.m.; Frances Lehman Loeb Art Center, Vassar College, Poughkeepsie; Exhibit runs through April 1; 845-437-7745. Mavis Staples Concert; Friday, Jan. 20; 8 p.m.; The Bardavon, 35 Market St., Poughkeepsie; Legendary singer of “I’ll Take You There” to perform live; Adults $45, members $40; 845473-2072. Morton Book Club Meeting; Tuesday, Jan. 24; 6:30-7:30 p.m.; Morton Memorial Library, 82 Kelly St., Rhinecliff; “The Paris Wife” by Paula McLain and “A Moveable Feast” by Ernest Hemingway will be discussed, copies available at library; 845-876-2903. Reader’s Rendezvous Book Club; Wednesday, Jan. 25; 7 p.m.; Grinnell Library, 2642 East Main St., Wappingers Falls; Read and discuss “Heaven is For Real,” by Todd Burpo; Free; 845-297-3428. Swing Dance Workshops; Tuesday, Jan. 27; 6:30-7:15 p.m. and 7:15-8 p.m.; Poughkeepsie Tennis Club, 135 S. Hamilton St, Poughkeepsie; $15 or $20 for both workshops; 845-454-2571. Dutchess County Regional Trails Conference; Saturday, April 21; Call for schedule; Discuss regional trail system with other interested parties; Cornell Boathouse, Marist College, Poughkeepsie; Free; 845-876-4123.

Deadline for calendar is noon on Friday: weekend@thehudsonvalleynews.com

Save the date for a special Powerhouse preview

Escape from the mid-winter blues with a special program – a reading of a new play on Saturday, Jan. 21, at 5 p.m., at the Vogelstein’s Center Martel Theater at Vassar College for this special free presentation. Visit powerhouse.vassar.edu for more information. find us online at www.thehudsonvalleynews.com and on facebook and twitter: @HVWeekend @HVNews

The Tivoli Artists Co-Op is accepting submissions for its Annual Erotica Show with the theme of “Let Me Entertain You.” The show will run February 3 - 26, 2012. Entry deadline is January 16, 2012. Artists may submit photographs, paintings, drawings, collage, mixed media, sculpture. The work exhibited will be of a sensual and playfully suggestive nature but not pornographic. 60 Broadway, Tivoli, www. tivoliartistsco-op.com

Dutchess County Art Association and Barrett Art Center have extended the call for entries for the 27th annual National Juried Contemporary Art Exhibition, “New Directions.” The show will be on display from Saturday, Jan. 21 through Friday, March 9, 2012 at 55 Noxon St., Poughkeepsie. MASS MoCA curator, Susan Cross will select paintings, drawings, prints, photographs, sculpture and mixed media pieces for the show. The extended entry deadline is Friday, December 30 at 6 p.m. For Barrett Art Center members, entry fee is $30 for the first four images and $5 for each additional image. For non-members, entry fee is $35 for the first four images and $5 for additional images. For more information and to request a prospectus, call 845-471-2550 or email info@barrettartcenter.org.

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Hudson valley news | weekend@thehudsonvalleynews.com | December 28, 2011 {11}


BY NICOLE DELAWDER | WEEKEND@THEHUDSONVALLEYNEWS.COM

Oh, Hudson Valley, how we love thee! Every week for the last 365 days, the Hudson Valley has been packed to the brim with art, theater, music and entertainment for all ages. Weekend takes a look back on all the goodness that took place right in our backyard this year. 2011 had it all – festivals of every kind, art of every genre, music of every taste and history all our own. What 2011

showed us most, though, is the power of our community. The unexpected visit from Hurricane Irene put things in perspective in the Hudson Valley. Whether it was a weeklong power outage leaving you asking for a generator for Christmas, or leaving you with hundreds of thousands of dollars in damages like the Center for the Performing Arts in Rhinebeck – our respect for Mother

Nature has been reinforced. Within 20 minutes, the arts space was submerged in 4 feet of water, damaging dressing rooms, a studio, a classroom, costume construction and storage areas. The Center cancelled several shows for weeks after, but bounced back to perform “The Diary of Anne Frank,” “The Man Who Came to Dinner,” “Dracula” and the annual fundraiser “Highlights from the Footlights.”

The Hudson Valley’s own Levon Helm came together with some of his musician friends for two concerts to benefit our neighbors devastated by Hurricane Irene. On Nov. 18 at UPAC in Kingston, The Levon Helm Band joined special guests Donald Fagen, Natalie Merchant, Graham Parker, Organ Meat featuring John Medeski, The Silver Hollers featuring Chris Wood and Liz Mitchell to donate their time and talent, donating all net proceeds to raise money for several organizations throughout the hardest-hit Catskill region. On Nov. 19, all proceeds from the Midnight Ramble at The Levon Helm Studios in Woodstock were donated by Helm, his band and special guest Hook Herrera. Before Irene left her mark, Mountain Jam rocked the Catskills in June with music and stunning views from Hunter Mountain. Performances by headliners > continued on next page

Pictured, clockwise from main: Soundpainting at Vassar College; damages from Hurricane Irene at the Center for Performing Arts at Rhinebeck; Levon Helm performing a benefit for hurricane victims; The cast of “Highlights from the Footlights” at the Center. File photos.

{12} December 28, 2011 | weekend@thehudsonvalleynews.com | Hudson valley news


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My Morning Jacket, festival founder Warren Haynes and his band Gov’t Mule and Grace Potter and the Nocturnals highlighted for the four-day festival. In June, the country’s oldest music and environmental festival, Clearwater’s Great Hudson River Revival in Crotonon-Hudson, featured Beacon’s own Pete Seeger, the Indigo Girls, Arlo Guthrie and many others on seven biodieselpowered stages. Seeger and Guthrie also made headlines when they performed and marched alongside protesters at Occupy Wall Street in New York City. Though Benjamin Krevolin left his post as president of the Dutchess County Arts Council, the Hudson Valley had no shortage of art this year. One of the season’s highlights was a cross-river collaboration of “A Juried Show of Work by Marist College Art Students” at the Arts Society of Kingston, where 17 current and former students featured

works that, according to the show’s juror and Marist alum Richard E. Jefferson, showcased the artists’ “ingenuity combined with strength in technique and execution.” Marist students also took center stage with the 25th annual Silver Needle Fashion Show in May. Weekend went behind-the-scenes as students from the Marist College Fashion Program, including Hyde Park’s own Lauren Duncan, showed off designs on the runway at the Mid-Hudson Civic Center.

In January, alumna Adene Wilson ’69 celebrated Vassar College sesquicentennialstyle with the ninth annual Modfest – a feast of modern and contemporary work through performances, lectures, a foreign film series, exhibitions, dance performances by the Vassar Repertory Dance Theatre and a fully staged opera. A featured exhibition of the festival, “150 Years Later: New Photography by Tina Barney, Tim Davis, Kathrine Newbegin,” showcased 40 new works, uncovering a side of Vassar that is not often seen by the average visitor to campus. Vassar College again teamed up with New York Stage and Film for the 27th Powerhouse Theater season, featuring performances of “F2M” by Patricia Wetting, “A Maze” by Rob Handel, folk musician Dar Williams’ first musical, “The Island Musical,” and the alwaysentertaining “Soundpainting” dancetheater piece in the Frances Lehman Loeb Art Center by Powerhouse apprentices. In Hyde Park, newly popular “Guided by Lantern” cemetery tours lit up the night as re-enactors portrayed the not-oftenseen at St. James Episcopal Church. Weekenders also got a peek into historic barns and working farms during Winnakee Land Trust’s annual tour. The September event featured eight privately owned properties, showing off the Hudson Valley’s stunning vistas, local agricultural artifacts, food and music. Though the year is over, the bounty of the Hudson Valley is never-ending. Here’s hoping 2012 continues to celebrate art and entertainment close to home.

Hudson Valley JULY 28- AUGUST 3, 2010

weekend

CELEBRATING LOCAL: MUSIC, THEATER, ART, FILM AND MORE

THE HEADLINERS: {P. 12} WEEKEND REVIEWS ‘PIRATE’ {P. 13} A FIERCE FIDDLER {P. 14} APPRENTICES PERFECT THEIR CRAFT

THE REGULARS: {P. 16} KIDS, COMICS AND MORE {P. 18} ARTS OPPORTUNITIES {P. 18} IS ‘SALT’ WORTH ITSELF?

{P.12}

{P.13}

{P.18}

WHY WEȜ

RHINEBECK

OUR TOP PICKS OF THINGS TO DO AND SEE IN THE AREA

PLUS: FROM HOLLYWOOD TO THE HUDSON VALLEY PAGE 10

Photos by Nicole DeLawder, except for Bard Fisher Center, photo by Peter Aaron/ESTO and Old Rhinebeck Aerodrome, photo courtesy www.oldrhinebeck.org.

Hudson valley news | weekend@thehudsonvalleynews.com | july 28, 2010 {9}

local news and entertainment delivered. ONLY $42 in Dutchess /$56 out of county. Send a check to P.O. Box 268, Hyde Park, NY 12538 or call 845-233-4651

If you are hosting an upcoming event in the Hudson Valley, email your information to weekend@thehudsonvalleynews.com.

Pictured, clockwise from top: One of the stops on Winnakee Land Trust’s annual Historic Barns and Working Farms tour; “Barbies” by Marist student Amanda Letchko; behind the scenes at Marist’s Silver Needle Fashion Show; Grace Potter at Mountain Jam. File photos.

Hudson valley news | weekend@thehudsonvalleynews.com | December 28, 2011 {13}


WEEKEND LOCAL READER

Happy well-mannered New Year BY ANN LA FARGE

Whew! If among your resolutions for the new yearr is a promise to be kinder and gentler and more wellk, for mannered, you are (or, shall I say, we are) in luck, not one but two new books promise to smooth out mply our prickly edges and, with grace and civility, simply ght treat each other better. And it’s all done with a light touch. I had fun reading Henry Alford’s “Would it KILL YOU to Stop DOING THAT?: A Modern n Guide to Manners” (Twelve, $24.99), a peppy y r. primer about smartening up and being, well, nicer. He even traveled to Japan, “where etiquette has been burnished to a high art,” observing with delight that on the subway there, there’s “no eating, drinking or phone calls.” Back home, he points out that we can all be uld stop doing oblivious to the things everyone wishes we would doing, for example, saying “no problem” instead of “you’re welcome,” answering a phone call with an email, loud shushing in a theater or library, telling your hostess about your dietary restrictions and asking a soldier, “Have you killed anyone?” Best of all is the emphasis on online manners (being un-friended hurts) and on parenting (what’s wrong with potty-mouth at the dinner table?) And, best of all is his riff on the “thank you” note. Yes, Virginia, it’s always appropriate … and hand written. Spring for a stamp and go for it. Also filled with good advice is Philip Galanes’s “Social Q’s: How to Survive the Quirks, Quandaries, and Quagmires of Today” (Simon & Schuster, $23). Galanes, who writes the “Social Q’s” column in The New York Times, contemplates a host of sticky situations, from dog breath and body odor to the three commandments for E-living, online dating and surviving the holidays. You’ll chuckle at his list of “Pet Peeves from Hell,” which include co-workers with nasty colds, gropers on the subway, rude kids and, as a final and, in my opinion, wondrously wise admonition, he proclaims: “Whenever possible, let it slide.” Happy manners! And speaking of light-hearted approaches to serious subjects, start off your reading year with a delicious romp through the literature of the ages with Sandra Newman, an English professor

Ring in the new year with Rabbit, a longhaired tortie. She likes attention but can turn fresh when she’s had enough. She enjoys the company of other cats. Make it your New Year’s resolution to fall in love with a pet from the DCSPCA.

call or visit if interested • 845-452-7722 • www.dcspca.org {14} December 28, 2011 | weekend@thehudsonvalleynews.com | Hudson valley news

with a light touch, in her guide to the Western world’s literary classics, “The Western Lit Survival Kit: An Irreverent Guide to the Classics, from Homer to Faulkner” (Gotham Books, $18). Swept back in time through (not saying how many) decades to those wonderful English courses in college, I wallowed my way through this delightful book, smiling all the way. Each book mentioned is rated on a scale of 1-10 in three categories: Importance, Accessibility and Fun (many surprises here). Start with Greece and Rome (The Satyricon, “garbled, goofy, and tirelessly X-rated”) and go on to St. Augustine’s Confessions, dubbed “a deadly cocktail of Christian theology and the misery memoir.” Chaucer, Dante (was Beatrice really a golden retriever?), the Renaissance (Francois Villlon gets a “10” for “Fun,” so does Don Quixote). Everyone once in a while, Newman comes up with a bon mot that really sets you a-thinking. a For example: “There are no important formal differences between George Eliot, Jonathan Franzen and Maeve Binchy.” El The timeline at the end of the book is handy when taking an overview, as are the birth bir and death dates of the great authors, from Homer onward. A delight … packed with ane anecdote, pop-culture gems, stories of literary hoaxes and good solid lit crit, this is the devoted reader’s Loose Canon par excellence. Enjoy! dev A And, undeterred by the festivities and the seemingly endless meals, I preserved some slight semblance of sanity by sneaking off to read a couple of novels – but I’ll save those slig for next week’s column. Meanwhile, I’d like to salute, once again, the folks who publish the books we all devour with so much gusto. Without them, where would we be? THANKS again! This New Year’s week, let’s all give tongue To readers’ heroes – oft unsung. Today, in tones far, far from solemn Let’s sing the sources of this column. For starters, we express our fandom To all the clever folks at Random: Hail Doubleday! For auld lang syne Praise Knopf, Pantheon, Ballantine, Delacorte, Vintage, Anchor, please, With special thanks to Nan Talese. Break out the booze! Let’s hoist a few To the gang at Farrar, Straus, Giroux. We’ll read all night, just like we useter Thanks to the folks at Simon & Schuster. Hail Little, Brown! Grand Central! Delve Into a toothsome tome from Twelve. Hail Houghton Harcourt! Shout HO ho ho For many classy books from SoHo Harper Colins, Scribner, Tor, Forge, Atria, and Picador. Onward and upward, never wearyin’ Cheer for St. Martin’s and Hyperion. We’ll toast good friends at Penguin Press And Viking too, and Holt, no less. And one that is a favorite still: Algonquin Books of Chapel Hill. And certainly, before we’re done, Sing to the gang at Kensington. Readers, put on your dancing shoes Kick high for the Hudson Valley News! Hail twenty-twelve, oh fearless leaders!!! And cheers – to all our Local Readers. Ann La Farge left her longtime book publishing job to do freelance editing and writing. She divides her time between New York City and Millbrook, and can be reached at alafarge@aol.com.


Conrad benefits the Center with seasonal celebration

WEEKEND MOVIE REVIEW

End-of-the-world party

Party like itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the end of the world â&#x20AC;&#x201C; or just feel like itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s all over while watching â&#x20AC;&#x153;New Yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Eve.â&#x20AC;? Gary Marshall plays it safe in this multi-storyline rom-com relying on big names, not content, to draw in the audience. If youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re looking for a mind-numbing series of poorly developed love stories to ring in your New Year then look no further. â&#x20AC;&#x153;New Yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Eveâ&#x20AC;? will leave you with only one resolution: not to watch it again.

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;RACING DAYLIGHTâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; IN ROSENDALE

On Wednesday, Jan. 11 all Rosendale Theatre members are invited to a screening of the film â&#x20AC;&#x153;Racing Daylight,â&#x20AC;? with a wine and cheese reception before the film. The film is directed by Rosendale Theatre Board member Nicole Quinn and stars David Strathairn and Academy Award-winner and Stone Ridge resident Melissa Leo. Q&A with the producer and director after the film. Become a member by Jan. 4, 2012, and you will be invited to this special event.

This week, George Conrad and accompanist Joel Flowers will perform their first holiday concert at The Center for Performing Arts at Rhinebeck. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Cathedral to Carol: A Holiday Celebrationâ&#x20AC;? will be performed on Thursday and Friday, Dec. 29 and 30 at 8 p.m. The duo will perform a selection of well-known carols and classical pieces, including â&#x20AC;&#x153;Gesu Bambino,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Pieta Signoreâ&#x20AC;? and well-loved treats â&#x20AC;&#x153;O Holy Night,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Adeste Fideles,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;O Little town of Bethlehem,â&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Ave Maria.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;I chose some songs that were not traditional holiday songs, but which have always meant the holidays to me. I hope that the inspirational messages of these songs, of hope and love and peace, will resonate with people in these difficult times,â&#x20AC;? said Conrad. Once Conrad learned of the damages to the Center for Performing Arts caused by Hurricane Irene, he graciously offered this concert as a benefit for The Centerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Recovery Fund. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Center is home to me. It has given me so many great memories and so many great friendships. There is all the warmth of family about it. This is the place that takes me out of my self when I am inclined to brood, and the place that helps me find myself when I am wandering. Just knowing that The Center is always there, that I can always come back, and that all of those wonderful friends will be there â&#x20AC;&#x201C; that is home,â&#x20AC;? Conrad said. Conrad has been a fixture in the Beacon City School District for 22 years as well as a local favorite amongst theatre-goers in the Hudson Valley. He has performed in such Center for Performing Arts favorites as â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hamlet,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;My Fair Lady,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Jesus Christ Superstar,â&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Rocky Horror Show.â&#x20AC;? Conrad most recently performed on The Centerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s stage as part of another benefit concert, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Highlights from the Footlights,â&#x20AC;? and as Bob Cratchit in â&#x20AC;&#x153;A Christmas Carol.â&#x20AC;? Flowers served for many years as the entertainment director for the U.S. Army in Germany, where he also performed and accompanied vocalists at the Theater Des Westerns and The Deutches Oper in Berlin. Residing in the Hudson Valley since 1994, Flowers has served as musical director for many local community theater productions and is the community recreation coordinator at the U.S. Military Academy at West Point. All proceeds from the performances will benefit The Centerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hurricane Irene Recovery Fund. Tickets are $18 and are available by calling The Centerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s box office at 845-876-3080 or by visiting www. centerforperformingarts.org.

Bard alum Farrow adds Forbes title to resume

The Bard College alum recently featured in the Hudson Valley News for receiving a Rhodes scholarship, Ronan Farrow can now add Forbes Magazineâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;30 Under 30â&#x20AC;? to his resume. Son of Woody Allen and Mia Farrow and now Hillary Clintonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 24-year-old special advisor on global youth, Farrow graduated from Bard in 2004 at the tender age of 15.

M ovies

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STILL TIME TO GIVE

Photo courtesy CAS Flickr.

Need a last-minute gift before the last of your holiday parties this weekend? The Catskill Animal Sanctuary recently added 32 acres and a second farm (pictured above) to further help rehabilitate animals in need. Through Jan. 31, all donations made to the Catskill Animal Sanctuary will be doubled up to $300,000. Meet the animals and find out more at casanctuary.org.

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FOR FURTHER INFORMATION VISIT WWW.GREATMOVIESLOWERPRICES.COM Hudson valley news | weekend@thehudsonvalleynews.com | December 28, 2011 {15}


weekend field notes

YEAR IN REVIEW

PHOTOS BY NICOLE DELAWDER | WEEKEND@THEHUDSONVALLEYNEWS.COM

Pictured, clockwise from top left: Andrew Bird at the Bardavon; The Preservation Hall Jazz Band at Mountain Jam; the opening reception of a Red Hook CAN art show in a vacant village building; Rosendale’s annual Pickle Festival; Dar Williams performing at a Powerhouse preview; International Women’s Day Festival on the Walkway Over the Hudson; Paula Poundstone at the Bardavon; Bannerman Island.

{16} December 28, 2011 | weekend@thehudsonvalleynews.com | Hudson valley news


DEMS WIN MAJORITY ON RHINEBECK BOARD Judge Brands decides in favor of Spinzia for council seat BY CHRISTOPHER LENNON Rhinebeck Democrats have cause to celebrate this New Year’s Eve. State Supreme Court Justice James Brands ruled on Dec. 23 that Democrat Elizabeth Spinzia secured enough of the contested ballots from the November election to give her a three-vote lead over Republican Debbi Mimoso. Spinzia’s 1,057-1,054 victory means Democrats will hold a 3-2 majority on the Rhinebeck Town Board come Jan. 1. “I’m glad my message resonated – we need to work harder if we want to preserve the things we love about Rhinebeck,” Spinzia said, “and I’m ready to tackle major issues, like shoring up Rhinebeck’s finances for the long term and developing a capital replacement plan. I’m very much looking forward to working with all town board members to get the job done.” Unofficial results from the Dutchess County Board of Elections on Election Day had Mimoso with a two-vote lead over Spinzia in a three-way race for two town council seats. Absentee and affidavit ballots were counted; 24 of them were contested and ultimately decided by Brands. Come 2012, Spinzia and Democrats Joe Gelb and Gina Fox will serve alongside

World’s first solar menorah Elizabeth Spinzia. File photo.

During Hanukkah last week, the world’s first solar-powered menorah was unveiled in Woodstock. The eco-friendly menorah was the brainchild of Rabbi Avraham Itkin, youth and program director of Chabad of Ulster County, who said, “We are very excited about this and hope to be able to replicate the concept in other menorahs around the world.” Photo submitted.

Republicans Bruce Washburn and Supervisor Tom Traudt. This will be the first time in Traudt’s six-year tenure – and only the second time in more than 100 years – that Democrats hold a majority on the board, and it should be interesting to see how this new dynamic plays out.

EXPRESS YOURSELF.

If you have a reaction to one of our stories or one of our columnists, let us know. Your opinion counts with us. Don’t confine your pontificating to the dinner table or the water cooler, share your thoughts with the rest of us. Write us at editorial@thehudsonvalleynews.com.

DUTCHESS COUNTY SPCA FAITHFUL COMPANION CREMATORY & CEMETARY The DCSPCA and our Faithful Companion staff understand the pain and loss felt when a beloved pet passes away. Please consider our personal services in your time of need. • Private cremation with cremains returned in a decorative tin • Full selection of beautiful urns • Memorial grave markers • Communal cremations • Cremation Certificate • Pick-up service • Grief counseling • Walk-ins welcome 7 days a week

PLEASE CONTACT: George Roussey Faithful Companion Director 845-452-7722 Ext. 19 www.dcspca.org

Molinaro celebrates Hanukkah in Rhinebeck

Dutchess County Executive-elect Marc Molinaro helped ring in the Hanukkah season in Rhinebeck on the first night of the festival, Tuesday, Dec. 20, by lighting the center candle of the public menorah on Market Street. Molinaro was joined by Rabbi Hanoch Hecht of the Rhinebeck Jewish Center. The ceremony was followed by a celebration with music, hot latkes, donuts and dancing with a crowd of about 50 people. Photo submitted.

support local news and businesses each week. subscribe to the Hudson Valley News

$42 in Dutchess/$56 out of county. Send a check to PO Box 268, Hyde Park, NY 12538 Hudson valley news | editorial@thehudsonvalleynews.com | December 28, 2011 {17}


Poughkeepsie libraries get $32K to aid Spanish speakers BY HV NEWS STAFF The Poughkeepsie Public Library District was recently awarded a two-year grant of $32,000 through the New York State Adult Literacy Library Services program in support of the Community Learning Plaza/La Plaza del Aprendizaje. The library district is collaborating with Poughkeepsie’s Literacy Connections in this outreach to the Spanish-speaking community. Programs include ESL classes, Spanish-language computer labs, assistance with job search and interviews, personal finance, information about health, housing, tax forms, workers’ rights, schools and colleges, telephone skills, library services and immigration. One project goal is to build self-sufficiency among participants and their families. “We are very conscious of the library district’s need to adapt to the changing needs of the community, and the Spanishspeaking population has increased

significantly in recent years,” said Director Tom Lawrence. Local agencies that work with the Hispanic population indicate that “substantial portions of the population are marginalized, largely because of their language difficulties,” said Lawrence. “It is very challenging for them to navigate the many services that are in place to help people find employment and other assistance without minimal English skills,” he said. “Our Community Learning Plaza is designed to address these needs.” Literacy Connections’ ESL classes are Monday nights at Adriance Memorial Library, beginning on Jan. 9, from 6 to 8 p.m. Free computer labs for Spanish speakers are offered Tuesday and Wednesday nights from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. at the library, located at 93 Market St., Poughkeepsie. Call 845-485-3445, ext. 3702 for more information.

Protestors gather at U.S. Rep. Nan Hayworth’s office in Somers to protest her “anti-worker policies.” Photo submitted.

LABOR GROUPS PROTEST CONGRESSWOMAN’S POLICIES BY HV NEWS STAFF Local labor advocates staged a holiday-themed protest in front of U.S. Rep. Nan Hayworth’s office earlier this week, saying they were “re-gifitng” the congresswoman’s “anti-worker policies.” The demonstrators gathered on Monday at Hayworth’s office in Somers, where they sang “We Wish You a Merry Congress” and held empty gift boxes “to symbolize what Hayworth has done for workers in the Hudson Valley,” according to the Hudson Valley Area Labor Federation.

The labor federation says Hayworth supported a bill that makes it easier for companies to outsource jobs and was willing to “play chicken” with unemployment insurance and the middle-class payroll tax holiday, among other things. “I hope that Rep. Hayworth will use the remainder of her term to act as a true representative of, and advocate for, American workers,” said Beth Soto, director of the Valley Area Labor Federation. “If not, we will remember in November.”

MOLINARO SWEARING-IN Equality for the holidays CEREMONY MOVED TO MARIST BY HV NEWS STAFF Due to an “overwhelming response requiring a larger venue,” incoming Dutchess County Executive Marc Molinaro’s swearing-in ceremony has been moved to the James J. McCann Center at Marist College.

The ceremony will take place Thursday, Dec. 29 at 10 a.m. The event is open to the public. Molinaro was originally scheduled to take the oath of office at the Wallace Center at the FDR Presidential Library and Museum.

{18} December 28, 2011 | editorial@thehudsonvalleynews.com | Hudson valley news

Richard Hathaway of Poughkeepsie Friends Meeting, Pat Lamanna of the Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of Poughkeepsie Social Action Committee, County Legislator Joel Tyner, The Rev. Blake Rider of Christ Episcopal Church, The Rev. Walter LeFlore of the Unitarian Fellowship, Fred Nagel of Dutchess Peace, The Rev. Gail Burger of the Dutchess Interfaith Council, Gerry Lyons, vice president of Marist Chapter of SEIU 20, Beth Soto, coordinator for Hudson Valley Area Labor Federation, and longtime community activist Mae Parker-Harris were among the attendees of Tyner’s 16th Annual Christmas/ Chanukah/ Kwanzaa Holiday Interfaith Candlelight Vigil for Economic Justice on Tuesday, Dec. 20. The vigil was held in front of the Dutchess County Office Building on Market Street in Poughkeepsie. Photo courtesy of Brian Pugh of the Hudson Valley Area Labor Federation.


STEINHAUS’S CHIEF OF STAFF TO STEP DOWN

The Rhinebeck High School men’s and women’s choirs, under the direction of Grace Lalicki, perform for members of the Rhinebeck Area Chamber of Commerce last week. Photos courtesy of Maureen Gates, www.sharpimagesphotographic.com.

Student musicians perform for business community BY HV NEWS STAFF The Rhinebeck High School men’s and women’s choirs recently performed for the Rhinebeck Area Chamber of Commerce. The performance was held during the December Business Contact Breakfast on Wednesday, Dec. 21, at The Rhinecliff Hotel.

Following their performance for the chamber, the students went on to sing for residents of The Thompson House in Rhinebeck. “This has become a wonderful tradition for the Chamber, the high school and our sponsor, Williams Lumber & Home

Centers,” said Chamber President Vicki Haak. “The students outdid themselves this year. We are very grateful to the Rhinebeck Central School District for supporting this event in an effort to keep the business community and the schools working together.”

BY HV NEWS STAFF Nancy Giordano, who has served as Dutchess County chief of staff under County Executive William Steinhaus for the past seven years, will retire at the end of the month. Giordano began her career in Dutchess County government 20 years ago, when Steinhaus took office in 1992. She was hired as executive secretary, worked her way up to assistant to the county executive and was appointed chief of staff in April 2005. “Nancy Giordano has been the cornerstone of my administration since day one,” Steinhaus said. “Every achievement, every initiative and every milestone, Nancy has been there … pulling it all together to make it happen. Nancy leaves a timeless mark on county government and the residents we serve and we thank her for all of her contributions to Dutchess County.” As chief of staff, Giordano has been responsible for working with Steinhaus to formulate all strategic, operational and budget policies, as well as programs and services, plus coordination, oversight, guidance and evaluation for county departments. She is currently the top-ranking female in Dutchess County government. “I am so grateful to have had the opportunity to serve my community and its residents over my entire career,” Giordano said. “Public service is all about people; whether helping an individual navigate state government or creating and implementing county programs or services to help benefit many, it all has been extremely satisfying and worthwhile.”

CRIMINAL JUSTICE STUDENT WINS SHERIFF’S SCHOLARSHIP

BY HV NEWS STAFF Jesse Fuerst, a Dutchess Community College student and Pleasant Valley resident, has been awarded a $250 New York State Sheriff’s Association Institute Criminal Justice Scholarship. The scholarship is presented annually to a full-time criminal justice major from each community college in New York State. Candidates for the scholarship must excel academically and demonstrate financial need. Fuerst is a member of Phi Beta Kappa, maintains a 3.94 grade-point average and is

an active member of the college’s Criminal Justice Club and Student Government Association. In addition, he serves as a justice on DCC’s Student Appeal Board. “Jesse is an outstanding individual who has distinguished himself as a student,” said Criminal Justice Program Chairman Dan Valentine. “He has the respect of his fellow students as well as the faculty and is most deserving of this award.” Fuerst will attend Utica College in January to pursue a bachelor’s degree in criminal justice.

Dutchess Community College President Dr. D. David Conklin, Criminal Justice Program Chairman Dan Valentine, Jesse Fuerst and Dutchess County Undersheriff Kirk Imperati. Photo submitted. Hudson valley news | editorial@thehudsonvalleynews.com | December 28, 2011 {19}


around town

pastries served after the concert. He then gave a short closing prayer. Thanks are given to Nate Silvieus for his audio/video expertise and to Gary Folchi for recording the concert. Before leaving, all attendees and students enjoyed refreshments and beverages, with many students making multiple trips to the table. Many stayed for a while to chat and assist in the clean up. Before and after the concert, ULCS was selling 2012 calendars, school sweatshirts and polo shirts. These can be purchased by calling the school office at 845-266-3497. DVDs of the concert are available for $5 by calling the school office as well.

CLINTON BY RAY OBERLY

Clinton New Year’s holiday closings

On Friday, Dec. 30, the town offices and highway department will be closed, and the library will be open until 4 p.m. On Saturday, Dec. 31, the town offices, highway department and library will be closed. Note on Saturday, Dec. 31, the recycling center will be open as usual from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. On Monday, Jan. 2, the town offices and highway department are closed, but the library will be open. The library will be closed on Wednesday, Jan. 4.

Church luncheon for seniors

ULCS Christmas concert

Upton Lake Christian School presented its free Christmas concert, “Celebrate Christmas,” on Dec. 16. The concert featured pre-K through sixth-grade students, with six students performing instrumental and vocal selections celebrating the true meaning of Christmas, the birth of Jesus Christ. The art department also displayed Christmas artwork created by the students. Pastor Jeff Silvieus of the Evangelical Free Church welcomed attendees and introduced Dana Duncan, the new music director at the school. After a short prayer, the concert began. Nadya Krueger and Julia Sampson (both fifth-graders) read the origin story of the song “O Holy Night.” Afterward, recorder soloist Jennifer Puhalski, a fourth-grader, played “O Holy Night” while the fifthand sixth-graders accompanied with hand chimes. Then, four pre-K students recited a “Christmas Star Rhyme” and ended by holding yellow stars in front of their faces. Nicky Robinson and Andrew Knapp (both fourth-graders) read the story of the “Twelve Days of Christmas,” describing the meaning of the various symbols used in the story. The kindergarteners, firstand second-grade students played “Jingle Bells” on xylophones with accompanying bells. They then sang “Twelve Days of Christmas” and held up numbers for each of the days as they sung. The third- and fourth-graders played a Christmas Medley of “Good King Wenceslas,” “Jingle Bells” and “Ode to Joy” on their recorders. Matthew Moore, a fourth-grader, read a story about the origin of the song “Silent Night,” then a chorus composed of third-, fourth-, fifth- and sixthgraders sang “On This Still, Silent Night,” with third-graders Danielle Lindsay, Kelsey Jenks and Ella Werner as soloists.

Pictured, from top: Upton Lake Christian School first- and second-grade students sing “Twelve Days of Christmas” and hold signs with numbers on them as they sing each day; The newly formed Upton Lake Christian School band plays a rock version of “Good King Wenceslas;” Upton Lake Christian School pre-K students recite a “Christmas Star Rhyme” and end by holding yellow stars in front of their faces. Photos by Ray Oberly.

Jennifer Puhalski, a fourth-grader, played a piano solo of “We Three Kings.” Chloe Yerger, a fifth-grader, read the story of “Good King Wenceslas.” The newly restarted band ensemble played a Rock Version of “Good King Wenceslas.” The band practices one day

{20} December 28, 2011 | editorial@thehudsonvalleynews.com | Hudson valley news

a week after school and home-schooled children can participate in the band. All the students sang “We Wish You a Merry Christmas” as the finale and several students presented Duncan with a gift. Pastor Silvieus thanked the parents for making and donating the many cookies and

The Evangelical Free Church of Clinton Corners held its free luncheon and invited all area senior citizens (60 or older) to attend on Dec. 6. The table decorations were very colorful and were in keeping with the Christmas theme. At each table setting was a candy cane and a card describing the meaning of the candy cane. Many years ago, a candy maker wanted to make a treat that symbolized the true meaning of Christmas and Jesus. The hard candy was shaped like a “J” to represent Jesus’ name. The color white stands for the pureness of Jesus. The color red represents the blood Jesus shed for us. Dee Hoiem welcomed the seniors, then read from the Bible and said a prayer before the meal. The meal started with cranberryfilled Jell-O topped with sour cream. The roast pork was cooked to perfection and served with peas and mashed potatoes with gravy. The surprise dessert was vanilla ice cream containing pieces of green and red peppermint, topped with whipped cream and a maraschino cherry. Grade-school students provided the entertainment, singing Christmas songs and playing musical instruments. This performance was a preview of the Christmas Concert on Dec. 16. The new music director, Dana Duncan, led the students. Janet Ludlam read three questions from the Bible. Everyone agreed the questions were easy, so she will develop more difficult ones for the next luncheon. The winners all received gifts for their correct answers. A door prize was given away and Pastor Jeff Silvieus gave a closing prayer. All were invited to return for the next luncheon on Feb. 7. Thanks are given to the church for holding these senior luncheons and the church members and volunteers for preparing and serving the food. This is an excellent opportunity for the seniors to socialize.


Pictured, from left: Members of the high school chorus join the band on stage for the closing song at last weekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Winter Concert. Photo by Steve Cabral; Will Carter and Heidi Johnson cheese it up before the United Presbyterian Christmas Concert last Friday. Photo by Jim Donnelly.

BY HEIDI JOHNSON

The Winter Concert at Stissing Mountain High School on Dec. 20 was wonderful! I was truly impressed with how well the jazz band, chorus and concert band played. They were really quite good, and when I spoke with band and chorus director Joe Deveau afterward, he said he was very pleased with the studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; performance. Congratulations to all who participated in this fine show. Thank you to Steve Cabral for emailing me a few photos from the concert. My concert at United Presbyterian on Dec. 23 also went well and we had a large and very appreciative audience. Heartfelt thanks to all my musical friends who joined me for this performance, and to the amazing and wonderful organist Will Carter, who accompanied our chorus and performed two solo pieces for us. The organ solos were the highlight of the concert. David Bisson and Karen Gale also wowed the audience with their renditions of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mary Did You Knowâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Ave Maria.â&#x20AC;? The second piece was accompanied with flute by ninth-grader Heather Cerul, who did a fine job. Again, my deepest thanks to all who joined us for this show, including all of

Stanford Grange wins again

I saw on the sign outside the Grange Hall that Stanford Grange won the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Distinguished Grangeâ&#x20AC;? honor again this year. I will get more details from Grange Secretary Ryan Orton and share them with you next week. Congratulations, Stanford Grange, for again achieving this high honor!

Upcoming Stanford Library programs

Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t forget that Susan Galaskas will be starting up her very popular watercolor class again on Jan. 3 at the Stanford Library. Classes will be held on the first and third Tuesday of every month. Call the

library to register: 845-868-1341. Also, a nifty program will be offered on Tuesday, Jan. 24 at 7 p.m. at the library. There will be a class on how to make the most of your e-reader (e.g. Kindle, Nook), including instruction on how to connect to the libraryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s full line of free downloadable books. If you got an e-reader for Christmas or Hanukkah, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll want to attend this program and find out how to access these free materials. Call the library for more information.

Stanford Rec winter soccer

I ran into Recreation Director Karla Triola last week while I was finishing up my Christmas shopping at McCarthyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s. Karla asked me to plug the new program the Rec Commission is starting this year, winter soccer. This program is open to students in kindergarten through sixth grade. Actually, 4-year-olds can join this program as well; they will play with the kindergarten team. The eight-week program begins Jan. 16 and ends March 8. I believe the games will be indoors at Cold Spring School, and Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll let you know next week if this is incorrect. Times are as follows: â&#x20AC;˘ Kindergarten: Mondays, 4:45 to 6 p.m. â&#x20AC;˘ Grades 1-2: Thursdays, 4:45 to 6 p.m. â&#x20AC;˘ Grades 3-4: Mondays, 6 to 7:30 p.m. â&#x20AC;˘ Grades 5-6: Thursdays, 6 to 7:30 p.m. Registration forms are available at both elementary schools, McCarthyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pharmacy and the library. Please call Karla if you have any questions about this program, or to volunteer to help coach or chaperone (volunteers are much needed!),

at 845-266-8593. Hope you all had a peaceful and relaxing holiday after all the busy times leading up to it. See you next week â&#x20AC;Ś Happy New Year! Heidi Johnson can be reached at 845392-4348 or playfulrelics@optonline.net.

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the singers who made up the chorus: Heather Cerul, Danielle Gaherty, Karen Gale, Cathy White, Jan Brooks, Judy Cale, Katherine Gale, Wendy Stoner, Jon Bisson, Rich Fine, Stephanie Fine, Niall Johnson, Brian Stoner, Preston Stoner, David Bisson and Ed Robison. Also, my lovely daughter, Bridget, who sang the alto solo on our closing piece, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Silent Night.â&#x20AC;? I read someplace recently that one of my favorite composers, John Rutter, once said Christmas is a time when folks are exposed to choral music â&#x20AC;&#x201C; a genre which they would not normally have occasion to hear. I was proud and pleased to bring such fine choral music to Amenia last Friday. Based on the ovation following the performance, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d say the audience highly enjoyed it as well. It was fun, too! Thanks, everyone.

Hudson valley news | editorial@thehudsonvalleynews.com | December 28, 2011 {21}


Man flees CT troopers, crashes in Oniontown

County Executive William Steinhaus. File photo.

LEGISLATURE BIDS STEINHAUS ADIEU

BY HV NEWS STAFF The Dutchess County Legislature last week took time to honor outgoing County Executive William Steinhaus for his 20 years of service to the county. Steinhaus, who is retiring Dec. 31, was elected county executive in 1992 and served five consecutive four-year terms. On Monday, Dec. 19, Legislature Chairman Rob Rolison presented Steinhaus with a plaque of appreciation from the Dutchess County Legislature.

“There is so much you have done for this county and its citizens,” said Rolison. “You have made your mark on Dutchess County and it has been a good era thanks to your leadership. It has been an honor to serve with you and we will miss you.” “It is easy to focus on our differences, but that is not where our focus should be,” said Steinhaus. “Let us look back at what we have achieved and accomplished, working together, over the past 20 years.”

The Dutchess County Sheriff’s Office arrested a man who evaded police in Connecticut, then crashed while fleeing from deputies in Dover last week. According to the sheriff’s office, on the morning of Monday, Dec. 19, deputies were contacted by Connecticut State Police and informed they had been in pursuit of a burglary suspect, later identified as Michael Moniz, 21 of New Milford, Connecticut, but had not been able to stop the vehicle, which was headed for the New York border. Connecticut Police provided a description of the vehicle and suspect and deputies began to patrol towards the state line. According to the sheriff’s office, Deputy Richard Brenner observed a vehicle on Old Route 22 in Dover matching the description, and when he attempted to stop the vehicle, Moniz fled. After a pursuit, Moniz reportedly crashed into an embankment at the intersection with Route 22, at which time he got out and fled on foot into the Oniontown section of Dover. Deputies and state police later found Moniz hiding inside a residence and he was taken into custody without further incident and positively identified, according to the sheriff’s office. A search of Moniz’s vehicle allegedly turned up the stolen property from Connecticut. “The arrest in this case was the direct result of attentive police work by Deputy Brenner along with a well-coordinated effort between members of the sheriff’s office, Connecticut State Police, and the New York State Police,” said Lt. John Watterson of the sheriff’s office. In New York, Moniz was charged with unlawfully fleeing a police officer in the third degree, criminal possession of stolen property in the fifth degree, criminal trespass in the second degree and reckless driving, all class-A misdemeanors, as well as traffic infractions. Moniz was arraigned in Dover Justice Court and remanded to Dutchess County Jail in lieu of $25,000 cash bail or $50,000 bond. Deputies say additional charges are possible, and it is likely Moniz will have to answer to charges in Connecticut after his case in New York has concluded.

Dover woman arrested for supplying dope to teen

New York State Police say a Dover woman provided a local teenager with the heroin she took when she overdosed late last week. According to police, on Dec. 23 at 6 p.m., troopers responded to a home {22} December 28, 2011 | editorial@thehudsonvalleynews.com | Hudson valley news

on South East Mountain Road in Dover for a report of a 16-year-old female who had overdosed on heroin. Upon arrival, the girl was transported to St. Francis Hospital by the Dover Rescue Squad.

Police investigated and determined Christine M. Spinney (see photo), 20, of Dover, purchased the heroin in Poughkeepsie and supplied it to the 16-year-old. Spinney was arrested and charged with endangering the welfare of a child, unlawfully dealing with a child, criminal possession of a controlled substance in the seventh degree, possession of a hypodermic instrument and unlawful possession of marijuana. Spinney was arraigned in Town of Poughkeepsie Court and remanded to Dutchess County Jail. The 16-year-old was later released after being treated at St. Francis Hospital.

FDR student had weed, stun gun in car

An FDR High School student was arrested last week when the school’s resource officer found marijuana, drug paraphernalia and a stun gun in his car, according to Hyde Park Police. Police say on Dec. 21 at 8:50 a.m., Officer Martin Monaco found what appeared to be marijuana and a pipe in plain view inside a vehicle in the FDR High School parking lot. Monaco learned the vehicle belonged to Zachary Boland, 18, of Hyde Park, a senior at FDR, according to police. Police say Boland was brought outside while Monaco searched the vehicle, in which he found more than 25 grams of marijuana and a stun gun resembling a flashlight. Boland was arrested and charged with criminal possession of marijuana in the fourth degree, a class-B misdemeanor; and criminal possession > continued on next page


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of a weapon in the fourth degree, a class-A misdemeanor. He was arraigned in Hyde Park Justice Court and ordered to reappear the following day.

Hyde Park man busted for motor vehicle scam

New York State Police say a Hyde Park man who swindled local residents and financial institutions was recently arrested following a five-month multiagency investigation. State police have arrested Ernest Canelli (see photo), of Hyde Park, the former owner of the now-closed Factory

contact Investigator Robert Torre of the New York State Police in Rhinebeck by email at Robert.torre@troopers.ny.gov or at 845-876-4049.

New York State Police have arrested a Hyde Park woman who allegedly tampered with her neighbor’s mail and created fraudulent documents impersonating the IRS and U.S. Treasury. Raphaela Cruickshank, 61, of Hyde Park, was arrested following an investigation by state police, the U.S. Department of Treasury and the U.S. Postal Inspection Service. Police say Cruickshank had been stealing and tampering with her neighbor’s mail and creating false government documentation since 2007. She was charged with forgery in the second degree, criminal possession of forgery devices in the first degree, tampering with private communication and petty larceny. She was arraigned in Hyde Park Justice Court and ordered to reappear Jan. 10.

Man charged with DWI following crash

New Spas in Poughkeepsie, following an investigation conducted with assistance from the Dutchess County District Attorney’s Office, the New York State Department of Motor Vehicles and U.S. Secret Service. Police say Canelli took out loans to pay for motor vehicles, including a Formula boat and subsequently defaulted on the loans. When the vehicles were about to be repossessed, Canelli would allegedly forge lien releases and sell them to other persons, oftentimes profiting by receiving cash back from the equity that remained in the vehicle. A search of Canelli’s home and Factory New Spas resulted in the recovery of computers and a firearm Canelli was not licensed to possess, according to police. Canelli was arrested and charged with multiple counts of forgery in the second degree, scheme to defraud in the first degree, criminal possession of a weapon in the third degree and grand larceny in the second degree. Police say additional charges may be forthcoming. State police are also investigating reports from several people who claimed they paid for hot tubs from Canelli and never received them, and say anyone who may have been a victim should

Barkeater, LLC. Notice of Formation of Limited Liability Company. Articles of Organization of Barkeater, LLC (the “LLC”) were filed with the Department of State of New York (“SSNY”) on November 2, 2011. Office location: Dutchess County. SSNY is designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of any process to the LLC at 7509 North Broadway, Suite 4, Red Hook, New York 12571. Purpose: All legal purposes.

Another forgery arrest in Hyde Park

A man who crashed his car in Hyde Park last week was arrested after police discovered his blood-alcohol content was more than three times the legal limit. According to Hyde Park Police, on Dec. 19 at 4 p.m., officers responded to a report of a vehicle that had struck a guardrail on Cream Street. An officer at the scene reportedly detected a strong smell of alcohol coming from the driver, Robert E. Grover, 48, of Hyde Park. Police say Grover failed field sobriety tests and was taken into custody on suspicion of drunken driving. At police headquarters, Grover was found to have a blood-alcohol content of 0.26%, and it was discovered he had a previous alcohol-related conviction. He was charged with class-E felony counts of aggravated DWI and DWI and arraigned in Hyde Park Justice Court. He was relased and ordered to reappear at a later date. No one was injured in the accident.

Pawling man arrested for smoking weed with teens

New York State Police have arrested a 19-year-old Pawling man who allegedly helped a group of younger teens smoke marijuana. According to police, on Dec. 23, troopers patrolling the Valley View Drive area of Dover observed five subjects at the end of a dead-end road. When the troopers approached, they smelled a

strong odor of marijuana, according to police. Police say Benjamin A. Casola (see photo), 19, of Pawling, assisted the other four, who were all 16 years old, in smoking marijuana. Casola was charged with four counts of unlawfully dealing with a child, and the younger teens were charged with possession of marijuana. All were ordered to appear in Dover Justice Court on Jan. 5.

Woman stole donation can from gas station

Rhinebeck Police have arrested a Poughkeepsie woman who allegedly stole an ASPCA donation can from the Fairgrounds Mobil gas station last week. Heather A. Rowe, 35, of Poughkeepsie, was charged with petty larceny, a class-A misdemeanor, on Dec. 18. She was ordered to appear in Village of Rhinebeck Justice Court on Jan. 12.

Recent arrests

The Hyde Park Police Department reports the following arrests: • John G. Declair, 55, of Poughkeepsie, was charged with criminal contempt in the second degree, a class-A misdemeanor, as a result of sending a letter to his ex-wife that violated a full stay-away order of protection issued by Judge David Steinberg on Nov. 17. • Daniel J. Smith, 38, of Hyde Park, was charged with criminal contempt in the second degree, a class-A misdemeanor. • Rossanna G. Prano, 38, of Wappingers Falls, was charged with criminal contempt in the second degree, a class A-misdemeanor. • Nelson M. Odondi, 18, of Poughkeepsie, was charged with DWI and reckless driving, both misdemeanors, and several traffic violations. According to police, at 8:35 a.m. on Christmas Day, Odondi was traveling north on Route 9 at an estimated speed of 90 miles per hour in a 45-mile-per-hour zone. He was arraigned and remanded to Dutches County Jail on $2,500 cash or bail bond.

Baright Realty, LLC. Notice of Formation of Limited Liability Company. Articles of Organization of Baright Realty, LLC (the “LLC”) were filed with the Department of State of New York (“SSNY”) on November 2, 2011. Office location: Dutchess County. SSNY is designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of any process to the LLC at 7509 North Broadway, Suite 4, Red Hook, New York 12571. Purpose: All legal purposes. Notice of formation of a Limited Liability Company (LLC), Name: Matteo-Bella, LLC; Articles of Organization filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 11/30/2011; Office Location: 60 W. Market Street, Red Hook, NY 12571; Dutchess County; SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served; SSNY shall mail copy of process to 60 W. Market Street, Red Hook, NY 12572; Term: Until (Perpetual); Purpose: Any lawful purpose. 112 PERRY LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 12/8/11. Office in Dutchess Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 1 Civic Center Plaza, Ste. 500, Poughkeepsie, NY 12601, which is also the principal business location. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. FALLKILL PROPERTIES, LLC ; Articles of Organization filed 12/14/2011 effective 1/1/2012; SSNY; Dutchess County, New York; SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. Address for mailing copy of process: 30 Toms Way, Staatsburg NY 12580; Purpose: any lawful purpose; Perpetuity. email your legal notice to: legalnotices@thehudsonvalleynews.com

Sweet Dreams Sleep Consultant LLC, Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 10/19/11. Office in Dutchess Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to C/O Maureen Abramoski, 18 Oakwood Blvd., Poughkeepsie NY 12603. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. Notice of Formation of VIEIRA SARDINHA REALTY, LLC, Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York on December 14, 2011. The office location is in Dutchess County, SSNY is designated as agent of LLC whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 2580 South Road, Poughkeepsie, New York 12601. Purpose for all lawful activities.

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Hudson valley news | editorial@thehudsonvalleynews.com | December 28, 2011 {23}


Local attorneys donate 250 new coats

Every other year for the past 10 years, local attorneys John Basso and Marty Rutberg host a holiday party and this year, charged each attendee an admission fee of a new coat. A total of 250 new coats were then donated to Dutchess Outreach. Pictured are Basso, Tara Whalen of Dutchess Outreach and Rutberg. Photo submitted. Marist College senior Meghan Talotta (center) drops off bags full of stuffed animals that were collected by the Marist College Dance Ensemble. Photo submitted.

Marist dancers give stuffed animals to young hospital patients BY HV NEWS STAFF The Marist College Dance Ensemble helped bring smiles to youngsters at the St. Francis Hospital Trauma Services Center by donating five bags filled with stuffed animals. Registered Nurse Peg Gallagher, clinical coordinator of the Emergency Department, said the stuffed animals will be given to children who are being treated for sicknesses or injuries at St. Francis. “The kids get a great deal of pleasure out of these stuffed animals,” she said. “It makes them feel more comfortable and that allows us to do our job.”

“We do a collection during our rehearsal week, just before our fall showcase show in November,” explained Marist senior Meghan Talotta, who serves on the dance group’s executive board. “The girls in the club buy the stuffed animals around town. We found out about St. Francis and how you might use the animals through one of our professors, Margaret Greenly (the hospital’s director of Quality Management Services). It was perfect because we like to keep our efforts local.”

Make your resolutions close to home. Have a happy and safe New Year.

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