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NORTH BERGEN SUMMER 2010

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palisade • hoboken & beyond

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CONTENTS 6 LETTERS

28 MANICURIST TO THE STARS Nailing it in Cliffside Park

8 CONTRIBUTORS

30 CHILD’S PLAY

9 EDITOR’S LETTER

Recreation in North Bergen

10 IN GEAR

32 BARBER SHOPS

12 LAW AND ORDER SVU On the set in North Bergen

35 GINA’S STORY

16 SPOTLIGHT ON

36 HOME ON THE HUDSON

Hoboken old and new A Hoboken love story

North Bergen

Modern Man

18 GREEN SCENE

38 WEEKEND GETAWAY

Braddock Park

Sandy Hook

20 WATERWAYS

DISH

Biking the Walkway

40 DiPalma Brothers Restaurant 42 Listings

23 IN PERSON

46 OUT & ABOUT

Hoboken’s man cave guy

Fundraisers

26 QUIXOTIC

47 DATES

Bloomer’s Beach

12 PHOTO BY JUSTIN STEPHENS, COURTESY OF NBC UNIVERSAL

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Publishers Lucha Malato, David Unger Editor in Chief Kate Rounds Art Director Jennifer Martiak Copyediting Christopher Zinsli Advertising Manager Tish Kraszyk Sales Staff Joseph Calderone, Toni Anne Calderone, Paul Cohen, C. Barbara Dillon, Ron Kraszyk, Christine M. Youngclaus Circulation Manager Roberto Lopez Circulation Luis Vasquez Accounting Christine Caraballo Palisade is a publication of The Hudson Reporter Assoc., L.P. 1400 Washington Street, Hoboken, NJ 07030. Submissions welcome, but please query first. Phone: 201.798.7800 Fax: 201.798.0018 Sales inquiries: palisade@hudson reporter.com E-mail: krounds@hudsonreporter.com www.palisademagazine.com Palisade Magazine is published by the Hudson Reporter Associates, L.P., 1400 Washington St., Hoboken, New Jersey 07030, (201) 7987800, Fax (201) 798-0018. Subscriptions are $20 per year, overseas are $40 per year, single copies are $7.50 each, multiple copy discounts are available. VISA/MC/AMEX accepted. Any subscription information should be sent to Palisade Subscriptions, 1400 Washington St., Hoboken, NJ 07030. Not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts or other unsolicited materials. Copyright ©2010, Hudson Reporter Associates L.P. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or part without written permission is prohibited.

COVER PHOTO BY JEAN-MARC GIBOUX COURTESY OF DIY NETWORK.

palisade • hoboken & beyond

SUMMER 2010

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LETTERS

I picked up Palisade Magazine in the hair salon in Hoboken today, the one with Lidia on the cover. I enjoyed reading it so much. All of the stories were fun to read and the restaurant suggestions and advertisements I found to be very helpful.

GINA TUCCI Hoboken I’ve been meaning to thank you for the wonderful article in Palisade. I really appreciate you taking the time for the article.

CHRIS O’CONNOR Founder and artistic director Mile Square Theatre Hoboken I recently came across the newest issue of Palisade Magazine. Great job to you and your team! I appreciated the golf course recommendations in the area and I know that my wife particularly enjoyed the wedding section (We just got married). Thanks for the good read.

JOE IRINEO Jersey City I received your magazine today. Really nice article on Red Hook. I will share with some of those mentioned. Very nice job!

DAVID E. SHARPS President, The Waterfront Museum Red Hook, Brooklyn My sister in law Anne Corrado Smith is a lifelong resident of Hoboken. She was intrigued by an article in the Spring issue. The article [“The House the Butcher Built”] contained photos of the interior of a brownstone house built in 1880 by my great uncle Michael Smith. Michael and my grandfather James were witnesses to the will of Hetty Green, reportedly the richest woman in the world at the time. Hetty was a miserly woman who lived in several cold water flats in Hoboken. When she died in 1917 her estate was valued at some $200 million, which today would be equal to about $17 billion. Hetty was included in a list of the 40 wealthiest citizens in America—the only woman. The Rockefellers, the Astors, and the Goulds were in the compilation. The Smith family came to America from County Meath, Ireland, in 1864. The father was a successful contractor. 6

SUMMER 2010

The four sons operated a prosperous wholesale-retail butcher store. James became the city treasurer from 1888 until he died in 1917 and was a friend of Hetty’s. Brother Patrick was a police commissioner, and brother Bryan was the founder of St. Mary’s Hospital. Michael’s daughter Elizabeth married “Crit” Ayers, the captain of the Princeton football team c. 1898. Both my parents were born in Hoboken in 1901 and were lifelong residents. My father grew up in a brownstone house owned by Joe Corrado that was recently sold. Eight family members were teachers in Hoboken—four generations of history and service to the city. You can take the boy out of Hoboken, but you can’t take Hoboken out of the boy.

PETER SMITH Flossmoor, ILL I wish to offer my sincerest compliments on Jersey City Magazine and Palisade Magazine. Your lifestyle publications have set a standard of journalistic excellence unmatched in my experience as a lifelong resident of Hudson County. (53 years and 31 as a teacher at Saint Dominic Academy). Reading your magazine makes me feel proud to reside “along the Hudson” and, if I were from somewhere else, I would certainly consider moving here. I especially enjoy your choice of themes, such as the special Wedding Section in the Spring 2010 edition of Palisade. The article, “The Sunken Ships of Bayonne” caught my attention. I lived in Bayonne most of my life and never knew of their existence. As a Hoboken resident, I am quite aware of the ubiquitous presence of the Hufnagel Landscaping trucks and have marveled at the outstanding work they do. Now, I have a name and personal anecdotes to think of whenever I admire a Hufnagel landscape. Keep up your outstanding work and I look forward to your summer editions!

JOSEPH P. NAPOLI Hoboken

Correction In “Feasting on River Views” in the Spring issue of Palisade, Waterside Restaurant and Catering in North Bergen was incorrectly listed as Frank’s Waterside. We regret the error.

palisade • hoboken & beyond


palisade • hoboken & beyond

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CONTRIBUTORS

ROGER KIMPTON began journalism studies

ROBERT E. CALEM

BETH DICARA

AMY HAND

after more than 20 yeas working as a grip in the film business. He has written extensively for the Web magazine “Grandparents.com,” as well as The New York Post and Canvas: Magazine for Sustainable Living. He has a professional certification in journalism from New York University.

ANDREW TAVANI has written for Who Wants To Be A Millionaire and Discovery Channel’s Cash Cab, for which he won a Daytime Emmy Award in 2009. He has also contributed to NYmag.com, the New York Press, TV Guide, and Time Out New York. tavaniwork.blogspot.com

ROGER KIMPTON

ANDREW TAVANI

GINA TUCCI

GINA TUCCI lives in Hoboken with her fiancé. She grew up in Garden City, Long Island, and graduated in 2004 from Hofstra University with a BS in music merchandising. She currently does A&R for Atlantic Records in New York City. She plays bass guitar, flute, piano, and tuba, and writes songs. Her wedding is August 11 in Italy. DIANA SCHWAEBLE is an award-winning reporter and the former managing editor for the Hudson Reporter Newspaper group. Her series of stories, “Home Sweet Hoboken,” won second place for feature writing in 2006 in the competitive New Jersey Press Association statewide contest. She is currently working on her first collection of short stories.

DIANA SCHWAEBLE

AMANDA STAAB

AL SULLIVAN

ROBERT E. CALEM has covered technology

TRICIA TIRELLA

and business for more than two decades. He was a founding editor of This Week In Consumer Electronics and holds a Master’s degree in journalism from Columbia University. He writes extensively about automobiles and is a regular contributor to Palisade’s In Gear department. He lives in Hoboken.

AMANDA STAAB is a graduate student at Columbia University’s Journalism School. A New Jersey native, she currently lives in Hoboken with her husband. AL SULLIVAN has been a staff writer for the Hudson Reporter newspaper chain since 1992. He was named journalist of the year in 2001 by the New Jersey Press Association, and photographer of the year in 2005 by the Garden State Journalists Association. In 2001, Rutgers University Press published a collection of his work, Everyday People: Profiles from the Garden State.

BETH DICARA is a photographer and ceramicist

TRICIA TIRELLA is a staff writer for The Hudson Reporter. She currently lives in Jersey City.

who has lived in Jersey City for 27 years. eveningstarstudio.net

JESSE WEEKS grew up in the shadow of the

AMY HAND is an event photographer with more than 20 years experience. She graduated from the Fashion Institute of Technology with an emphasis in still life and fashion photography. “Photography allows me to express my passion for composition and color as well as experience many different people,” she says. Amyhand.com

Rocky Mountains in Salt Lake City where he often returns for skiing, rafting, and weak beer. After obtaining B.A.s in History and Spanish out West, he moved to Hoboken for its stronger beer. He currently enjoys cycling around northern New Jersey, playing basketball on the mean streets, and refereeing the cage match between his id, ego, and superego.

JESSE WEEKS

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SUMMER 2010

palisade • hoboken & beyond


LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

B L U E S P A C E

ARCHITECTURE

&

INTERIOR DESIGN

N Residential

N Commercial

N Retail

PHOTO BY MARIE PAPP

Specializing in:

Summer in the Cities Our summer cover boy is Jason Cameron, the Do It Yourself Network’s contractor who can turn a guy’s crash pad into a girl magnet and man cave. Read Andrew Tavani’s Q and A, and you’ll see there’s more to this Hoboken resident than just paint and plaster. We spotlight North Bergen in this issue. Don’t miss Roger Kimpton’s story about being a grip on the North Bergen set of Law & Order: SVU—talk about an inside scoop! We look at what North Bergen has to offer kids in summer, we visit Braddock Park, and we enjoy a fabulous meal at Di Palma Brothers Restaurant, where you can buy a beautiful antique after dinner. When you’re watching a movie, it’s one of those little details that you don’t think much about, but somebody has to do the on-set manicures and pedicures. Cliffside Park’s Marie Salandra is a manicurist to the stars. Check out her film credits. Jesse Weeks had a fun assignment— riding his bike the length of the River Walkway. His blog (bike log) tells you everything you need to know if you want to tackle this scenic ride. If you want to leave the area for a summer jaunt, join us for an overnight in Atlantic Highlands and Sandy Hook. If you have a story you want to share with us, email it to krounds@hudson reporter.com. Our first one came from Gina Tucci, who fell in love with and in Hoboken. We will name this department after you. Read “Gina’s Story” and then send us yours. (550 words or less). Take Palisade to the beach. There’s much more to enjoy.

Custom homes, additions and interior décor Residential building interiors and lobbies Office Interiors for expansion or relocation Restaurants, Bar/ Lounges and Cafes We are committed to our clients in bringing their vision to life in the most innovative and efficient ways that meet and exceed their needs.

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palisade • hoboken & beyond

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IN GEAR

SUMMER COOL WARM UP AND CHILL OUT THIS SUMMER WITH THESE INNOVATIVE ACCESSORIES FOR YOUR ACTIVE LIFESTYLE. BY ROBERT E. CALEM

CHILL THREADS The sweatier you get the cooler you’ll feel in sports shirts made with Icefil fabric. Its threads have a larger dimension to absorb and wick moisture faster, a chemical treatment to provide SPF 30 to 50+ sun protection and—most notable—a coating of Xylitol, which reacts with moisture (sweat) to produce a cooling sensation. New Balance is introducing Icefil this season in its new Game Point Polo ($50) and Top Spin Performance Crew ($40) men’s tennis tops, and NB Cool short sleeve ($28) and NB Cool sleeveless ($26) men’s fitness tops. Descente is using Icefil fabric in the new men’s and women’s Ice Tee short sleeve ($50-$55) and Ice Tee sleeveless ($45) running tops, and new men’s and women’s Icefil Jersey ($90) and women’s Icefil Sleeveless Jersey ($80) bicycling tops. Also, Pearl Izumi is featuring Icefil in its new Fly short sleeve ($55), Fly long sleeve ($65) and Fly sleeveless ($45-$65) running tops for men and women. newbalance.com veltecsports.com pearlizumi.com

SEE IT THROUGH Ordinary running jackets hide your fashionable sports shirts, but the limited-production New Balance NBx Component Jacket ($100) shows them off through translucent nylon fabric. Available this season only, it’s feather light and water resistant, with visible seam-sealing tape that also becomes part of the jacket’s fashion statement. Other features include X-Static fabric at the collar, an internal pocket for a digital audio player, adjustable draw cords at the waist, and a ventilation yoke at the back. The men’s version also has a large rear cargo pocket, which the entire jacket folds into for easy packing. newbalance.com

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palisade • hoboken & beyond


IN GEAR

TRAINING ZONE Keep your running on track with the new Adidas miCoach Pacer ($140), a collection of digital devices that scrutinizes your performance and gives you spoken motivational guidance as you go. The package contains a sensor that clips on to a running shoe and records your stride rate, pace, and distance; a heart rate monitor that straps around your chest; and the main Pacer unit that wirelessly tracks those devices’ readouts and provides real-time audible coaching. Together, the components help you stay in a miCoach “training zone” and adhere to a plan created and maintained at a personalized website. To also listen to your favorite music, hook the Pacer up to any digital audio player using the included cable. micoach.com

SOUND DESIGN Typical earphones aren’t exercise-friendly. They fall out or need constant adjustment when jostled, their cables can become brittle and break in cold weather, and sweat or rainwater seeping through their enclosures can short out the loudspeakers. So Sennheiser, the German maker of premium headphones, has teamed up with Adidas and BMW Design Works to create a new line of sports models engineered to overcome those problems. The co-branded Sennheiser and Adidas OMX 680 earclip, PMX 680 neckband, MX 680 earbud ($80 each) and CX 680 ear-canal ($120) earphones all are sweat and water resistant, able to be rinsed under a faucet, and have cables wrapped in Kevlar to keep them flexible at temperatures down to -10 degrees Celsius. The MX 680 and CX 680 also feature patented “EarFins” that lock in to the concha of the ear to keep the earphones stable while you’re in motion. sennheiserusa.com

SMART CASES Protect your smartphone from drop shocks, scratches, and dust (but not water) while enjoying a summer adventure. Otterbox Defender Series ($50) cases—available for the iPhone 3G/3GS and a variety of Blackberry, HP, HTC, Motorola, Nokia, Palm, and Samsung smartphones—fully enclose your phone inside a two-piece hard polycarbonate shell, which is further covered by a soft silicone skin. Clear polycarbonate protectors built into the shell halves cover the phone’s screen and camera lens, while vents and silicone plugs shelter the speaker and ports from dust—and all buttons and functions remain accessible. Similarly, the nearly as protective but lower-priced Otterbox Commuter Series ($35) cases are available for the iPhone 3G/3GS and Blackberry, HP, HTC, LG, Nokia, Palm, and Samsung smartphones. otterbox.com

palisade • hoboken & beyond

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PHOTO BY JUSTIN STEPHENS, COURTESY OF NBC UNIVERSAL

Hollywood on the Palisades ON THE SET WITH LAW & ORDER: SVU BY ROGER KIMPTON

n film parlance, the warehouse in North Bergen would be described as “ND” —nondescript. Maybe so, but upon entering you’re transported to the magical world of the Hollywood soundstage. From 1999 through 2002 I spent more time in this building than I did with my wife; I was best boy grip on Law & Order: Special Victims Unit. Grips move the camera on dollies and cranes, and refine the lighting instruments so the image is sculpted to appear natural. We secure all lighting and move set walls, and we are the set safety officers. The best boy is much like the foreman on a construction crew.

I

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How did the iconic New York television franchise wind up with a branch in North Bergen? In 1999 all adequate New York stage space was occupied, so producer David DeClerque sent his people out to scout locations, and when they came upon this 52,000-square-foot cavernous space, he knew they’d found a home for SVU. THIS SPRING I RETURN TO THE SET. AT THE reception desk I’m told that Mariska Hargitay (Detective Olivia Benson), wants to see me. I assume she’s my first interview and wants to be done with it. As soon as I hit the make-up room door,

palisade • hoboken & beyond


PHOTO BY WILL HART, COURTESY OF NBC UNIVERSAL

she leaps from her seat, no makeup, curlers in, and runs to offer a hello like we were long lost relatives, evidence of the collegial spirit that makes SVU a special work environment. Unit production manager Gail Barringer says, “We all get along, it’s an easy commute, and we have three months off in the summer if you want to go do a movie.” She laughs. “Hell, we marry each other.” She’s expecting her second child with husband Jansen Lambie, a longtime member of the sound department, and Mariska met her husband Peter Hermann when he began his recurring role as attorney Trevor Langan. Electrician Ron Paul, the show’s unofficial historian, puts the number of babies born to cast and crew during the series at 56. Recently during a pivotal scene, a young actress seemed a bit flustered and stumbled on a couple of takes. Mariska immediately stepped in to encourage her and help her focus. “Hey, I remember the days when I guest starred on other series,” Mariska says sitting in her dressing room, which she decorated herself; her son August’s toys are scattered about. “It’s tough walking into someone’s ‘home’ where they have a shorthand that you can’t know.” Christopher Meloni (Detective Elliot Stabler) has a more strident acting style that translates to his on-set interactions—friendly but reserved. Richard Belzer (Detective John Munch) proudly embraces his role as curmudgeon, though his ever-present little dog, a curly-haired stray named Bebe, tarnishes that image a bit.

palisade • hoboken & beyond

Ice-T (Detective Fin Tutuola) is deeply concentrated on the task at hand, while Dann Florek (Captain Don Cragen) has a sardonic wit. None have an attitude, which is rare in an ensemble cast. DANN DESCRIBES THIS UNIT COHESION AS A “Tapestry” beginning with great writing overseen by Dr. Neal Baer, who was responsible for the scripts on ER. Next is Dick Wolf ’s masterful casting. The show is noted for its guest stars, including Carol Burnett, Hillary Duff, Fran Lebowitz, AnnMargaret, Sharon Stone, MarloThomas, and many more. Wolf wanted this show to be more character driven than the mother ship (the original Law & Order) so Benson and Stabler had to truly be partners. “Dick somehow saw a chemistry between Mariska and I,” Chris says. “Our connection is essential and it’s real.” So close are the two that Mariska is Godmother to Chris’s daughter. The show is kid friendly. One day the schedule was juggled to allow Chris to come in late to see something at his six-year-old son’s school. “It was great, we had a little father-son breakfast,” he says. Wolf is also responsible for the directorial careers of crew and former cast members, including Peter Leto, a North Bergen High School grad, who did stints as second assistant director and producer before becoming one of two resident directors.

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PHOTO BY WILL HART, COURTESY OF NBC UNIVERSAL

Wardrobe supervisor Ginnie Patton, who has been on the show since 2000, says, “I’m staying on this horse until it rides out from under me.” She says that the “boys” aren’t difficult to dress. Occasionally they’ll ask for a different tie, but that’s about it. “Belzer just insists on wearing dark shirts,” and Mariska’s wardrobe, which is jammed onto two 12-foot racks, “runs the gamut from Gucci to H&M.” The easiest? Ice-T. “He’ll wear whatever you give him,” Ginnie says. Ice-T lives in a neighboring town and drives to work, unlike carless cast and crew who are driven by teamsters. Dann Florek, standing at his dressing room window overlooking the parking lot, says, “I amuse myself waiting for Ice to arrive so I can see what he’ll be driving. Will it be the Astin-Martin, the Red Bentley or Coco’s (his wife’s) white Cadillac?” WHEN I WORKED HERE ONLY THE BARE BONES sets were built, including the squad room and the interrogation room. On this visit I found every square foot of the stage being used. In my day the courtroom and hospital sets required a pilgrimage to the mother ship in New York. Several sets serve as multiple locations. The courtroom, which features the judge’s bench first seen on the classic 1984 NBC comedy hit Night Court, is used for all “law” sequences from arraignments to appeals. In addition to a large wardrobe room filled with everything from police and fire uniforms to a special hooker section, the hallways surrounding the room are lined with rolling racks of stock. The walls are covered with paintings and wall hangings for set dressing.

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Part of the adjoining building has been rented to store set dressing, and the carpenters have been moved to a site in Fairview. Over the years, the stage has extended beyond the studio and onto local streets. Since the character of Stabler has been having marital problems, the exterior of his Queens home is being filmed in Fort Lee. “We have used New Jersey locations on eight of the 20 episodes this season,” says locations coordinator Derek Miller. Every effort is made to fit in local sites when the script is reviewed, but as in all L&O episodes the “City” is part of the cast. The locations department is the show’s “liaison to the world,” says locations manager Trish Adlesic, who must assuage the concerns of the community while accommodating the requirements of the production. A Herculean task at times. She “goes to the outside world and invites them to our party,” but not everyone wants to be invited. The proprietor of Three Star Bagel, located on a busy thoroughfare, vented about police controlling traffic to accommodate shooting and, their biggest grouse, “they bring all their own food, they don’t buy anything.” One of the production people counters that she buys coffee there all day. “Great coffee,” she says. THE BAGEL WOMAN IS CORRECT THAT A CATERER provides the food. Shooting Stars Catering serves a hot breakfast including an omelet bar. Lunches usually include three entrees, two starches, two veggies, and an assortment of salads all from a step van. Though not budgeted for it, Lisa Brown, who owns the

palisade • hoboken & beyond


company with her husband, provides a hot snack in the morning and again after lunch. “They expect it,” she says. “They work hard and I can’t let them down.” She considers the cast and crew her “kids.” So if Chris Meloni wants a “turkey burger made with Worcestershire Sauce and spinach several times a day,” she will make sure he gets it. Mariska uses her own chef on most days to take the requirements of her diet off Lisa’s shoulders. Mornings are usually busy and often I was unable to get breakfast. On many days one of Lisa’s staff would appear with my favorite omelet saying, “Lisa said you have to eat this.” And I did. “We have over a hundred local vendors,” says Gail Barringer. When production designer Dean Taucher needed someone to copy graphics he went to the Yellow Pages and discovered Jeffrey de Boer. His family had been in the photo lab business since 1934. They settled in New Jersey after escaping The Netherlands during the Holocaust. That business, however, has been devastated by the digital age so Jeffrey now does media design. So happy was Dean with the work, Jeffrey now does all graphics for SVU, Ugly Betty, Law & Order, and the NBC network itself. “I have 12 employees and am in the process of moving to a larger facility,” Jeffrey says, “and it all began with that phone call.”

commission it wasn’t financially feasible to stay in New Jersey, and the tax credit was established. Gail, who “signs every purchase order and sees every invoice” and production accountant Linda H. Miller estimate the company spends, with three rents and utilities, nearly $3 million in the area, plus tax paid by the crew. One place the company spends its cash is North Bergen’s Trattoria La Sorrentino, an authentic pizza restaurant owned by a Neapolitan family. Every Friday night the production orders pizzas from Trattoria. “We send them around 20 pizzas and some sandwiches,” says Giacomo Vanacore, one of the family’s two sons. “For them we don’t care that they call when we are busiest. We love them.” The feeling’s mutual. “We love, love, love it here,” Gail says. “We don’t want anything to change.”—PM

GOVERNOR CHRISTIE’S PROPOSED budget eliminates all film tax credits. When New York initiated an incentive program, the show examined the cost of moving to New York. David DeClerque told New Jersey’s film

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SUMMER 2010

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SPOTLIGHT ON

North Bergen

NORTH BERGEN FIREHOUSE AND PLAYGROUND. PHOTO COURTESY OF DEAN MARCHETTO ARCHITECTS.

orth Bergen sits atop the 200 million-year-old Palisades cliffs, giving it some of the steepest hills east of San Francisco. Its parks, diverse businesses, and stunning views of New York City help make it appealing to thousands of residents and visitors. Soon the township will begin working on a “streetscape” project along JFK Boulevard East, upgrading sidewalks, lights, and landscaping. “The township works extremely hard to make sure that the people who see North Bergen get a very favorable impression of it,” says Mayor Nicholas Sacco. The township also prides itself on its recreation opportunities. Future plans call for installing synthetic turf soccer fields in James J. Braddock Park and 64th Street Park, as well as replacing playgrounds, with the help of state Open Space funding. North Bergen aggressively seeks state grants for yearly upgrades of its coveted green spaces.

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In this issue “Green Scene” spotlights Braddock Park. While the park is operated by Hudson County, it spans almost one third of the section of town bordering the Palisades. It features Woodcliff Lake, the largest in the county, which offers fishing year round as well as an island that serves as a bird sanctuary. “Child’s Play” showcases the sports and activities provided by the North Bergen Recreational Department to township kids throughout the summer. The town’s wide array of restaurants includes the newly opened Waterside Restaurant, offering a contemporary fine dining experience with dramatic New York views; Aladdin’s Grill, serving Mediterranean cuisine; and Di Palma Brothers, which we highlight on page 40. Businesses of all sizes thrive here, and these popular eateries reflect North Bergen’s remarkable diversity. “North Bergen is a clean and safe community,” says Sacco. “People who live here take pride in their homes and properties, and I’m very proud of the community.”—Tricia Tirella

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Take in the View at

Lincoln Harbor

Fine restaurants and the best view of theManhattan skyline

Harbor Bar & Brasserie 201.348.4444

Chart House 201.348.6628 www.chart-house.com

www.harborbar.com

Ruth’s Chris Steak House

Houlihan’s 201.863.4000

201.863.5100

www.houlihans.com

www.ruthschris.com

For a Free Directory of Services & Restaurants call 201.348.3703 or 201.348.4780 Lincoln Harbor 1200 Harbor Blvd., Weehawken, NJ www.LincolnHarbor.com Featuring fine restaurants, Sheraton Lincoln Harbor Hotel, Foodcourt & Services Conveniently located off I-495, adjacent to the Lincoln Tunnel. On-site NY Waterway Ferry stop to New York City. Accessible by Hudson—Bergen light rail connections to North Bergen, Hoboken Path Station, 22nd St. in Bayonne & Jersey City. NJ Transit Buses: # 167 from Toms River; # 64 from Lakewood; # 156, # 158, and # 159 from Edgewater Sheraton Lincoln Harbor Hotel: 201.617.5600


GREEN SCENE

James J. Braddock Park—North Bergen

PHOTOS BY KATE ROUNDS

Sometimes called North Hudson Park, this vast city oasis (160 acres) is bordered by 79th Street, Bergenline Avenue, and Boulevard East. It occupies about half the land area east of Kennedy Boulevard in the township. Established in 1910 as North Hudson Park, it was later named for James J. Braddock, an Irish American boxer who won the world heavyweight championship in 1935. Russell Crowe played him in the 2005 movie Cinderella Man. The park has miles of walking and bike paths, ball fields, tennis courts, a track, a handball court, bacci ball courts, picnic area, Woodcliff Lake for fishing, and Bruins Stadium, a football and soccer venue. Last year, the new North Hudson Park Environmental Academy opened in the once vacant county-owned James J. Braddock Park Interpretive Center overlooking the lake The one-year program, which transitions students from grammar school to high school, is comprised of eight girls and 16 boys from Guttenberg, North Bergen, Weehawken, and West New York. 18

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I visited Braddock on a beautiful spring day, riding by bike from the Palisade office in north Hoboken. You can get on the light rail at Lincoln Harbor and take it to the 49th Street station, which lets you off on Bergenline. The park is a straight shot up Bergenline to 79th Street. A word of caution: Bergenline Avenue is probably the county’s least friendly venue for cyclists. The street and the sidewalk are mobbed. Riding on the street you risk car doors opening and vehicles cutting you off, and riding on the sidewalk, well, not a good idea. Without a bike you can take the jitney, and if you go by car, there are parking spaces in Braddock. On a weekday afternoon, the park was filled with kids of all ages—playing basketball, football, tennis, soccer, and handball. The playground was filled with little kids, and the lake was filled with ducks, geese, turtles, and even a cormorant that raised its snakelike neck and then dove into the semi-murky waters. Willows wept over the nature paths as young parents with strollers and old folks on benches enjoyed the greenery of this expansive city park.—Kate Rounds

palisade • hoboken & beyond


GREEN SCENE

The Future Looks Bright at Lincoln Harbor Yacht Club

Dock and relax in a calm, quiet, and safe world-class marina. In addition to the 250 floating docks, impressive views of the NYC skyline, four restaurants-including Ruth's Chris Steak House, the Chart House, Harbour Bar and Houlihan's, a 165-suite Sheraton Hotel, a mini-mall, ferry service and easy access to Manhattan right outside the gate, Lincoln Harbor Marina and Yacht Club also confidently boasts the following amenities:

Lincoln Harbor Yacht Club 1500 Harbor Boulevard Weehawken, NJ 07086 Ph.201.319.5100 Fax 201.319.5111 Visit our website : www.lincolnharbormarina.com

MAYOR NICHOLAS I. SACCO

• Professional staff to assist with docking 24 hours a day • Crew-friendly marina • Excellent security, including TV monitoring • Cable television available • Conference room and business services • Mini work-out center • Yacht detailing and mechanic services available • Winter storage • Access to Hudson River Walkway • Tennis courts and running track nearby

&

COMMISSIONER ALLEN PASCUAL

NORTH BERGEN MUNICIPAL POOL CALL TO REGISTER 201.392.2061 FOR UPDATED INFO GO TO

WWW.NORTHBERGEN.ORG

NORTH BERGEN RECREATIONAL CENTER 6300 MEADOWVIEW AVE., NORTH BERGEN

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WAT E R WAY S

VIEW FROM LIBERTY STATE PARK

ENTRANCE TO LIBERTY STATE PARK

LIBERTY NATIONAL GOLF COURSE

Up the River with a Pedal TWO INTREPID CYCLISTS BIKE THE LENGTH OF THE HUDSON RIVER WALKWAY BY JESSE WEEKS PHOTOS BY DIANA SCHWAEBLE

he Hudson River Walkway is a 20-plus-mile path that begins in Jersey City and continues to the George Washington Bridge and beyond. Below, along with mileage markers, are points of interest and places to stop for rest or refreshment. The Hudson-Bergen Light Rail is handy and provides a quick return trip if the whole loop is too intimidating. Bring a spare tube, a pump, water, and a helmet. You can rent bicycles from Grove Street Bicycles at 365 Grove St. in Jersey City. So mount up, make a day of it, and have fun!

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0.0 Start with lunch at The Pointe Restaurant at Point Liberté or fuel up with snacks from Port Liberté Wine & Deli. The walkway starts across Chapel Avenue from the NY Waterway terminal, wending its way through Port Liberté, passing several of CRRNJ TRAIN TERMINAL

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JESSE WEEKS

the Liberty National Golf Course holes and a migratory bird nesting area.

1.5 Enjoy a Churchill on the cigar terrace of Liberty National’s clubhouse. The club is members only, so once you return your crested blazer, and security escorts you off the premises, continue into Liberty State Park. The path is under construction at the entrance. Follow the road and pick up the path again via the parking lot. Check out the views of the Statue of Liberty and New York Harbor.

4.1 At Liberty State Park ferry terminal, stop for a cruise to the statue and Ellis Island or wander into the old train terminal, former gateway to “all points west.” LIBERTY LANDING MARINA

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WAT E R WAY S

LIBERTY STATE PARK

CRRNJ TRAIN STATION IN LIBERTY STATE PARK

GOLDMAN SACHS BUILDING

4.5 Stop at Liberty House Restaurant. On a terraced lawn facing 7.5 Get a bite at Henry’s on the Hudson. Continuing north, the Manhattan, enjoy a drink or play chess with three-foot chess pieces. Exit the parking lot onto the cobblestone street for a taste of the Hudson County version of the Paris to Roubaix bicycle race, or take the paved path that runs parallel. Continue .5 miles to the boat yard and then take the footbridge into a gravel driveway.

5.6 Let’s hope you don’t need medical attention this early in the ride, but if you do, drop into Liberty Health Jersey City Medical Center.

5.7

Zeppelin Hall Biergarten features 144 draft lines, liter mugs, pitchers, and outdoor picnic tables (lederhosen not provided). It’s sandwiched between the Jersey Avenue and Marin Boulevard light rail stops. Turn right at the Zeppelin entrance and then right on Tidewater Street. Continue alongside the light rail tracks. A right on Washington Street takes you to the Morris Canal and the Korean War Veteran’s Memorial. Head back to the path along the light rail until you come to Goldman Sachs, the tallest building in New Jersey.

7.0

Head north to the Katyn Massacre Monument at Exchange Place which commemorates the 1940 massacre of some 22,000 Polish nationals by the Soviets. HOBOKEN WATERFRONT

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section in front of Crystal Pointe has not been completed. Veer onto Second Street and turn back onto the path through the entrance to the Mandalay On The Hudson condos.

8.3

The path runs past the Pavonia/Newport PATH station offering several refreshment options, including Starbucks, South City Grill, and Babo Teahouse & Gelateria.

9.1

The path runs right through the Hoboken terminal. If you don’t dismount in the terminal, law enforcement will instruct you to. Exit at the north end of the station and continue past Pier A through Hoboken’s waterfront park.

9.6 The W Hotel, Trinity, The Quays, and 3Forty Grill all offer great views of Manhattan.

9.7

Crepe Grill serves lunch fare on the water. The path continues on Frank Sinatra Drive for a half mile along the water.

10.3

The Boat House is the original home of the New York Yacht Club. A plaque commemorates the club and the birth of the America’s Cup race.

PAVONIA NEWPORT

NEWPORT LIGHTHOUSE ON LEFRAK POINT

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WAT E R WAY S

10.6 Up next are Lua, offering Latin-inspired cuisine, The

houses. A half mile later the path leads to another section of sidewalk along River Road.

Turning Point with diner style food, and NY Waterway terminal which offers an escape to Manhattan. Bike around the Hudson Tea Building and over the Park Avenue Bridge. Take the first right. Welcome to Weehawken.

Sabor Restaurant across River Road in North Bergen is a Latin bistro, should that float your boat.

11.7 Harbor Bar, Houlihan’s, Ruth’s Chris Steakhouse, and

Ride into City Place shopping center opposite Gorge Road in Edgewater. Pick up the path at the east end of the center past Fleming’s Steakhouse and Baumgart’s Sushi.

the Chart House will come into view. The Harbor Bar is at the Sheraton Hotel. If you can’t go on, get a room. Continue past Lincoln Harbor toward Port Imperial Boulevard, where there’s a short unpaved section as you approach. Pick up the path again by taking a right into Waterfront Park.

14.0 P.F. Chang’s is off the path along River Road in West New York.

16.8 17.1

18.1

En route in Edgewater are Outback Steakhouse, McDonald’s, Target, and the Crab House.

18.3

At Edgewater Driving Range, you can practice your Scottish drive-by skills or putt around the miniature golf course.

18.4 If your ironwork worked up your appetite, stop in at

14.3

Starbucks, Ben and Jerry’s, and Giannone Wine and Liquors are among the Shops at Riverwalk in West New York. Good spot for a venti iced orange mocha frappuccino.

Matsushima Japanese Steakhouse or the Japanese mall, both in Edgewater. Pick up the latest Japanese-language periodicals to catch up on your favorite dorama plot lines. Continue on the sidewalk along Old River Road.

15.1 The path brings you in to the sidewalk along River Road. 18.7 The Binghampton Shops in Edgewater features 15.6 Palisades Medical Center in North Bergen features Binghampton Bagels, Yolato Yogurt, and Trader Joe’s. top-notch cardiac care should you need it. 19.3 Head back toward the water at the entrance to Whole 15.8 Waterside Restaurant in North Bergen provides extensive Foods and continue for another mile past the Edgewater marina. outdoor seating. Follow the path into the parking lot and head toward the end of the row of condos. The path continues to the right with a slight unpaved section. Stay left of the red row

All Saints students have an appreciation for the diversity and cultural wonder of urban life

Continue on the sidewalk along River Road past Admiral’s Walk, Mariner’s Landing, and Eleven Eleven River Plaza Inc. The doormen at these condo complexes told me that developers had not yet constructed waterfront access. If they ever do, cigars may be in order from Havana Cigars across River Road. The sidewalk leads to a park at mile 20.4. The path goes back to the water for another half mile, ending at a small hill in front of Le Jardin Restaurant in Edgewater. Follow the shoulder of River Road up a gentle incline.

22.0 At the base of the hill leading to the

small School

BIG Mission

Early Childhood, Ages 3 - 4 Q Elementary Grades K - 4 Middle School, Grades 5 -8 At All Saints we inspire… Q

The discipline and integrity to be successful in school and in life

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An appreciation for the diversity and cultural wonder of urban life

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A responsibility for this planet and gratitude for its beauty

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A developed sense of one’s own spirituality through social action and service

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A sincere love of learning

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201.792.0736

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entrance to Palisades Interstate Park and the GWB is Rusty Kales Pub in Edgewater. Your correspondent decided to lose all momentum going up the hill and stop for refreshment. The folks were friendly and the jukebox had “Highwayman” by the Highwaymen. Very nice.

22.3 Turn into Palisades Interstate Park for miles of greenway with little traffic or go up the hill to the GWB. If you find the hill challenging, the words of Thomas Paine waiting at the top—“These are the times that try men’s souls”—will resonate. Ride over the bridge to continue on the Manhattan bike path, or just head back to one of your favorite Jersey watering holes for a cold one. You’ve earned it!—PM For info on the walkway, go to http://www.state.nj.us/dep/cmp/ czm_hudson.html

palisade • hoboken & beyond


IN PERSON

PHOTO BY JEAN-MARC GIBOUX COURTESY OF DIY NETWORK

Questions for Jason Cameron THE LICENSED CONTRACTOR, HOST OF THE DIY NETWORK’S MAN CAVES AND DESPERATE LANDSCAPES—AND HOBOKEN RESIDENT— TALKS ABOUT PURSUING AN ACTING CAREER, BUILDING A “TROOP CAVE” FOR U.S SOLDIERS IN KUWAIT, AND MAN CAVE ESSENTIALS. BY ANDREW TAVANI

How did you acquire your expertise in carpentry and construction? I grew up in the U.P. [Michigan’s Upper Peninsula] and we heated our house with a wood stove, so I was introduced to the chain-saw at a young age. Every year we’d go out and cut ten cords of wood—myself and my two brothers split it, stacked it, and we’d have to get up at three in the morning to load the stove, otherwise we’d go cold. I worked as a [house] framer in high school, worked in concrete for a long time, and pretty much all aspects of building. When I started doing finished carpentry, I fell in love with that. I apprenticed with a master carpenter and that became a passion of mine.

palisade • hoboken & beyond

While you worked in construction, you’d always wanted a TV acting career? I was always interested in being an actor, but you can’t live in the U.P. and want to pursue that business. You have to get the hell out of there and move to New York or L.A. I had been doing small commercials in my hometown market. When I was 28, I thought, “If I don’t make a move now, I’m never going to do it.” So I uprooted myself, moved to New York, and was a working actor for a while.

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IN PERSON

MAN CAVES HOSTS JASON CAMERON AND TONY "THE GOOSE" SIRAGUSA. PHOTO BY DAVID S. HOLLOWAY COURTESY OF DIY NETWORK.

You had a small role on Sex and the City. What was that like? I was told my role might turn into a love interest of Miranda’s [Cynthia Nixon]. The scene was: We were in Central Park running the marathon and Miranda was in the 15-minute-mile group and I was in the 5-minute-mile group. And she was trying to get away from this guy that was bothering her. She was going to run up to my group and we were going to bump into each other and have “a moment.” We start running and Cynthia Nixon is behind me and all of a sudden somebody screams. I turn around and Cynthia is on the ground holding her leg. She pulled her hamstring. [Laughs.] I was like, walk it off, Cynthia. But, of course, they carried her off and basically all you saw was my eyebrow in the scene. I’d been on there before as a featured extra, and I had a recurring part on Guiding Light. And when I was in negotiations for a long-term contract with them, While You Were Out came up.

How did that opportunity arise? I went into the city on a casting call and the casting director said, “Just down the street they’re casting for this home improvement show.” So I went down, auditioned, and got the job. I think it was because I had my tool belt with me.

With home improvement shows, you’ve returned to your roots. Is that a surprise? I never knew that I would end up in this genre. Even though I love to do this, I never thought I’d combine the two. It wasn’t until a while after I got out here that I realized that this genre started 24

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getting big—it all happened with Trading Spaces. And then While You Were Out.

Is it fulfilling to combine the two careers? In the respect that they are two things that I love to do. But it’s not legit acting. It’s not scripted TV. It’s not what I came out here for.

You still want to do traditional TV and movie acting? I’m still venturing there. It’s just tough because my schedule is really full. But I’m still in talks and I’m working with an agency.

Why are home improvement shows so popular? Everybody’s got a vision for what they want for their ideal home. And everybody has that desire to know how to do it themselves. You see the transformation and think, “Wow, if they could do it, maybe I can do it.” We really try to impart the howto information to people. And it’s good family viewing for all ages.

What are the items that simply must be in the man cave? Bars. Kegerator. Flat screen. There are man caves without those elements, but it’s rare. We get really creative with bars because we build so many of them. But there are other things that have gone into man caves, ranging from a cigar lounge to a wine cellar to a golf clubhouse.

palisade • hoboken & beyond


IN PERSON

crew. It’s a combination of being prepared and having good guys who really know what they’re doing.

Are you ever worried that you might’ve bitten off more than you can chew? Yes, 80 percent of the time. Especially when you know you’ve got some big builds, you always get nervous. Plus, you’ve got Goose behind you screaming, “When are we getting outta here?” But we always get it done. It may be a few hours later than anticipated, but we do not sacrifice quality.

Man Caves partnered with the USO to build a “Troop Cave” at the Camp Virginia military base in Kuwait. What was that like? It was a very gratifying experience. It was a huge space and we built all of it from the ground up—a new theater, a gaming area, lounge, Internet area, music room, and a room for United Through Reading [which provides technology to allow soldiers to read books to their children at home]. We never would’ve been able to do it without the help of the USO construction battalion. They were amazing, as were the men and women of the armed forces.

Did your crew have to adjust to extreme conditions? I couldn’t believe that the troops go through this. You’re constantly breathing in sand. They have a flag system. If they fly a black flag, which represents the hottest temperature of about 130 degrees, you have to rest 20 minutes for every 10 minutes of work because you can dehydrate really quickly. PHOTO BY ANDREW TAVANI

And what items are forbidden in a man cave? Goose [Man Caves co-host Tony Siragusa] is the official authority on that. We’ve got a list going and Goose adds to it all the time. Right off the top of my head: no doilies, no scented candles, no neon or pastel colors, no throw pillows, no flowers of any kind, no fruit.

Are homeowners expected to help out with the man caves? Oh, hell yeah, dude! We’re not giving these things away. [Laughs.] The homeowners are very hands on because that’s the whole point—to impart some knowledge to them. When they’re enjoying their man caves, they can sit there and think to themselves, “I helped build this.” They gotta help or they’re not getting it.

You guys complete a man cave in two days—how do you do them so quickly?

Many of the man caves are located in North Jersey. Why? Goose and I live here. Goose already travels a lot doing NFL coverage for Fox and I travel a lot hosting Desperate Landscapes. He doesn’t want to travel, and I don’t mind that.

You’ve lived in Jersey City and you currently live with your wife in Hoboken. Why? It’s very convenient to the City without being in it. Hoboken’s a great town because it’s one square mile. Everything’s convenient. It’s quiet enough, clean, and a little working class.

Does the man who makes man caves for others have his own man cave? Not yet. I live in a thousand-square-foot condo, so there isn’t much room. But as soon as I get some more space, it’s the first thing I’m gonna get.—PM

It’s magic, dude. [Laughs.] It’s hard work. We work 14-to-15hour days and it’s not all fun and games. And I’ve got a really good

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QUIXOTIC

BACK IN THE DAY. PHOTOS COURTESY OF PALISADES INTERSTATE PARK COMMISSION

The Quest for

Bloomer’s Beach

BY DIANA SCHWAEBLE

t’s not very often that a reporter gets asked to photograph ruins in New Jersey. So when my editor asked for pictures of the remains of Bloomer’s Beach in Palisades Interstate Park, I was curious. The bathhouse and beach were named for a local 19th century family. Built in 1934 by the Civil Works Administration, Bloomer’s Beach was a popular diversion until it was closed in 1941. The authors of Architecture Walks: The Best Outings Near New York City describe the ruins as “repeated arched windows and doorways and imposing steps up from the shoreline.” On my first attempt to find these grand ruins, I biked into the park from the River Road/Edgewater entrance with Palisade writer Jesse Weeks. Coasting down the first winding hill, parts of

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the George Washington Bridge appear through the trees, looming large against the majestic Palisade cliffs. The first winding road ends at the Alpine Area basin, which has picnic places but no signs directing us to Bloomer’s Beach. The park’s map indicates many hiking trails but doesn’t mention sights along the way. On our ride back up the hill, Jesse noticed a little wooden sign with an arrow pointing to the right with Englewood Boat Basin carved into it. Since we were headed to the GWB that day, I decided to try again the next day. THE NEXT DAY I FOLLOWED THE CARVED WOODEN sign down another winding road that twists back up the Palisades.

palisade • hoboken & beyond


QUIXOTIC

THE “RUINS.” PHOTOS BY DIANA SCHWAEBLE

Here is another picnic area and a makeshift fishing spot by the parking lot, which was filled with fishermen and what looked liked office workers napping in their cars. There are several neglected stone buildings in this area, one with a tarp covering the roof. If there is a park map, I couldn’t find it. But there are several foot-worn paths, which are crudely marked with wooden signs. I asked several fishermen and one park employee for directions to Bloomer’s Beach. My question was met with confusion, but the park employee pointed vaguely to a set of trails, which led up the mountain, not toward the beach. I walked, looking for the stone structure, its “roof ” open to the sky. BY THE THIRD DAY, I WAS BEYOND FRUSTRATED BUT still determined. I drove back to the Englewood basin and trekked back on foot toward the marina. There were signs of life here, with boaters getting ready to push off and people wandering the dock. I noticed an old man who seemed to be in charge. I asked him if he’d heard of the Bloomer’s Beach ruins. Not only had he heard of them, he said he could show me an old picture. I followed him into the office where he pointed to the picture tacked on the wall. He told me there was also a museum with historical pictures from the 1930s. He instructed me to walk past the boats, past another large tarp, and to keep going past a fence and onto a muddy trail that looked

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like you “shouldn’t be going on,” he said. “Continue on that and you’ll run right into them.” I asked if the ruins would be on my left or right. He assured me they would be on the left. His directions were spot on. Just off that muddy trail is an opening and the remains of the bathhouse. I have to admit I wanted to see a living testament to history and all the lives that were shaped by a summer, an era, and a war. What I found was a wall, which blends into the cliffs. The “imposing steps up from the shoreline” led to an abandoned sandy patch that looked better suited for a parking lot than a bathing beach. A lone picnic table faced the rotting pier. Upon inspection, I found a faded plaque tucked in the bushes indicating Bloomer’s Beach. I felt the same way I did after visiting Stonehenge expecting to be in awe and instead finding the stones aren’t that big and whatever mystery once existed was replaced by commercial tourism. But perhaps the story of long-gone places is enough. As I made my way back, I passed a couple who had prepared a picnic lunch. As she laid it out on the table, he snapped pictures that will reveal a crumbling wall with arches overlooking the shoreline. Their memory of the day will surely be different from mine. Perhaps people still seek out the past if only to marvel at how little remains.—PM

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PHOTOS BY CAMILO GODOY

Manicurist to the Stars SHE NAILS IT EVERY TIME ver wonder who was responsible for Carmella Soprano’s fingernails? Well, you can stop wondering. It’s Maria Salandra, owner of Cliffside Park’s Finger Fitness Nail Salon. Edie Falco isn’t her only big name. Others include Christina Aguilera, Ellen Burstyn, Glenn Close, Jennifer Connolly, Russell Crowe, Michael Douglas, Felicity Huffman, Andy Garcia, Nicole Kidman, Shia LaBeouf, Rachel McAdams, Demi Moore, Jack Nicholson, Natalie Portman, Queen Latifah, and Catherine Zeta-Jones. Salandra, a Cliffside Park native, was trained at the Parisian Beauty Academy in Hackensack. She’s been in the business for 20 years and a celebrity manicurist for 15. Her love for the business started when she was a kid. “My mom got her hair and nails done on Saturdays,” Salandra says. “She had a manicurist that I adored. I watched her do my mother’s nails, I practiced, and one thing led to another.” Her uncles are hairdressers. “I was in their salons and involved with what they were doing,” she says.

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A singer, Salandra majored in music and minored in psychology. She still sings, doing backup vocals for various artists and compilation CDs for exercise companies. She was on Star Search and has a gospel musical, Revelation, playing in Branson, Missouri. “I’ve always done nails for friends and family,” she says, “and I didn’t want to wait tables.” So when she was 22, she opened her own salon. “I have my own technique and styles,” she says. “I used to use muslin to make nails and I also custom-blend nail polishes.” Her late father was a dentist—“I couldn’t put my hands in somebody’s mouth”—but she did make nails with the acrylic that he used to make teeth. Through friends in Hollywood, she found her niche as a celebrity manicurist. Her first movie was Mixed Nuts with Rita Wilson, Liev Schreiber, and Steve Martin. “It was a great cast of characters, and it snowballed from there,” she says. Edie Falco went from one extreme to the other nail-wise when she careered from Carmella Soprano to Nurse Jackie. During the first season of the Sopranos, Salandra made acrylic nails for

palisade • hoboken & beyond


Colockwise: Edie Falco, Christina Aguilera, Felicity Huffman, Nicole Kidman, Queen Latifah, Natalie Portman, Glenn Close, and Ellen Burstyn.

Carmella. But Salandra says they became too hard to maintain. When Falco “would rip them off, I had to start again.” After that, “I made my own press-on nails for her. I made at least 10 to 12 sets of Edie nails in pink and white. They didn’t look fake, and for the consistency of the film they matched exactly.”

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And what’s Falco like to work with? “She’s the most unaffected star,” Salandra says. “She’s a normal, down-to-earth hands-on woman. She’s laid back and cool. The real Edie wouldn’t take time for nails like that.” Nor would Nurse Jackie. For that show she gets “plain manicures and pedicures. She loves to get her feet done.” Salandra also made a box of nails for The Sopranos’ Adriana, the Drea De Matteo character, a real Jersey girl with the nails to show for it, who came to a bad end at the hands of her gangster boyfriend. “It was the best set to work on,” Salandra says. “My father did all the prosthetic teeth when they got their teeth knocked out.” Salandra went to Canada to work on the Chicago set, where she did Queen Latifah’s nails. “It was the basic manicure to keep it even the whole time,” Salandra says. “I love Queen Latifah. It’s really quite inspiring where she came from in our area and how much of a light she is to women today.” Actors often have no say in how their nails are done. It’s “what the director or producers envision,” Salandra says. She does the nails of the hand doubles as well to maintain continuity. The actors often get “slight manicures while they’re getting their hair and makeup done.” But one actor who paid special attention to his nails was Russell Crowe, who played John Nash in A Beautiful Mind. “John Nash in real life was a slender, long man,” Salandra says. “Russell’s hands didn’t match. John’s hands were delicate, and Russell wanted his hands more manicured, more appropriate for the character.” Salandra does not take offense if she is ignored while manicuring an actor’s nails on the set. “When I sit there with them, they’re getting their hair done, the dialect coach is there. They’re doing different accents, reading lines. Being an actor is far more intense than anyone understands—the research, the concentration. They maintain character whether the director says ‘Cut!’ or not.” Salandra read in an article that Crowe didn’t feel like Nash until he put his nails on. “And Edie didn’t feel like Carmela until she put her nails on,” says Salandra. Most fans will be surprised to know that Jack Nicholson is a real nail guy. “He gets his hands and feet done all the time whether I do them or not, whether the character wants it or not,” Salandra says. “I love him, he’s so funny and cool, the epitome of a cool cat. I worked with him in The Departed and Something’s Gotta Give.” On the upcoming Wall Street sequel, Salandra worked with Shia LaBeouf and Michael Douglas, whom she describes as a “great guy, a family man now. He’s Hollywood royalty, he’s been in the business since he was a child. I worked on his father. I was honored to care for him and didn’t charge for a pedicure.” For the Golden Globe awards Salandra did the honors for Keanu Reeves and Up in the Air’s Vera Farmiga. When Rita Wilson was going on Letterman to promote Mixed Nuts she asked Salandra to paint a picture of Letterman on one of her nails. Letterman’s response? “It could be me or it could be Marv Albert.” She went down to Florida to attend to Demi Moore’s nails in Striptease. She did Diane Keaton and her kids. She refers to Al Pacino as a “very cool ’60s throwback, very relaxed.” He told her, “Do what ya gotta do, you’re the best, otherwise you wouldn’t be here.” It’s common knowledge that hairdressers and manicurists often develop shrink-like relationships with their clients. In one instance a major celebrity offered support to Salandra. “Both my mother and father had brain cancer, and my mom was a big part of the salon. I wouldn’t be in business for 20 years if I hadn’t had my mother working with me and running the place. I was maintaining a façade, and Nicole Kidman was so helpful to me and loving and supportive. She said I could call any time and gave me the biggest hug. She’s an amazing woman.” You’d think there would be no more nail dreams for this celebrity manicurist to realize, but it turns out she has one more manicure mountain to climb. “I want to do nails for music videos,” she says. “I want to get into that niche.”—Kate Rounds SUMMER 2010

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C H I L D ' S P L AY

PHOTOS BY KATE ROUNDS

Summer in the City NORTH BERGEN AND KIDS, HAPPY TOGETHER f you’re a busy North Bergen parent on a tight budget, you’re in luck during the summer months. For a mere 30 bucks per kid a season, the city provides a wide array of activities that will keep kids off the street and away from the television. First, there’s the legendary North Bergen pool at 91st Street off Tonnelle Avenue. John Cellini, supervisor of recreation and parks, isn’t even sure how big it is. “It’s pretty big,” he says. “Olympic size.” It includes an adult pool and a shallow pool for infants. On the premises are a basketball court and volleyball court. Then of course there’s the huge and beautiful Braddock Park (See p. 18), which is one of seven sites where the city runs summer camps for kids. The $30 includes activities as well as a free lunch and one field trip a week for five weeks. Field trips have included bowling at Bowler City in Hackensack, ice skating at Hackensack’s Ice House, and outings to the Newark Museum and to Van Saun County

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Park in Paramus, where there is a railroad, carousel, pony rides, and a zoo. The other six sites are 11th Street off Kennedy Boulevard, the Franklin School at 50th and Columbia Avenue, Robert Fulton School at 74th Street, Horace Mann School at 83rd Street, and two at the 64th Street Recreation Center on Meadowview Avenue, one of which accommodates the special needs program. All kids who sign up get to participate. “Nobody gets cut,” Cellini says. Activities include a baseball program through August that fields 15 teams with 13 kids to a team, along with T-ball for five- and six-year-olds. The rookie team is for seven- and eight-year-olds, and Little League is for nine- to 12-year-olds. “Last year the Little League got to the semifinals in the district,” Cellini says. For girls there’s a softball league which fields 12 teams with 14 to a team, run by Joanne Sogulizzo. Co-ed soccer runs to the end of June, fielding 26 teams with 22 kids to

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C H I L D ' S P L AY PHOTO BY KATE ROUNDS

a team, including a clinic league for six- and seven-year-olds. The in-house league is for eight- to 16-year-olds, and there are three traveling teams for 12 and under, 15 and under, and 17 and under that travel around the state to play other teams. “These are the all-stars,” Cellini says. Each year the city also hosts special events such as a luau, rock concert, or motorcycle show. The summer program, which has been in operation for 30 years, handles about 700 kids a season and runs from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., Monday through Friday. Counselors come from local high

schools and colleges. The campers must live in North Bergen, but that is the only requirement. Cellini, a North Bergen native, has been in his current position for 15 years. “The program is a big help to our community,” he says. “Working parents can drop off kids around 8:30 and don’t have to worry about getting a babysitter, and they’re happy to hear the price.”—Kate Rounds (201) 861-9601 northbergen.org

PHOTOS BY MICHAEL A. MELHAM, ALPHA DOG SOLUTIONS, INC.

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Clip Joints BARBERSHOPS AND THE CHANGING FACE OF HOBOKEN

BY AMANDA STAAB PHOTOS BY CAMILO GODOY

he time-honored shave—straight razor and strop—is holding on in Hoboken despite the enormous changes the city has seen in the last century. Local factories that once produced color pencils, mattresses, and bread have been demolished or converted into luxury condos. Immigrants from Europe and Central America settled entire neighborhoods, only to move on decades later, leaving behind remnants—an ethnic restaurant or two, a bilingual church, or shoe repair service. But barbershops continue to tell a story about Hoboken’s past and present. The shaving ritual begins with a client in a chair, towel around the neck, and moisturizer on the face, followed by a hot lather from the suds machine. After a three or four minute rub, the barber picks up his blade, glinting in the light, slides it over the willing cheeks, pressing gently so as not to draw blood. Light aftershave to close the pores, lotion to calm the skin, hot towel to soothe the face. A quick whisk to clean up, a few seconds in front of the hair dryer to evaporate leftover droplets and tighten the skin, and the procedure is complete. The mile-square city had more than 100 barbershops in the 1920s, about 50 in the 1960s, and now only a few are left. “These shops here are really rare,” says Harold Whalen, the lone employee at Gino’s Barber Shop, pointing to the worn black and

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NICK LEONE, GINO’S BARBER SHOP

white checkered linoleum floor. Gino’s is owned by Nick Leone and has been in the Leone family for more than six decades. The barbershop itself, however, has been open for business in the same location, 363 First St., for more than a century. Other shops have come and gone. The newest is Hoboken Man, located uptown in one of the ritziest buildings in the area. “Our theme is the old-school barbershop with a modern-day twist,” says Emily Gonce, who started the venture with her husband and a small group of friends. It took them two years to solidify their vision and select the décor. Now the walls that were once

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EMILY GONCE, HOBOKEN MAN

concrete slabs are paneled in dark wood with high gloss and stainless steel accents. In the lobby, designed to mimic a bar, stools are upholstered with alligator leather fastened with bronze studs. Playboy covers from Marilyn to Marge are on display, and flat-screen TVs are mounted in nearly every corner. About the only features reminiscent of an old barbershop are the 10 vintage Belmont barber chairs with smooth tan leather and metal frames. Like its design, Hoboken Man’s services blend traditional and modern, from the straight-razor shave to the mani-pedi combo. “We wanted to take it to the next level,” says Gonce, a petite blonde who works as a lobbyist for a big insurance company by day and visits the shop by night. “Most everything that we do isn’t done in an ordinary fashion. If we’re going to do it, we’re going to be the best.” Gino’s Barber Shop, in a four-story residential building with brick and blue siding, had four owners before 1945, when Gino Leone, an immigrant from the Italian coastal city of Molfetta, purchased it for $700. Leone learned the trade as a boy, when his father, a fisherman, sent him to be a barber’s apprentice to help support the family. In 1938, Leone came to Hoboken and worked at a barbershop on River Street until he saved enough money to open his own place. He met an Italian girl, born and raised in Hoboken, and the two started a family. The oldest of their three sons, Nick, began his informal training as a barber at 10 and eventually cut hair alongside his father. At the time, most shops were run by Italians. Some older places were owned by Germans, and by the mid ’60s, a handful of Cubans had also set up businesses. It was then that men began to grow their hair, and the industry declined. “Business got very slow,” says Nick Leone, who has white hair and works in faded jeans and loafers. “I didn’t lose any customers. I just lost the

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frequency of haircuts.” In 1971, Nick, with his own family to support, left Gino’s to open a dry cleaners in Englewood. While he was away from Gino’s, he says, something tragic happened: the unisex trend took root. “Guys’ wives and girlfriends were afraid that their barbers would cut their hair too short, so they would bring them to a beauty parlor and have their hair cut,” says Leone, reclining in a barber chair and lighting a cigarette. “Barbers always gave you your money’s worth.” In the 1980s, AIDS became an issue for barbers, and some states considered banning the straight-razor shave. “There was always a chance of pinheads of blood coming out, and everybody was scared crap,” says Leone, adding that some barber schools stopped teaching it. “That was a big change, and that’s why all these young barbers who trained after 1984 are not really barbers.” (Technicians at Hoboken Man are trained in-house by a master barber. They shave the face, neck, and below the earlobes, something their teacher did not learn in school.) Leone never gave up on the traditional shave, and when he took over Gino’s in 1991, other barbers in town who had given it up were forced to follow his example. Leone keeps a life-size, black-and-white cutout of his father dressed in a traditional white barber’s coat in a front corner of the shop. He’s also managed to hold on to two chairs that were there when Gino bought the place. A long row of small wooden chairs lines the wall opposite the mirrors that are blackening ever so slightly around the edges. One modest flat-screen TV sits in the corner near a pedestal sink that also appears in a photo taped near the phone. It shows Nick at 16 and his two brothers modeling their own coats. “We don’t look as pretty as the other places,” says Whalen, his graying hair tied back in a ponytail and his Giants jersey just short enough in the sleeves to reveal his rose and vine tattoos, “but this is a man’s shop.”

Gino’s doesn’t have a website, and Leone answers his own phone. Barbershops aren’t at all like the ones seen in movies, he says. They’re businesses, and he takes his seriously. When shorter styles increased volume, Leone changed his walk-in service to appointment only and hired Whalen to handle the Saturday stragglers who forgot to call ahead. Between them, they have nearly 90 years of experience, eight years working together, and absolutely no qualms telling the other that he’s wrong. They both agree, however, that unisex salons still don’t know how to cut hair as well as they do. “There’s a certain amount of pride that has to walk out the door,” says Leone. “My customers never walk out of here putting their hats on.” Leone and Whalen don’t like to see the passing of the traditional Hoboken barbershop. The town is no longer dominated by recent immigrants. Instead, many young people in town work white-collar jobs in Manhattan and can afford luxury condos worth half a million or more. Whalen says he realized the shift when the Lipton Tea factory on 15th Street was divided into high-end units. “You could almost say uptown Hoboken is kind of like living on Park Avenue in New York City, seriously,” he says, his gold chains swinging as he moves in his chair. Now the same developer has built Maxwell Place on the site of the old coffee plant, where Hoboken Man sits adjacent to Starbucks and Kings. Though the modern barbershop is yet another sign that Hoboken is evolving, some things never change. Back on First Street, Leone is calm and steady as he picks up a razor. “I don’t think there’s a barber around who can shave as well as I do,” he says. His customers aren’t looking for signature packages and waxing services. They come for football talk, friendly banter, and two barbers who have done their face time. —PM

RESOURCES Dominick’s & Vincent’s Barber Shop 1032 Washington St., Hoboken (201) 792-0077

Now representing Travelers, Home, Condo, Renters, Umbrella, Auto.

First Street Barber Shop 55 First St., Hoboken (201) 798-6361 Gino’s Barber Shop 363 First St., Hoboken (201) 792-3577 Hair I Am 461 5th St., Hoboken (201) 795-9077 JC Barber Shop 1032 Willow Ave., Hoboken (201) 420-9600 Mike’s Hair Design 700 Willow Ave., Hoboken (201) 656-9869

CALL US FOR YOUR HOME AND CONDO NEEDS!

Brownstone & High Value Home Specialists. 930 Washington St., Hoboken (201)659-2403 ESTABLISHED 1906 www.mullerinsurance.com 34

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Mr. L. Hair Creations 600 Park Ave., Hoboken (201) 656-9501 The Hoboken Man 1150 Maxwell Lane, Hoboken (201) 610-0500

palisade • hoboken & beyond


GINA’S STORY MY LOVE AFFAIR WITH HOBOKEN BY GINA TUCCI

was born and raised in Nassau County with the dream of living in Manhattan. The minute I graduated from Hoftsra University I got a job in the big city. My two best friends and I shared a converted one-bedroom apartment. It was an absolute blast, but somehow I started to feel suffocated. After five years, I was itching to find a boyfriend I could talk to, spend the whole day with, travel with, and share experiences with. I was starting to give up on the idea that I was going to meet him in New York City. In the midst of this longing and restlessness, I met my fiancé and discovered Hoboken, N.J. I fell into a long-term relationship with both of them. On our first date, he told me he lived in Hoboken. For a Long Island girl, New Jersey was totally off limits, but I certainly started to like him. Even though he had grown up in New Jersey and had lived there his whole life, I just couldn’t hold it against him. Finally the moment came when he wanted to invite me to his place. I couldn’t believe I had to cross the water. It was a Sunday in May. He picked me up at 10 a.m. and drove me to Hoboken for brunch. The minute we went through the Lincoln Tunnel I was waiting for the uncomfortable feeling to kick in—but it never came. It had only taken 26 minutes to get from the east side of Manhattan to Hoboken. When I looked to my left, I saw the Manhattan skyline for the first time from the Jersey side. The view was breathtaking. You could see every street from west to east, every monumental building, every section of town. He took me to brunch at Lua on Sinatra Drive. As I was drinking my mimosa, looking out at the river and the amazing Manhattan view, I could have sworn I was on vacation. After brunch he showed me the gorgeous grass parks on the water, the quaint shops on Washington Street, the restored townhouses on Garden Street, and then we rode into artsy Jersey City. There is so much culture and history, it felt like a little Manhattan. When we pulled into Liberty State Park I couldn’t believe my eyes. The Statue of Liberty was so close I could almost touch it. The grass looked as though it went for miles and miles. All this land, and I could still see the city! I was drunk on the open air. For the first time in ages I felt like myself. When we got back to Hoboken, I couldn’t get over how big his apartment was. The kitchen was bigger than my New York City living room. Soon I was spending a lot of time in Hoboken and quickly discovered my favorite bars, shops, and restaurants. From a hearty meal at Helmers’ or a spicy feast at India on the Hudson to Italian subs at Fiore’s, Hoboken is a food lover’s heaven. I couldn’t believe that this was New Jersey. After he proposed to me, we bought our first home together—in Hoboken. It’s paradise.—PM

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Do you have a story you would like to share? Please email it in an attached Word document to krounds@hudsonreporter.com and put “personal story” in the subject line. It should not be more than 550 words. Include your phone number.

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HOME ON THE HUDSON

CONTEMPORARY

Crib BRAND NEW BETWEEN THE BRIDGES PHOTOS BY AMY HAND olks watching this house go up between the Park Avenue and Willow Avenue bridges in Weehawken were often baffled. Rising very close to the Park Avenue Bridge in a pie-shaped lot with an industrial landscape for a backyard, it inspired questions like what is this thing, and what could this guy be thinking? Well, the local developer who envisioned it as a home for himself says it’s a “prime location for a single guy—immediate access to the city by bus, tunnel, or ferry.” A car buff, he has ground-floor space for a seven-car garage, which currently houses a truck, two sports cars, and a motorcycle. It’s a light and airy four-story structure fashioned from brick, steel, and cinderblocks with blond wood floors and windows on three sides of the triangle. The second floor features a kitchen, living room, and dining room in a loft-like design. The house has a master suite with walk-in closet and private bath, two guest rooms, five bathrooms (four marble and one granite), an exercise area, laundry room, and five flat-screen TVs strategically placed throughout the house. There are two gas fireplaces, a huge one in the living room and a smaller one in the master suite. Each

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guest bedroom has its own bathroom. You can take the elevator, but the stairs are beautiful with oak treads and handrails of polished steel and cables like a suspension bridge.

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HOME

ON THE HUDSON

The floors have radiant heat, and zone heating and air conditioning regulate the temperature throughout the building. The owner confesses that he never uses the kitchen. Nevertheless, it’s fully loaded with two dishwashers, a wine cooler, and the most modern appliances, just like in a “nice suburban house,” he says. The house, which was built by Anthony Pasculli Construction and designed by architect Russell Bodner, is spare, minimal and mostly white. “I add color with art,” says the owner, who collects art from all over the world. He describes the space as “minimal modern eclectic.”

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The dining room table is a beautiful piece of rugged wood handcrafted by furniture maker Jeff Taylor who works out of the Neumann Leather building in Hoboken A terrace off the living room faces west and one off the master suite faces the river. The owner says he “spent extra on windows for sound proofing” because he was so close to bridge traffic, but in the end he found that you “get more traffic on Washington Street. Here they go over the bridge, and they’re gone.” The owner, the son of a Hoboken bricklayer, has homes in Manhattan, Palm Beach, and Southampton. He already has a vision for another house in the area. “It’s like postnatal depression,” he says. “Now what?”—Kate Rounds SUMMER 2010

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W E E K E N D G E TAWAY

The Shore Next Door WANT A BEACH WITHIN REACH? TRY SANDY HOOK

ong trips and lots of traffic can keep some folks away from the beach for an entire summer. But you can get the same salt-air experience closer to home at Sandy Hook and neighboring towns, about an hour away from Liberty State Park by car. The best news is, you may not even have to take to the road at all. The SeaStreak ferry leaves from Pier 11, World Financial Center, and East 35th Street in Manhattan daily, speeding you to Atlantic Highlands in about an hour ($40 roundtrip). You can easily walk from Atlantic Highlands to waterfront restaurants but you will definitely need a vehicle to cross the new Highlands Bridge and go into Sandy Hook. At press time, there was still a lot of construction under the bridge, so follow the “detour” signs. Henry Hudson discovered the 1,665-acre barrier peninsula on his way to the stretch of riverfront that all of us now call home. On a clear day you can see the Manhattan skyline from the Atlantic shore of Sandy Hook. In fact, we visited on a windy, clear spring day, and the skyline was visible from lots of spots, looming through the haze, its huge expanse gray and ghostly in the distance. The beach is already familiar to the many day trippers who come from Hudson County. On the western shore of the Gateway National Park, there are vast acres of sand and trails without life guards or rest rooms, where leashed dogs are welcome. This section

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of the park is favored by bikers and kite surfers. On the eastern or Atlantic shore, there are lots of amenities, but don’t bring your dog. If you like bathing in the buff, there are nude beaches, both gay and straight. Accommodations include the Sandy Hook Cottage B&B, Seascape Manor B&B, GrandLady by the Sea, and Nauvoo at Sandy Hook, all in Highlands. You’ll find lots of food and beverage options in the area, including wonderful seafood restaurants. All are located outside Gateway National Park, except Sea Gulls’ Nest Deck Restaurant and Bar, which is located in the park. Bahr’s Landing is a local landmark, next to the Highlands Bridge. Right on the water, it offers an outdoor deck, marina, and tons of seafood on its extensive menu. Early on a Tuesday afternoon, we enjoyed a seafood dinner. We had the place almost to ourselves, seated near the huge windows overlooking the marina and the bridge. There’s a gift shop and the requisite nautical paraphernalia. Other eateries include Moby’s right next door to Bahr’s Landing, Something Fishy, just after the bridge and near the park entrance. This seasonal eatery is known for its soft shell crabs. Many bars in Highlands, in nearby Sea Bright, Atlantic Highlands, and Rumson have outside dining and dock space. Local bands often entertain at these popular night spots. But if you visit off-season, be sure to check as many of the restaurants are seasonal with limited operating hours in the spring or fall. If you happen to visit in July, the Sandy Hook All Woman Lifeguard Tournament is not to be missed. Teams represent towns up and down the east coast from Cape Cod to North Carolina. You’ll see these women demonstrating the skills and maneuvers that help them save dozens of lives each summer. Boat rentals include fishing charters, party boats, and tour boats, some of them originating at Bahr’s Landing. Surrounding towns also offer boat rentals. Those who want to escape the beach can enjoy biking, rollerblading, walking, and running trails. The Henry Hudson Trail stretches nine miles from Aberdeen to Atlantic Highlands. It accommodates horseback riders and cross country skiers, and is wheelchair accessible. If you’re going to make a weekend of it, local boosters suggest staying in Highlands, on the hill across the bay from Sandy Hook. The highest point on the east coast, it became a haven for bootleggers during Prohibition. And for folks who worry about natural disasters such as floods or tsunamis, this might be a great place to find refuge. There you’ll find the Twin Lighthouses, built in 1828, reportedly 38

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W E E K E N D G E TAWAY

PHOTOS BY KATE ROUNDS

the first-ever twin lighthouses, the first to use kerosene, and the first to use electricity. Visit the maritime museum and enjoy fabulous views of Sandy Hook and New York. For fabulous food, check out Doris and Ed’s Restaurant. Since the SeaStreak docks in Atlantic Highlands, you might want to take a look at this cozy hamlet where prominent members of the Methodist Church and other denominations settled in the late 1800s. You’ll find little inns, cottages, and gift shops offering baskets, jewelry, and toys as well as antique shops and galleries featuring local artists. The First Avenue Playhouse offers a dessert-and-dinner theater and puppet shows, and the Strauss Mansion Museum, a Queen Anne-style structure, features period furniture, a Native American room, and a Victorian garden.

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Should you want to spend the night, try the Blue Bay Inn on 51 First Ave.This waterfront town has a yacht club, marina, and charter boats for fishing and touring. If you feel like getting away from it all this summer, take a quick trip to these seaside retreats.—Kate Rounds

RESOURCES seastreak.com atlantichighlands.org ahnj.com

Gateway National Recreation Area Visitor Center (732) 872-5970 sandy-hook.com SUMMER 2010

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DISH

Di Palma Brothers Restaurant PHOTOS BY BETH DICARA here to begin with this fabulous place? Let’s start with Raffaele Di Palma welcoming us to his family’s warm, friendly, antique-filled space. It’s at Kennedy Boulevard and 87th Street in North Bergen and you sure could miss it tucked among the odd car dealership, bank, and furniture showroom if you weren’t looking for it. It’s about the only establishment with trees out front; one is strung with white lights. And don’t worry, there’s parking in the adjoining lot. At 6 p.m. on a Thursday it’s pretty quiet, a perfect time to float around looking at the antiques—furniture, statuettes, lamps, paintings, you name it, everything has a price tag. Di Palma is BYOB so be sure to bring your favorite wines to accompany the spectacular menu.

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The minute we sat down the waiter brought a very fresh salad tossed with a simple balsamic vinegar and olive oil dressing, along with fresh bread and butter. You can choose from the regular menu or the specials. The prices are very reasonable, appetizers from $7-$12, entrees from $15-$25. But we didn’t even get a chance to peruse the menu. One dish after another appeared for us to taste and savor: rice balls; eggplant balls; stuffed orange pepper with sausage, eggplant,

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DISH

pasta, and mozzarella, garnished with fresh asparagus; grilled artichokes; fried calamari with lemon and marinara sauce; mussels with hot and spicy marinara sauce; shrimps with penne and broccoli rabe; tiramisu; a truffle; zeppoles filled with homemade custard cream topped with fresh blackberries; and two huge mugs of decaf cappuccino. Stop in and try all these things for yourself—suffice it say everything tastes fresh and home-cooked, and the portions are huge. (Our neighbors were ecstatic with the leftovers we brought back.)

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Slowly, the place filled up and we made friends with some of our fellow diners. Two guys in a gospel choir had just come from the gym and were sharing a selection of appetizers and a bottle of red wine. Andrea Carraro was there with her sister and niece. They’re regulars. They had lots of menu recommendations and even suggested we buy some antiques. The DiPalma family hails from the Amalfi Coast in Italy and settled in Union City. They’ve been in the food business since 1907 and opened this restaurant 14 years ago. If you don’t visit, well, you’re just going to have to live with that decision.—Kate Rounds Di Palma Brothers Restaurant 8728 Kennedy Boulevard North Bergen (201) 868-3005 SUMMER 2010

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dish spotlight

Edward’s Steak House Rated NJ Monthly Top 25 Restaurants in NJ. “Critics Choice” for Best Steakhouse. Now on Open Table, go to our website and make reservations online. Jersey City’s premier dining experience, offers steak, seafood and more, with an elegant flare. Tucked into a brownstone in Historic Downtown Jersey City, Edward’s is comfortably upscale. Edward’s two well appointed dining rooms and classic Prohibition era bar provide the perfect venue for intimate evenings and larger gatherings. Edwards’ Wine Spectator Award winning wine list offers over 130 selections to please the wine lover. Edward’s serves lunch and dinner Monday through Friday and is open for dinner Saturday evenings. AMEX, MC, V, $$, 8,Ç

239 Marin Blvd., Jersey City (201) 761-0000 www.edwardssteakhouse.com

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Martini Grill Rated The Record 2/25/2005. “If it's good enough for Britney Spears, Steven Spielberg, Johnny Depp, Denzel Washington, Mary J. Blidge, Tom Cruise, Sean Penn, Martha Stewart and executives of the world's top companies, then Martini Grill in Woodridge might be worth checking out.” Live Jazz Friday and Saturday.Minutes From Teterboro Airport. Extensive Martini Menu and Wine List. Restaurant • Bar • Lounge. AMEX, MC, V, $$, Ç

187 Hackensack St., Wood-Ridge (201) 939-2000

Komegashi too Michael Anthony’s Heated glass enclosed patio. Spectacular views of Manhattan. Sunday brunch. Late Night Lounge (Friday and Saturday). Live entertainment. Large Banquet Party Hall, can accomodate all functions. Dining Hours: 11:30 am - close. Sunday Brunch. Open 7 days. On pier parking, street parking and courtesy validated parking in Westin Hotel garage. Located at Newport Marina Pier. AMEX, D, MC, V, $$, 8, Ç

KEY TO SYMBOLS

502 Washington Blvd. Jersey City (201) 798-1798 www.mar-jc.com

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Michael Anthony’s WATERFRONT RESTAURANT

Open for lunch and dinner, Komegashi too offers contemporary Japanese cuisine, along with expertly prepared sushi, sashimi and more. Located next to Newport Marina, our main dining room overlooks a spectacular view of the Manhattan skyline. Popular for our unbeatable happy hour specials, our full-service bar carries an extensive list of wine, beer, sake and signature cocktails. Catering and private parties available.Wheel Chair Access: YesCredit Cards Accepted: Visa, MasterCard, American ExpressPrice Range: $$ (Moderate, Approximately $12-30 dinner entrée. AMEX, MC, V, $$, 8, Ç

Komegashi, (201) 433-4567 103 Montgomery Street, JC Komegashi Too, (201) 533-8888 99 Pavonia Avenue, JC www.komegashi.com

payment

price

AMEX (American Express) D (Discover) DC (Diners Club) MC (Master Card) V (Visa)

$ (under $15) $$ ($15 to $25) $$$ (Over $25)

SUMMER 2010

 (Wheelchair Accessible)

 (Bar)

access

alcohol



(No Liquor License)

palisade • hoboken & beyond


palisade’s

dish

restaurant highlights along the hudson

american BOULEVARD DINER 9201 Bergen Boulevard North Bergen (201) 861-2006 www.BoulevardDinernj.com The folks at this family restaurant and diner have more than 40 years in the restaurant business. Open 24/7, Boulevard Diner serves breakfast, lunch and dinner all day and also features daily specials. Ample parking is available in its spacious parking lot. Free Wifi. AMEX, D, MC, V, $, ,

WATERSIDE RESTAURANT AND CATERING 7800 B River Road North Bergen (201) 861-7767 www.watersiderestaurantandcatering.com Located on the Hudson River across from Manhattan, The Waterside offers dramatic views of the New York skyline, impeccable service, the best steaks and seafood on the water, and fine wines in a wide range of prices. The restaurant, which is under new management, has just been completely redesigned, combining contemporary energy with classic elegance. Enjoy live entertainment Thursday through Sunday. Valet parking is available. AMEX, MC, V, $$, ,

Antonia’s

fusion PARK AVENUE BAR AND GRILL 3417 Park Avenue Union City (201) 617-7274 www.parkavenuebarandgrill.com Sleek, chic, and unique, Park Avenue Bar and Grill offers an exquisite experience with unobstructed views of the New York City skyline. Enjoy the dining or sensational tapas from a perfectly fused American/Latin menu in six distinct multi-level, indoor/outdoor dining and lounge areas. AMEX, MC, V, $-$$$, ,

R E S TA U R A N T & C AT E R I N G

By The Park

STEAKS • SEAFOOD • PASTA

PARTY ROOM

FOR ANY OCCASSION SEATING 20-150 PEOPLE

OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK MONDAY - FRIDAY 11:30PM-10PM SATURDAY 11:30PM-11PM LUNCH & DINNER

SUNDAY BRUNCH 11:30AM-3:00PM DINNER 3:00PM-11PM

LIVE ENTERTAINMENT FRIDAY & SATURDAY 9011 PALISADE AVE. NORTH BERGEN P 201.868.0750 • FAX 201.868.0783

KEY TO SYMBOLS

WWW.ANTONIASBYTHEPARK.COM

THE BEST STEAKS AND SEAFOOD ON THE WATER THE RECORD

BREATHTAKING NYC SKYLINE VIEWS AMAZING Wine List ENTICING American Menu OUTDOOR LIVE Entertainment Thursday –Sunday PERFECT Location For Your Catering Event from 50-210 People with customizable menus

Outdoor Dining for Lunch and Dinner on the Water’s Edge (weather permitting)

7800 B River Road North Bergen, NJ 07047 www.watersiderestaurantandcatering.com

Outside Bar for Cocktails under the Starlight

payment

price

AMEX (American Express) D (Discover) DC (Diners Club) MC (Master Card) V (Visa)

$ (under $15) $$ ($15 to $25) $$$ (Over $25)

palisade • hoboken & beyond

 (Wheelchair Accessible)

 (Bar)

access

alcohol



(No Liquor License)

SUMMER 2010

43


DISH

italian ANTONIAS BY THE PARK 9011 Palisade Avenue North Bergen (201) 868-0750 www.Antoniasby the Park.com One of the best authentic Italian restaurants featuring the freshest pasta, seafood, and steaks along with daily specials. From our exceptional cuisine to our elegant ambience, Antonia’s is second to none. Come in and enjoy live music Thursday-Saturday. Private party room available for up to 150. AMEX, MC, V, $$, 

GP’S RESTAURANT 24 - 69th Street (1/2 block from Boulevard East) Guttenberg (201) 861-6588 www.gpsrestaurant.com

KEY TO SYMBOLS

Serving traditional homemade Italian/ American food for more than 30 years, GP’S is a local favorite. Its Greek house salad and hearty family meal keep customers coming

44

back year after year. One important detail … GP’S has valet parking! AMEX, MC, V, $$, 

MARTINI GRILL 187 Hackensack Street Wood-Ridge (201) 939-2000 Just minutes from Teterboro Airport, this award-winning restaurant offers drink specials Monday-Friday, noon-7; live entertainment Wednesday-Saturday; and live jazz Friday and Saturday. If the Martini Grill is good enough for the likes of Tom Cruise, Johnny Depp, Sean Penn, Britney Spears, Steven Spielberg, Martha Stewart, and Denzel Washington, it might be worth checking out. AMEX, D, MC, V, $$, ,

MICHAEL ANTHONY’S 502 Washington Blvd. Jersey City (201) 798-1798 www.mar-jc.com From the moment you step into Michael Anthony’s you can’t help but be impressed

by the nautically inspire décor. High ceilings, boating-shaped bar, ten-foot sails for the indoor and outdoor bars, and waterfall walls separating the banquet room and restaurant enhance your fine Italian dining experience. Enjoy a cordial on the deck overlooking the spectacular Manhattan skyline. Join us for happy hour, dinner, or a private social event. AMEX, D, MC, V, $$, ,

japanese KOMEGASHI 103 Montgomery Street Jersey City (201) 433-4567

KOMEGASHI TOO 99 Pavonia Avenue Jersey City www.komegashi.com (201) 533-8888 Fresh, beautifully presented sushi and traditional Japanese fare is the order of the day at two of Jersey City’s favorite

payment

price

AMEX (American Express) D (Discover) DC (Diners Club) MC (Master Card) V (Visa)

$ (under $15) $$ ($15 to $25) $$$ (Over $25)

SUMMER 2010

 (Wheelchair Accessible)

 (Bar)

access

alcohol



(No Liquor License)

palisade • hoboken & beyond


DISH restaurants. Komegashi too waterfront with a spectacular Manhattan skyline, while the been serving the financial 15 years. AMEX, MC, V, $$, , 

sits on view of original district

the the has for

cooked to perfection in its Argentinean furnace. Quality is the watchword for its entire menu, and attentive, friendly service is a La Fusta tradition. AMEX, D, MC, V, $$, ,

steakhouse

latin

EDWARD’S STEAK HOUSE

LA FUSTA RESTAURANT 1110 Tonnele Avenue North Bergen (201) 770-1950 www.lafustarestaurant.com This North Bergen favorite offers a taste of Argentina in the heart of Hudson County. La Fusta prides itself on its superb meat dishes,

LA FUSTA

239 Marin Boulevard Jersey City (201) 761-0000 www.edwardssteakhouse.com Edward’s Steak House offers steak, seafood, and other sumptuous fare with an elegant bistro flare. Tucked into an historic townhouse in downtown Jersey City, Edward’s is comfortably upscale. The menu includes all the classic steaks and chops—aged prime sir-

loin, porterhouse, filet mignon, and more. You’ll enjoy the atmosphere whether you’re celebrating a special occasion or stopping by for a steak sandwich at the bar. AMEX, MC, V, $$, ,

THE RIVER PALM TERRACE 1416 River Road Edgewater (201) 224-2013 www.riverpalm.com In addition to its tender, prime, dry aged beef, sparkling fresh seafood, farm fresh salads, extra thick chops, homemade desserts, and an award winning wine list, the River Palm also serves a full sushi menu prepared by its own sushi chef. AMEX, D, MC, V, $$, 

Experience 4 levels of Taste & Style! SINCE 1970

Restaurant & Steak House

Roofdeck w/NYC Views, Courtyards Fine Dining • Bar & Lounge www.parkavenuebarandgrill.com 3417 Park Ave., Union City (201) 617-7274

EST. 1983

Argentine Cuisine, Grain-fed Beef House-made Gnocchi & Avocado Salad

Rated by Zagat NJ’s Top Steak House and one of America’s Top Restaurants

NJ MONTHLY

1110 TONNELLE AVENUE NORTH BERGEN, NJ 07047 (201) 770-1950 • (201) 770-1965 www.LaFustaRestaurant.com

P palisade’s

dish section

if you’re interseted in being premiered in our dish section please contact us, (201) 798-7800

Serving Lunch & Dinner www.riverpalm.com

1416 River Road, Edgewater

201-224-2013

KEY TO SYMBOLS

HOBOKEN & BEYOND

other locations Mahwah & Fair Lawn

payment

price

AMEX (American Express) D (Discover) DC (Diners Club) MC (Master Card) V (Visa)

$ (under $15) $$ ($15 to $25) $$$ (Over $25)

palisade • hoboken & beyond

 (Wheelchair Accessible)

 (Bar)

access

alcohol



(No Liquor License)

SUMMER 2010

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OUT

&

ABOUT

PALISADES MEDICAL CENTER FASHION SHOW The event raised funds for Guardians of Healing, a group of local healthcare professionals who serve in countries in need of medical help.

CLOCKWISE: (l.-r.) Hector Florentino, MD, Palisades Medical Center; Juan Gonzalez, MD, Palisades Medical Center; Carmelo Milazzo, MD, chairman of the board, Guardians of Healing; and Felipa De la Cruz, Palisades Medical Center. Standing back row (l.-r.) Marian Jekonski, administrative assistant; Nikki Mederos, director of external affairs; Alexandra Aybar, medical records analyst; Dorothy DeLuca, director of medical records; Luz Vasquez, manager of materials management. Sitting front row (l.-r.) Kathy Aitchison, coordinator of the PMC Foundation; Miriam Stablein, director of QI/PI/regulatory compliance; and Maureen Coccaro, director of nursing administration. (l.-r.) Marta Ruiz, first secretary of the embassy; Ramon Ruiz; Felipa de la Cruz; Rafael Evans, Dominican Consul; Roberto Saladin; and Berta Saladin (l-r) Rafael Evans; Roberto Saladin; Berta Saladin; Dr. Juan Gonzalez, vice chairman, Guardians of Healing; and Hilsa Gonzalez, wife of Dr. Gonzalez

(l.r.) Damary Collado, president and founder; Roberto Saladin, Jr., son of ambassador; Rosita Rodriguez, member of Guardians of Healing; Berta Saladin, ambassador; Felipa de la Cruz, member of Guardians of Helaing; Maria Pineda, member of Guardians of Healing; and Xenia Rodriguez, member of Guardians of Healing. PHOTOS BY ROY GROETHING

46

SUMMER 2010

palisade • hoboken & beyond


D AT E S

PALISADES INTERSTATE PARK. PHOTO BY ANTHONY G. TARANTO, JR.

JUNE

Prudential Hall 1 Center St., Newark $23-$79 (888) GO-NJPAC njpac.org

All Summer Volunteer gardeners are welcomed at Liberty State Park in Jersey City on Saturdays from 8 a.m. to 11 am. No experience is necessary. Call (201) 915-3403 on Saturdays or contact LSP horticulturist Maria Wakefield at lspgardening@verizon.net

13 “Forest View” guided hike, Palisades Interstate Park, with Christina Fehre. 11 a.m., park headquarters. About seven miles, four hours. Bring lunch. Free. (201) 768-1360 ext. 107. “Short Stories for Long Days” at Mrs. Kearney’s tavern, reading adventures for children (ages four–9) with Lindsey Foschini. 4-5 p.m. $3 per child (includes treats). Pre-registration required, (201) 768-1360 ext. 108. njpalisades.org

3 The Art House Poets, musicians, performance artists, open mike 8-10 p.m. Art House Productions (201) 915-9911 arthouseproductions.org

19-20 4 JC Fridays A day of free events throughout Jersey City (201) 915-9911 Jcfridays.com

Red Bull Air Race World Championship, Liberty State Park, Morris Pesin Drive, Jersey City, Race pilots compete over the Hudson River. Check redbullairrace.com.

1-6, NJPAC’s Legally Blonde, The Musical June 1-3, 7:30 p.m.; June 4, 8 p.m., June 5, 2 and 8 p.m., June 6, 2 and 7 p.m.

palisade • hoboken & beyond

24 NJPAC’s Sounds of the City free summer concert series Theater Square, NJPAC’s public plaza Runs for ten Thursday evenings

(888) GO-NJPAC njpac.org

New Jersey Youth Theatre. (888) GO-NJPAC njpac.org

25 New York Philharmonic with New York Choral Artists, Alan Gilbert, conductor Beethoven’s Missa Solemnis NJPAC’s Bank of America Classical Series. Prudential Hall 8 p.m. $29-$118 1 Center St., Newark $23-$79 (888) GO-NJPAC njpac.org

JULY 10 Watertower District Festival and the launch of the new Watertower District Assoc. An outdoor concert will feature several artists, artwork displayed outside, food from many local restaurants, and more. (201) 617-1110, artsechogalleria.com.

24 The Metropolitan Waterfront Alliance (MWA) hosts its annual City of Water Day Festival on Governors Island and at Liberty State Park in Jersey City. It’s a fun and family oriented daylong celebration of the New York and New Jersey waterfronts. Visit waterfrontalliance.org. Free

AUGUST 15 Kayaking days on the Hudson on sit-on-top kayaks, Maxwell Place Park, Maxwell Place and Sinatra Drive, Hoboken, (201) 420-2207. No experience required. 1-5 p.m. Free.

NEW YORK MINUTE

16-25

June 9-August 1

Jonathon Larson’s Pulitzer Prize/Tony Award-winning rock musical RENT is an arts training program collaboration between NJPAC and the

Shakespeare in the Park “The Winter’s Tale” and “The Merchant of Venice” (212) 539-8500 publictheater.org

SUMMER 2010

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+ Price Match Guarantee

If you find a lower price, we’ll refund the difference.

+ 97-Hour Exchange Policy on used vehicles

+ FREE Lifetime NY/NJ Multi-Point Inspections on your Honda & any other vehicle in your household

+ Convenient Hours

Service Open 7 Days A Week

+ FREE In-Home or In-Office Buying Service + FREE Rental Vehicle with all major services

+ FREE Valet Parking + FREE Express Oil Change for first-time customers

+ Full Service Honda Authorized Body Shop: Open Sat & Sun + Convenient Location JFK Blvd, between the Lincoln Tunnel and George Washington Bridge

Visit www.HudsonHonda.com for details. John F. Kennedy Blvd West

NJ Turnpike

GW Bridge

N 66th St. Lincoln Tunnel

6608 John F. Kennedy Blvd West, West New York, NJ |

888.208.0017

Profile for Hudson Reporter Assoc., LP

PALISADE MAGAZINE  

SUMMER 2010

PALISADE MAGAZINE  

SUMMER 2010

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