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5- Chinese; 6- Other. Ethnicity as such can be argued to significantly racialise groups by appearance while not accurately identifying one’s heritage or identity because in each category, there are many cultures or subcultures, as Bhugra (2004) has argued. White can be a Polish person, a Mexican or an Iraqi; it does not mean that they share common cultural identities. Similarly, a person from India is not necessarily the same as a person from Mauritius (Asian ethnic group). A Jamaican and a Senegalese also do not share a similar culture or a heritage (Black or Black British ethnic group). Second, ethnicity does not account for the place of birth but instead lumps all groups into these six aforementioned categories, which is misleading in epidemiological research. I find that it is indispensible but not necessarily constructive, to use ethnicity in this research because of the NHS’s reliance on this term. However, I do not solely rely on this term and rather expand on using other definitions such as ‘first generation immigrant’, and culture. In an effort to generate a deeper understanding of cultural differences in schizophrenia, it would be impossible to reach any constructive conclusions if using ethnicity as an indicator alone. Ethnicity, as a standalone variable, does not reveal whether a person is a first, second or third generation migrant and I find it essential to keep a distinction in this research. I have also shied away from using the term ‘minority ethnic group’ as an indicator because it has been argued to convey a disadvantage, and often inferiority over other groups (Bhopal, 1997). 3.2.3 First Generation Immigrant 80

Profile for Huda Shalhoub

DECODING SCHIZOPHRENIA ACROSS CULTURES  

Thesis from Brunnel University, United Kingdom, London

DECODING SCHIZOPHRENIA ACROSS CULTURES  

Thesis from Brunnel University, United Kingdom, London