Page 53

neighbourhoods. The National Centre for Statistics (2002) did not find an association between urbanacity and psychosis, so it could also mean that the cluster of all psychotic illnesses in one category may have led to skewed results that do not account for the real representation of the distribution of schizophrenia prevalence in urban areas. The correlations between urbanization and poverty have also been expanded upon over the years with a consensus on the finding that those populations who live in poor conditions usually reside in the city centre (The British Psychological Society, 2000). Ultimately, indicators such as unemployment, social isolation and living in public housing should quintessentially be contributing to higher admission rates for the diagnosis of schizophrenia (Burnett et al., 1999; Harvey et al., 1996). The National Statistics have reported that 45 % of the BME populations in the UK reside in London (refer to figure 3), consequently adding to the finding that Giggs’ report in 1973 that the rates of ethnic minorities in London have not drastically changed. If urbanization explains the reason for increased schizophrenia, then all studies should show that in cities, all groups who have developed schizophrenia should experience higher than normal rates, and not just immigrant or BME groups, but as we already seen, this has not been the case.

52

Profile for Huda Shalhoub

DECODING SCHIZOPHRENIA ACROSS CULTURES  

Thesis from Brunnel University, United Kingdom, London

DECODING SCHIZOPHRENIA ACROSS CULTURES  

Thesis from Brunnel University, United Kingdom, London

Advertisement