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the 1980 by Hitch and Rack. In their findings, it was found that there was a considerable amount of schizophrenia diagnoses among Polish patients in Bradford, UK. The rates were higher than UK born patients, suggesting that a reason for this may be lower social cohesion among that group (Hitch and Rack, 1980). The last section of the MHPV questionnaire illustrated the opinions and beliefs of mental health professionals in relation to the etiology and differences in content of symptoms of schizophrenia from a cross-cultural perspective. Such vexed questions have been directed at the respondent cohort in an attempt to uncover the opinions and also to find out if there are any new themes that may emerge with reference to the new migrant populations. Generally, the mental health professionals agreed that there was a change in the demographic shifts of the schizophrenia patient cohorts, and there was also general agreement that migrants were more likely to develop schizophrenia. Nevertheless, this finding has been iterated by many studies over the last two decades (Fearon and Morgan 2006; Cantor-Graae and Selten, 2005; Burnett, et al. 1999; Hitch and Rack, 1980; Jarvis, 1998; Carter et al., 2002; Bhui et al., 2003; Morgan et al., 2006; McGrath, 2004; Littlewood, 1992). As anticipated, respondents also added that Black Caribbean groups, Mixed Black and Black Africans were the most likely groups to be diagnosed with schizophrenia in the UK. The least likely groups were reported to be Chinese and Other Mixed groups. Teasing out the intricacies of this known but complex finding, this idea enables one to contemplate whether this belief affects the higher likelihood for a diagnosis and serves as a preconceived notion. The most likely reason that was agreed upon among the cohort for the higher schizophrenia prevalence and incidence among non- UK born patients was that they 231

Profile for Huda Shalhoub

DECODING SCHIZOPHRENIA ACROSS CULTURES  

Thesis from Brunnel University, United Kingdom, London

DECODING SCHIZOPHRENIA ACROSS CULTURES  

Thesis from Brunnel University, United Kingdom, London

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