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apply to the non UK born generation. From the 2001 census, Yar and colleagues (2006) also found that 13% of the healthcare sector is born outside the UK, with the largest proportion coming from Asia, Africa and other European nations. Such findings, however, include dentists and midwives possibly explaining why the results are dissimilar to what was found in the MHPV questionnaire. Another possibility may be due to selection bias of the MHPV study. One would assume that people who fill out the questionnaire are themselves more likely to be migrants. Generally, one may argue that people get involved in research that is more personal to them; hence, there might have been a high representation of non UK nationals in the sample. Additionally, there was a statistically significant correlation (p<0.05) between country of origin and demographic shifts evidenced over the last year. Those who were not UK nationals reported to have seen more demographic shifts in their schizophrenia patient cohorts in comparison to UK nationals. The second most prevalent second language spoken among mental health professionals was French. This increased linguistic diversity may signal either a strength or a weakness in the mental health system, for two reasons. It may serve as a buffer when it comes to dealing with patients from the same background as there would be a better cross-cultural understanding of linguistic symbols, values and behaviours displayed in the illness. But it may also be a disadvantage when a clinician is encountered with a dissimilar culture and language, possibly leading to misunderstandings and misattributions in the symptoms displayed, as has been argued in the theoretical underpinnings of the thesis and as we saw in the meta-synthesis (chapter four).

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Profile for Huda Shalhoub

DECODING SCHIZOPHRENIA ACROSS CULTURES  

Thesis from Brunnel University, United Kingdom, London

DECODING SCHIZOPHRENIA ACROSS CULTURES  

Thesis from Brunnel University, United Kingdom, London

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