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From the MHPV questionnaire, mental health professionals were asked to provide the numbers of their current patients who have been treated for schizophrenia in relation to main groups in which epidemiological and clinical information is lacking: numbers of people diagnosed with schizophrenia who were born in Central and Eastern Europe, the Middle East and Afghanistan and North Africa. This exercise was used to estimate the prevalence rates and demographic composition of these groups of patient cohorts in London. Beyond what has been discussed in chapter five, the results from the MHPV questionnaire have indicated that 61.7% of the respondents reported having noticed shifts in the demographics of the population diagnosed over the last five years, while 28% had not noticed any changes (the rest had no direct experience and therefore reported to be “unsure�). This suggests that the majority of the respondents saw significant nationality shifts in their schizophrenia patients. This finding is not surprising however, due to the rise in the numbers of migrants to the UK over the last decade (as has been reported in chapters two and five). From 29 respondents whose answers were eligible for analysis, a total of 419 patients were diagnosed with schizophrenia. When asked about the countries of origin of the patients, it was estimated that 4.52% were from Central and Eastern Europe (n= 19), 6.68% from the Middle East and Afghanistan (n= 28) and 22.43% from Africa (n= 94). Calculations of prevalence rates of schizophrenia by country of origin seemed to have been highest amongst people who were born in the African Diasporas.

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Profile for Huda Shalhoub

DECODING SCHIZOPHRENIA ACROSS CULTURES  

Thesis from Brunnel University, United Kingdom, London

DECODING SCHIZOPHRENIA ACROSS CULTURES  

Thesis from Brunnel University, United Kingdom, London

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