Page 2

ABSTRACT Ample studies have shown that African Caribbean ethnicities in the United Kingdom are more likely to be diagnosed with schizophrenia than British born citizens. Epidemiological studies have illuminated the fact that migrant groups, and especially African Caribbeans, are at the highest risk to be diagnosed with schizophrenia in the UK. Studies have repeatedly established such findings over the last two decades but have come up with inconsistent etiological theories. This research aimed at a) investigating the differences and similarities in the content of manifestations of schizophrenia amongst migrant and non-migrant groups; b) testing whether the theory of ethnic density may account for reasons why certain migrants are more likely to be diagnosed with schizophrenia; c) estimating the current rates of schizophrenia diagnosis amongst Central and Eastern European, North African and the Middle Eastern populations. The methods of the project were threefold: First, a qualitative systematic review was achieved, followed by descriptive statistics and a regression analysis using a secondary NHS patient dataset. A semi-structured questionnaire was also disseminated to 48 mental health professionals in London. The findings suggest that a third of the schizophrenia cohorts in Brent are first generation migrants, with patients from the African Diasporas to be most represented (N=419). Another theme asserts that schizophrenia’s manifestations are culturally multifarious and its interpretations are reliant on diagnosers’ medical and cross-cultural experiences. The study affirms that schizophrenia can no longer be deciphered without decoding cultural signifiers of the patient and diagnoser. The less similar the culture of the clinician to the patient, the more likely that cultural distance may take place, leading to higher chances of a fragile clinical encounter. Intra-cultural diversity in the clinical settings posits future recommendations to achieving higher cultural competence and completing more ethnographic research. Key Words: Schizophrenia; Ethnic Density; Culture; Symptoms; Central and Eastern European; North African; Middle Eastern; Mental health professionals; Cross-Cultural Differences. 1

Profile for Huda Shalhoub

DECODING SCHIZOPHRENIA ACROSS CULTURES  

Thesis from Brunnel University, United Kingdom, London

DECODING SCHIZOPHRENIA ACROSS CULTURES  

Thesis from Brunnel University, United Kingdom, London

Advertisement