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served to describe and confirm previous findings that certain ethnic groups are more likely to be at risk for mental illnesses, and specifically schizophrenia, in comparison to the rest of the population. Also, this chapter tested the theory of ethnic density to measure whether there are any associations between the population representation of an ethnic group and the diagnosis of a mental illness from within Brent. There is not a strong body of evidence to suggest that the theory of ethnic density applies to all ethnicities and migrant groups. Ethnic density also cannot be understood lightly because one needs to understand the context of the situation. Ethnic density may be understood as a protective factor for immigrants in a sense that it serves as an increase to social capital and social bonds thus, decreasing alienation for ethnic and migrant groups. Social capital theory and can be viewed as an extension to the explanations behind ethnic density and which is defined as a term that describes social networks, relations, trust and power (Whitely and McKenzie, 2005). According to the stress-buffering theory, the more one is connected with their immediate and non-immediate surroundings, the better one’s mental health (Cohen and McKay, 1984). The stress-buffering hypothesis has found evidence that social bonds act as protective factors in developing emotional and psychological distress. Thus, one’s social bonds become richer when there is a high proportion of people from the same culture, indeed working as a protective factor against the development of a mental illness. On the other spectrum, if a person moves to a new country and is unable to connect with people who speak the same language and see the world similar to what he or she is used to, it then might lead them to become an increased susceptibility to developing a mental illness.

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Profile for Huda Shalhoub

DECODING SCHIZOPHRENIA ACROSS CULTURES  

Thesis from Brunnel University, United Kingdom, London

DECODING SCHIZOPHRENIA ACROSS CULTURES  

Thesis from Brunnel University, United Kingdom, London

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