Page 120

might have contributed to explaining the differences in age, where previous literature has confirmed onset to be earlier for males in comparison to females (Jablensky and Cole, 1996; Reeves et al., 2002). Other characteristics of the common profile of a person suffering from schizophrenia were that the person is most likely to belong to a Black ethnic minority or be an immigrant. Another group that was over represented were Turkish migrants in Germany (Haasen et al., 2001). At least 51% of people diagnosed with schizophrenia were generally males, accounting for statistical significance. The majority of the studies have also shown that people with schizophrenia were typically unemployed, and either single or never married (Bergner et al., 2008; Maslowski and Mthoko.,1998; Brekke and Barrio, 1997; Hutchinson et al., 1999; Strakowski et al., 1996; Haasen et al., 2001; Arnold et al., 2004; Jenkins, 1988). However, first generation immigrants were found to have a higher percentage of being married compared to the indigenous population, but still lower compared to those who are not diagnosed with schizophrenia (Littlewood and Lipsedge, 1981). For the studies that have reported migrant status, it was shown that the most likely people to be diagnosed with schizophrenia are those who are second generation migrants or who were born in their host country; i.e. Turkish patients in Germany: (Haasen et al., 2001). The systematic review found that there was agreement to the central features of schizophrenia, but it was emphasized that the differences are more ‘salient’ in nature (Katz et al., 1988). Based on WHO findings (1979), schizophrenia is ubiquitous to all cultures but only psychopathological displays are confirmed to be different. The crosscultural differences, however, did not seem to be well understood as they not only

119

Profile for Huda Shalhoub

DECODING SCHIZOPHRENIA ACROSS CULTURES  

Thesis from Brunnel University, United Kingdom, London

DECODING SCHIZOPHRENIA ACROSS CULTURES  

Thesis from Brunnel University, United Kingdom, London

Advertisement